TCUK10 Graham Wignall - Lean Docs
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There's no stopping us now! What we can learn from the Toyota Production System ...

There's no stopping us now! What we can learn from the Toyota Production System

This session looks at what we can learn from Lean Manufacturing and apply to documentation processes to improve overall efficiency and costs. As well as looking at potential areas for potential productivity gains, it introduces the language of Lean Manufacturing – helping documentation managers to align their projects with wider corporate startegies and to help secure executive management support and budget. Attendees to this session will come away with some new and innovative ideas about how to sell the vision and importance of global content management and processes to executive management by using the right language. They will understand what their global content is really costing them and how they can cut this down considerably with reuse and removal of wastage.

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TCUK10 Graham Wignall - Lean Docs Presentation Transcript

  • 1.
  • 2. There’s No Stopping Us Now!
    What we can learn from the Toyota Production System, or Lean Documentation 101
    Graham WignallBusiness Development Director
  • 3. There’s No Stopping Us Now!
  • 4. Topics For Today
    Why learn about lean?
    TPS, Lean techniques and documentation
    Types of waste in documentation
    Building the business case
    Conclusions
    Q&A
    Managing
    content
    A time and
    a place
    Re-use of
    content
    Conclusions
    Lean
    techniques
    Types of
    waste
    Q&A
  • 5. Why Learn About Lean?
    “A good catchword can obscure analysis for fifty years...”
    Wendell L Willkie
    Conclusions
    Learning
    About Lean
    Types of
    waste
    A time and
    a place
    Managing
    content
    Re-use of
    content
    Q&A
  • 6. Why Learn About Lean?
    Too many projects, not enough funds
    What’s hot? (and what’s not...)
    Don’t speak Geek (or if you must...)
  • 7. Lean Techniques & Documentation
    “He that idly loses 5s. worth of time, loses 5s., and might as prudently throw 5s. into the river.”
    Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanac
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    A time and
    a place
    Managing
    content
    Re-use of
    content
    Q&A
  • 8. Publishing – How ExpensiveIs It?
    Typical figures for technical documentation show
    Technical illustration costs per page $200
    Authoring/proofing costs per page $200
    Translation costs per page (20 languages) $800
    Total cost per page $1,200
    If you have a range of 50 products, each with a 200 page manual, you could be spending $12,000,000 per year!
    It MUST be possible to do this more efficiently…
  • 9. Types Of Waste
    “There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.”
    Peter F. Drucker
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    A time and
    a place
    Managing
    content
    Re-use of
    content
    Q&A
  • 10. Types Of Waste In Lean Manufacturing
    Lean Manufacturing focuses on seven kinds of waste (or Muda, Mura and Muri in TPS terminology):
    Overproduction
    Motion
    Waiting
    Conveyance
    Processing
    Inventory
    Correction
  • 11. Types Of Waste In Documentation
    There are five main areas in documentation where waste occurs:
    Publishing ‘over-complete’ documentation that caters for multiple configurations, variants or audiences
    Lack of integration between engineering and technical documentation departments
    Multiple authors writing the same thing in different ways introducing inconsistency and lowering quality
