Rob Farrow, Open University
Quill West, Tacoma Community College
April 9, 2014
11:00 am Pacific, 2:00 pm Eastern
OER Impac...
Collaborate Window Overview
Audio & Video
Participants
Chat
Tech Support available at:
1-760-744-1150 ext. 1537, 1554
Agenda
• Introductions
• CCCOER Overview
• The Liberated Project: Student Voices at
Tacoma College
• Community College Res...
Welcome
Please introduce yourself in chat window
Quill West
OER Project Director
Tacoma Community College
Rob Farrow
Senio...
• Promote adoption of OER to enhance
teaching and learning
–Expanding access to education
–Supporting professional develop...
240+ Colleges in 17 States & Provinces
OER Impact Research Informs
– Curriculum development
– Academic Senate
– Student advocacy
– Grant proposals/reports
– Coll...
Liberated: Student Voices
Quill West
OER Project Director
Eliciting Student Voice
tacomacc.edu/open
TCC
OER
Project
“The
Liberated”
Support
Faculty
Assessment of
Success
Outreach and
Development
OER create greater
access to education by
lowering costs and
making classes more
interesting.
OER create greater
access to education by
lowering costs and
making classes more
interesting.
Prove it!
Savings: Regular tracking of courses.
Surveys: Students and faculty quarterly.
Achievement Data: Quarterly reviews from IR.
OER is better?
Are they thinking
Have a panel.
Survey classes using OER.
Teachers give journals.
Visit classes – Teach Intellectual Property.
Students pick...
OER Impact in
Community Colleges
Rob Farrow, PhD
Senior Researcher
Institute Educational Technology
• Research project at The Open University (UK)
• Funded by William & Flora Hewlett Foundation for two years
• Two professo...
Keyword Research Hypothesis
Performance OER improve student performance/satisfaction
Openness People use OER differently f...
CCCOER/OERRH Research Collaboration
Focus on impact of OER adoption on teaching practice, institutional policies and
facto...
Colleges Participating in OERRH Research
Anne Arundel CC (MD) Baltimore City CC (MD)
Cerritos CC (CA) College of the Canyo...
• Most respondents were
experienced teachers (84% at least
7 years) with postgraduate degrees
(96%)
• Most teach full-time...
136 usable survey responses were recorded:
• De Anza College, CA (5)
• Foothill College, CA (33)
• Houston Community Colle...
OER Behaviours of
College Educators
52%
24%
18%
11% 9%
7%
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
I have adapted
open educational
resources to fit my
needs
I have created
o...
7.9%
10.8%
12.2%
18 %
23%
25.2%
25.9%
29.5%
32.4%
34.5%
37.4%
38.1%
38.8%
64.7%
69.8%
Data sets
Whole course
Interactive g...
OER Repositories Used
1% 2% 4% 5%
9%
11% 13%
17%
20%
26% 26%
32%
35%
43%
71%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
YouTube is...
Factors relevant to choosing OER
7%
9%
21%
29%
33%
36%
42%
42%
43%
43%
48%
48%
48%
49%
51%
58%
69%
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% ...
OER impact on
teachers/students
Impact on teaching practice from OER use
6%
13%
14%
14%
16%
18%
19%
21%
22%
23%
3%
5%
1%
3%
4%
2%
2%
2%
2%
2%
0% 20% 40% 6...
OER: perceptions of impact on learners
8%
9%
9%
12%
12%
12%
14%
15%
15%
15%
16%
17%
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%...
Perception of
Financial Savings
Has your institution saved money
through OER?
yes
44%
no
19%
don't know
37%
“OER resources are old-school, low-tech
module...
Have your students saved money
through OER?
yes
62%
no
13%
don't know
25%
“Saving money is a
big incentive for
students an...
OER impact on
student retention
strongly agree
12%
agree
26%
neither agree nor
disagree
50%
disagree
8%
strongly disagree
4%
“OER use helps at-risk studen...
11%
18% 21%
35% 36% 36%
47%
57%
60%
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
Materials are
available in
different
languages
Availability of
c...
Attitudes
“Some at-risk students benefit from
OER because of the obvious release
of financial obligation. Others are
chall...
Importance of Open Licensing
How important is open licensing (e.g. CC)?
crucial
20%
very important
34%somewhat important
19%
neither important nor
unim...
Summary
Summary of Results
• Most of the respondents have used some sort of OER, though only around a
quarter create OER
• Most re...
Summary of Results
• There were mixed views about whether OER was saving institutions money, but
approximately 2/3 felt th...
