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C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
C/P/R Revives Your Magazine
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C/P/R Revives Your Magazine

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This unique approach to improving the content of your magazine can make any publication stronger and more engaging to its readers.

This unique approach to improving the content of your magazine can make any publication stronger and more engaging to its readers.

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  1. AURAS DESIGN
  2. AURAS DESIGN ROBERT SUGAR
  3. USING CPR TO REVIVE YOUR PUBLICATION
  4. When redesigning or updating your magazine, Ancestry Hot on tHe trail of tHe family outlaw September / OctOber 2006, VOL. 24 / NO. 5 $4.95 U.S. $5.95 caNada here’s an interesting approach to finding the right mix of design and content... Roots to African American Lives How to Tell Your Story Taking Care of the Family Business
  5. When redesigning or updating your magazine, here’s an interesting approach to finding the right mix of design and content... When the Good Die Young DNA Seals the Deal Nature, Nurture or What?
  6. Three Kinds of Design Every magazine uses three types of design elements that make up each issue...
  7. Three Kinds of Design Concept This level comprises the issue map and all of the template elements for type styles, navigation elements and grid use in every issue.
  8. Three Kinds of Design Concept Comprehensives This is the familiar level at which pages of individual issues are designed (using of course the template from the concept level).
  9. Three Kinds of Design Concept Comprehensives Creatives Whatever talent, skills, and idiosyncratic interests designers bring to the pages at the service of the magazine’s branding make up the “creative” level.
  10. Three Kinds of Design Concept CPR is all about the concept level. Finding the right mix of content that creates the most interesting balance of story types among features, departments and special sections make a book have more interesting design.
  11. Special Advantages of Trade, Enthusiast & Association Pubs:
  12. Special Advantages of Trade, Enthusiast & Association Pubs: Esoteric Interest Defines Scope The subject matter is easily defined and the content of the magazine is easy to structure.
  13. Special Advantages of Trade, Enthusiast & Association Pubs: Esoteric Interest Defines Scope Highly Definable, Colluding Demographic The readership is interested in the subject and the subject defines the readership universe, and they are already really interested.
  14. Special Advantages of Trade, Enthusiast & Association Pubs: Esoteric Interest Defines Scope Highly Definable, Colluding Demographic Corollary Advertisers Trades, hobbies, and professions all have easily identified vendors that serve the association or community.
  15. Special Advantages of Trade, Enthusiast & Association Pubs: Esoteric Interest Defines Scope Highly Definable, Colluding Demographic Corollary Advertisers Knowledge Assets Associations and enthusiast groups are composed of many experts and leaders as a matter of definition.
  16. Special Advantages of Trade, Enthusiast & Association Pubs: Esoteric Interest Defines Scope Highly Definable, Colluding Demographic Corollary Advertisers Knowledge Assets Organizational Assets Often these associations create programs and have a history of service that can be mined for content.
  17. What is C/P/R? C P R
  18. What is C/P/R? Community P R
  19. What is C/P/R? Community Product or Process R
  20. What is C/P/R? Community Product or Process Reference
  21. Community
  22. Community Share an Esoteric Language (Argot)
  23. Community Share an Esoteric Language (Argot) Share Common Environments ( W o r k o r P l Ay S PA c e )
  24. Community Share an Esoteric Language (Argot) Share Common Environments ( W o r k o r P l Ay S PA c e ) Share Similar Experiences (ShoP tAlk)
  25. Community Share an Esoteric Language (Argot) Share Common Environments ( W o r k o r P l Ay S PA c e ) Share Similar Experiences (ShoP tAlk) Share Professional Passions ( h i S t o r y, i S S u e S & e v e n t S , F u t u r e )
  26. Community Share an Esoteric Language (Argot) Share Common Environments ( W o r k o r P l Ay S PA c e ) Share Similar Experiences (ShoP tAlk) Share Professional Passions ( h i S t o r y, i S S u e S & e v e n t S , F u t u r e ) Share Exclusivity (uS/not them)
  27. Product
  28. Product Products (APPlicAtion, ProDuction, vAlue)
  29. Product Products (APPlicAtion, ProDuction, vAlue) Techniques (eFFiciency & creAtivity)
  30. Product Products (APPlicAtion, ProDuction, vAlue) Techniques (eFFiciency & creAtivity) Processes ( u n D e r ly i n g t e c h n o l o g y )
  31. Reference
  32. Reference Expertise (mASterS & heroeS)
  33. Reference Expertise (mASterS & heroeS) Perspective ( r At e , r e v i e W, P ro g n o S t i cAt e )
  34. Reference Expertise (mASterS & heroeS) Perspective ( r At e , r e v i e W, P ro g n o S t i cAt e ) Authority (StAnDArDS & leADerS)
  35. Here is a redesign that uses CPR as the basis for rethinking the issue map.
  36. Contents The old contents show a JANUARY 2005 � VOLUME 64 � NUMBER 1 journal archetype with lots of small evenly-weighted Features feature stories. . . 54 Entertaining Destinations M I C H A E L D. B E YA R D An entertainment paradigm seems to have emerged, and it appears to be the real thing. 59 Gaming Retail STEVE BERGSMAN There is still plenty of room for retail on the Strip. 66 Going “Off Mall” 54 BRAD BERTON 59 Entertainment Department store chains are experimenting with a new Strip shopping. futures. format to capture convenience-oriented customers. 74 Lost in Translation Y A R O M I R S T E I N E R A N D N AT H A N I E L P O T E E T E S S A Y : Now is the time to rethink and rearticulate the nomenclature of the retail development industry. 80 Neighborhood Shopping M I C H A E L D. B E YA R D , M I C H A E L P AW L U K I E W I C Z , A N D A L E X B O N D Ten strategies can help rebuild neighborhood retail. 66 New track. SPECIAL SECTION: RETAIL DEVELOPMENT/ SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND THE SOUTHEAST 90 Retail Hotspots B E T H M AT T S O N - T E I G Retailers get creative to land stores in an increasingly JANUARY 2005 � $15.00 crowded California market. 92 Heading South B E T H M AT T S O N - T E I G A growing population base in Florida, Georgia, and Alabama piques retailers’ interest. RETAIL FORMATS n INFILL DEVELOPMENT n FINANCE TRENDS n SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA/SOUTHEAST 108 The Debt and Equity Scene ON THE COVER: MIKE SHERIDAN F I N A N C E T R E N D S : With low interest rates, active 90 Photo: Corbis California crunch. lenders, and an improving economy boasting good job growth and reasonable net absorption, 2005 is shaping up to be a unique time in the history of commercial real estate investment.
  37. . . .The departments have Contents continued from page 11 no structure or organizing editorial themes that PUBLI 110 Net Lease Transactions further the magazine RAC rlevit D A R I N L . B U C H A LT E R A N D M I K E S Y E R S EDITO F I N A N C E T R E N D S : More companies could enter KRIS mission or branding. into net lease transactions to restructure real estate assets and capitalize on favorable market conditions. kkess MANA KAR kscha 112 Global Real Estate Securities COPY LEE MENIFEE NAN nstew F I N A N C E T R E N D S : Direct investments in JAME international property markets provide competitive jmull returns, plus variable diversification benefits. D AV drose Departments ART D BETS bvanb 48 16 Point of View India shops. GRAPH The Wal-Mart Challenge ANN Dale Mulartrick and David Silver amor To succeed alongside this category killer requires BYRO sharpened operations. bholl PROD 20 Capital Markets DIAN Managing for the Crisis dsaus Bowen H. McCoy EDITO In uncertain times like these, effort above and beyond CEC the usual must be devoted to strategic thinking. cmine ADMIN 24 At Issue Y VO Eminent Domain in Economic Development ystan Inside ULI Leonard Zax and Rebecca L. Malcolm Are courts going to require a fundamental change in public/private partnerships? ADVER L AU (202- 124 SENIO 32 In Practice CAR Forum Looks at Emerging Land Use Forgotten Urban Land (202- Issues, Impact on Growth Issues Daniel T. Kildee NATIO Using tax foreclosure as a community development (design President's Message: Why Sustainable tool, a new initiative has resulted in the most YA S M Growth Matters Now More Than Ever progressive land banking law in the nation. (202- Energizing Allentown’s Vision ADVER 37 Solution File THO Gladstone Receives ULI Washington Transit Dependent (202- Lifetime Achievement Award William P. Macht ADVER Plus: A child care center and an indoor transit center are UNI (202- � Who’s Who at ULI and the helping to revitalize a blighted neighborhood. ULI Foundation � ULI Calendar of Events 41 In Print, Etc. 46 Developments Volume Urban La bined No 48 Open Portfolio 1025 Th D.C. 20 Upping the Mall Ante Land Ins efit of m Denise Orr tiple cop 5011 or Setting the standard for the next generation of for five t Opinions mall design in India. are thos sarily th 53 This Issue vertisem endorse Land as manusc 122 Community Builders Profile tected b or in any mission 136 Back Page to Yvonn and col
  38. JANUARY 06 VO LU M E 6 5 , N U M B E R 1 urbanland W W W. U R B A N L A N D . U L I . O R G The new design has fewer features divided into a large “A” package 50 A Rude Awakening BARBARA KREISLER 74 Breaking the Cycle of Poverty 87 Keeping Traditions in and smaller “B” stories. It has been five months since Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast. Urban Land offers a 24-page special report with an overview, recommendations, and C H A R L E S LO C KWO O D After the outlay of hundreds of billions of dollars to alleviate Highland Park DOUGLAS R. PORTER A small city outside Chicago It makes for a more interesting TOC. . . essays from urban planners, local business leaders, poverty, the question is, why takes big steps to meet developers, architects, and academia regarding the future are these efforts not working? affordable housing needs. of the Crescent City. 90 Toronto in Lights 58 ULI’S 70 Louisiana’s A L B E R T WA R S O N Recommendations Coastal Plight A Hollywood-style megastudio for Rebuilding CHARLES PICCIOLA and media village under New Orleans The future safety of construction in a dead New Orleans cannot be industrial zone on Toronto’s 64 Visions for ensured without rebuilding central waterfront promises New Orleans Louisiana’s wetlands. to kick-start a long-awaited RON NYREN revitalization. Representatives from the 72 Rebuilding academic, development, the Gulf Coast 79 Redeveloping 94 Financing business, and preservation KEVIN SHANLEY Downtown Mixed-Use communities discuss the rebuilding of New Orleans. We must learn from this tragedy, ask the hard PAT R I C I A L . K I R K A shift in the public’s perception Development ALAN GOODKIN questions about rebuilding, of living in high-density urban 67 Operation and move ahead skillfully environments is converging with Efficiently priced capital is Rebirth and quickly. market forces and efforts by local available for well-conceived governments to revitalize cities, projects. P R E S KA B ACO F F Development needs to be creating momentum that is connected to New Orleans’s moving urban redevelopment neighborhoods. forward at unprecedented speed. 68 Rebuilding 84 Resettling in the Soul of Philadelphia New Orleans A DA M G L A S E R WA R R E N W H I T L O C K Science, jobs, and new For New Orleans to be residents are turning rebuilt successfully, it must Philadelphia into one of the be objective about its past. most vital and successful mixed- use urban areas in the country. O N T H E C OV E R : P H OTO : C A D E M A R T I N
  39. JANUARY 06 urbanland 96 Land Writes 96 Preserving Affordable 10 Housing Bro JOHN McCARRON JO When it comes to the future of affordable Toda rental housing, what is new is a national fulfi refocusing on the urgent need to preserve in it what is old. 10 99 Toward a New Discourse STE on Mixed-Use Development The E L L E N B E R KO W I T Z com More needs to be done to offset the an a significant impediments currently interfering and with the creation of these projects on a with communitywide scale. tour . . .As does creating 24 Developments 32 Dialogues 106 ProActive New York City Promotes Green 32 ULI 106 In Practice editorial packages for the Affordable Housing Best Affordable Housing Accommodating Need, Preparing for Growth The Marketing Mix for Mixed Use departments, which help Developments Named M A R I LY N J . TAY L O R KEN BECKER BuildingGreen Announces Tough choices will need to be Not only is the marketing mix 2005 Top Ten Green Building made about what, when, and different, but there also are new “brand” the magazine. Products where rebuilding occurs in market segments that must be New Orleans. reached. Federal Tenants Drive Mixed-Use Redevelopment The Resilient City: 34 Housing 108 Open Space How Modern Cities Raising the Roof in The Value of Urban Recover from Disaster New Orleans Open Space MARK MURO AND RICHARD HUFFMAN B R U C E K AT Z Philadelphia’s Rittenhouse How should the nation go about Square illustrates how urban rebuilding a flood-prone, racially public open space can add divided city of great character and value to adjacent private soul so that it reemerges more properties. inclusive, sustainable, and prosperous than before? 40 Retail The Forgotten Frontier of Retailing Curing Fire Hazards M I C H A E L B E YA R D with Healing Hooves America’s inner-city, minority Washington’s New neighborhoods are still the Mixed-Use Gospel forgotten frontier of retailing. In Memoriam—Longtime ULI Leader Charlie Shaw 42 ULX A New Kind of Aging in Place Retail Look JAMES MIARA 113 Green Use Former D.C. Convention Center Site Transformed Ten remade malls have Greening Downtown Greens into Public Park transformed the role of M A RY VO G E L malls in American society Some cities are striving to make through creative design. their building sites and parks as
