2009<br />
The hyphae and arbuscules of the mycorrhizal fungi that live in symbiosis with plant roots can be tricky to study under th...
These sawflies (suborder: Symphyta) are laying their eggs on a sea grape  plant (Coccolobauvifera), where the herbivorous ...
H & E Staining of a Mouse Pancreas: The Islets of Langerhans are clusters of endocrine tissue within the pancreas.  In typ...
 Lightning strike at night over the Dowling Bridge, Rappahannock River, Tappahannock, VA<br />Lightning Over the Rappahann...
Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fuller...
A colorful sea anemone (Phymanthus sp.) collected as part of a biodiversity in remote Kingman Reef, Northern Line Islands....
When two nitrogen atoms bond together, they share three electrons between each other, creating an almost inseparable tripl...
I saw my first albino American alligator last summer, on a visit to California Academy of Sciences. However, this alligato...
Cleared leaf of the monocot species Montrichardia arborescence. The specimen was chemically treated during two weeks for i...
Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fuller...
I took this photo of the 80-million-year-old fossil at the Museum of Natural History of New York. According to the museum'...
Fluorescence microscopy image of transgenic Abeta-expressing CHO cells (7WD10 cell line) treated with beauveriolide I, pro...
A hybridized ornamental from the rosaceae family being pollinated by a North American honey bee. The photo was taken in Ju...
The following depicts the eye of a mouse model exhibiting retinal degeneration. The lab with which I am affiliated uses ge...
Photo of fossil angiosperm wood (about  16 - 0.7 million years old) from Thailand, taken under the microscope in radial se...
A spider enjoys a meal on a leaf in Hakusan National Park, Katsuyama city, Japan.<br />Nature's Plate<br />NareeratBooncha...
Mouse kidney section merged of DAPI and hrGFP images.<br />Kidney Sand Dollar<br />Pedro E. Cruz (Medicine)<br />
A new molt from a cicada holding the bud of a flower shows the beginning of new summer life in the countryside of Katsuyam...
The image of albumin microspheres under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The particle size distributed from 1 to 10 mic...
Transversal section of a fruit of Sacoglottisovicarpa. The specimen was sectioned for the identification of fossil fruits ...
Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Her...
SabatiabrevifoliaRaf., shortleaf rose gentian. The bifid and twisted stigma will unfold as the flower matures.            ...
Anthers of Rhododendron, open by 2 pores.                        <br />Anthers of Rhododendron<br />Iju Chen (Biology)<br />
Example of fossil pollen grains from Eocene of Huadian, Jilin, China<br />Fossil Pollen<br />Iju Chen (Biology)<br />
Fluorescence microscopy image of transgenic Abeta-expressing CHO cells (7WD10 cell line) treated with beauveriolide III, p...
Lacewing Eggs<br />IjuChen (Biology)<br />
In order to understand the fundamental science behind the flapping flight performed by natural flyers such as bumblebees a...
This is a photograph of muscle and connective tissue of snake cloaca. The picture was taken with a microscope during resea...
An unidentified insect along the hiking trail in Morningside Nature Center, Gainesville, Florida                  <br />Re...
Inspired by the venus flytrap, I set out to express the balance and complex beauty found in the most surprising relationsh...
Rat neurons (green, stained for neurofilament NF-M), and astrocytes (red, stained for glialfibrillary acidic protein) and ...
This photo was taken in Spain during summer 2008. It is not necessarily a point of personal research, however I believe it...
Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Her...
This photo is a result of condensation an early morning outside outside the HPHP building.   The macro viewpoint reveals t...
Fluorescence microscopy picture of Abeta-expressing cells (7WD10 cell line) stained using immunocytochemistry using an ant...
Fluorescence microscopy image of CHOH1 control cells treated with beauveriolide I, probed with lyesenin and stained with a...
To an insectivorous bird, a Morpho butterfly is just another edible insect. This wing of the Morpho butterfly belonged to ...
This image which resembles a work of abstract art is a group of Interleukin 8 crystals, grown for the purpose of x-ray cry...
We constantly are pouring over lecture outlines, textbooks pages, and an endless supply of internet resources, yet we ofte...
I have always been amazed by the complexities of science on both the microscopic and astronomical tiers. At the cellular l...
Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fuller...
This picture was taken during vacation in Thailand. The snail looked so beautiful and out of its element, juxtaposed again...
Flowers are extremely rare in the fossil record. This tiny and recently discovered specimen from Colombia proves that deli...
 Electron micrograph of uranyl acetate negative stain of human foodborne pathogen, "L. monocytogenes" serotype 1/2a flagel...
Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fuller...
 Color enhanced photo of flagella of the food-borne human pathogen "Listeriamonocytogenes". Flagella are visualized by imm...
Focus is one my favorite photos.  The photo literally focuses the biology of the human eye while also revealing it's hidde...
This Christmas wreath was composed from the homo-hexamerHfq protein model (PDBID: 1HK9).  The monomer contains a character...
Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fuller...
These are reproductive structures of a fungus that is decomposing a dead tree still standing at San Felasko State Reserve....
135nm Silica nanoparticles used for Polishing Si wafers in Semiconductor Industry. The image is taken using Transmission E...
 This picture was taken at the Mpala research center in Kenya during an ecology study abroad program. The fence in the pic...
 This is a 3-D image reconstrction obtained by confocal microscopy.  The specimin is the venom gland dissected from a wasp...
An albino aligator floating in a pond at the St. Augustine Aligator Farm. Albino aligators do not survive very well in the...
Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Her...
Incorrectly oriented section of mouse gut embedded in paraffin and not a full representative section.  H&E stain.  What is...
In art, an eye is commonly given the meaning of reflection. An eye can skew one's perspective, it can flip objects, and it...
This painting connects the similarity between the interactions of molecules and and the interactions amongst human beings....
Marauding invaders colonize hapless territory. Light photomicrograph of a fine needle aspirate collected from the skin of ...
This plot shows the power of EEG (“brain wave”) frequency bands of native English speakers in response to spoken Thai word...
A single grain of the pollen of Linumnarbonese. The surface of the grain is covered in club like structures called clavae....
Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Her...
Electron micrograph of uranyl acetate negative stain of human foodborne pathogen, "L. monocytogenes" serotype 1/2a flagell...
We rely on our perception of senses while searching to reveal the mysteries of the brain.  The irony of this limitation co...
This is a dropped leaf of the sea grape (Coccolobauvifera) named for its cluster of red-purple fruits that resemble grapes...
 This flower is made up of protein crystals. Each petal of the flower is an individual crystal of interleukin 8, an import...
In the allegory of medical science, cancer cells are our demons. They march on healthy tissues, choking out and suffocatin...
Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fuller...
Inspired by the venus flytrap, I set out to express the balance and complex beauty found in the most surprising relationsh...
Rat glial cells, more specifically astrocytes stained for GFAP, an astrocyte filament protein (red) and DNA (blue).<br />M...