• Many community colleges require IRB approval for faculty surveys
• IRBs may meet infrequently particularly during academ...
Next Steps
Next Steps
• Further analysis of this cohort, including isolation of the OER advocates and
OER detractors to identify beha...
OER Impact Map
oermap.org
Global Impact Summary
Impact Summary (USA)
Map of OER Projects
Evidence Map (College, USA)
OER Policy Map (USA)
Live Evidence Summary
Filtering data according to
sector, hypothesis & polarity
Framework for comparing
disparate evidence types
Collaborative r...
We want to put you on the map!
So let us know about OER activity
and impact in your local college
Thanks for listening!
oerresearchhub.org
oermap.org
rob.farrow@open.ac.uk
in service of The Open University
Next CCCOER Webinar
Wed, May 14
Thank you for attending!
Please type QUESTIONS in the chat window or
click on the talk button.
Contact Information
Una Dal...
Share
http://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/4424154829/in/photostream/
IMG_4591 http://www.flickr.com/photos/bionicte...
OER Impact and Student Voices
OER Impact and Student Voices
OER Impact and Student Voices
OER Impact and Student Voices
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

OER Impact and Student Voices

563

Published on

Does OER usage improve teaching practice, foster open policies at institutions, and make access to education more equitable? These oer hub open universityare the hypotheses that the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources(CCCOER) has been investigating in collaboration with the OER Research Hub at Open University. Through the use of faculty surveys and interviews with college administrators and leaders from over 20 community colleges, data has been Tacoma Collegegathered on teaching practices and perceptions of how open and online educational resources enhance student learning and foster institutional open policies. We will also hear from Tacoma Community College’s “The Liberated Project” student voices on how students benefit directly from OER and the major role they can play in OER adoption.

Please join the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) for this free webinar on Wed, April 9, 11:00 am (PT), 2:00 pm (ET) featuring:

• Dr. Rob Farrow, lead researcher for the community college collaboration at the OER Research Hub project. Dr. Farrow will share his year-long journey including many visits to U.S. community colleges to observe and interview administrators, faculty, and students engaged in open education practice and advocacy.

* Quill West, OER director and faculty librarian at Tacoma Community College created the Liberated Project to share student voices in the OER adoption process. The talk will feature “The Liberated,” students who have taken courses where OER are used instead of textbooks and also will describe how to invite students to add their voices to the evidence that OER has a positive impact on teaching and learning.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
563
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • ELLUMINATE/CCC Conference Opening Script [Start recording…] Welcome to the ________ Webinar for DAY, MONTH, YEAR [sponsored by]. [If applicable] Today’s guests come to us from _______ in ____, ___. I will introduce them shortly, but first I want to go over a few details about this [Elluminate/CCC Confer] session for those who are new to [Elluminate/CCC Confer].DetailsAt the upper left of your screen, you should see the Participants window, which lists the participants in this session. You can use the icons underneath this window to:Raise your hand if you have a question or comment and you wish to speakThere are also happy and sad faces and an applaud icon Below the Participants window is the Chat window to the center-left of this screen where you can type a question or comment into the box at any time. You can also send a private message to another participant at any time, but please be aware that moderators can see all private messages.Below the chat area is the Audio window in the bottom left of the screen. Click on the raised your hand button to let us know you would like to speak. You can use a head set or your phone for audio chat. If you are using a microphone and have been recognized to speak, Click the button with the microphone on it and begin speaking. Remember to click the button again when you finish speaking so that someone else can have a turn. You can control your mic and volume levels with the sliders. And if you are having trouble with your headset or microphone, you can access the Audio Setup Wizard from the Tools menu on the top toolbar. From Tools, select Audio, and then Audio Setup Wizard, and follow the on-screen instructions.[CCC Confer ONLY] If you are using the telephone to speak, Click on the phone handset below the microphone and audio volume sliders. The call-number and pin will then appear in a dialog box.