  40. develop ments development now meet criteria set power of eminent domain to obtain Finance Commission, which pro- New York City by the Green Communities Initiative, BestAffordable 124 properties. vided $7.8 million in tax-exempt Promotes Green a five-year, $555 million initiative of the Natural Resources Defense HousingProjects The Domingo Viernes Apart- ments, which was chosen best bonds; the Washington Mutual Bank, which provided $4.6 million Affordable Housing Council and the Enterprise Founda- tion to build 8,500 green affordable Named overall affordable housing project in equity for the 4 percent low- in the nation, is the first affordable income housing tax credits; a Seat- New York City is expanding its lead- homes nationwide that promote The Domingo Viernes Apartments, housing project built in the city’s tle Housing Authority deferred loan; ership in green building beyond health, conserve energy, and pro- an abandoned bus storage site Chinatown area in 50 years. The and a Federal Home Loan Bank of commercial construction to afford- vide easy access to jobs, schools, redeveloped into affordable housing $15.4 million development, a proj- San Francisco affordable housing able housing, the occupants of and services. for low-income families and seniors ect of the Seattle Chinatown Inter- program grant. which stand to benefit the most In just one year, Enterprise, in Seattle, won the grand prize in national District Preservation and The winners in the other eight from the associated cost savings which helps build affordable hous- Affordable Housing Finance maga- Development Authority, provides categories were: zine’s inaugural Readers’ Choice housing, a community center, and Awards for the nation’s best afford- l BEST FAMILY PROJECT North Beach a multilingual library in an area able housing developments. Place, San Francisco, California; where 57 percent of the residents Other prize winners include rehabil- developers: Bridge Housing Corp., live below the poverty level. itation projects like the International John Stewart Company, and EM One of the financing solutions Hotel Senior Housing development in Johnson Interest, Inc. came from the Seattle Office of San Francisco, and ground-up proj- Housing’s housing trust fund, which l BEST HOMEOWNERSHIP ects like the Valle del Sol complex in Dupont Commons, city of Savannah, Mercy Housing, sets aside a portion of property PROJECT Stockton, California, which serves Washington, D.C.; developers: and local development partners. taxes for affordable housing projects area agricultural workers. Dupont Washington Interfaith Network, and contributed $2.5 million to the l BEST REHAB PROJECT YWCA, Commons in Washington, D.C., pro- Fort Dupont Resident Council, project. The rest of the funding Boston; developer: YWCA Boston. vides homeownership to first-time Enterprise Homes Inc., and came from a U.S. Bank permanent buyers, while the Folsom/Dore Apart- Nehemiah Homes Inc. l BEST RURAL/FARMWORKER loan; the Washington State Housing ments house the homeless in San PROJECT Valle del Sol, Stockton, Francisco. The distinctive rehabili- The Domingo Viernes Apartments, in l BEST MASTER-PLANNED California; developer: Asociacion tated mixed-use building of the Seattle, Washington, was chosen best COMMUNITY Cuyler-Brownsville, Campesina Lazaro Cardenas. ENTERPRISE COMMUNITY YWCA in Boston provides affordable overall affordable housing project. Savannah, Georgia; developers: l BEST SENIORS’ PROJECT Inter- housing while sharing space with the national Hotel Senior Housing, Boston Lyric Stage, high school class- San Francisco; developers: Inter- rooms, and a restaurant/café. national Hotel Senior Housing Inc. Resources tapped by the proj- and Chinatown Community Devel- and improved health outcomes. The ing, has invested more than ects’ sponsors include federal and opment Center. city’s new green building standards $27 million in grants, loans, and tax state low-income housing tax cred- its, low-interest bank loans, and l BEST SPECIAL NEEDS/SINGLE- set environmentally responsible credit equity in New York City to guidelines for the construction and create more than 470 green, afford- affordable housing loans and grants ROOM-OCCUPANCY (SRO) from a variety of federal, state, and PROJECT Folsom/Dore Apart- renovation of many building proj- able apartments under the Green local agencies. The unique financing ments, San Francisco; developer: ects paid for with city capital funds. Communities Initiative. New York strategies include those of Dupont Citizens Housing Corp. The city’s Department of Housing City–based Citigroup is awarding a Preservation and Development $1.5 million grant, made possible by Commons, which received $3 mil- l BEST URBAN PROJECT Mandela (HPD) recently worked with the New the Citigroup Foundation, to lion in an interest-free construction Gateway, Oakland, California; International Hotel Senior Housing York State Energy Research and Enterprise in support of Green loan raised by area religious lead- developer: Bridge Housing Corp. in San Francisco was chosen best Development Authority (NYSERDA) to Communities. ers, and the Cuyler-Brownsville revi- seniors’ project (above) and the broaden its energy efficiency guide- talization project, which got its start Folsom/Dore Apartments in San when Savannah, Georgia, used its Francisco was named best special lines. About 800 buildings slated for needs/SRO project (top). 24 U R B A N LA N D JANUARY 2006 JANUARY 2006 U R B A N LA N D 25 Each section has its own design theme and variation.
  41. develop ments UL JAN06 FINAL 1/24/06 11:23 AM Page 97 landwri tes development now meet criteria set power of eminent domain to obtain Finance Commission, which pro- New York City by the Green Communities Initiative, BestAffordable 124 properties. vided $7.8 million in tax-exempt Promotes Green a five-year, $555 million initiative of the Natural Resources Defense HousingProjects The Domingo Viernes Apart- ments, which was chosen best bonds; the Washington Mutual Bank, which provided $4.6 million Affordable Housing Council and the Enterprise Founda- tion to build 8,500 green affordable Named overall affordable housing project in equity for the 4 percent low- in the nation, is the first affordable income housing tax credits; a Seat- New York City is expanding its lead- homes nationwide that promote The Domingo Viernes Apartments, housing project built in the city’s tle Housing Authority deferred loan; ership in green building beyond health, conserve energy, and pro- an abandoned bus storage site Chinatown area in 50 years. The and a Federal Home Loan Bank of commercial construction to afford- vide easy access to jobs, schools, redeveloped into affordable housing $15.4 million development, a proj- San Francisco affordable housing able housing, the occupants of and services. for low-income families and seniors ect of the Seattle Chinatown Inter- program grant. which stand to benefit the most In just one year, Enterprise, in Seattle, won the grand prize in national District Preservation and The winners in the other eight from the associated cost savings which helps build affordable hous- Affordable Housing Finance maga- Development Authority, provides categories were: zine’s inaugural Readers’ Choice housing, a community center, and Awards for the nation’s best afford- l BEST FAMILY PROJECT North Beach a multilingual library in an area able housing developments. limited-income families, including Place, San Francisco, California; Preserving From Boston to San Francisco, cities million Other prize winners include rehabil- and states are scrambling to find ways to where 57 percent of the residents those headed by blue- and pink-collar workers poverty level. live below the be able to rent an average two-bedroom unit developers: Bridge Housing Corp., in the Boston area. San Francisco is highest at John Stewart Company, and EM One in three American families tax assessment breaks; help finding responsi- ble tenants; low-interest, fix-up loans; and Affordable itation projects like the International renew their existing stock of physically worn- essential to local economies, had aOne of the financing solutions $29.60 per hour,Interest, Inc. national aver- Hotel Senior Housing development in safe, Johnson but even the out—and financially tapped-out—rental hous- ground-up proj- in which to live. came from the Seattle Office of age ($15.37) is three times the federal mini- decent place now spend more than 30 even outright fix-up grants, funded, perhaps, by additional fees on property title transfers. Housing San Francisco, and Housing’s housing trust fund, which l BEST HOMEOWNERSHIP ing. They are challenging developers,the Valle del Sol complex inthese affordable rental properties ects like for-profit firms and nonprofit organizations alike, to Many of sets aside a portion of property mum wage of $5.15 per hour. PROJECT Dupont Commons, percent of their income—the city of Savannah, Mercy Housing, Smaller tools do the job best, for there is Stockton, California, which serves risk. Buildings favorably located in are now at One in three American families, including and local development partners. Washington, D.C.; developers: a near consensus that preservation of exist- taxes for affordable housing projects J O H N M CC A R R O N come up with new forms of ownership, new workers. Dupont city neighborhoods tend to “go area agricultural types of financing, and new Commons in solu- gentrifying condo” shortly and contributed $2.5 million to the architectural Washington, D.C., pro- after federal strictures lapse. both owners and renters, now spend more Washington Interfaith Network, than 30 Fort Dupont Resident Council,recom- percent of their income—the recommended maximum—on l BEST REHAB PROJECT YWCA, ing affordable apartments makes more sense that trying to build our way out of the prob- When it comes to the future of project. The rest of the funding Boston; developer: YWCA Boston. vides homeownership to first-time are buildings that just limp tions. This is all in an effort to save thousands More typical came from a U.S. Bank permanentmendedEnterprise Homes Inc., and in buyers, while the Folsom/Doreundercapitalized and undermaintained, maximum—on housing. One housing. One in eight—more lem. It would make less strategic sense, after affordable rental housing, what of apartment buildings that were built or reha- along, Apart- loan; the Washington State Housing eight—more than 14 million families—spend l BEST RURAL/FARMWORKER Nehemiah Homes Inc. all, to focus on new construction while exist- is new is a national refocusing on bilitated over the past 30 years, especiallythe homeless in San ments house their tax shelter benefits exhausted, their Francisco. The distinctive rehabili- at least half their income on shelter, an l BEST MASTER-PLANNED than 14 million families—spend PROJECT Valle del Sol, Stockton, California; developer: Asociacion ing units vanish at twice the speed—not those made affordable with the help of federal owners facing sizable taxable gains should Viernes Apartments, in The Domingo expense that too often crowds out medical when the cost of rehabilitating is from 33 to COMMUNITY Cuyler-Brownsville, the urgent need to preserve tated mixed-use building of the subsidies that have expired—or that soon will. they elect to sell. Seattle, Washington, was chosen best overall affordable housing project. care or a healthful diet. at least half their income on Campesina Lazaro Cardenas. 50 percent cheaper than building new. Plus, ENTERPRISE COMMUNITY YWCA in Boston provides affordable Savannah, Georgia; developers: The scope of the expiration problem alone This federal subsidy expiration crunch There appears to be no letup in sight. l BEST SENIORS’ PROJECT Inter- not when the death throes of an older, what is old. housing while sharing space with the is major. Between 1965 and 1990—affordable has occurred just as the entire private Boston Lyric Stage, high school class- John McIlwain, ULI’s senior resident fellow shelter, an expense that too often national Hotel Senior Housing, undermanaged, and undercapitalized build- housing’s “golden age”—America investedrestaurant/café. for rental housing finds itself in a rooms, and a over market (housing), sees a private rental market caught San Francisco; developers: Inter- ing can drag down an entire neighborhood. $60 billion worth of public and Resources tapped by the proj- private funds in supply/demand squeeze. in a “double whammy” of condominium con- crowds out medical care or a national Hotel Senior Housing Inc. and Chinatown Community Devel- A recent survey conducted by the D.C.