    Process or control deficiencies allowing out of date information to be used or published
    Unnecessary review cycles
  • 12. Re-use Of Content
    “All we are doing is looking at the time line, from the moment the customer gives us an order to the point when we collect the cash. And we are reducing the time line by reducing the non-value adding wastes.”
    TaiichiOhno, Toyota
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    A time and
    a place
    Managing
    content
    Re-use of
    content
    Q&A
    無駄
    Muda: activity that adds no value
  • 13. Re-use Of Content
    The same content appears more than once in a document
    Procedures
    Warnings, Cautions and Advisories
    • Only use lifting equipment designed for the task.
    • 14. Never expose lifting equipment to loads exceeding the specified safe working load (SWL) value.
    • 15. Check lifting equipment visually for damages prior to use.
    • 16. Check that all dowels are secured with locking pins before lifting.
    • 17. When replacing parts, only use original parts authorized by ACME Inc.
    a. Install jack adapters (1) on brackets (2).
    (1) Place adapters (1) on brackets (2).
    (2) Insert pins (3) in holes of adapter (1) and brackets (2).
    b. Position two 5-ton tripod jacks (4) under adapters (1). Use jacks.
    (1) Turn two pressure valve screws (5) clockwise to close. Use jack handle (6).
    (2) Pump handle (6) until ram (7) contacts adapter (1).
    c. Position 3-ton tripod jack (8) under tail boom
    jack pad (9).
    (1) Turn pressure valve screw (10) clockwise to close. Use jack handle (11).
    (2) Pump handle (11) until ram (12) contacts pad (9).
    d. Release parking brake (para 1.61).
  • 18. Re-use Of Content
    The same content appears in more than one document
    Product data sheets
    User guides
    Maintenance manuals
    FAQs
  • 19. Re-use Of Content
    The same content relates to more than one product
    Components and subassemblies
    Procedures
    Boilerplate
    BMW 120d
    BMW 520d
    BMW 320d
  • 20. ‘Accidental’ Content
    “How do I write thee? Let me count the ways...”
    with apologies to Elizabeth Barrett Browning
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    A time and
    a place
    Managing
    content
    Re-use of
    content
    Q&A
    無駄
    Muda: activity that adds no value
  • 21. ‘Accidental’ Content
    WARNING: Switch power off only when the fan has stopped
    WARNING: Switch power off once the fan has stopped
    WARNING: Disconnect power only when the fan has stopped
    WARNING: Never switch the power off until the fan has stopped
    WARNING: Do not power down until the fan has stopped
    WARNING: Do not power down before the fan has stopped
    WARNING: You must wait until the fan has stopped before switching off the power
    WARNING: Wait until the fan has stopped running before switching off the power
    WARNING: Do not disconnect power if fan is running
    WARNING: Fan must be stopped before disconnecting power
  • 22. ‘Accidental’ Content
    Accidental content is very expensive
    It has to be proofed
    It has to be reviewed
    It may have to be translated
    It has to be published
    It reduces consistency
    It reduces clarity
    It reduces quality
    It reduces usability
  • 23. Driving Efficiency
    “Time waste differs from material waste in that there can be no salvage.  The easiest of all wastes and the hardest to correct is the waste of time, because wasted time does not litter the floor like wasted material.”
    Henry Ford
    Re-use of
    content
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    Managing
    content
    A time and
    a place
    Q&A