This work is a beautiful illustration of the biodiversity found locally in Gainesville.  I took this photo for a friend in...
A neuron from an adult rat (stained for neurofilanenetr NF-L, green) surrounded by neuronal progenitors stained with an an...
Here is an scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of a pair of esophageal cancer cells stacked on top of a surface of Zn...
Oligodendrocytes are specialized glial cells that protect, support, and myelinate the axons of neurons.  Without them, the...
This work is a chlorine bubble, no larger than the size of pushpin. Bubbles represent one of the most perfect scientific f...
Ignoring healthy cells, the red, molecular padlock cleverly latches onto elusive infection DNA.  Once captured, the infect...
This photo was taken through the eyepiece of a microscope in a geology lab on campus and depicts a slice of rock that is a...
This painting was inspired by my first research experience in UF.  Last summer, I began studying the dynamics of PML prote...
Field-emmision scanning electron microphotograph of apical attachment pore of Pryodiniumbahamensevarbahamense a beautiful ...
Four rat microglia cells stained for coronin (red), vimentin (green) and DNA (blue).<br />Rab-CoroA2 reg-Chi-Vim(4109) -G-...
This photo was taken on a camping trip in the Arabian desert (Saudi Arabia), just a couple of hours outside Riyadh. On the...
Each individual cell is a red blood cell taken from a mud flat dwelling worm. Each cell is outlined in green with each ind...
To learn the culture of others, we need to be embedded in those cultures. The Second China Project provides a digital 3D, ...
Is injection of a mixture of two separate viral vectors into the developing brain an efficient method to deliver two genes...
Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Her...
 This fractal is generated by iterating the function f(z)=(1+0.4i)sin(z) in the complex plane. This illustrates the mathem...
Inspired by the venus flytrap, I set out to express the balance and complex beauty found in the most surprising relationsh...
If these orchid bees were larger they could be used as Christmas tree decorations.  These, male orchid bees, however, are ...
Fluorescence microscopy image of CHOH1 control cells, probed with lysenin and stained with anti-lysenin antibody and DAPI ...
One quarter of this image is nothing else but a part of a butterfly wing (genus Hamadryas, family Nymphalidae, if one must...
Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fuller...
First there was a butterfly. Then, there was our brain. Then, our brain developed techniques to study our brain, since we ...
Three different colored, extremely small sized (fL) lasers have been merged and overlapped by careful arrangements of opti...
The picture was taken inside a four-story Rainforest exhibit at California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. Hundreds ...
A 60 million year old fossil leaf from Colombia shows the marks left by its insectivorous predator. A mine with a spiral p...
Beach morning glory (Ipomoea pes-caprae) is a common beach vine, but has glorious flowers at various times in the year.  T...
This photo is of muscle and connective tissue of snake cloaca. The picture was taken with a microscope during research of ...
It has been noticed that there are fewer butterflies flying in our yards every year, and we set out to determine why.  Par...
This is a picture of the plant Bromeliapinguin taken at Tortuguero, Costa Rica.  It is part of the same family as pineappl...
Tortuguero, Costa Rica is sea turtle nesting beach situated between two tropical river mouths, where driftwood, and this w...
5C11-NF-H<br />Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stained with a mouse monoclonal antibody to neurofilament NF-H (green), a...
This is a golden orb spider (Nyphilacalvipes; locally known as the banana spider) that is very common throughout the south...
This is a photograph taken at Mpala research center in Kenya, where ecological research is being done on the mutualism tha...
Cool, silver bundles of connective tissue in the underside of the skin await oxygen-delivery from miniscule, red blood ves...
This beautiful collection of spots is a diffraction pattern from a single protein crystal of interleukin 8. Each spot repr...
 This is a photograph taken at high magnification of sea snake cloaca and surrounding tissue. The photograph was taken dur...
Recently discovered fossil leaf from the Andes of Colombia. This 60 million year old fossil is a unique window to ancient ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Elegance of Science Art Contest 2009

873

Published on

These are all of the entries for the 2009 Elegance of Science Art Contest.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
873
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Elegance of Science Art Contest 2009"

  1. 1. 2009<br />
  2. 2. The hyphae and arbuscules of the mycorrhizal fungi that live in symbiosis with plant roots can be tricky to study under the microscope. After clearing and staining these sugar maple roots, the fungi pop into view in brilliant blue against the golden transparent root cells. A kaleidoscope of life I never knew existed, all in the earth beneath my feet. This is my artistic rendering of the scene, acrylic on canvas. Dec. 2008.<br />Mycorrhizas in Full Color – 1st Place<br />Megan M. Smith (Soil & Water Science)<br />
  3. 3. These sawflies (suborder: Symphyta) are laying their eggs on a sea grape plant (Coccolobauvifera), where the herbivorous larvae will begin munching upon hatching. They have been observed to cause substantial damage to their host plant. This photo was taken at Tortuguero, Costa Rica.<br />Orderly Destruction – 2nd Place<br />Hannah Vander Zanden (Biology)<br />
  4. 4. H & E Staining of a Mouse Pancreas: The Islets of Langerhans are clusters of endocrine tissue within the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, autoimmune processes selectively destroy the insulin-producing beta cells in the islets, resulting in abnormal glucose metabolism. Shown here is an islet of a diabetes-prone NOD mouse during the early stages of mononuclear cell infiltration (peri-insulitis) that precedes beta-cell destruction.<br />Fatal Attraction: When the Immune System Goes Bad – 3rd Place<br />YaimaLuzardo, Clayton E. Mathews, Molecular Pathology Core (Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine)<br />)<br />
  5. 5. Lightning strike at night over the Dowling Bridge, Rappahannock River, Tappahannock, VA<br />Lightning Over the Rappahannock – Alumni Award Winner<br />Wes Marston(UF Alumni)<br />
  6. 6. Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fullerene and smashed it against graphite (layers of Carbon) using a computer simulation. The interlocking layers of graphite were fairly interesting from certain angles, which caused me to take some pictures.<br />The Roads of Graphene – Honorable Mention<br />Victor V. Albert (Physics)<br />
  7. 7. A colorful sea anemone (Phymanthus sp.) collected as part of a biodiversity in remote Kingman Reef, Northern Line Islands. <br />Sea Anemone <br />Machel Malay (Biology)<br />
  8. 8. When two nitrogen atoms bond together, they share three electrons between each other, creating an almost inseparable triple bond. One of the only forces in nature to break apart the bond is a strike of lightning. In this painting, the eruption of energy and symmetry of the elements is highlighted throughout the work, despite it's contrasting styles.<br />Life is Nitrogen<br />Hamilton Jones (Fine Arts)<br />
  9. 9. I saw my first albino American alligator last summer, on a visit to California Academy of Sciences. However, this alligator is familiar to most school children in the San Francisco area, who visit the academy on field trips. The alligator spends most of his days lying on a warm rock in the middle of an improvised swamp, its body curved in a gracious "S", paws outstretched. He seems to share the space peacefully with several turtles. <br />Albino Alligator<br />Anastasia Kozak (English)<br />