- various types of rental housing. Programs include federal andAmericans aspire to be a nation ects’ sponsors Though versions and price inflation, the latter driven based National Housing Trust shows that at and improved health outcomes. The ing, has invested more than ranged from federally insured low-interest mort- city’s new green building Apartments in $27 million in grants, loans, and tax The 44-unit Southwinds standards state low-income housinghomeowners, the country’s population of of tax cred- by too many investors—from small-time spec- healthful diet. opment Center. least 40 city and state housing agencies l BEST SPECIAL NEEDS/SINGLE- set environmentally responsible about to Narragansett, Rhode Island, was credit equity gages toYork City to Section 8low-interest bank loans, and in New project-based its, rent subsidies renters increased by half from 1970 to 2000, ulators to deep-pocketed pension funds— have refocused their tax credit allocation “age out” of its federal subsidy contract when affordable housing loans and grants a month can’t compete with a developer out ROOM-OCCUPANCY (SRO) guidelines for theAffordable Housing (POAH) put more to today’sgreen, afford- Preservation of construction and create than 470 low-income housing tax credits. and now exceeds 35 million. Who among us chasing too few apartment buildings. criteria on efforts to preserve and improve PROJECT Folsom/Dorecondominiums.” to market $400,000 Apart- renovation ofpurchase/redevelopment package apartments underprograms worked from athan of federal, state, andof us do, at some point or other together a many building proj- able that Some the Green better variety rents? Most The consequent run-up in rents, McIlwain existing multifamily homes. Housing think ments, Santo do? McIlwain, Pitchford, and What Francisco; developer: will preserve affordability for another years. others. The bottom line, though, was that 10 unique financing But the vast majority of us ects paid for with city capital funds. 20Communities Initiative. New York local agencies. The in our lifetime. argues, hurts not only apartment seekers, but tanks, charitable foundations, and financial strategies include those of on the middle and bottom rungs of the Dupont Citizens Housing Corp. others argue that governments at all levels The city’s Department of Housing City–based Citigroup is awarding a live also entire regional economies. “If your work- intermediaries such as the New York–based Preservation and Development $1.5 million grant, made possible by Commons, which received $3 mil- need to develop a menu of incentives that, l BEST URBAN PROJECT Mandela income ladder, typically working at jobs that ers can’t afford to live anywhere near your Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) lion in an interest-free construction (HPD) recently worked with the New the Citigroup Foundation, to do not pay enough to make homeownership business,” he says, “you can pay them more, Gateway, Oakland, California; the playing field. Hotel Senior Housing together, would begin to level International also are gearing up. York State Energy Research and Enterprise in support of Green loan raised by area religious lead- developer: Bridge presidentCorp. Housing of Boston-based Francisco was chosen best in San Cor- a viable option. or you can move your business to where the Marty Jones, One of the most ambitious efforts is the ers, and the Cuyler-Brownsville revi- Development Authority (NYSERDA) to Communities. coran Jennison Companies, points toseniors’ projectWindows of Opportunity initiative launched in so-called (above) and the broaden its energy efficiency guide- talization project, which got itsrental market they face today is The start workers are.” As global price competition Folsom/Dore Apartments in San setaside ordinances in which cities like Bostonwas named by the Chicago-based John D. and lines. About 800 buildings slated for when Savannah, Georgia, used its . . . and getting tighter. During extremely tight intensifies, he notes, employers are taking the Francisco 2003 best special those same 30 years that the number of latter course . . . to overseas labor markets. are requiring residential developers to include project (top). T. MacArthur Foundation, a ten-year, needs/SRO Catherine renters was increasing, the nation’s stock of Those sentiments are echoed by Michael some affordable units in their buildings . . . or $50 million attempt to preserve 100,000 24 rental units hardly grew at all. In certain metro- Pitchford, president and CEO of the Community pay into a public fund that subsidizes develop- U R B A N LA N D JANUARY 2006 JANUARY 2006 U R affordable N D B A N L A dwellings nationwide through tar- 25 politan areas, such as Chicago, the number of Preservation and Development Corporation, a ers who do. Developers may not like it, says geted grants and loans to nonprofit housing apartments actually declined. The Joint Center D.C.-based nonprofit developer of affordable Jones, whose firm controls 15,000 apartments developers and financial intermediaries. Over for Housing Studies at Harvard University esti- housing. Bullish conditions in residential real nationwide, but as rents soar, such conces- the longer term, the hope is to research and mates that the nation lost more than 1 million estate, especially condominium conversions, sions may prove necessary to stave off govern- develop new methods that could help pre- affordable apartments during the 1990s alone. have made it extremely difficult for developers ment-imposed rent control, “which creates serve a million affordable units. Since 2000, average rents nationwide have of affordable rental housing to compete as more problems than it solves,” she notes. “If you’re going to add to the stock of risen three times faster than average incomes. properties come to market. Developer setasides, however, do not affordable housing,” says Deborah Schwartz, A recent survey conducted by the Washington, “You have older owners of rental proper- reach mom-and-pop owners of two to six vice president for human and community D.C.–based National Low Income Housing ties dying off or cashing out,” Pitchford says, apartments. To keep them in the business of development at MacArthur, “you can’t afford Coalition found that a family must earn a mini- “but for us they’re out of reach. Someone out renting to working families, incentives may to lose the units your already have.” The mum “housing wage” of $24.35 per hour to to rehab apartments that will rent for $1,200 need to include sweeteners such as property foundation is backing more than a dozen 96 U R B A N LA N D JANUARY 2006 JANUARY 2006 U R B A N LA N D
  42. UL JAN06 FINAL 1/24/06 11:21 AM Page 42 ulx Retail Look J A M E S M I A R A 1. Transit-oriented development: creating a new urban neighborhood center WISCONSIN PLACE CHEVY CHASE, MARYLAND Owners/Developers: New England Development, Newton, Massachusetts; Archstone-Smith, Denver, Colorado; and Boston Properties, Boston, Massachusetts Architect: Arrowstreet, Somerville, Massachusetts Currently under development, Wisconsin Place will transform a mundane eight- Ten remade malls have Shopping malls have had many left in many communities,” note the its size should be expanded or acre intersection of two major roadways and a subway station in Chevy Chase, NEW ENGLAND DEVELOPMENT ups and downs in popular percep- authors of the new ULI publication reduced, and whether it should Maryland, into a live/work/play/shop neighborhood center. It will include transformed the role of malls tion over the past 50 years. They Ten Principles for Rethinking the open itself to the surrounding com- 305,000 square feet of Class A office space, 432 luxury residential apartments, began as a fresh and exciting alter- Mall. The land, which includes acres munity by extending roads across a Bloomingdale’s store, boutique shops, destination restaurants, a Whole in American society through native to fading downtown com- of underused parking lots, often has parking lots and turn itself inside Foods Market, parklike public spaces, underground parking, and on-site Metro mercial districts. Later, they were become increasingly valuable, not out by moving storefronts from the creative design. seen as insidious predators, suck- just for shopping, but for a complete interior to the street. In addition, an subway access. It also will have a 21,000-square-foot community center. ing the life out of the downtown range of center-city uses. Increased examination of traditional town cen- shopping experience. Their air-con- value has spurred investments in ters has led to such design solu- ditioned environments were cred- radical makeovers. “These ‘land tions as adding offices and ited with adding a pleasant, banks’ provide great opportunities residences above ground-level retail leisurely element to shopping. for intensification of development by shops. The new malls also strive to Later, their air-conditioned bland- adding land uses and development become destination entertainment ness was blamed for robbing the types that are needed in most subur- venues as well as the focus of civic shopping experience of spontane- ban communities, but not available,” activities by adding community ity. They removed congestion from the Ten Principles authors write. In meeting rooms, libraries, and other 2. Changing sprawl already crowded central cities on some cases, remade malls are even municipal services. into a community the one hand, and fueled sprawl becoming de facto downtowns. Mall owners and architects assert BELMAR LAKEWOOD, COLORADO and increased traffic on the other. In contrast with earlier times that the greatest concentration of Owner/Developer: Continuum Partners LLC, Visiting a shopping mall became a when generic malls were built at design energy today involves the Denver, Colorado regular part of the family routine for the bottom of highway exit ramps transformation of tired, sometimes Architect: Elkus Manfredi, Boston, some, while others vowed never with little thought given to either derelict older shopping malls into Massachusetts again to set foot in one. consumer preferences or community profitable retail districts that are the Lakewood, Colorado, a Denver But lately, some gray area has development, today, mall center of community life. The best suburb, grew to be the state’s begun to appear. Those who once makeovers are based on research remade malls meld tenets of new fourth-largest city in a series of took comfort in a mall’s predictable and state-of-the-art urban design urbanism, smart growth, and green development spurts over a 30-year familiarity are demanding a new, principles. Renovation solutions are design with the latest concepts in period. For most of its existence, more exciting shopping experience— guided by retail-market-area demo- retailing and marketing. These malls Lakewood was a cluster of homes and mall owners are responding. On graphics and the needs of the com- recognize that meeting consumer loosely arranged into 13 neighbor- the other end of the spectrum, munity. According to the authors, preferences is compatible with serv- hoods. It needed a unifying center— ELKUS MANFREDI ARCHITECTS inveterate mall opponents are “New design concepts, retail for- ing civic needs. a place to which all residents would seeing possibilities for urban devel- mats, public environments, ameni- The following are ten examples of naturally gravitate. The redesign of opment in the redesign of old, ster- ties, mix of tenants, mix of uses, remade malls that through creative Belmar mall became a community ile, monolithic malls located in a anchors, parking configurations, design have transformed the role of master plan that included commer- sea of parking spaces, creating cen- neighborhood links, price points, malls in American society. cial, civic, and cultural functions. ters integrated with their surround- and customer experiences” are all A total of 3.3 million square feet ing communities. driven by the notion that malls can JAMES MIARA is a Needham, of interconnected retail, office, and No longer situated on the fringe of fill gaps in the community. Massachusetts–based freelance writer. residential space is divided into 19 blocks, with an urban plaza serving as a focal point, along communities where land was plenti- Subjective concepts such as iden- with movie theaters, restaurants, and hotels. Three parking structures concealed from major ful and highway access was conven- tity, sustainability, community, and streets comprise the remaining 2.5 million square feet. When the first phase of the redevelop- ient, malls now are surrounded by place are prominent topics in ment was completed in 2004, Lakewood mayor Steve Burkholder called Belmar the city’s new residential developments, which redesign discussions. These abstrac- town center, adding, “It will give Lakewood residents a place to connect.” places them at the center of once- tions often affect physical decisions centerless communities. such as the ratio of retail to other “Malls often occupy the largest uses, whether the mall should be land parcels under single ownership reconfigured or torn down, whether 42 U R B A N LA N D JANUARY 2006 JANUARY 2006 U R B A N LA N D 43
  43. urbanland It has been five months since Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast. Urban Land offers a 24-page special report with an overview, recommendations, and essays from urban planners, local business leaders, developers, architects, and academia regarding the future of the Crescent City. A RUDE A AKENING W BARBARA KREISLER PHOTOGRAPHY BY CADE MARTIN 50 U R B A N LA N D JANUARY 2006 JANUARY 2006 U R B A N LA N D 51
