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Homelessness in Billings 2012:  Research and Trends
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Homelessness in Billings 2012: Research and Trends

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  • 1. www.WelcomeHomeBillings.org
  • 2. Topics- Homeless Conditions in Billings- “Welcome Home Billings”: the 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness- Goals and Accomplishments
  • 3. Homelessness in Billings
  • 4. Frequency Distribution of 100 Continuum Homelessness Rates (2011) 90Number of Continuum s of Care 80 Billings Metro, 2012 70 - 20 persons / 10,000 60 - Higher than 65% 50 40 of Continuum Areas 30 20 10 0 Homelessness Rate per 10,000 People
  • 5. Homelessness in Billings
  • 6. †2012 PIT Survey Facility Stays 33% 30% 19% 10% 7% 6% 6% 5% Friend/ Emergency Outside, Trans. Motel / Not Friend / Other Family Shelter etc. Shelter Hotel Listed FamilyShort-Term Long-Term
  • 7. †2012 PIT Survey Time Since Home 30% 26% 17% 12% 8% 4%2%1 Week More More More than More than More Moreor Less than 1 than 1 3 Months 6 Months than 1 than 2 Week Month Year Years
  • 8. †Montana Rescue Mission, 2011-2012 Time Since Home for Montana Rescue Mission61% 15% 14% 3% 2% 1% 4% Less 6 mo to 1-2 2-3 3-5 5-10 10+than 6 1 Year Years Years Years Years Years mo
  • 9. †2012 PIT Survey Prior Episodes of Homelessness32% 27% 15% 15% 10%Once Twice Three 4+ Times No Prior Times Episodes
  • 10. †2012 PIT Survey Reason for Leaving 18% Last Home 15% 13% 13% 7% 5% 4%Friend/ Rent Lost/ Evicted, Sudden Domestic Prison /Family Problems No Job Non-Rent Income Violence JailConflict Change
  • 11. †2012 PIT Survey Length of Time in Community 21% 18% 15% 14% 11% 9% 7% 3% 2%Less Than 1 Week More than More More than 1 More than More More than More than 1 Week to 1 1 Month than 4 year 2 Years than 5 10 Years 20 Years Month Months Years
  • 12. †Montana Rescue Mission, 2011-2012Length of Time in Community 44% 20% 15% 17% 4%30 days 1-6 More than 6 months 1-5or less Months 5 Years to 1 Year Years
  • 13. †2012 PIT Survey Income 52% 13% 13% 10% 6% 1% 6% 3%None Part- SSI Full- TANF Social Other Un- Time or Time Cash Security Dis. employment SSDI Asst.
  • 14. †2012 PIT Survey Non-Cash Benefits 87% 33% 8% 3% 3% 8% 6% 5% 4%SNAP Medic- Medicare VA WIC Section TANF - Other SCHI aid Med. 8, etc. Other Services
  • 15. Homelessness in Billings
  • 16. †2012 PIT Survey Age Breakdown 44% 40% 17%Under 18 18-24 25+
  • 17. †2012 PIT Survey Gender57% 43%Male Female
  • 18. †2012 PIT Survey Gender Comparison of Stays,58% including Precariously Housed Female 35% Male 32% 28% 26% 16% 16% 6%Friends & Emergency Outside Transitional Family Shelter Shelter
  • 19. †2012 PIT Survey Household by 49% 43% Relationship (% of Population) 1% 7%Individual Family Non-family Family & Non-family
  • 20. †2012 PIT Survey Family Structure- Homeless individuals about 3times less likely to be married- Est. 81% of families withchildren are single-parent - 2/3 of which are most likely single mothers
  • 21. †2012 PIT Survey Ethnicity 59% -Native Americans and African-Americans 7 times more likely to be homeless 28% -Latinos twice as likely 7% 0% 1% 4%White Native Latino Black/ Asian Other American African American
  • 22. Homelessness in Billings
  • 23. Average Income by Quintile Bracket [20%] in 2010 Poverty Level Billings Metro Percentile Rank Quintile 1 (lowest) $14,500 89% Quintile 2 $30,500 76% Quintile 3 $47,500 67% Quintile 4 $73,000 67% Quintile 5 (highest) $142,500 57% Top 5% $240,000 59%*Percentile Ranking compared to other Metro Statistical Areas (MSAs), higher is better., US Census.
  • 24. Levels of Poverty (2010) Poverty Level Billings Metro Average for Percentile Rank Metros Below 50% of 5% 8% Poverty Line 89% Below 125% of 18% 22% Poverty Line 78% Below 150% of 22% 28% Poverty Line 77% Below 200% of 31% 38% Poverty Line 78%*Percentile Ranking compared to other Metro Statistical Areas (MSAs), higher is better. US Census.
  • 25. Poverty for Select Groups (2010) Population Group Billings Percentile Rank Age Under 18 63% Over 25 78% Over 65 71% Gender Male 91% 63% Female Ethnicity 73% Latino 25% Native American White 64%*Percentile Ranking compared to other Metro Statistical Areas (MSAs), higher is better., US Census.
  • 26. Selected Employment Trends Statistic Billings Percentile Rank General Unemployment June 2012 (4.9%) 96% Labor Force Participation Rate (2010) 88% Unemployment Rate for Persons in Poverty (2010) Male 93% Female 94%*Percentile Ranking compared to other Metro Statistical Areas (MSAs), higher is better., US Census.