  10. 10. Cleared leaf of the monocot species Montrichardia arborescence. The specimen was chemically treated during two weeks for its final mounting and it was used for analysis of leaf venation and the identification of fossil species. The clear view of the veins and the pink color give to the leaf an extraterrestrial appearance. <br />Alien Leaf<br />Fabiany Herrera (Biology)<br />
  11. 11. Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fullerene and smashed it against graphite (layers of Carbon) using a computer simulation. The interlocking layers of graphite were fairly interesting from certain angles, which caused me to take some pictures.<br />Fullerene Fragmentation<br />Victor V. Albert (Physics)<br />
  12. 12. I took this photo of the 80-million-year-old fossil at the Museum of Natural History of New York. According to the museum's description, ammonite is one of only three gemstones produces by living organisms-the others being pearl and amber. The presence of this iridescent gem indicates the location of ancient seas, such as the Western Interior Seaway in the middle of North America where this one was found. <br />Ammonite<br />Anastasia Kozak (English)<br />
  13. 13. Fluorescence microscopy image of transgenic Abeta-expressing CHO cells (7WD10 cell line) treated with beauveriolide I, probed with beauveriolide I and stained with anti-lysenin antibody, anti-Abeta 40 antibody and DAPI chemical stain.<br />B1 lysenin fin<br />Daniel Witter (College of Medicine)<br />
  14. 14. A hybridized ornamental from the rosaceae family being pollinated by a North American honey bee. The photo was taken in June 2009 in a Gainesville neighborhood using a Nikon S560 camera.<br />The Floral Stork<br />Jis Joseph (Agriculture and Science)<br />
  15. 15. The following depicts the eye of a mouse model exhibiting retinal degeneration. The lab with which I am affiliated uses gene therapies to treat retinal diseases associated with macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. The eerie blue orb of a white mouse's cornea contrasts the veiny interior of a degenerated retina. Using a fundus microscope, a devise used to focus on the smallest of blood vessels within the retina of a mouse, I attempted to capture the process and effects a degenerative disease can have on tissue. <br />An Eye for Excellence 3<br />Zachary Cohen (Molecular Genetics and Microbiology)<br />
  16. 16. Photo of fossil angiosperm wood (about 16 - 0.7 million years old) from Thailand, taken under the microscope in radial section. The vessels, rays, fiber cells were completely silicified in the color arrangement of warm tones, and a nice weave pattern. It is like a beautiful master art piece created by nature. <br />Beauty of Fossilized Wood<br />NareeratBoonchai (Florida Museum of Natural History)<br />
  17. 17. A spider enjoys a meal on a leaf in Hakusan National Park, Katsuyama city, Japan.<br />Nature's Plate<br />NareeratBoonchai (Florida Museum of Natural History)<br />
  18. 18. Mouse kidney section merged of DAPI and hrGFP images.<br />Kidney Sand Dollar<br />Pedro E. Cruz (Medicine)<br />
  19. 19. A new molt from a cicada holding the bud of a flower shows the beginning of new summer life in the countryside of Katsuyama, Japan.<br />New Summer Life<br />NareeratBoonchai (Florida Museum of Natural History)<br />
  20. 20. The image of albumin microspheres under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The particle size distributed from 1 to 10 micrometer. The albumin spherical particles collapsed, shrank, and embodied into each other. Every particle is different. Every one is one of a kind. <br />Spherical Chaos<br />Hung-Yen Lee (Materials Science and Engineering)<br />
  21. 21. Transversal section of a fruit of Sacoglottisovicarpa. The specimen was sectioned for the identification of fossil fruits and cladistic analyses of flowering plants. Five radiating carpels surround a central seed. Abundant cavities filled with resins provide buoyant properties to this unique fruit. <br />Buoyant Fruit<br />FabianyHerrera (Biology)<br />
  22. 22. Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Herceptin for the purpose of improving immunotherapy by extending the half-life of this drug in the blood stream. The crystals are colored because they polarize visible light. The straight clean edges show that these crystals are well ordered. These crystals provide the basis for an improved strategy to treat breast cancer. <br />Crystals of a Breast Cancer Drug<br />David Ostrov, Arieann DeFazio, Shun Lu (Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine)<br />
  23. 23. SabatiabrevifoliaRaf., shortleaf rose gentian. The bifid and twisted stigma will unfold as the flower matures. <br />A dewed flower<br />IjuChen (Biology)<br />
  24. 24. Anthers of Rhododendron, open by 2 pores. <br />Anthers of Rhododendron<br />Iju Chen (Biology)<br />
  25. 25. Example of fossil pollen grains from Eocene of Huadian, Jilin, China<br />Fossil Pollen<br />Iju Chen (Biology)<br />
  26. 26. Fluorescence microscopy image of transgenic Abeta-expressing CHO cells (7WD10 cell line) treated with beauveriolide III, probed with lysenin and stained with anti-lysenin antibody, anti-Abeta 40 antibody and DAPI chemical stain.<br />B3 lysenin multiple fin<br />Daniel Witter (College of Medicine)<br />
  27. 27. Lacewing Eggs<br />IjuChen (Biology)<br />
  28. 28. In order to understand the fundamental science behind the flapping flight performed by natural flyers such as bumblebees and hummingbirds, research has been carried out to discover an efficient wing structure that will enable Micro Air Vehicles maneuver in tight spaces by flapping wings at the University of Florida. In this picture, the aeroelastic behavior of artificial flapping wings is captured with pulsed laser that illuminates a sheet of seeded airflow. The experimental technique, called Particle Image Velocimetry, can process the image to obtain the information of the velocity and vorticity of the airflow around the wings. In the laser sheet in the middle of the picture, the airflow is clearly visible. The wings are each 75 mm long and being actuated at 25 Hz. Its flexible structure allows passive deformation that utilizes only one degree-of-freedom motion to generate significant thrust. The laser sheet also highlights several cross section of the deformed wing, showing 10 frames captured during flapping. The flapping mechanism that enables such rapid and robust actuation is also designed and developed at UF. It allows for a wide range of actuation frequency and amplitudes for studying wing structures suitable for flapping flight. <br />Solving the Mystery of Flapping Flight<br />Pin Wu (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)<br />
  29. 29. This is a photograph of muscle and connective tissue of snake cloaca. The picture was taken with a microscope during research of the gross morphology of snake cloaca in the Evans lab at UF. <br />Muscle Rivers<br />Molly Womack (Zoology)<br />
  30. 30. An unidentified insect along the hiking trail in Morningside Nature Center, Gainesville, Florida <br />Ready to Jump<br />Iju Chen (Biology)<br />
  31. 31. Inspired by the venus flytrap, I set out to express the balance and complex beauty found in the most surprising relationships, that of the carnivorous plant and the fly. In somewhat of an abstract way, I portrayed three sets of fly's eyes. On the left, I drew a magnified view of a fly's eye. On the right, I decided to juxtapose the eye with a microscopic view of a transverse section of a plant in the shape of the matching eye. <br />Shown here: the Damselfly and the view of the stele of the Running Clubmoss<br />one out of a series of three, watercolor and pastel pencil on paper, 15" x 22" <br />Damselfly Catches Glimpse of Running Clubmoss<br />MirelleMajas (Fine Arts)<br />