  44. The sections are grouped using CPR ideas. dialoguehousing The Dialogue section has expert franchise M A R K M U R O B R U C E K AT Z content divided by vertical markets. . . Raising the Roof in New Orleans dialogueretail Now that the initial bungled How should the nation go response to the housing crisis cre- about rebuilding a flood-prone, ated by Hurricane Katrina is five M I C H A E L B E YA R D months old, the truly herculean chal- racially divided city of great lenge of rebuilding the rotted homes and ghostly neighborhoods of the character and soul so that it Gulf Coast region presses with reemerges more inclusive, implacable urgency. No longer can sustainable, and prosperous reconstruction be slotted for some conveniently distant month or year. The Forgotten Frontier of Retailing No longer will lofty promises suffice. than before? Instead, debates are rightly turn- ing from the mistakes of the initial Despite years of publicity, basis than do white communities, public housing with little hope of effort to house perhaps 1.2 million America’s inner-city, effort, and recent development suc- but, not surprisingly, they are inun- bettering their lives. Unemployment displaced Gulf Coast residents, to minority neighborhoods cesses, the lack of retail services is dated with fast-food restaurants and for the Ninth Ward was above 30 sharp questions about reconstruct- still a shameful reality in most liquor stores. percent, public education was defi- ing specific neighborhoods—most are still the forgotten lower-income neighborhoods The report concludes that poor cient, the quality of health care notably at Katrina’s ground zero, around the country. Mile after mile residents of Chicago’s south side live was poor, the crime rate was high, metropolitan New Orleans itself, frontier of retailing. of desolate commercial streets and in a commercial desert—a situation and racism was still a part of where more than 200,000 houses retail strips is still typical, and mil- that appears to perpetuate itself in everyday life. While this situation lie in the original flood zone. There, lions of residents are forced to the absence of anchor retailers that was extreme, similar situations 600,000 people were driven from travel outside their communities draw other retailers. According to the exist today in cities around the their homes—nearly 60 percent of just to shop for basic items. While study, the real culprit is low incomes, country, and retail simply cannot them nonwhite, many of whom it is true that the situation is slowly but because income, segregation, flourish in this type of environ- lived in some of the most segre- changing in some communities as and race are highly correlated in ment. It is not too much to hope gated and flood-prone residential forward-thinking American cities, the effects are dis- that the rebirth of lost neighbor- areas in America. retailers and proportionate in predominantly hoods in New Orleans will provide All of this sharpens the most public and pri- African American communities. One a golden opportunity to bring back crucial question of the new year vate developers of the most important recommenda- more sustainable, mixed-income for those who care about cities bring services to tions of the study is that more neighborhoods that can support and development in America: how inner-city mar- mixed-income communities should retail services and serve as a model should the nation go about kets, any drive be created in order to draw more for the rest of the country of sus- rebuilding a flood-prone, racially through vast retailers to these neighborhoods—an tainable, retail-served communities. divided city of great character and CADE MARTIN swaths of Amer- admirable goal. But the most suc- But to accomplish this, more will be soul so that it reemerges more ican cities cessful program designed to do just required than simply building real inclusive, sustainable, and pros- shows that that—HOPE VI—is in danger of being estate and finding tenants willing to perous than before? needed to achieve them are ready do it—though at a time when both much more scrapped by Congress. lease space. It will require building This is a tough question. For- at hand. Developers, planners, and seem to be in short supply. needs to be The situation in the inner city of healthy neighborhoods in all their MARK MURO (top) is the policy tunately, current research on both public officials weighing the daunt- done. No other New Orleans was particularly illustra- facets so that retailing can flourish. director of the Brookings Institution the realities of prestorm New ing task of rebuilding New Orleans The Proper Outlines developed coun- tive of the problems of underserved With the development industry’s Metropolitan Policy Program. BRUCE Orleans and more broadly on should not dither or delay. The task The proper goals for reconstruction try would toler- neighborhoods, even before Katrina focus on glitzy, innovative projects KATZ (above) directs the program and may be gargantuan, but the United are both ambitious and simple: American housing and development ate the situation struck. While the tourist’s image of ranging from the latest lifestyle is a vice president of the institution. CADE MARTIN policy provides reassurance that not States knows how to deliver high- l Greater New Orleans’s unbal- that exists in New Orleans was one of commercial centers to new suburban town cen- (Their report New Orleans after the Storm: Lessons from the Past, a Plan for the only are the proper goals of recon- quality housing and to design sus- anced, unsafe development patterns today’s Ameri- vibrancy and fun, especially in the ters, it is easy to lose track of the Future can be viewed at www.brook.edu/ struction discernible, but also that tainable places. This country just must be bent toward safer, more can inner-city French Quarter and a few other reality that many communities metro/pubs/ 20051012_NewOrleans.htm.) many of the policies and practices needs the will and the leadership to sustainable development. neighborhoods, and it has been tol- neighborhoods, the nearby lower have virtually no retail at all and erated here for too long. Ninth Ward had no grocery store, no little hope of getting any—none of A newly released study, Chain bank, and few other stores and the chain stores, none of the 34 U R B A N LA N D JANUARY 2006 Reaction: Income, Race, and Access services. Other poor neighborhoods restaurants, none of the specialty to Chicago Retailers, conducted for in the city faced similar retail defi- outlets, none of the entertainment the Metro Chicago Information ciencies, but, of course, what they offerings, and none of the services Center, documents the situation all had in common was that they other communities take for granted through a survey of 75 neighbor- had much deeper problems; lack of in their day-to-day lives. And it is hoods across the city. It shows that retail services was just a symptom important to remember that no minority neighborhoods have fewer of community dysfunction and not neighborhood can be truly livable MICHAEL BEYARD is a senior resident fellow and grocery stores, pharmacies, eye care the disease itself. without retail services, and no met- ULI/Martin Bucksbaum Chair providers, health clubs, bookstores, The poor were largely ware- ropolitan area can be truly sustain- for Retail and Entertainment. and other retailers on a per-capita housed in isolated and dilapidated able with rot at its core. U L 40 U R B A N LA N D JANUARY 2006
  45. proactive solution file W I L L I A M P. M A C H T . . .while ProActive is a Best Practices product and process section. Suburban Industrial Chic Lofts Multistory industrial ware- lege-educated 25- to 34-year-olds disperse vagrants attracted by the Finding the economics and generally younger professionals empty warehouse, Proton Capital houses near the heart of Ameri- in a single-floor can cities have often been in knowledge-based industries. won a special land use permit to converted to trendy loft condomini- Hood and Poris designed the lofts, develop eight units. warehouse conversion. proactive ums. But rarely have developers which include 21-foot-high ceilings Unlike their urban counterparts, green use and mezzanines, specifically to suburban lofts need to provide and architects found market, plan- appeal to this demographic group. higher parking ratios. Hood was MARY VOGEL ning, and economic factors aligned The 150-by-66-foot concrete-block able to acquire an additional 6,291- to permit conversion of single-floor structure, located at the end of a square-foot parcel, enlarging the suburban warehouses to lofts with dead-end street, abuts railroad site to 22,515 square feet and bring- a similar industrial-chic flair. The Greening Downtown Greens tracks to its east and older single- ing the land cost to $530,000, or conditions were right, though, in family houses worth less than $24 per square foot. He provided a Royal Oak, Michigan, an inner-ring $200,000 to its south and west. single-car garage for seven units, suburb 15 minutes north of down- Under the mixed-use development plus outdoor parking for all eight town Detroit with enough former ordinance, the maximum allowed units. To increase efficiency, a With the rapid rise in the open space. As the guidelines industrial structures to constitute a density was only five units, but with master bedroom and bath were popularity of the LEED rating require of all BPC’s parks, Teardrop Some cities are striving warehouse district in a rezoned the support of neighbors eager to placed on top of each garage, with industrial area. There, as its first system for measuring a building’s Park is maintained using organic to make their building sites degree of “greenness,” downtowns fertilizers and nonchemical pest project, Proton Capital, LLC, 28- are becoming more healthful places control practices. Much effort has and parks as “green” as year-old developer Matthew Hood’s in which to live and work. Ironically, been put into getting the right soil Plymouth, Michigan–based com- a building may now be greener and plant balance to facilitate the their buildings. pany, and architect Michael Poris, than the site it sits on—especially if organic maintenance. principal of Detroit-based McIn- that site is conventionally land- At a cost of $17 million, Teardrop tosh Poris Associates, have rede- scaped. By mimicking nature to Park succeeds in using the water veloped a 10,000-square-foot, capture stormwater and by provid- from the neighboring green build- single-story, former lumber ware- ing habitat for native pollinators and ing, attracting pollinators, and edu- other wildlife, building sites and cating visitors about nature. To be house to create eight lofts. parks could strive to be as green as green, however, downtown green The 400 Parent Avenue Lofts their buildings—even downtown. space does not need to be so development is Royal Oak’s first What better place to reach a maxi- materially or financially resource adaptive use project under a 2001 © J E N N I F E R W E I S BO R D mum number of people about the ordinance permitting mixed-use need for a new approach to green development. Royal Oak has space. The following looks at what attracted a burgeoning cohort of so- three cities are doing to put more called creative-class residents—col- To enliven the interiors of the units, a flexible loft work-area mezzanine green in green urbanism downtown. Teardrop Park in New York City’s the three-foot-deep steel trusses Battery Park City, two blocks from the overlooking the 21-foot-high living were left exposed and painted black. New York City World Trade Center site, connects area below. This configuration residents in a highly urbanized area Rectangular skylights between the Teardrop Park in New York City’s Bat- trusses highlight them and bring increased the usable area to to nature. It includes nearly 17,000 light into the mezzanine flexible between 1,264 and 2,225 square tery Park City offers a good example plants, trees, and rock formations workspace and the center of the living feet per unit, excluding garages. of green space that reflects the new native to the state. area. The bathroom core on both A major challenge for both Hood environmentally responsible ethic in levels is painted bright red, and all rebuilding cities. The park is located jagged Hamilton bluestone. Mimick- and Poris was to design enough the mechanical ducts and wiring units, and provide each with two blocks from the World Trade ing the tectonic geology of the conduits are exposed. enough width and light, within the Center site, on River Terrace between Hudson River Valley, this “ice wall” Below the projecting bay windows, 66-foot depth of the building. With Warren and Murray streets. The uses the stormwater from the first ©JENNIFER WEIS- insulated black garage doors only 150 feet of building width, five name was picked prior to 9/11 and LEED gold residential high rise, the surrounded by recessed black door of the units are about 15 feet wide, was inspired by the amorphous Solaire, to create dripping surfaces frames give added depth and contrast shape of the site, roughly that of a in the summer that change into a to the facade. They also contrast and the other three are 24 feet wide. But 21-foot ceilings, with a teardrop. (See “Teardrop Park,” page wall of ice sculptures in the winter. sharply with aluminum-and-glass entry doors and transoms. double-height glass wall on the 82, July 2004.) In addition, the park uses the intensive as Teardrop Park. In fact, A sanctum evoking a glen in the Solaire’s treated wastewater to some of the greenest landscaped Catskills Mountains region, Teardrop maintain the landscape. spaces cost less to build and main- 118 U R B A N LA N D JANUARY 2006 Park gives people who live in one All private developers in Battery tain than conventional landscapes of the most urbanized places on Park City must follow Battery Park while saving on other costs such as earth a connection to nature. There City Authority’s (BPCA’s) environ- stormwater fees, watering, mowing, are nearly 17,000 plants and trees mental guidelines for both residen- and other maintenance. native to New York State; rock for- tial and commercial buildings. mations have been created from Based on the LEED rating system, Chicago 1,900 tons of bluestone, granite, the guidelines required to be ful- Like New York’s Battery Park City limestone, and fossil stones that filled are equivalent to what is Authority, Chicago also has require- have been painstakingly transported needed for the LEED gold level. ments that are leading to greener to the city from Albany, Ulster, and BPCA designed and created green space in its downtown revital- Washington counties upstate; and Teardrop Park based on these envi- ization—and in the entire city. As of there is a 27-foot-high, 168-foot-long ronmental guidelines and other 2005, between 154 and 200 munici- wall, constructed of natural slabs of sustainable principles specific to pal and private green roofs totaling JANUARY 2006 U R B A N LA N D 113