  • OER Impact and Student Voices

    1. 1. Rob Farrow, Open University Quill West, Tacoma Community College April 9, 2014 11:00 am Pacific, 2:00 pm Eastern OER Impact Research Faculty & Student Voices
    2. 2. Collaborate Window Overview Audio & Video Participants Chat Tech Support available at: 1-760-744-1150 ext. 1537, 1554
    3. 3. Agenda • Introductions • CCCOER Overview • The Liberated Project: Student Voices at Tacoma College • Community College Research: OER Hub at Open University • Questions & Answers APRIL IS NATIONAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE MONTH!! Image: Creative Commons c-by-nc EpicFireworks
    4. 4. Welcome Please introduce yourself in chat window Quill West OER Project Director Tacoma Community College Rob Farrow Senior Researcher OER Research Hub Open University, UK Moderator: Una Daly Director of Community College Outreach OpenCourseWare Consortium
    5. 5. • Promote adoption of OER to enhance teaching and learning –Expanding access to education –Supporting professional development –Advancing the community college mission CCCOER Funded by the William & Flora Hewlett Foundation
    6. 6. 240+ Colleges in 17 States & Provinces
    7. 7. OER Impact Research Informs – Curriculum development – Academic Senate – Student advocacy – Grant proposals/reports – College board of trustees – Institutional open policies – State legislation
    8. 8. Liberated: Student Voices Quill West OER Project Director
    9. 9. Eliciting Student Voice tacomacc.edu/open
    10. 10. TCC OER Project “The Liberated” Support Faculty Assessment of Success Outreach and Development
    11. 11. OER create greater access to education by lowering costs and making classes more interesting.
    12. 12. OER create greater access to education by lowering costs and making classes more interesting. Prove it!
    13. 13. Savings: Regular tracking of courses. Surveys: Students and faculty quarterly. Achievement Data: Quarterly reviews from IR.
    14. 14. OER is better? Are they thinking
    15. 15. Have a panel. Survey classes using OER. Teachers give journals. Visit classes – Teach Intellectual Property. Students pick the issue. More qualitative survey. Happy accidents.
    16. 16. OER Impact in Community Colleges Rob Farrow, PhD Senior Researcher Institute Educational Technology
    17. 17. • Research project at The Open University (UK) • Funded by William & Flora Hewlett Foundation for two years • Two professors lead four researchers among a team of ten • Tasked with building the most comprehensive picture of OER impact • Organised by eleven research hypotheses • Collaboration model across different educational sectors • Global reach but with a USA focus OER Research Hub oerresearchhub.org
    18. 18. Keyword Research Hypothesis Performance OER improve student performance/satisfaction Openness People use OER differently from other online materials Access OER widen participation in education Retention OER can help at-risk learners to finish their studies Reflection OER use leads educators to reflect on their practice Finance OER adoption brings financial benefits for students/institutions Indicators Informal learners use a variety of indicators when selecting OER Support Informal learners develop their own forms of study support Transition OER support informal learners in moving to formal study Policy OER use encourages institutions to change their policies Assessment Informal assessments motivate learners using OER
    19. 19. CCCOER/OERRH Research Collaboration Focus on impact of OER adoption on teaching practice, institutional policies and factors of cost and access Feb-May 2013 Faculty Survey Development IRB Process May-Dec 2013 Survey Deployment Ongoing Interviews and focus groups with faculty; policymakers; students Incorporation of institutional evidence into OER Impact Map Jan-Apr 2014 Analysis & Dissemination
    20. 20. Colleges Participating in OERRH Research Anne Arundel CC (MD) Baltimore City CC (MD) Cerritos CC (CA) College of the Canyons (CA) De Anza College (CA) Florida Virtual Campus (FL) Foothill CC (CA) Houston CC (TX) Maricopa County CC District (AZ) Northern Virginia CC (VA) Roane State CC (TN) South Florida CC (FL) Tacoma CC (WA) University of Maryland University College (MD)
    21. 21. • Most respondents were experienced teachers (84% at least 7 years) with postgraduate degrees (96%) • Most teach full-time (65%) and are involved in online instruction (57%) n=136. For more detail on sampling: http://oerresearchhub.org/2014/02/17/oer-impact-at-community-colleges-elearning2014/
    22. 22. 136 usable survey responses were recorded: • De Anza College, CA (5) • Foothill College, CA (33) • Houston Community College, TX (41) • Northern Virginia Community College (30) • Roane State Community College, TN (13) • South Florida Community College, FL (4) May 2014: survey data is being supplemented with analysis of qualitative data gathered from college visits in Virginia, Maryland, Washington, and California.