  32. 32. Rat neurons (green, stained for neurofilament NF-M), and astrocytes (red, stained for glialfibrillary acidic protein) and DNA (blue).<br />Chk-NF-m-2000<br />Gerry Shaw (Neuroscience)<br />
  33. 33. This photo was taken in Spain during summer 2008. It is not necessarily a point of personal research, however I believe it exposes one of the most important basic building blocks of natural science. A tree certainly doesn't require a microscope, but it's secrets are many and it's lessons are great. I believe more can be learned from a tree about the biology and scientific makeup of our world more than any other living entity. This photo looks to achieve that message.<br />Common Thread<br />Ashley Vaniska (Department of Health Sciences, Research, Management, and Policy)<br />
  34. 34. Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Herceptin for the purpose of improving immunotherapy by extending the half-life of this drug in the blood stream. The crystals are colored because they polarize visible light. The straight clean edges show that these crystals are well ordered. These crystals provide the basis for an improved strategy to treat breast cancer. <br />Crystals of a Breast Cancer Drug<br />David Ostrov, Arieann DeFazio, Shun Lu (Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine)<br />
  35. 35. This photo is a result of condensation an early morning outside outside the HPHP building. The macro viewpoint reveals the hidden water globes.<br />Condensation<br />Ashley Vaniska (Department of Health Sciences, Research, Management, and Policy)<br />
  36. 36. Fluorescence microscopy picture of Abeta-expressing cells (7WD10 cell line) stained using immunocytochemistry using an anti-lysenin antibody and DAPI chemical stain.<br />cont7WD10 w lysenin DAPI<br />Daniel Witter (College of Medicine)<br />
  37. 37. Fluorescence microscopy image of CHOH1 control cells treated with beauveriolide I, probed with lyesenin and stained with anti-lysenin antibody, Oil red O, and DAPI chemical stain.<br />control H1 B nile red fin<br />Daniel Witter (College of Medicine)<br />
  38. 38. To an insectivorous bird, a Morpho butterfly is just another edible insect. This wing of the Morpho butterfly belonged to one of their prey. The blue color and majestically slow flight of the butterfly most likely attracted the predator - a high price to pay for beauty. The wing has dropped down from the sky and landed on a log; it was raining, and a few moments later it became mud. At this brief moment I was passing by and took the picture. <br />Scientist would say that there was no life in this object – just a reflection of light in the prism-like translucent structure of the scales on the butterfly wing. The wing, however, still had much of its former owner’s vibrant beauty, and appeared far from the detritus that surrounded it. <br />The image is taken on a research trip in Costa Rica.<br />Between Life and Death<br />Andrei Sourakov (Florida Museum of Natural History)<br />
  39. 39. This image which resembles a work of abstract art is a group of Interleukin 8 crystals, grown for the purpose of x-ray crystallography. Interleukin 8 is an important mediator of the human immune system. These extremely large crystals (more than 1mm long) allowed for us to solve the crystal structure of Interleukin 8 to an unprecedented level of resolution. This allows us to see previously unexplored fine details of the structure that are relevant for drug discovery.<br />Interleukin 8 Abstract<br />ArieannDeFazio(Pathology & UF Alumni)<br />
  40. 40. We constantly are pouring over lecture outlines, textbooks pages, and an endless supply of internet resources, yet we often fail to look past all of solid information at our own experiences. Often the simple act of just seeing a part of nature is enough to inspire any artist and drive any scientist. While studying the Mastering Biology website for my upcoming exam this beautiful specimen landed on my key board and started investigating. I crept away to find my camera and was lucky to find the butterfly still perched on my laptop and snapped the shot. This temporary visit reminded me to look deeper into what our majors ask and make more connections between science its art. <br />Looking Past<br />Sarah Saavedra (Biology)<br />
  41. 41. I have always been amazed by the complexities of science on both the microscopic and astronomical tiers. At the cellular level, the mitochondrial electron transport chain offers a glimpse the dynamic nature of the physical laws, and the propensity of life to make the best of them. Proteins embedded within the lipid bilyer of a mitochondrion pass electrons about, pumping out protons to make a charge gradient in the intermembrane space. The downhill energetics of moving protons back into the cell through an ATP synthase can be used generate cellular energy. <br />Gradients in Space<br />Fady Paul Marji (Biology & Chemistry)<br />
  42. 42. Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fullerene and smashed it against graphite (layers of Carbon) using a computer simulation. The interlocking layers of graphite were fairly interesting from certain angles, which caused me to take some pictures.<br />The following depicts the eye of a mouse model exhibiting retinal degeneration. The lab with which I am affiliated uses gene therapies to treat retinal diseases associated with macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. The eerie blue orb of a white mouse's cornea contrasts the veiny interior of a degenerated retina. Using a fundus microscope, a devise used to focus on the smallest of blood vessels within the retina of a mouse, I attempted to capture the process and effects a degenerative disease can have on tissue. <br />An Eye for Excellence 1<br />Zachary Cohen (Molecular Genetics and Microbiology)<br />
  43. 43. This picture was taken during vacation in Thailand. The snail looked so beautiful and out of its element, juxtaposed against the bright green palm leaf. It was hard to resist its composed, self-assured, slow beauty. <br />The Snail<br />Anastasia Kozak (English)<br />
  44. 44. Flowers are extremely rare in the fossil record. This tiny and recently discovered specimen from Colombia proves that delicate flowers can be as strong as the hardest tree. <br />Exceptional Flower<br />FabianyHerrera (Biology)<br />
  45. 45. Electron micrograph of uranyl acetate negative stain of human foodborne pathogen, "L. monocytogenes" serotype 1/2a flagella. Displayed is a color enhanced photo of flagella. Flagella were isolated by physical shearing from bacterial cells and later utilized as antigen for development of Listeria specific antibodies important in development of detection assays. <br />Flagella RYB<br />Harald Messer (Molecular Genetics and Microbiology)<br />
  46. 46. Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fullerene and smashed it against graphite (layers of Carbon) using a computer simulation. The interlocking layers of graphite were fairly interesting from certain angles, which caused me to take some pictures.<br />Between the Layers<br />Victor V. Albert (Physics)<br />
  47. 47. Color enhanced photo of flagella of the food-borne human pathogen "Listeriamonocytogenes". Flagella are visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy using Cy-2 conjugated antibodies specific for "L. monocytogenes" flagellin protein. Flagella expression is tightly regulated for growth and survival of the bacterium. Therefore, development of specific antibodies are important in detection and monitoring of the pathogen food, water, and the environment. 400X magnification. <br />Glowing Edge<br />Harald Messer (Molecular Genetics and Microbiology)<br />