  46. Not every redesign uses CPR Digital Genealogy: The First 10 Years Ancestry as the organizing factor, but July / August 2006, VOl. 24 / NO. 4 $4.95 u.s. $5.95 CANAdA it can be the way to insure 10 a balance of content within each part of the book. Ten years ago, Braveheart won the Academy• Ten years ago, Starbucks debuted its first overseas coffee shop Award • William J. Clinton was re-elected • software was still delivered on floppy discs • WebTV debuted president • the Blizzard of the Century hit • Ten yea rs ago, digital genealogy was a pipe dream • the 56k the East Coast • Ten years ago, Pokemon modem was developed • Instant messaging hit the Internet • was released • the Daily Show debuted— Hotmail started providing free e-mail accounts • Ten years without Jon Stewart • the average price ago, only 28 percent of publ libraries offered access to of a gallon of unleaded was under $1.50 the Internet • day-planners met their demise at the Steve Jobs rejoined Apple • Angela’s Asheshands of PalmPilot • Amazon sold only books • Ten years was a best seller • Tiger Woods played his o • Ancestry.com puts its first digital records online first professional tournament • ER was the • Ten years ago, Braveheart won the Academy Award top television show • Dell started selling •William J. Clinton was re- elected president • Blizzard computers on a website • software was of the Century hit the East Coast • Dallas Cowboys still delivered on floppy discs • WebTV won the Superbowl • Ten years ago, the first Pokemon debuted • Ten yea rs ago, digital geneal- game was released • Chicago Bulls set an NBA ogy was a pipe dream • the 56k modem record for the most wins in season • Rent opened on was develeeeoped • Ancestry.com put its Broadway • Dolly the sheep was born • Ten years ago, The first digital records online • Ten years ago, Atlanta hosted the summer Olympics • Ramones played Evolution of only 28 percent of public libraries offered their final show • Big 12 con- ference held its first football access to the Internet • day-planners met game • New York Yankees won the world series • their demise at the hands of PalmPilot • Ten years ago, Steve Jobs rejoined Apple • Angela’s Amazon sold only books • Ten years o • Ashes was a best seller • Oprah made her first book Family History Ancestry.com puts its first digital records club selection • Tiger Woods played his first professional online • Ten years ago, Braveheart won the tournament. Ten years ago, the Daily Show debuted— Academy Award •William J. Clinton was re-without Jon Stewart • ER was the top television show • HP intro- elected president • Blizzard of the Century duced its first photo printer • Starbucks opened a store in Utah • hit the East Coast • Dallas Cowboys won Ten years ago, the average price of a gallon of unleaded was well under $1.50 • Twister became the first movie commercially sold
  47. Digital Genealogy: The First 10 Years Ancestry July / August 2006, VOl. 24 / NO. 4 $4.95 u.s. $5.95 CANAdA 10 Ten years ago, Braveheart won the Academy• Ten years ago, Starbucks debuted its first overseas coffee shop Award • William J. Clinton was re-elected • software was still delivered on floppy discs • WebTV debuted president • the Blizzard of the Century hit • Ten yea rs ago, digital genealogy was a pipe dream • the 56k When the the East Coast • Ten years ago, Pokemon modem was developed • Instant messaging hit the Internet • was released • the Daily Show debuted— Hotmail started providing free e-mail accounts • Ten years Good Die without Jon Stewart • the average price ago, only 28 percent of publ libraries offered access to of a gallon of unleaded was under $1.50 the Internet • day-planners met their demise at the Steve Jobs rejoined Apple • Angela’s Asheshands of PalmPilot • Amazon was a best seller • Tiger Woods played his o • Ancestry.com puts its first professional tournament • ER was the • Ten years ago, Braveheart Youngsold only books • Ten years first digital records online won the Academy Award top television show • Dell started selling •William J. Clinton was re- elected president • Blizzard computers on a website • software was of the Century hit the East Coast • Dallas Cowboys still delivered on floppy discs • WebTV won the Superbowl • Ten years ago, the first Pokemon debuted • Ten yea rs ago, digital geneal- game was released • Chicago Bulls set an NBA ogy was a pipe dream • the 56k modem record for the most wins in season • Rent opened on was develeeeoped • Ancestry.com put its Broadway • Dolly the sheep was born • Ten years ago, The first digital records online • Ten years ago, Atlanta hosted the summer Olympics • Ramones played Evolution of only 28 percent of public libraries offered their final show • Big 12 con- ference held its first football access to the Internet • day-planners met game • New York Yankees won the world series • their demise at the hands of PalmPilot • Ten years ago, Steve Jobs rejoined Apple • Angela’s Amazon sold only books • Ten years o • Ashes was a best seller • Oprah made her first book Family History Ancestry.com puts its first digital records club selection • Tiger Woods played his first professional online • Ten years ago, Braveheart won the tournament. Ten years ago, the Daily Show debuted— Academy Award •William J. Clinton was re-without Jon Stewart • ER was the top television show • HP intro- DNA Seals elected president • Blizzard of the Century duced its first photo printer • Starbucks opened a store in Utah • the Deal hit the East Coast • Dallas Cowboys won Ten years ago, the average price of a gallon of unleaded was well under $1.50 • Twister became the first movie commercially sold Nature, Nurture or What?
  48. 10 Contents 10 Cover Story Ancestry Publisher Family History’s Digital Decade Michael Sherrod Columns Executive Editor Loretto D. Szucs, fuga 28 Digging Deeper: Going Fishing Put on your hip waders and dig up some worms—it’s time to find ancestors. Managing Editor 18 Game of Lives Jennifer Utley Exactly how did family history become By Myra Vanderpool Gormley, cg a player in the digital game? Senior Editor 32 Breakthrough: Solving a Chi-Town Mystery Jeanie Croasmun jcroasmun@ancestrymagazine.com 20 That Magic Moment If they weren’t missing, exactly why was this family so hard to find? By Janet Sjaarda Sheeres Associate Editor Family history is personal. Anastasia Sutherland Tyler For three pros, so was its digital evolution. By Loretto Dennis Szucs 40 Research Cornerstones: Picking up Breadcrumbs Art Director It pays to know how to recreate a source—just in case. Robert Davis 2 Who Else Is Turning Ten? By Amy Johnson Crow, cg Graphic Designer Mark Vermeulen See who else joined Ancestry.com in the digital evolution ten years ago. 48 Found: Rescuing the Rain Goat Contributing Editors A handwritten thank-you this good had to find its way back home. Kurt Laird By Jake Gehring Tana Pedersen Lord By Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak Matthew Rayback 25 How Rawlins Got Digitized Matthew Wright How one writer’s family showed up 54 Five Steps Beyond: Census Records Editorial Intern in his kitchen. Virtually. Five ways to wander based on the direction of a single census record. Arly Evensen By Paul Rawlins By Paula Stuart Warren, cg Contributors Curt B. Witcher, fuga 55 Essentials: Ch-ch-ch-changes Donn Devine, cg, cgi Is it buyer’s remorse or just a healthy fear of big, new technology? Beau Sharbrough Features By Laura A. Prescott Juliana S. Smith Paula Stuart-Warren, cg Myra Vanderpool Gormley, cg 9 It’s 1910—Do You Know Where Your Four-Year-Old Future 60 Connections: How Our Ancestors Stayed Tuned Roseann Reinemuth Hogan, Ph.D. Grandma Is? Two cans, a string, and other ways our ancestors stayed informed. Terry and Jim Willard See what an every-name index can do for you. By Beau Sharbrough Advertising Jeanie Croasmun 1 In Katrina’s Image 64 Pro|Confession: Not the Only Tool in the Toolbox (801) 705-7000 Recreating a history following one of America’s worst disasters. Why online resources can’t replace the entire toolbox. jcroasmun@ancestrymagazine.com By Jeanie Croasmun By Mary Douglass, cg Ancestry Magazine (ISSN 1075-475X) is lished bimonthly by MyFamily.com, Inc 30 When You Drink from the Water, Consider the Source 66 Bare Bones: From Here to Interring W 4800 North, Provo, UT 84604. Perio . Why documenting your sources is more important now than ever before. A whirlwind tour of tombstones leads to a chance to photograph them all. Postage Paid at Provo, UT and at addit By Elizabeth Shown Mills, cg, cgl, fasg By Debra J. Richardson mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address ch 2 Savoring Tastes of Home to Ancestry Magazine, 360 West 4800 N Food and culture help create a tasty side of family history. In Every Issue Provo, UT 84604. Canadian return ad Station A, P Box 54, Windsor, Ontario .O. By Andrew Bay 6J5. Publications Agreement No. 400431 3 Editor’s Note All contents are copyright © 56 Future Perfect, Past Perfected 7 Readers’ Voices MyFamily.com, Inc. and may not be r Ten years of advancement was just a start. See what’s in store for the future. 8 Letters duced without written permission. Repri By Dave Moon any material contained in this issue are 10 Getting Out able for a small fee. 17 Heritage Recipe: Sin, Grandma Style For subscriptions, call toll-free 1 28 Timeline: How Did You Spend Your Summer Vacation? 262-3787 in the United States and Ca A n ce s t r y  Jul y / August 2006 Subscription price: $24.95 annually. P
  49. Fate doesn’t play fair. For one family The 1840s hoax that historian, that’s the driving force behind popularized the Ouija board. celebrating the life of a relative who 18 died long before his game was up. Tombstones aren’t the only things awaiting A look at death, 1750s style. visitors to the cemetery. 26 Maybe it’s a message from the afterlife or just our over-active imaginations, but does it ever How one tombstone 36 seem like an ancestor wants to be found? There is a good reason to talk to your aunt. can send you in five different directions. Is it nature, nurture, or kismet? The truth A look at the history of behind why we act like our ancestors— death and disease. even the ones we don’t know. Sorting through death 25 records can be enlightening. 56 Young, successful, strong, and healthy—so why did no one question his death? Any number of reasons may have caused our ancestors to shuck their heritage generations Searching backwards can back. How people of all backgrounds are striving help you discover just who is family in a historic photo. to reclaim an ethnicity that’s rightfully theirs. Cin cin! When Spedini is served, it’s always Ahh, the power of technology. one man found out where we all connect. How Why a a celebration. forgotten DNA test became an opportunity to mend a branch severed decades before. Interactive maps, working-class neighborhoods, and a warning regarding the Not enough hands? promises of genetic testing. Then try these research tools—on your wrist. Mirror, mirror, on the wall, How did a distant Exactly who is buried in I’m my mother after all. relative influence you? the headless horseman’s might not be Posting a family tree tomb? Plus, how 200 yearsyour identity a threat, but keeping When the family photo isn’t later, private is still a smart move. Nathanial Webster yours, finding its rightful Dust off that little black continues to shape Autumn. owner can be a tricky and Searching for Gramp’s book—from living heritage tangled prospect. prison record, and the to the Day of the Dead, impact of one good Apple. there’s plenty to do this fall. PowerPoint time Now’s the perfectisn’t just for business to plant spring anymore—find out how to meetings bulbs and the seeds it to create a whole new generation use of research. of slide shows. ANCESTRY SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
  50. The three organizing parts of the book yesterdAy have a balance of CPR elements. Most of us started our family be found to identify the next genera- Reference research looking for our parents, tion back—no document that declares grandparents, great-grandparents, a particular man and woman are and so on. We may have occasionally the parents of that ancestor. How- By Donn Devine, CG, CGi branched out to include one of their ever, with indirect evidence about the siblings when that sibling was our ancestor’s brothers and sisters, you own aunt or uncle, particularly if we may be able to construct a solid argu- already knew or had heard stories ment for the identity of the parents. about that person. But, eventually, the Take an ancestor listed as a 13- tendency to concentrate only on our year-old son in the 1900 census, in narrow, direct line returned. a household with a male head, wife, Computer data entry has pro- other sons ages 11 and five, and pelled this direct-line tendency. In daughters ages eight and two. With- years past, family researchers used out a birth record for the 13-year-old, printed-forms—family group sheets— the obvious assumption is that the to record collected family history male head of household and wife are information. These sheets served as the boy’s parents. But this assumption continual reminders of the need to is premature until records for each include information about all of the child are checked. A birth, marriage, children associated with a paren- or death certificate for the 11-year-old tal couple. Computer family history might identify a different mother than programs, however, tend to focus the wife listed in 1900, and that wife more on each individual, no lon- also would be much more likely to be ger reminding us to consider the mother of the 13-year old. everyone. Still, the greatest benefit to seek- When you focus only on ing collateral relatives might come direct lines of descent— in what their direct-line descendants your parents, grandpar- possess—records that don’t exist in ents, great-grandparents, any online database, public reposi- and so on—it becomes tory, or your own collection. Say, for pretty easy to fall into example, the old family Bible wasn’t some of the following passed down in your line; there is traps: still the possibility that it survives in ▶ overlooking distant, the hands of a second, third, or even yet unidentified cousins more distant cousin, and it’s almost who may possess records, guaranteed to be a real treasure for heirlooms, or family tradi- tracing the generations before mod- tions that didn’t survive in ern vital records. And, as a bonus, your line of descent. you may even stumble upon a col- ▶ Missing important indirect lateral line that includes a genealogist evidence that might be needed who has already compiled the family’s to establish your own line of descent, ancestry, hopefully with just as much particularly when there is no direct as care as you would take. evidence to be found. ▶ Losing valuable insights that a more detailed look at the whole fam- , is an attorney ily would reveal, like earlier marriages and archivist in Wilmington, Delaware. by one or both spouses. He is a former National Genealogical In every ancestral line, there comes Society board member and currently a point when no direct evidence can chairs the society’s Standards Committee. ANCESTRY • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