    23. 23. OER Behaviours of College Educators
    24. 24. 52% 24% 18% 11% 9% 7% 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 I have adapted open educational resources to fit my needs I have created open educational resources for study or teaching I have added a resource to a repository I have created resources myself and published them on a Creative Commons (CC) licence I have added comments to a repository regarding the quality of a resource I have added comments to a repository suggesting ways of using a resource Patterns of OER Use Of those that create OER (24%) less than half publish them on an open (CC) licence
    25. 25. 7.9% 10.8% 12.2% 18 % 23% 25.2% 25.9% 29.5% 32.4% 34.5% 37.4% 38.1% 38.8% 64.7% 69.8% Data sets Whole course Interactive games Infographics Audio podcasts Learning tools, instruments and plugins Lesson plans E-books Tutorials Elements of a course (e.g. a module/unit) Open textbooks Quizzes Lectures Images Videos Types of OER Used Multimedia content is around twice as popular as other OER (including textbooks) Few reported using a whole course of OER, suggesting they cherry pick resources as needed Very few are using openly available data to teach
    26. 26. OER Repositories Used 1% 2% 4% 5% 9% 11% 13% 17% 20% 26% 26% 32% 35% 43% 71% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% YouTube is more than twice as popular as most OER respositories
    27. 27. Factors relevant to choosing OER 7% 9% 21% 29% 33% 36% 42% 42% 43% 43% 48% 48% 48% 49% 51% 58% 69% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Being required to use a resource for a project/task The resource featuring a catchy title or attractive image(s) The resource having previously been used with students Evidence of interest in that resource (e.g. lots of downloads) The length/complexity of the resource The resource being recently created, uploaded or updated Personal recommendation Having previously used this resource successfully Use of interactive or multimedia content Positive user ratings or comments about the resource A description of learning objectives or outcomes being provided The resource having a Creative Commons license A detailed description of the resource content The resource being easy to download The resource having an open license allowing adaptation Created/uploaded by a reputable/trusted institution/person The resource being relevant to my particular interests/needs
    28. 28. OER impact on teachers/students
    29. 29. Impact on teaching practice from OER use 6% 13% 14% 14% 16% 18% 19% 21% 22% 23% 3% 5% 1% 3% 4% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% I make use of a wider range of multimedia I reflect more on the way that I teach I have broadened my coverage of the curriculum I now use OER study to develop my teaching I have improved ICT skills I more frequently compare my own teaching with others I have a more up-to-date knowledge of my subject area I use a broader range of teaching and learning methods I collaborate more with colleagues I make more use of culturally diverse resources strongly agree– agree– neither agree nor disagree– disagree– strongly disagree–
    30. 30. OER: perceptions of impact on learners 8% 9% 9% 12% 12% 12% 14% 15% 15% 15% 16% 17% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% ... increases interest in the subjects taught ... builds confidence ... allows me to better accommodate learners' needs ... increases collaboration and/or peer-support ... increases enthusiasm for future study ... increases participation in class discussions ... increases satisfaction with the learning experience ... leads to improved student grades ... increases engagement with lesson content ... develops independence and self-reliance ... leads to interest in a wider range of subjects ... Increases experimentation with ways of learning Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree
    31. 31. Perception of Financial Savings
    32. 32. Has your institution saved money through OER? yes 44% no 19% don't know 37% “OER resources are old-school, low-tech modules that are not peer-reviewed or nationally normed. There are some interesting tentative attempts at creativity but much of OER is cr*p.” “Students return for additional classes” “They don't like losing the revenue stream from the bookstore” “I know that some instructors are only using OER which provides substantial savings for our students.”
    33. 33. Have your students saved money through OER? yes 62% no 13% don't know 25% “Saving money is a big incentive for students and institutions.” “I still use publishers' textbooks in my classes. I use OER as supplements to the textbook.” “My students tell me and enrollment in my classes has continually increased over those of my peers.” “I developed an online textbook for the personal health class that I teach. This saves each of my students approximately $100.” “I know that some instructors are only using OER which provides substantial savings for our students.”
    34. 34. OER impact on student retention
    35. 35. strongly agree 12% agree 26% neither agree nor disagree 50% disagree 8% strongly disagree 4% “OER use helps at-risk students to continue their studies” “Driving down the cost coupled with the ability to modify and adapt the material to meet the needs of my learners are two major factors in why I like using OER materials.” • More than 1/3 believed that OER use promotes student retention • Around half feel it has no effect • The remainder (12%) disagreed or strongly disagreed with one noting that “other things are more important”.