  • 27. Housing Affordability (2010) Cost Burdened Renters Billings Metro Average for Percentile Rank (2010) Metros By Severity More than 30% 42% 52% 95% More than 50% 17% 27% 98% By Income Bracket Less than $10,000 85% 92% 91% $10,000 - $15,000 77% 87% 93% $20,000 - $35,000 52% 66% 88% $35,000 - $50,000 9% 29% 55%*Percentile Ranking compared to other Metro Statistical Areas (MSAs), higher is better., US Census.
  • 28. Housing Availability- 5th Fastest Growing housing market in country- But one of the tightest housing markets in country - 2.4% Rental Vacancy Rate (2012) - Less than 1% Homeowner V acancy Rate (3rd lowest in country)
  • 29. Homelessness in Billings
  • 30. †2012 PIT Survey Education 50% Individuals with a high school education or less are twice as likely to become homeless in Billings. 21% 19% 1% 5% 4%No Diploma/ HS Some Associates Bachelors Graduate/ GED Diploma/ College/ Degree Degree Prof. GED No Deg. Degree
  • 31. †2012 PIT Survey Disability Frequency among Homeless 53% Disabled Persons 46% 30% 20% 1% 6% Mental Physical Substance Chronic Develop- HIV/AIDs Health Disability Abuse Problem Health mentalProblem Condition Disability
  • 32. †Montana Rescue Mission, 2011-2012Mental Health / Dev. Disability* In 2011, 1719 homeless persons diagnosed with Serious Mental Illness through Mental Health Center 57% 43% Yes No*”Yes/No” Status from among guests at Montana Rescue Mission
  • 33. †Montana Rescue Mission, 2011-2012 Chemical Dependency* 74% 26% Yes No*Among guests at Montana Rescue Mission
  • 34. †Montana Rescue Mission, 2011-2012 Previously Incarcerated* 55% 45% Yes No*Among guests at Montana Rescue Mission
  • 35. “Welcome Home Billings”:
  • 36. HistoryFormed in 2006, chosen as a pilot for Montana.Released “Welcome Home Billings,” the Ten Year Plan to EndHomeless in 2009.Structure20 members drawn from nonprofits, government, businessand broad community.Holds bimonthly public meetings.
  • 37. VisionNo one in Billings has to be homeless.Everyone in Billings has access to tools andopportunities for safe, appropriate and affordablehousing.MissionThe Mayor’s Committee on Homelessness has partneredwith local organization and community members to developand implement a comprehensive ten-year plan in the pursuitof ending chronic homelessness in the Billings community.
  • 38. Cross-Cutting Goals Collaboration Awareness Accountability Sustainability
  • 39. Key Initiatives Billings Community Billings Connect Area Metro Vista Resource Project Network Housing First Business Project Community Garden & Food Consortium Security Project Spare Change Initiative for Real Change
  • 40. Goals &Accomplishments of the T Y Plan en ear
  • 41. Introduce Plan to EndAwareness Homelessness and increase public knowledge.Over 450 presentations given to thecommunityMore than 40 Volunteers in Service toAmerica (VISTAs) brought to Billings as apart of the Metro Vista Project.Spare Change for Real Change hasgenerate more than 6 events and over$22,000 dollars for Homelessness.
  • 42. Facilitate partnershipsCollaboration and increase efficacy through collaborative initiatives. 50 Organizations involved in Ten Year Plan to end homelessness. “Billings Community Connect,” annual community event that last year brought out 431 community members, 47 agencies and 180 volunteers. Two new collaborative housing projects with integrated support.
  • 43. “Increase city’s supply Housing of decent, affordable housing.”Housing provide for 2,706 low-income orhomeless individuals.56 new housing units for homeless or low-income residents created.Essential repairs provided for 116 areahomes.Weatherization improvements for 911homes.
  • 44. Provide adequatePrevention emergency homeless prevention programs. Rental assistance for 3,331 households. Emergency shelter provided for 3,439 people. Homelessness prevention services provided for 656 individuals.
  • 45. Expand treatment / Services service capacity and linkages to services.Over 381,000 meals served.Health coverage for 3,068 uninsured andhomeless persons.Case management for over 7,500 clients.Over 20,000 people received clothingand household items.
  • 46. Increase personalAssets income and economic opportunities.Over 10,000 people received job searchand readiness assistance.More than 1,000 participants infinancial education classes.Childcare assistance for 2,470 people.Over 11,000 bus passes and 833 gasvouchers donated.
  • 47. Sources• 2007-2011 Point-in-Time Counts by Continuum of Care, 2011 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress (AHAR) Supplemental Report.• American Community Survey, US Census Bureau (2012).• Bureau of Labor Statistics Data, US Department of Labor (2012).• Federal Reserve Economic Data, St. Louis Federal Reserve (2012).• Healthcare for the Homeless Summary Data for Billings (2011).• Montana Housing Status Survey Data for Billings (2012).• Montana Rescue Mission Summary Intake Data, July 2011-June 2012.• “Snapshot of Home Ownership in Local Housing Markets,” National Association of Home Builders (2012).• PATH Montana Statewide Annual Report (FY2011).• “Rental housing markets: Musical chairs, with fewer chairs,” Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis (2012).