  51. The three organizing parts of the book yesterdAy have a balance of CPR elements. Most of us started our family be found to identify the next genera- Products research looking for our parents, tion back—no document that declares grandparents, great-grandparents, a particular man and woman are and so on. We may have occasionally the parents of that ancestor. How- By Donn Devine, CG, CGi branched out to include one of their ever, with indirect evidence about the siblings when that sibling was our ancestor’s brothers and sisters, you own aunt or uncle, particularly if we may be able to construct a solid argu- already knew or had heard stories ment for the identity of the parents. TODAY about that person. But, eventually, the Take an ancestor listed as a 13- tendency to concentrate only on our year-old son in the 1900 census, in narrow, direct line returned. a household with a male head, wife, Computer data entry has pro- other sons ages 11 and five, and pelled this direct-line tendency. In daughters ages eight and two. With- years past, family researchers used out a birth record for the 13-year-old, printed-forms—family group sheets— the obvious assumption is that the to record collected family history male head of household and wife are information. These sheets served as the boy’s parents. But this assumption continual reminders of the need to is premature until records for each include information about all of the child are checked. A birth, marriage, children associated with a paren- or death certificate for the 11-year-old tal couple. Computer family history might identify a different mother than programs, however, tend to focus the wife listed in 1900, and that wife more on each individual, no lon- also would be much more likely to be ger reminding us to consider the mother of the 13-year old. everyone. Still, the greatest benefit to seek- When you focus only on ing collateral relatives might come direct lines of descent— in what their direct-line descendants your parents, grandpar- possess—records that don’t exist in ents, great-grandparents, any online database, public reposi- and so on—it becomes tory, or your own collection. Say, for pretty easy to fall into example, the old family Bible wasn’t some of the following passed down in your line; there is traps: still the possibility that it survives in ▶ overlooking distant, the hands of a second, third, or even yet unidentified cousins more distant cousin, and it’s almost who may possess records, guaranteed to be a real treasure for heirlooms, or family tradi- tracing the generations before mod- tions that didn’t survive in ern vital records. And, as a bonus, your line of descent. you may even stumble upon a col- ▶ Missing important indirect lateral line that includes a genealogist evidence that might be needed who has already compiled the family’s to establish your own line of descent, ancestry, hopefully with just as much particularly when there is no direct as care as you would take. evidence to be found. ▶ Losing valuable insights that a more detailed look at the whole fam- , is an attorney ily would reveal, like earlier marriages and archivist in Wilmington, Delaware. by one or both spouses. He is a former National Genealogical In every ancestral line, there comes Society board member and currently a point when no direct evidence can chairs the society’s Standards Committee. ANCESTRY • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006
  52. The three organizing parts of the book yesterdAy have a balance of CPR elements. Most of us started our family be found to identify the next genera- Community research looking for our parents, tion back—no document that declares grandparents, great-grandparents, a particular man and woman are and so on. We may have occasionally the parents of that ancestor. How- By Donn Devine, CG, CGi branched out to include one of their ever, with indirect evidence about the siblings when that sibling was our ancestor’s brothers and sisters, you own aunt or uncle, particularly if we may be able to construct a solid argu- already knew or had heard stories ment for the identity of the parents. TODAY about that person. But, eventually, the Take an ancestor listed as a 13- tendency to concentrate only on our year-old son in the 1900 census, in narrow, direct line returned. a household with a male head, wife, Computer data entry has pro- other sons ages 11 and five, and pelled this direct-line tendency. In daughters ages eight and two. With- years past, family researchers used out a birth record for the 13-year-old, printed-forms—family group sheets— the obvious assumption is that the to record collected family history male head of household and wife are information. These sheets served as the boy’s parents. But this assumption continual reminders of the need to is premature until records for each include information about all of the child are checked. A birth, marriage, TOMMORROW children associated with a paren- or death certificate for the 11-year-old tal couple. Computer family history might identify a different mother than programs, however, tend to focus the wife listed in 1900, and that wife more on each individual, no lon- also would be much more likely to be ger reminding us to consider the mother of the 13-year old. everyone. Still, the greatest benefit to seek- When you focus only on ing collateral relatives might come direct lines of descent— in what their direct-line descendants your parents, grandpar- possess—records that don’t exist in ents, great-grandparents, any online database, public reposi- In 2005, more than 250,000 While releasing personal informa- • Don’t share too much personal and so on—it becomes tory, or your own collection. Say, for Americans complained to the Federal tion about your family for the public to information. Get to know the person pretty easy to fall into example, the old family Bible wasn’t Trade Commission about possible peruse can sometimes seem like risky before sharing your full name, address, some of the following passed down in your line; there is identity theft; another 400,000 cited business, learning and sharing more phone number, or other personal infor- traps: still the possibility that it survives in other forms of personal fraud. And about your family via the Internet can mation. ▶ overlooking distant, the hands of a second, third, or even odds are good that every person who be safe and convenient, provided you • Create a free e-mail account through yet unidentified cousins more distant cousin, and it’s almost filed a complaint thought he or she was take the following precautions, courtesy Yahoo, Hotmail, or a similar service, and who may possess records, guaranteed to be a real treasure for doing nothing risky at the time the theft of RootsWeb.com: keep that account specifically for answer- heirlooms, or family tradi- tracing the generations before mod- occurred. • When posting to message boards, ing blind contacts or when registering tions that didn’t survive in ern vital records. And, as a bonus, It turns out that even the most innoc- choose a username that expresses your for things online. Be as vague as possible your line of descent. you may even stumble upon a col- uous activity can harbor a potential personality but not your real name. when you set up that e-mail account— ▶ Missing important indirect lateral line that includes a genealogist for danger, if you’re not careful. But in only include the bare mini- evidence that might be needed who has already compiled the family’s 2005, the following were specifically mum of information, and to establish your own line of descent, ancestry, hopefully with just as much pinpointed to be the riskiest: realize that your screen name particularly when there is no direct as care as you would take. or username can be a one- evidence to be found. Internet auctions............................12% time nickname. ▶ Losing valuable insights that a Foreign money offers .....................8% • And only allow bare more detailed look at the whole fam- , is an attorney Shop-at-home and catalog sales ..8% bones information about liv- ily would reveal, like earlier marriages and archivist in Wilmington, Delaware. Prizes, lotteries, or sweepstakes ...7% ing relatives to be released by one or both spouses. He is a former National Genealogical Internet services and computer when you post your family In every ancestral line, there comes Society board member and currently complaints ......................................5% tree, using terms like “Living” a point when no direct evidence can chairs the society’s Standards Committee. Business opportunities and or “Living Smith.” Keep easily ANCESTRY • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006 work-at-home plans.....................2% traceable identifying informa-
  53. H E R I T A G E A G E found Gary Mokotoff doesn’t take paying clients. B y J e a n i e C r oa S M u n in America today (as hobbies go, it’s second only As an author, editor, lecturer, and leading figure to gardening). Some searches, like Eveylne’s, are in the field of Jewish American genealogy, Gary extreme—places, families, names, memories, has spent years immersed in the discovery of and connections gone. Others start as simple his own family history and prefers to encourage attempts to learn an ancestor’s occupation, others to do the same. But occasionally, a lifestyle, or raison de etre, but eventually become, request for assistance comes along pertaining for the researcher, a chance to open the door to a to the Holocaust. It’s at those times that Gary heritage previously shelved. is compelled to help the researcher. Always pro So how, exactly, did our ethnic heritages bono—free of charge. escape us? In a situation like Evelyne’s—where Two years ago, such a case arrived on Gary’s who she was became a matter of life or death— desk. A Belgian woman, Evelyne Haendel, had it’s understandable that a heritage would get dis- contacted the Hidden Child Foundation in New carded. But for the millions of immigrants and York City for assistance in locating a relative descendants of those immigrants in America, who was reported to have lived in the city 50 people who didn’t escape but who crossed the years earlier. Evelyne was seeking the relative— threshold into the land of opportunity willingly, any relative, really—as part of her quest to regain why was their ethnicity checked at the door? her identity and her heritage, both of which were, in essence, taken from her when she was hidden by her parents with a Christian family “In the 19th century,” says Barry Moreno, in Belgium. At the time, Evelyne’s parents were historian of the Ellis Island Immigration on the verge of being deported to Auschwitz— Museum, “particularly in the cities, people she never saw them again. Evelyne was just two were coming in contact with real hostility. years old. There was a lot of pressure associated with Evelyne’s situation, says Gary, is not complete- being a greenhorn. That was something that ly unique in Holocaust research. “The tragedy [immigrants] feared,” he says. “There was is that there are many, many people in Evelyne’s considerable prejudice against manifestations of position,” he says. “They were left on a doorstep, foreign culture.” Assuaging these fears, for most given as very young children to Christian neigh- immigrants to America, meant assimilating bors. Some of them don’t know their [birth] into the culture—quickly. To do this, they often names. They’re all trying to find their families shucked aspects of the ethnic identities they and their identities.” arrived with in order to blend. Sometimes assimilation was the adoption of Americanized name. “There’s the myth of name Searching for an identity is one of the driving changing at Ellis Island,” says Barry, indicating factors behind the popularity of family history this wasn’t how name changes occurred. “It was ANCESTRY • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2006 • ANCESTRY
  54. Content Scope with CPR COmmUNITy PRODUCT REFERENCE Conferences and Events Reviews media (Book Reviews, etc.) master Profiles/Interviews Utilization Shows/Exhibitions Forum/Feedback Category Industry/Enthusiast Overviews Prognostication Historical How-To’s Essays from Leaders/Experts Q A/ Roundtables Pro Tips Tricks Contests Lists Reader Tips Tricks Critical Issues Expert Analysis Vertical markets Step-by-Steps