  48. 48. Focus is one my favorite photos. The photo literally focuses the biology of the human eye while also revealing it's hidden meaning - the human desire to learn, grow, and seek a higher level in all areas of life.<br />Focus<br />Ashley Vaniska (Department of Health Sciences, Research, Management, and Policy)<br />
  49. 49. This Christmas wreath was composed from the homo-hexamerHfq protein model (PDBID: 1HK9). The monomer contains a characteristic sm-fold that is seen throughout nature. This ancient protein is involved in RNA processing and modification.<br />The image was composed in MacPyMol. The backbone of the protein was duplicated to create the ribbon core of the wreath and the forest green foliage. The ribbon contains helices and beta sheets with beveled sides and a gold color. The foliage was created by creating a molecular surface and drastically decreasing the probe radius. Hydrogens were added to the lone water oxygens (usually hydrogens aren't in pdb model), and colored a berry red. Finally, rendering parameters were altered to minimize the sheen and bring out the colors. <br />Christmas Wreath<br />Kit Fuhrman (Immunology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine)<br />
  50. 50. Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fullerene and smashed it against graphite (layers of Carbon) using a computer simulation. The interlocking layers of graphite were fairly interesting from certain angles, which caused me to take some pictures.<br />The following depicts the eye of a mouse model exhibiting retinal degeneration. The lab with which I am affiliated uses gene therapies to treat retinal diseases associated with macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. The eerie blue orb of a white mouse's cornea contrasts the veiny interior of a degenerated retina. Using a fundus microscope, a devise used to focus on the smallest of blood vessels within the retina of a mouse, I attempted to capture the process and effects a degenerative disease can have on tissue. <br />An Eye for Excellence 5<br />Zachary Cohen (Molecular Genetics and Microbiology)<br />
  51. 51. These are reproductive structures of a fungus that is decomposing a dead tree still standing at San Felasko State Reserve.<br />Fungal Steps<br />Jis Joseph (Agriculture and Sciences)<br />
  52. 52. 135nm Silica nanoparticles used for Polishing Si wafers in Semiconductor Industry. The image is taken using Transmission Electron Microscopy at MAIC, UF.The art work shows how the image depicts Florida state.<br />Gator Island<br />KannanBalasundaram (Materials Science and Engineering)<br />
  53. 53. This picture was taken at the Mpala research center in Kenya during an ecology study abroad program. The fence in the picture is to keep large herbivores out of the enclosed area and is part of a large study comparing the ecological effects of excluding various animal types from certain areas of savanna on the Mpala reserve. <br />Enclosure<br />Molly Womack (Zoology)<br />
  54. 54. This is a 3-D image reconstrction obtained by confocal microscopy. The specimin is the venom gland dissected from a wasp (species D. longicaudata). The tissue was prepared by Professor Pauline Lawrence in the Dept of Entomology.<br />It's Great to BEE a Florida<br />Steve McClellan (ICBR-Flow Cytometry Core Labs) <br />
  55. 55. An albino aligator floating in a pond at the St. Augustine Aligator Farm. Albino aligators do not survive very well in the wild since they do not blend in with the environment when they are young and prone to being eaten by larger aligators. This photo was take in June 2009 using a Nikon S560 camera.<br />Gator Ghost<br />Jis Joseph (Agriculture and Sciences)<br />
  56. 56. Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Herceptin for the purpose of improving immunotherapy by extending the half-life of this drug in the blood stream. The crystals are colored because they polarize visible light. The straight clean edges show that these crystals are well ordered. These crystals provide the basis for an improved strategy to treat breast cancer. <br />Crystals of a Breast Cancer Drug<br />David Ostrov, Arieann DeFazio, Shun Lu (Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine)<br />
  57. 57. Incorrectly oriented section of mouse gut embedded in paraffin and not a full representative section. H&E stain. What is unique about this image is that, had the specimen been oriented correctly, we never would have gotten such a nice view.<br />Histology Is Where the Heart Is…<br />Kelley Durden (Pathology - Molecular Path Lab)<br />
  58. 58. In art, an eye is commonly given the meaning of reflection. An eye can skew one's perspective, it can flip objects, and it can give them light. The eye in this painting reflects a river extending infinitely into its depth and bound only by the outer skin. The reflection comes from the person's thoughts rather than the objects standing in front of her. And instead of light, a dark, thunder striking ambiance surrounds the scene, and a tear falls off the boundary of the eye. The scene is set to reveal mixed feeling of anger and sadness kept inside.<br />The painting focuses on the different personalities of human beings, mainly the reason as to why some are greatly affected by their surroundings while others are completely immune and seem to live in their own world. Hence the tranquility of the man who is sitting down, drinking, and the paper boat.<br />Acrylics and Oils. <br />In Depth<br />Sheryl Chocron (Chemical Engineering)<br />
  59. 59. This painting connects the similarity between the interactions of molecules and and the interactions amongst human beings. Inspired by a course on organic chemistry, I made up my own atoms. The large yellow atom on the bottom of the painting is to represent myself. Each of the other atoms are people who appear in my day to day life frequently. Each color represents a different type of connection to me. Warm tones represent confidence, bright colors represent happiness, red represents love, and dark colors represent conflict. I made up molecules of people who are related. The connections between these molecules and myself are outlined in black, and each type of molecule hits a different part of me. <br />Acrylics and Oils on Canvas. <br />Interactions<br />Sheryl Chocron (Chemical Engineering)<br />
  60. 60. Marauding invaders colonize hapless territory. Light photomicrograph of a fine needle aspirate collected from the skin of a cat with Cryptococcus neoformans yeast infection. <br />Colony <br />Heather Wamsley (Physiological Sciences & UF Alumni)<br />
  61. 61. This plot shows the power of EEG (“brain wave”) frequency bands of native English speakers in response to spoken Thai words. The frequency bands are on the y-axis (in Hz), the time relative to the onset of the word is on the x-axis (in msec). The maximum power (darker red colors) can be seen in the alpha (8-12 Hz) and theta frequency bands (4-7Hz) especially in the first 200ms after onset of the word. This study investigated brain wave responses in adult native speakers of English, Mandarin Chinese and Thai when listening to Thai words. In contrast to English, languages such as Thai and Chinese are tonal, that is, they use changes in pitch to distinguish word meaning. The study was aimed at investigating changes in perception of these tones as a function of native language (tonal, non-tonal) and short term training. After training, the brain waves of the English speakers (depicted in the figure) resembled those of the native Thai participants, suggesting that the adult brain is malleable and able to acquire new speech contrasts. <br />EEG Time-Frequency Plot for English Speakers Listening to Thai Lexical Tones<br />Edith Kaan, Walid Kara, Andreas Keil (Linguistics & Psychology)<br />
