Social Media Use in the Queensland Floods

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Presented by Jean Burgess and Axel Bruns at the Eidos Institute symposium "Social Media in Times of Crisis", Brisbane, 4 Apr. 2011.

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Social Media Use in the Queensland Floods

  1. 1. Social Media Use in the Queensland Floods<br />Image by campoalto<br />Assoc. Prof. Axel Bruns / Dr. Jean BurgessQueensland University of Technology<br />Assoc. Prof. Kate Crawford / Frances ShawUniversity of New South Wales<br />ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries & Innovation<br />
  2. 2. Crisis Communication research in the CCI<br />ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries & Innovation (national, based at QUT)<br />Project: Media Ecologies & Methodological Innovation<br />Aims to implement new methods to understand the changing media environment;<br />Focusing on the relationship between social media and traditional media and communication platforms;<br />Combining large-scale computer-assisted techniques with qualitative social research and close textual analysis<br />Focus on Crisis Communication<br />Natural disasters<br />Other ‘acute events’<br />
  3. 3. Crisis Communication research in the CCI<br />Jan-April 2011<br />Focus on uses of social media during the Qld Floods<br />Archive of tweets using #qldfloodshashtag<br />Analysis<br />Volume of tweets over time<br />@replies and retweets: key actors and their networks<br />URLs: key media resources, user-uploaded images and videos<br />Emergence and uptake of hashtags and other user conventions<br />Content analysis: themes and purposes over time<br />
  4. 4. Case study: @QPSMedia<br />
  5. 5. Next steps<br />More forensics: successes and failures, especially rumours and misinformation<br />Further comparison with other recent natural disasters<br />Comparing mainstream and social media coverage<br />Social context: in-depth interviews with residents<br />Direct engagement with emergency services, government and media<br />
  6. 6. Twitter and the Queensland Floods: #qldfloods tweets<br />10 Jan 2011 11 Jan 2011 12 Jan 2011 13 Jan 2011 14 Jan 2011 15 Jan 2011<br />
  7. 7. Local Focus: #qldfloods from Toowoomba to Brisbane<br />Toowoomba vs. Lockyer/Grantham vs. Ipswich vs. Brisbane slide<br />10 Jan 2011 11 Jan 2011 12 Jan 2011 13 Jan 2011 14 Jan 2011 15 Jan 2011<br />
  8. 8. Twitter and the Queensland Floods: #qldfloods posters<br />retweet feeds<br />mainstream media<br />Qld Police<br />
  9. 9. Twitter and the Queensland Floods: #qldfloods @replies<br />authorities<br />mainstream media<br />
  10. 10. Twitter and the Christchurch Earthquake: #eqnz @replies<br />mainstream media<br />authorities<br />utilities<br />
  11. 11. Key Accounts over Time<br />
  12. 12. @QPSmedia as Central #qldfloods Information Source<br />
  13. 13. #qldfloods Network Map – Most Active Accounts Only(Degree >= 15 / Node size: indegree / node colour: outdegree)<br />
  14. 14. Twitter Events in Perspective: Comparing the Main 24h<br />
  15. 15. Twitter and the Japanese Tsunami: Beyond the #Hashtag<br />
  16. 16. Twitter and the Queensland Floods<br />First lessons:<br />#qldfloods as coordinating tool – one central hashtag<br />Go where the users are – and help establish hashtag<br />Plus inventive additions – e.g. @QPSmedia #Mythbuster tweets<br />Most activity by individuals – but key official accounts cut through<br />Enable easy retweeting and sharing of messages<br />Respond and engage<br />Mainstream media are important in social media environments, too<br />Twitter as an amplifier of key messages<br />Twitter vs. Facebook – which works when?<br />
  17. 17. Image by campoalto<br />http://mappingonlinepublics.net/<br />@snurb_dot_info | a.bruns@qut.edu.au<br />@jeanburgess | je.burgess@qut.edu.au<br />@katecrawford | k.crawford@unsw.edu.au<br />

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