  55. CPR can be used to improve the interest of cover lines.
  56. • P CPR can be used to improve the interest of cover lines. Here’s a good balance of stories. • C • P • R • C • R
  57. Critique Your Content with CPR
  58. Critique Your Content with CPR • Have you covered all three in desired PROPORTIOn? 1
  59. Critique Your Content with CPR • Have you covered all three in desired PROPORTIOn? 1 • Is the content in the Reference column all 2 ExCLuSIvE content, or can the information be found other places?
  60. Critique Your Content with CPR • Have you covered all three in desired PROPORTIOn? 1 • Is the content in the Reference column all 2 ExCLuSIvE content, or can the information be found other places? • How different is the editorial RHyTHm of the stories? 3
  61. Critique Your Content with CPR • Have you covered all three in desired PROPORTIOn? 1 • Is the content in the Reference column all 2 ExCLuSIvE content, or can the information be found other places? • How different is the editorial RHyTHm of the stories? 3 4 How are the features SPREAD across the categories? •
  62. Critique Your Content with CPR • Have you covered all three in desired PROPORTIOn? 1 • Is the content in the Reference column all 2 ExCLuSIvE content, or can the information be found other places? • How different is the editorial RHyTHm of the stories? 3 4 How are the features SPREAD across the categories? • 5 Looking at each feature, is it possible to use a • sidebar or follow-up story to ExTEnD the feature into another category?
  63. Critique Your Content with CPR • Have you covered all three in desired PROPORTIOn? 1 • Is the content in the Reference column all 2 ExCLuSIvE content, or can the information be found other places? • How different is the editorial RHyTHm of the stories? 3 4 How are the features SPREAD across the categories? • 5 Looking at each feature, is it possible to use a • sidebar or follow-up story to ExTEnD the feature into another category? 6 Would items within a category be more EffECTIvE • in a larger themed editorial package?
  64. Critique Your Content with CPR • Have you covered all three in desired PROPORTIOn? 1 • Is the content in the Reference column all 2 ExCLuSIvE content, or can the information be found other places? • How different is the editorial RHyTHm of the stories? 3 4 How are the features SPREAD across the categories? • 5 Looking at each feature, is it possible to use a • sidebar or follow-up story to ExTEnD the feature into another category? 6 Would items within a category be more EffECTIvE • in a larger themed editorial package? • What’s mISSIng? 7
  65. Using CPR From the Ground Up Since all of us magazine types are interested in magazines, here is a peek at a new magazine for magazine enthusiasts that has been built on CPR principles.
  66. F O R P U B L I C AT I O N S O N LY GET MORE CREATIVE The use of argot in the nameplate and deck resonate with the community of readers.
  67. THE MAGAZINE FOR MAGAZINE EDITORIAL DESIGN F O R P U B L I C AT I O N S O N LY GET MORE CREATIVE The use of argot in the nameplate and deck resonate with the community of readers. But just to make sure, the scope of the community is clearly identified.
  68. THE MAGAZINE FOR MAGAZINE F O R P U B L I C AT I O N S O N LY EDITORIAL DESIGN GET MORE CREATIVE Now, to come up with an appropriately provocative concept for the cover that reflects the shared experience of the readers. . .
  69. THE MAGAZINE FOR MAGAZINE F O R P U B L I C AT I O N S O N LY EDITORIAL DESIGN GET MORE CREATIVE Now, to come up with an appropriately provocative MAKE ’EM LISTEN! concept for the cover 5 Things Every DESIGNER that reflects the shared Should experience of the readers. . . Know About EDITORIAL maybe not enough of a visual tweak. . .
  70. THE MAGAZINE FOR MAGAZINE F O R P U B L I C AT I O N S O N LY EDITORIAL DESIGN THE MAGAZINE FOR MAGAZINE EDITORIAL DESIGN F O R P U B L I C AT I O N S O N LY GET MORE CREATIVE MAKE ’EM LISTEN! 5 Things Every GET MORE CREATIVE DESIGNER Should MAKE ’EM LISTEN! Know About 5 Things Every EDITORIAL EDITOR Should Know About DESIGN
  71. THE MAGAZINE FOR MAGAZINE EDITORIAL DESIGN F O R P U B L I C AT I O N S O N LY GET MORE CREATIVE The cover and TOC MAKE ’EM LISTEN! are designed to be 5 Things Every a balance of EDITOR Should C,P R features , and editorial Know About packages. DESIGN
  72. THE MAGAZINE FOR MAGAZINE EDITORIAL DESIGN F O R P U B L I C AT I O N S O N LY FEATURE THIS %*#@ The Grid GET MORE CREATIVE FPO INTERVIEW D.J. STOUT The cover and TOC on Being PC MAKE ’EM LISTEN! are designed to be (Magazine, 5 Things Every a balance of that is) EDITOR Should C,P R features IMAGE FIRST AID , and editorial Make GOOD Know About packages. Things Happen to DESIGN BAD Pictures Plus:
  73. 5 Things Every EDITOR Should IMAGE FIRST AID Make GOOD Know About Things Happen to DESIGN BAD Pictures Plus: PRO CESS RE:REdEsign, 20 QuEstions FoR: MichaEl gRossMan, nEw launchEs, covER chaRgE, layouts that woRK TOOLBOX stocK housE showdown, laB coloR, sEcREt PagE layout PRogRaM tRicKs RR REviEws oF: stocK housEs, nEw Fonts, illustRatoRs, PhotogRaPhERs
  74. FPO TOC G E T C R E AT I V E � P R E M I E R I S S U E PROcess 24 Ten Things Editors 30 ThingsGood Designers Make Happen 38 #!@% The Grid HOW DO THEY DO THAT? ToolBox PRACTICE MAKES to Bad Pictures MODULAR GRID PERFECT Need to Know 12 RE:DESIGN 45 L AYO U T Request for Redesign Mondrian wa What to ask for when you’re looking for ...a Painter? an outside firm to remake your magazine, The term Mondrian Lay CREATIVE PROS BREAK THE and how to get the redesign you need. about like everyone kno RULES what it is and who Mon MAKE DO 14 CREATIVE BRIEFS fact, Piet Mondrian has The Art of the to offer magazines desig TEN Art Meeting How to bring your best ideas to the table 46 TYPE A “COMMANDMENTS” to get the best out of your designers. Rags to Riche LESS�THAN�PERFECT Fully justified type is ou IMAGES 16 WRITERS BLOCK days, but the art of crea Thinking Backwards margins is often left to t 42 D.J Stout TECHNICAL Sometimes imagining what your Here’s what to look for a Goes PC settings to get the best TRICKS article looks like after it’s designed MAXIMUM can make your writing better. MAKE LEMONADE 48 IMAGE CONSU DESIGN POTENTIAL RADICAL 18 QUESTIONS FOR: Back to the L REDESIGN Michael Grossman Most designers know th As the original designer of Saveur, between CMYK and RG 34 Preparation: of of us realize the value o Six Degrees National Geographic Traveler, and Entertainment Weekly, Grossman has colorspace: LAB. It can evolved beyond mere design—but Mission Possible what exactly does that mean? 50 HANDS�ON Five Tricks IMPROVE 21 COVER CHARGE Layout pros use these te YOUR MAGAZINE The Invisible Quark and InDesign to PAY ATTENTION Nameplate make better documents Should images go over the nameplate, 90% of users don’t even and if so how much can you cover up? MISSION STATEMENTS Three strategies make all the difference. 52 H I ,T E C H Crossing Ove 20 LATE GREAT When you need to mov Spy Magazine OUTLINE Macs and PCs things ca (1986-1998) Irony may close on the dicey. Here are a few th Saturday Evening Post, but it was alive will make the transition and well in this iconic publication, with a tone influenced by the Harvard Lampoon and a classic design by Alexander Isley. 22 REDESIGN REVIEW Fast Company In a less frenetic redesign, FC uses elegance to communicate style. MARCEL DUCHAMP
  75. FPO TOC G E T C R E AT I V E � P R E M I E R I S S U E R • P • 24 Ten Things Editors 30 ThingsGood Designers Need to Know Make Happen 38 #!@% The Grid to Bad Pictures MODULAR GRID P • 12 PROcess HOW DO THEY DO THAT? RE:DESIGN Request for Redesign What to ask for when you’re looking for 45 ToolBox PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT L AYO U T Mondrian wa ...a Painter? an outside firm to remake your magazine, The term Mondrian Lay CREATIVE PROS BREAK THE and how to get the redesign you need. about like everyone kno RULES what it is and who Mon MAKE DO 14 CREATIVE BRIEFS fact, Piet Mondrian has The Art of the to offer magazines desig TEN Art Meeting How to bring your best ideas to the table 46 TYPE A “COMMANDMENTS” to get the best out of your designers. Rags to Riche Fully justified type is ou C • LESS�THAN�PERFECT IMAGES 16 WRITERS BLOCK days, but the art of crea Thinking Backwards margins is often left to t 42 D.J Stout TECHNICAL Sometimes imagining what your Here’s what to look for a Goes PC settings to get the best TRICKS article looks like after it’s designed MAXIMUM can make your writing better. MAKE LEMONADE 48 IMAGE CONSU DESIGN POTENTIAL RADICAL 18 QUESTIONS FOR: Back to the L REDESIGN Michael Grossman Most designers know th As the original designer of Saveur, between CMYK and RG 34 Preparation: of of us realize the value o Six Degrees National Geographic Traveler, and Entertainment Weekly, Grossman has colorspace: LAB. It can R • evolved beyond mere design—but Mission Possible what exactly does that mean? 50 HANDS�ON Five Tricks IMPROVE 21 COVER CHARGE Layout pros use these te YOUR MAGAZINE The Invisible Quark and InDesign to PAY ATTENTION Nameplate make better documents Should images go over the nameplate, 90% of users don’t even and if so how much can you cover up? MISSION STATEMENTS Three strategies make all the difference. 52 H I ,T E C H Crossing Ove 20 LATE GREAT When you need to mov Spy Magazine OUTLINE Macs and PCs things ca (1986-1998) Irony may close on the dicey. Here are a few th Saturday Evening Post, but it was alive will make the transition and well in this iconic publication, with a tone influenced by the Harvard Lampoon and a classic design by Alexander Isley. 22 REDESIGN REVIEW Fast Company In a less frenetic redesign, FC uses elegance to communicate style. MARCEL DUCHAMP