  62. 62. A single grain of the pollen of Linumnarbonese. The surface of the grain is covered in club like structures called clavae. THe measure only a few microns in height. This is a detail rarely acheived in light microscopy. <br />Magnificent Pollen<br />David M. Jarzen (Florida Museum of Natural History)<br />
  63. 63. Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Herceptin for the purpose of improving immunotherapy by extending the half-life of this drug in the blood stream. The crystals are colored because they polarize visible light. The straight clean edges show that these crystals are well ordered. These crystals provide the basis for an improved strategy to treat breast cancer. <br />Crystals of a Breast Cancer Drug<br />David Ostrov, Arieann DeFazio, Shun Lu (Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine)<br />
  64. 64. Electron micrograph of uranyl acetate negative stain of human foodborne pathogen, "L. monocytogenes" serotype 1/2a flagella. Displayed is a color enhanced photo of flagella. Flagella were isolated by physical shearing from bacterial cells and later utilized as antigen for development of Listeria specific antibodies important in development of detection assays. <br />Flagella Blue<br />Harald Messer (Molecular Genetics and Microbiology)<br />
  65. 65. We rely on our perception of senses while searching to reveal the mysteries of the brain. The irony of this limitation constantly threatens to shatter the persistence which leads to progress. Nevertheless, we use the tools available to please our senses and gasp in awe at the wonders that science consistently displays. <br />This fluorescence micrograph is an overlay of two images. First, a high power image was captured with an immunofluorescent stain for a neuron specific protein (red) and a stain that highlights all cell nuclei (blue). Second, a low power image of the same neuron specific brain depicts the gross brain tissue organization. <br />The Brain Revealed<br />Adam Mecca (Physiology and Functional Genomics)<br />
  66. 66. This is a dropped leaf of the sea grape (Coccolobauvifera) named for its cluster of red-purple fruits that resemble grapes. This photo was taken at Tortuguero, Costa Rica, where I study the nutrient input from sea turtle nests to the beach vegetation. <br />Sea Grape<br />Hannah Vander Zanden(Biology)<br />
  67. 67. This flower is made up of protein crystals. Each petal of the flower is an individual crystal of interleukin 8, an important mediator of the human immune system. It was grown for the purpose of X-ray crystallography and neutron diffraction. Neutron diffraction is an exciting emerging technology, allowing for us to visualize previously unexplored fine structural features that provide the basis for drug discovery. To make this possible, crystals were grown in deuturated (heavy) water (a radioactive form of water). This crystal and many others from this protein are being studied to find improved treatments for inflammatory diseases and cancer. <br />Interleukin 8 Flower<br />ArieannDeFazio(Pathology & UF Alumni)<br />
  68. 68. In the allegory of medical science, cancer cells are our demons. They march on healthy tissues, choking out and suffocating what lies in their path. Their perversion is their unmatched desire to prevail. <br />Aberration<br />Joanna Scian(Pathology)<br />
  69. 69. Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fullerene and smashed it against graphite (layers of Carbon) using a computer simulation. The interlocking layers of graphite were fairly interesting from certain angles, which caused me to take some pictures.<br />The following depicts the eye of a mouse model exhibiting retinal degeneration. The lab with which I am affiliated uses gene therapies to treat retinal diseases associated with macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. The eerie blue orb of a white mouse's cornea contrasts the veiny interior of a degenerated retina. Using a fundus microscope, a devise used to focus on the smallest of blood vessels within the retina of a mouse, I attempted to capture the process and effects a degenerative disease can have on tissue. <br />An Eye for Excellence 2<br />Zachary Cohen (Molecular Genetics and Microbiology)<br />
  70. 70. Inspired by the venus flytrap, I set out to express the balance and complex beauty found in the most surprising relationships, that of the carnivorous plant and the fly. In somewhat of an abstract way, I portrayed three sets of fly's eyes. On the left, I drew a magnified view of a fly's eye. On the right, I decided to juxtapose the eye with a microscopic view of a transverse section of a plant in the shape of the matching eye. <br />Shown here: the Striped Horse Fly and the leaf (needle) of the Prickly Pine<br />one out of a series of three, watercolor and pastel pencil on paper, 15" x 22" <br />Striped Horse Fly Makes Out Prickly Pine<br />MirelleMajas (Fine Arts)<br />
  71. 71. Rat glial cells, more specifically astrocytes stained for GFAP, an astrocyte filament protein (red) and DNA (blue).<br />Ms-GFAG2-3<br />Gerry Shaw (Neuroscience)<br />
  72. 72. This work is a beautiful illustration of the biodiversity found locally in Gainesville. I took this photo for a friend in Ichetucknee State Park who was previously involved in extensive wildlife research during his undergraduate study.<br />Nature's Breadcrumbs<br />Ashley Vaniska (Department of Health Sciences, Research, Management, and Policy)<br />
  73. 73. A neuron from an adult rat (stained for neurofilanenetr NF-L, green) surrounded by neuronal progenitors stained with an antibody to alpha-internexin (red).<br />Neuron Small<br />Gerry Shaw (Neuroscience)<br />
  74. 74. Here is an scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of a pair of esophageal cancer cells stacked on top of a surface of ZnOnanorods. Ideally, the nano-size of the surface has an effect on the way cells adhere to a substrate. By looking very closely via SEM, we are able to detect that these cells assume a more spherical shape and have a difficult time forming colonies (and therefore tumors). This has potential application to non-fouling medical stents by limiting cancerous cell growth on the implants.<br />Cancer Cells on Nanorods<br />David Lovett(Chemical Engineering)<br />
  75. 75. Oligodendrocytes are specialized glial cells that protect, support, and myelinate the axons of neurons. Without them, the processes of our brains would be hindered, and the speed of firing of axon potentials through neurons would decrease significantly. Many neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis are linked to a degradation of glial cells. I used acrylic paint on canvas to portray my interpretation of the importance and complexity of oligodendrocytes.<br />The Neuron's Assistant<br />Emily Korszen (Biology)<br />
  76. 76. This work is a chlorine bubble, no larger than the size of pushpin. Bubbles represent one of the most perfect scientific figures and photography gives us the unique ability to study some of their most intricate features.<br />Pin-Size Globe<br />Ashley Vaniska (Department of Health Sciences, Research, Management, and Policy)<br />
  77. 77. Ignoring healthy cells, the red, molecular padlock cleverly latches onto elusive infection DNA. Once captured, the infection is illuminated as bright red mulberries inside cells. Anaplasmamorulae in cultured endothelial cells visualized using a novel technique, in situ DNA target-primed rolling circle-amplification of a padlock probe, and fluorescence with differential interference microscopy. <br />A Padlock Hunts for Hidden Infection <br />Heather Wamsley (Physiological Sciences & UF Alumni)<br />