    36. 36. 11% 18% 21% 35% 36% 36% 47% 57% 60% 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Materials are available in different languages Availability of culturally- relevant materials Materials can be used for improving non-native language skills Materials can be adapted to suit student needs Greater range of learning methods Use of resources for improving study skills Materials can be used flexibly Materials can be accessed at any time Reduced cost of study materials OER as promoter of student retention: factors
    37. 37. Attitudes “Some at-risk students benefit from OER because of the obvious release of financial obligation. Others are challenged by the technology and OER actually makes their success rates drop.” “My concern is that at-risk students don't seem to do well in online environments because it doesn't always provide them the structure they need.” “Many at risk students don't have the means to access high speed internet or have limited technological availability. To assume they do is simply wrong. Additionally, they have more complicated extrinsic factors impacting their lives, which may require more intensive contact from the instructor to keep them involved in the course. OER is not going to be a make or break issue of retention. It is not a panacea for at-risk students.” “The biggest factors in physics for student attrition are time-constraints and insufficient previous preparation, neither of which is affected by the class resources.” OER and retention of at-risk students: comments against
    38. 38. Importance of Open Licensing
    39. 39. How important is open licensing (e.g. CC)? crucial 20% very important 34%somewhat important 19% neither important nor unimportant 22% not at all important 5% More than half feel that open licensing is important, but fewer actually practice it. This could indicate either 1) that educators are not confident about licensing their work or 2) they feel it is an avoidable addition to their workload.
    40. 40. Summary
    41. 41. Summary of Results • Most of the respondents have used some sort of OER, though only around a quarter create OER • Most report positive effects on their teaching practice as a result of OER use, particularly around peer collaboration and improved subject knowledge • A smaller proportion (but still in excess of 40%) feel that OER use directly leads to improved reflection on pedagogical practice • Positive effects were also identified for learners, especially around increased self-reliance, subject interest and experimentation
    42. 42. Summary of Results • There were mixed views about whether OER was saving institutions money, but approximately 2/3 felt that students had saved money • Around 1/3 believe that OER is improving student attrition while around 1/2 believe it is not having an effect • Only around half of OER creators have used open licensing • There is a core of advocates who understand and actively promote OER; they adopt open educational practices and believe it leads to benefits • There were similar numbers who thought OER wasn‟t making much of a difference and a core of what might be termed „anti-OER‟ responses. Sometimes this seems to result from misunderstanding OER
    43. 43. • Many community colleges require IRB approval for faculty surveys • IRBs may meet infrequently particularly during academic breaks • IRBs limit approvals to prevent duplication and survey fatigue • The process can take longer than expected - good planning is essential! Reflection: Survey Research in Community Colleges
    44. 44. Next Steps
    45. 45. Next Steps • Further analysis of this cohort, including isolation of the OER advocates and OER detractors to identify behavioural and attitudinal patterns • Cross-referencing with other OERRH surveys, e.g. Saylor „informal learners‟ survey (n=3014) to build a more complete picture of different stakeholders • Integration of institutional metrics (where possible) and qualitative data gathered in field work • Open dissemination of raw data; openly licensed research instruments • Adding your data to OER Impact Map (http://oermap.org)
    46. 46. OER Impact Map oermap.org
    47. 47. Global Impact Summary
    48. 48. Impact Summary (USA)
    49. 49. Map of OER Projects
    50. 50. Evidence Map (College, USA)
    51. 51. OER Policy Map (USA)
    52. 52. Live Evidence Summary
    53. 53. Filtering data according to sector, hypothesis & polarity Framework for comparing disparate evidence types Collaborative research, analysis & dissemination Openness in action: openly licensed research instruments, data Effective evidence- based decision- making and advocacy
    54. 54. We want to put you on the map! So let us know about OER activity and impact in your local college
    55. 55. Thanks for listening! oerresearchhub.org oermap.org rob.farrow@open.ac.uk
    56. 56. in service of The Open University
    57. 57. Next CCCOER Webinar Wed, May 14
    58. 58. Thank you for attending! Please type QUESTIONS in the chat window or click on the talk button. Contact Information Una Daly unatdaly@ocwconsortium.org Rob.Farrow Rob.Farrow@open.ac.uk Quill West qwest@tacomacc.edu
    59. 59. Share http://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/4424154829/in/photostream/ IMG_4591 http://www.flickr.com/photos/bionicteaching/4700979984/ cc-by-sa La belle tzigane http://www.flickr.com/photos/joyoflife/21063837 cc-by-sa Asian Library Interior 5 http://www.flickr.com/photos/ubclibrary/453351638/ cc-by-nc-sa Petru http://www.flickr.com/photos/joyoflife/23724427/ cc-by-nc-sa Opensourceways http://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/4371000710/ cc-by-sa Photo credits: 63 Free the textbook: Creative Commons licensed by opensourceway, https://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/ Student Voices Shortened Video:http://link.videoplatform.limelight.com/media/?mediaId=e5097f9adf364e37906cec38bde0 9828&width=720&height=457&playerForm=d9c11ff565014fcb8d568dff82701523
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×