  76. Good 38 #!@% The Grid PROcess ToolBox RR AND s Happen HOW DO THEY DO THAT? PRACTICE MAKES REVIEWS � RESOURCES THE REST d Pictures MODULAR GRID PERFECT � OPO 12 RE:DESIGN 45 L AYO U T 53 STOCK MARKET FPO=Chutzpah Request for Redesign Mondrian was Cheap (but It’s OUR POSITION ONLY (get What to ask for when you’re looking for ...a Painter? not Cheap) it), but it’s time editorial design BREAK THE an outside firm to remake your magazine, The term Mondrian Layout gets bandied stops being treated like the design and how to get the redesign you need. Comparing three ultra-low cost stock about like everyone knows exactly profession’s equivalent of a dentist. RULES services against the higher-priced spread. what it is and who Mondrian was. In KE DO 14 CREATIVE BRIEFS fact, Piet Mondrian has something 54 LAUNCH PAD 4 H�J The Art of the to offer magazines designers. Art Meeting Three Design Gems “Why Hasn’t There Been How to bring your best ideas to the table 46 TYPE A Although these titles are as different A Pub Like This Before?” as can be, one thing ties them Each month FPO publishes the to get the best out of your designers. Rags to Riches together—excellent approaches good and the bad, HOSANNAS THAN�PERFECT Fully justified type is out of fashion these to design and branding. AND JIBES (assuming the design 16 WRITERS BLOCK days, but the art of creating ragged community has something to say.) Thinking Backwards margins is often left to the computer. 42 D.J Stout 56 TECHNICAL FONT FONT Sometimes imagining what your Here’s what to look for and how to adjust Monotype Menhardt Pro Goes PC article looks like after it’s designed can make your writing better. settings to get the best looking text. ITC Avant Garde Pro 60 ARTIST SHOWCASE Pros Put Their Best 48 I M A G E C O N S U LTA N T Feats Forward NADE HFJ Verlag RADICAL 18 QUESTIONS FOR: Back to the LAB Illustrators, photographers, and REDESIGN Michael Grossman Most designers know the difference 58 S W E E T SPOTS designers promote their work. As the original designer of Saveur, between CMYK and RGB, but few of us realize the value of that “other” Dave Clark egrees of National Geographic Traveler, and Entertainment Weekly, Grossman has colorspace: LAB. It can do amazing things. Ralph Butler 64 ENDBUG Denial’s Not Just a ration: evolved beyond mere design—but River in Eqypt on Possible what exactly does that mean? 50 HANDS�ON Five Tricks And scope ain’t just a mouthwash, IMPROVE 21 COVER CHARGE Layout pros use these techniques in PasteBoard either. How clients, employers and even professional organizations take advantage INE The Invisible Quark and InDesign to save time and OBSERVED IN of designers (and not in a good way.) PAY ATTENTION Nameplate make better documents—and probably THE MARGINS Should images go over the nameplate, 90% of users don’t even know they exist. Fool Me Once... FOR PUB LICA TIONS O N LY THE MAGAZINE and if so how much can you cover up? You Can Quote Me FOR MAGAZINE EDITORIAL DESIG 52 N H I ,T E C H TEMENTS Three strategies make all the difference. Desk Top Crossing Over 20 LATE GREAT When you need to move files between Design Beastiary GET MO RE CREA TIV E Glossary Spy Magazine Macs and PCs things can get a little MAK E ’EM LIST EN! 5 Things Every (1986-1998) Irony may close on the dicey. Here are a few things that Kneads Work DESIGNER will make the transition seamless. Should Saturday Evening Post, but it was alive One Great Tool Know About EDITORIAL and well in this iconic publication, with a My Hero Plus: tone influenced by the Harvard Lampoon Classic Book FEATU RE THIS PRO CESS RE:REDESIGN, �� QUESTIONS and a classic design by Alexander Isley. %*#@ The Grid FPO INTER VIEW FOR: MICHAEL GROSSMAN, NEW LAUNCHES, COVER D.J. STOUT on Being CHARGE, LAYOU TS PC (Magazine, that is) THAT WORK 22 TOO LBOX REDESIGN REVIEW IMAG E FIRST AID STOCK HOUSE Make GOOD Thin Happen to BAD gs SHOWDOWN, LAB Fast Company COLOR, SECRET Pictures PAGE LAYOUT PROGRAM TRICK S R�R In a less frenetic redesign, FC uses REVIEWS OF: STOCK HOUSES, NEW FONTS, ILLUSTRATORS, elegance to communicate style. PHOTOGRAPHERS
  77. P • R • Good 38 #!@% The Grid PROcess ToolBox RR AND s Happen HOW DO THEY DO THAT? PRACTICE MAKES REVIEWS � RESOURCES THE REST d Pictures MODULAR GRID PERFECT P • � OPO 12 RE:DESIGN 45 L AYO U T 53 STOCK MARKET FPO=Chutzpah Request for Redesign Mondrian was Cheap (but It’s OUR POSITION ONLY (get What to ask for when you’re looking for ...a Painter? not Cheap) it), but it’s time editorial design BREAK THE an outside firm to remake your magazine, The term Mondrian Layout gets bandied stops being treated like the design and how to get the redesign you need. Comparing three ultra-low cost stock about like everyone knows exactly profession’s equivalent of a dentist. RULES services against the higher-priced spread. what it is and who Mondrian was. In KE DO 14 CREATIVE BRIEFS fact, Piet Mondrian has something 54 LAUNCH PAD 4 H�J The Art of the to offer magazines designers. Art Meeting Three Design Gems “Why Hasn’t There Been How to bring your best ideas to the table 46 TYPE A Although these titles are as different A Pub Like This Before?” as can be, one thing ties them Each month FPO publishes the to get the best out of your designers. Rags to Riches together—excellent approaches good and the bad, HOSANNAS THAN�PERFECT Fully justified type is out of fashion these to design and branding. AND JIBES (assuming the design 16 WRITERS BLOCK days, but the art of creating ragged community has something to say.) Thinking Backwards margins is often left to the computer. 42 D.J Stout 56 TECHNICAL FONT FONT Sometimes imagining what your Here’s what to look for and how to adjust Monotype Menhardt Pro Goes PC article looks like after it’s designed settings to get the best looking text. 60 ARTIST SHOWCASE C • can make your writing better. ITC Avant Garde Pro Pros Put Their Best 48 I M A G E C O N S U LTA N T Feats Forward NADE HFJ Verlag RADICAL 18 QUESTIONS FOR: Back to the LAB Illustrators, photographers, and REDESIGN Michael Grossman Most designers know the difference 58 S W E E T SPOTS designers promote their work. As the original designer of Saveur, between CMYK and RGB, but few of us realize the value of that “other” Dave Clark egrees of National Geographic Traveler, and Entertainment Weekly, Grossman has colorspace: LAB. It can do amazing things. Ralph Butler 64 ENDBUG Denial’s Not Just a ration: evolved beyond mere design—but River in Eqypt on Possible what exactly does that mean? 50 HANDS�ON Five Tricks And scope ain’t just a mouthwash, IMPROVE 21 COVER CHARGE Layout pros use these techniques in PasteBoard either. How clients, employers and even professional organizations take advantage INE The Invisible Quark and InDesign to save time and OBSERVED IN of designers (and not in a good way.) PAY ATTENTION Nameplate make better documents—and probably THE MARGINS Should images go over the nameplate, 90% of users don’t even know they exist. Fool Me Once... FOR PUB LICA TIONS O N LY THE MAGAZINE and if so how much can you cover up? You Can Quote Me FOR MAGAZINE EDITORIAL DESIG 52 N H I ,T E C H TEMENTS Three strategies make all the difference. Desk Top Crossing Over 20 LATE GREAT When you need to move files between Design Beastiary GET MO RE CREA TIV E Glossary Spy Magazine Macs and PCs things can get a little MAK E ’EM LIST EN! 5 Things Every (1986-1998) Irony may close on the dicey. Here are a few things that Kneads Work DESIGNER will make the transition seamless. Should Saturday Evening Post, but it was alive One Great Tool Know About EDITORIAL and well in this iconic publication, with a My Hero Plus: tone influenced by the Harvard Lampoon Classic Book FEATU RE THIS PRO CESS RE:REDESIGN, �� QUESTIONS and a classic design by Alexander Isley. %*#@ The Grid FOR: MICHAEL CP R •• • GROSSMAN, NEW FPO INTER LAUNCHES, COVER VIEW D.J. STOUT on Being CHARGE, LAYOU TS PC (Magazine, that is) THAT WORK 22 TOO LBOX REDESIGN REVIEW IMAG E FIRST AID STOCK HOUSE Make GOOD Thin Happen to BAD gs SHOWDOWN, LAB Fast Company COLOR, SECRET Pictures PAGE LAYOUT PROGRAM TRICK S R�R In a less frenetic redesign, FC uses REVIEWS OF: STOCK HOUSES, NEW FONTS, ILLUSTRATORS, elegance to communicate style. PHOTOGRAPHERS
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