  78. 78. This photo was taken through the eyepiece of a microscope in a geology lab on campus and depicts a slice of rock that is a mere thirty microns in thickness. In fact, this slice is so thin that it is translucent. What is special about this particular view is the large white grain of a mineral known as a Plagioclase Feldspar. While the mineral is commonly seen as a white rectangle, it was a new sight to find this weathering pattern of mirrored spades. Because Plagioclase is an orderly mineral with a specific arrangement of atoms that is relatively fixed, it tends to weather along specific planes of weakness. Perhaps these spades reflect some repeated weakness in the cyrstallographic structure that weathered more readily than the surrounding mineral. <br />Two of Spades<br />Amy Washuta (Interdisciplinary Ecology (SNRE))<br />
  79. 79. This painting was inspired by my first research experience in UF. Last summer, I began studying the dynamics of PML protein in a stressed cell. The goal was to insert a strand of PML cDNA into fluorescent vectors of different colors, and into a cell. To achieve this first step, I learned how to run gel electrophoresis, inoculate bacteria, and use the equipment in the laboratory. The pig reminds me of a vacuum machine used for DNA purification due to its shape. <br />I also enhanced my knowledge on enzymes, proteins and replication of cells. I started painting this when I was told that I had to write a paper about what I've discovered. This canvas served as a medium for putting my thoughts in order. <br />Acrylics on Canvas.<br />PML Protein in the Laboratory: 1st step<br />Sheryl Chocron (Chemical Engineering)<br />
  80. 80. Field-emmision scanning electron microphotograph of apical attachment pore of Pryodiniumbahamensevarbahamense a beautiful bioluminescent dinoflagellate is common to Atlantic tropical and subtropical inshore waters. Its shimmering glow can light up the waters during nightfall but beware its potential saxitoxin production can bioaccumulate in shellfish and other aquatic organisms creating human health concerns. Field-emmision scanning electron microphotograph of apical attachment pore of<br />Pyrobahamensebahamense<br />Karen Kelley (Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research)<br />
  81. 81. Four rat microglia cells stained for coronin (red), vimentin (green) and DNA (blue).<br />Rab-CoroA2 reg-Chi-Vim(4109) -G-2<br />Gerry Shaw (Neuroscience)<br />
  82. 82. This photo was taken on a camping trip in the Arabian desert (Saudi Arabia), just a couple of hours outside Riyadh. On the way to the camping spot in the Red Dunes, we stopped to admire some desert flowers and look for scorpions in the cool shade of stones and old oil cans. I love the little marks left by this specimen on the pristine sand.<br />Scorpion<br />Anastasia Kozak (Department of English)<br />
  83. 83. Each individual cell is a red blood cell taken from a mud flat dwelling worm. Each cell is outlined in green with each individual lysosome shown in red and each individual nucleus shown in blue. Lysotracker Red and Hoechst fluorescence dyes were used.<br />Red Blood Cells<br />Maria Christina Vasquez (Animal Science)<br />
  84. 84. To learn the culture of others, we need to be embedded in those cultures. The Second China Project provides a digital 3D, multi-user immersive environment to support cultural training at a distance. Challenges in the project have required a blending, and coordination, of scientific, engineering, and artistic concepts. Art and design are illustrated in the design of clothing, shape of avatars, and the layout and design of all objects, buildings, and terrain. Engineering elements include the construction of computer programs that enable all object and avatar interactions, dynamics, and program-driven avatars (bots). Science is central to the project with our use of formal experiments run on human subjects, exposed to Second China, to determine the effects of presence on memory and cultural sensitivity. <br />Faces of Second China<br />Paul Fishwick, Ryan Tanay, Hyungwook Park, Julie Henderson, RashaKamhawi, Amy Jo Coffey<br />(Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, P. K. Yonge Developmental Research School)<br />
  85. 85. Is injection of a mixture of two separate viral vectors into the developing brain an efficient method to deliver two genes to single cells? To answer this question, we injected a mixture of two viruses into embryonic chicken brain, each of which carried a gene encoding a fluorescent reporter protein. For this experiment, we chose the reporter proteins green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Cherry (CHER), a red fluorescent protein. The treated brain was sectioned and examined using a fluorescent microscope. The section shown here is a cross-section of the choroid plexus, a tissue located in the cerebral ventricles that secretes cerebrospinal fluid. The plexus contains numerous green or red fluorescent cells expressing GFP or CHER, respectively. Cells expressing both proteins (peach) were relatively rare, a result that argued against use of this approach to deliver two genes to single cells. <br />Vibrant Neural Chimera<br />Sue Semple-Rowland, William Coggin, Rachel Ludlow (Neuroscience)<br />
  86. 86. Herceptin is a monoclonal antibody used to treat certain types of breast cancer. We crystallized new modified forms of Herceptin for the purpose of improving immunotherapy by extending the half-life of this drug in the blood stream. The crystals are colored because they polarize visible light. The straight clean edges show that these crystals are well ordered. These crystals provide the basis for an improved strategy to treat breast cancer. <br />Crystals of a Breast Cancer Drug<br />David Ostrov, Arieann DeFazio, Shun Lu (Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine)<br />
  87. 87. This fractal is generated by iterating the function f(z)=(1+0.4i)sin(z) in the complex plane. This illustrates the mathematical concept in complex dynamics of what Devaney calls chaos where great complexity comes from a relative simple function. The fractal was computed pixel by pixel, where the pixel (x,y) was converted into a complex number (x+iy) and then iterated in the function f(z). The color was determined by whether or not the point (x+iy) converged and by how many iterates it took to converge. <br />(1+0.4i)sin(z) iterated<br />Jason Harrington(Mathematics)<br />
  88. 88. Inspired by the venus flytrap, I set out to express the balance and complex beauty found in the most surprising relationships, that of the carnivorous plant and the fly. In somewhat of an abstract way, I portrayed three sets of fly's eyes. On the left, I drew a magnified view of a fly's eye. On the right, I decided to juxtapose the eye with a microscopic view of a transverse section of a plant in the shape of the matching eye. <br />Shown here: the Hanging-Thief Robber Fly and different stages of mitosis in a Hyacinth root tip.<br />one out of a series of three, watercolor and pastel pencil on paper, 15" x 22"<br />Hanging-Thief Robber Fly Detects Hyacinth <br />MirelleMajas (Fine Arts)<br />
  89. 89. If these orchid bees were larger they could be used as Christmas tree decorations. These, male orchid bees, however, are relatively small insects that inhabit the rainforests of Central and South America. Their broad hind legs help them to collect and store scent from orchids. The scent is used later as perfume to gain favorable attitude of a conspecific female. Perhaps, this is the purpose of the bright coloration as well. Because each Orchid bee species visits specific orchid species, their smells are unique. The long tongues are used to reach inside their favorite flowers. These bees were collected as part of the study on their chemical ecology.<br />Orchid Bees<br />Andrei Sourakov (Florida Museum of Natural History)<br />
  90. 90. Fluorescence microscopy image of CHOH1 control cells, probed with lysenin and stained with anti-lysenin antibody and DAPI chemical stain.<br />contCHOH1w lysenin final<br />Daniel Witter (College of Medicine)<br />