    Mura: unevenness, inconsistency
  • 24. Feast And Famine
    Write
    Review
    Publish
    Translate
    Write
    Translate
    Review
    Publish
    Write
    Translate
    Review
    Write
    Translate
    Review
    Write
    Translate
    Review
    Modules can be written, reviewed and translated in parallel:
    Reduced time to market
    More effective use of resources
  • 25. Driving Efficiency
    “When you buy bananas all you want is the fruit not the skin, but you have to pay for the skin also. It is a waste. And you the customer should not have to pay for the waste.”
    Shigeo Shingo, Toyota
    Re-use of
    content
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    Managing
    content
    A time and
    a place
    Q&A

    Mura: unevenness, inconsistency
  • 26. Customer Centric Documentation
    Everywhere you look, customers are paying for banana skins
    The glove-box manual that tells them all about the optional Sat Nav they don’t have
    The handbook in 20 languages, 19 of which they can’t read
    The 400 pages of documentation when all they need to know is where to find the power switch
  • 27. Customer Centric Documentation
    Move to “mass customisation” in documentation
    Deliver the right material in the right quantity to the right person
    Deliver only what is needed
    Assemble documentation from components
    Assemble and publish on demand
    Publish “Just In Time”
  • 28. Managing Content
    “The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency.  The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency.”
    Bill Gates, Microsoft
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    A time and
    a place
    Managing
    content
    Re-use of
    content
    Q&A
    無理
    Muri: overburden, lack of standardisation
  • 29. The Challenge Of Re-Use
    Any new method that reduces Muda or Mura but produces more work downstream for people or equipment eventually produces a new type of inefficiency
    Moving from tens or hundreds of documents to thousands or tens of thousands of components represents a major challenge for people and systems
    Identifying, versioning, managing and assembling output requires new tools and skills
    As the number of ‘moving parts’ increases, so does the management overhead, particularly when dealing with an extended supply chain
  • 30. Component Content Management
    To get maximum value from your documentation resources, you should be able to do a number of things:
    Write once, use many.
    Re-purpose.
    Manage translations where appropriate.
    Publish to multiple outputs.
  • 31. Building The Business Case
    “The most efficient way to produce anything is to bring together under one management as many as possible of the activities needed to turn out the product.”
    Peter Drucker, Management Consultant
    Managing
    content
    A time and
    a place
    Re-use of
    content
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    Q&A
  • 32. Re-use Of Content – The Opportunity?
    Typical figures for technical documentation show
    Technical illustration costs per page $200
    Authoring/proofing costs per page $200
    Translation costs per page (20 languages) $800
    Total cost per page $1,200
    Total cost for 10,000 pages $12,000,000
    Industry case studies show typical figures for re-use of 20-30% or more
    If re-use allows you reduce the amount of content you produce, that amounts to
    3,000 pages per year
    $3,600,000 per year
  • 33. ‘Accidental’ Content – How Expensive?
    Typical figures for technical documentation show
    Technical illustration costs per page $200
    Authoring/proofing costs per page $200
    Translation costs per page (20 languages) $800
    Total cost per page $1,200
    Total cost for 10,000 pages $12,000,000
    If you reduce the ‘accidental’ new content by just 10% you save:
    $20 per page authoring
    $80 per page translating
    $1,000,000 per year
  • 34. Automation – The Opportunity?
    Typical figures for technical documentation show
    Technical illustration costs per page $200
    Authoring/proofing costs per page $200
    Translation costs per page (20 languages) $800
    Total cost per page $1,200
    Total cost for 10,000 pages $12,000,000
    SDL’s experience indicates that human ‘transaction’ costs account for 50% of document production
    Automation typically reduces these transactions by 30% saving:
    $30 per page authoring
    $120 per page translating
    $1,500,000 per year
  • 35. Conclusions
    “If you need a new process and don't install it, you pay for it without getting it.”
    Ken Stork, past president,
    Association for Manufacturing Excellence
    Managing
    content
    A time and
    a place
    Re-use of
    content
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    Q&A
  • 36. Conclusions
    Many organisations have invested heavily in Lean Manufacturing tools and methodologies, but their documentation lags far behind.
    Authoring Management tools to enforce terminology and reduce ‘accidental’ content creation
    Component Content Management to support modular content and re-use
    Dynamic Publishing tools to build customer centric documentation on demand
    Align the requirements of Technical Communications with wider corporate initiatives.
    Learn the language of those who have access to funding!
  • 37. Questions & Answers
    Managing
    content
    A time and
    a place
    Re-use of
    content
    Conclusions
    Learning
    about Lean
    Types of
    waste
    Q&A
  • 38. DITA Workshops
    DITA Workshops with JoAnnHackos @ SDL in Maidenhead:
    • Minimalism: Creating Information People Can Use
    • 39. December 7th-8th
    • 40. DITA: Getting Started
    • 41. December 9th – 10th
    www.comtech-serv.com
  • 42. © 2009 SDL International. Company Confidential. Forward-looking information is based upon multiple assumptions and uncertainties and does not necessarily represent the company’s outlook.
    Thank you
    Copyright © 2009 SDL International. All rights reserved.
    SDL and the SDL Logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of SDL International or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries.  Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.
    This document is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as advertising.  All warranties relating to the information in this document, either express or implied, are disclaimed to the maximum extent allowed by law.  The information in this document is subject to change without notice.