  91. 91. One quarter of this image is nothing else but a part of a butterfly wing (genus Hamadryas, family Nymphalidae, if one must know). These butterflies are also called “Crackers” (though they are not restricted to Florida - their name is rather a reflection of their habit of making cracking sounds with their wings while flying). <br />Multiplied four times, the original image transforms into a mandala-like pattern, which evokes little association with the butterfly it represents. Butterfly is already nothing but a deception of senses - its insect essence is concealed by the beauty and the size of its wings. Likewise, a simple mirror image of the wing fragment here conceals the butterfly, leaving only beauty and symmetry.<br />A Black Hole in the Butterfly Wing<br />Andrei Sourakov (Florida Museum of Natural History)<br />
  92. 92. Buckminsterfullerene is a soccer-ball-shaped molecue made up of 60 carbon atoms. Last year, I put a Xenon atom in a fullerene and smashed it against graphite (layers of Carbon) using a computer simulation. The interlocking layers of graphite were fairly interesting from certain angles, which caused me to take some pictures.<br />The following depicts the eye of a mouse model exhibiting retinal degeneration. The lab with which I am affiliated uses gene therapies to treat retinal diseases associated with macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. The eerie blue orb of a white mouse's cornea contrasts the veiny interior of a degenerated retina. Using a fundus microscope, a devise used to focus on the smallest of blood vessels within the retina of a mouse, I attempted to capture the process and effects a degenerative disease can have on tissue. <br />An Eye for Excellence 4<br />Zachary Cohen (Molecular Genetics and Microbiology)<br />
  93. 93. First there was a butterfly. Then, there was our brain. Then, our brain developed techniques to study our brain, since we are very curious of why we are curious. On the transection of our brain, we recognize a butterfly image (actually it is the spinal fluid that is butterfly-shaped. If you type “brain, butterfly” in Google, you will see multiple images of it.) The image here is derived accidentally – it is a mirror image of a butterfly wing fragment. Ironically, it looks a little bit like a transection of our brain (of course, with a butterfly image in the center).<br />Butterfly-Brain-Butterfly-Brain<br />Andrei Sourakov (Florida Museum of Natural History)<br />
  94. 94. Three different colored, extremely small sized (fL) lasers have been merged and overlapped by careful arrangements of optical lens. This is a self-built laser set-up for the Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy. <br />The Beauty in Lasers<br />Yan Chen (Chemistry)<br />
  95. 95. The picture was taken inside a four-story Rainforest exhibit at California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. Hundreds of butterflies flutter around the enclosure, and visitors are advised to make sure that none are trapped inside their clothing when they leave the exhibit. These two butterflies are enjoying a feast of orange slices put out by the staff.<br />The Feast<br />Anastasia Kozak (Department of English)<br />
  96. 96. A 60 million year old fossil leaf from Colombia shows the marks left by its insectivorous predator. A mine with a spiral pattern is also observed at the right side of the fossil leaf. <br />The Meal of an Insect<br />FabianyHerrera(Biology)<br />
  97. 97. Beach morning glory (Ipomoea pes-caprae) is a common beach vine, but has glorious flowers at various times in the year. This photo was taken at Tortuguero, Costa Rica, where I study the nutrient input of sea turtle nests to the beach vegetation. <br />Beach Morning Glory<br />Hannah Vander Zanden (Biology)<br />
  98. 98. This photo is of muscle and connective tissue of snake cloaca. The picture was taken with a microscope during research of the gross morphology of snake cloaca in the Evans lab at UF. <br />Muscle Rapids<br />Molly Womack (Zoology)<br />
  99. 99. It has been noticed that there are fewer butterflies flying in our yards every year, and we set out to determine why. Part of the reason might lie in the fact that butterfly caterpillars are under attack from new exotic enemies. This sample of tachinid flies hatched from butterfly caterpillars collected at the University of Florida. In some instances, we found up to 90% of butterfly caterpillars resulting in flies.<br />Alien Attack<br />Andrei Sourakov (Florida Museum of Natural History)<br />
  100. 100. This is a picture of the plant Bromeliapinguin taken at Tortuguero, Costa Rica. It is part of the same family as pineapple, and the pink coloration is due to young structures that are not fully pigmented with chlorophyll. <br />Blushing Bromeliad <br />Hannah Vander Zanden (Biology)<br />
  101. 101. Tortuguero, Costa Rica is sea turtle nesting beach situated between two tropical river mouths, where driftwood, and this washed up tree, are common.<br />Driftwood <br />Hannah Vander Zanden (Biology)<br />
  102. 102. 5C11-NF-H<br />Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stained with a mouse monoclonal antibody to neurofilament NF-H (green), antibody to vimentin (red) and DNA (blue).<br />5C11-NF-H<br />Gerry Shaw (Neuroscience)<br />
  103. 103. This is a golden orb spider (Nyphilacalvipes; locally known as the banana spider) that is very common throughout the southeastern United states, Caribbean, and northern parts of South America. The female that is depicted is known to be the largest species of spider in North America and is builds a unique orb shaped web made out of gold silk. The silk known to be one of the toughest fibers in the world and today scientist are trying to develop techniques to harvest or synthesize the silk for military purposes.<br />Web of Gold<br />Jis Joseph (Agriculture and Sciences)<br />
  104. 104. This is a photograph taken at Mpala research center in Kenya, where ecological research is being done on the mutualism that some ant species have with Acacia trees. The Acacia trees provide the ants with housing and food, while the ants provide the tree with protection from herbivores. <br />Mutualism<br />Molly Womack (Zoology)<br />
  105. 105. Cool, silver bundles of connective tissue in the underside of the skin await oxygen-delivery from miniscule, red blood vessels. Bovine dermal collagen and capillaries visualized using indirect immune-labeling of von Willebrand factor and fluorescence with differential interference microscopy. <br />Red Fire River Seen From Above: A Raging River Brings Life to a Desolate Outpost<br />Heather Wamsley (Physiological Sciences & UF Alumni)<br />
  106. 106. This beautiful collection of spots is a diffraction pattern from a single protein crystal of interleukin 8. Each spot represents x-rays that have been reflected off of sets of planes within the crystal. Analysis of this pattern allows us to see the structure of the protein so well that we can see individual atoms. Understanding the locations of all of the atoms is providing the basis for a new method to treat cancer.<br />Interleukin 8 Diffraction<br />ArieannDeFazio(Pathology & UF Alumni)<br />
  107. 107. This is a photograph taken at high magnification of sea snake cloaca and surrounding tissue. The photograph was taken during research of the gross morphology of snake cloaca in the Evans laboratory at UF. <br />Tissue Whirlpool<br />Molly Womack (Zoology)<br />
  108. 108. Recently discovered fossil leaf from the Andes of Colombia. This 60 million year old fossil is a unique window to ancient rainforests from South America. The astonishing yellow color of the fossil leaf stimulates the view of the observer.<br />Yellow Fossil Leaf<br />FabianyHerrera(Biology)<br />

×