Aspergers Power Point

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A power point I made for my College Anatomy & Physiology Class

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Aspergers Power Point

  1. 1. Aspergers Autism<br />By Nikki De Hoyos<br />
  2. 2. 1) In Aspergers, there is a dysfunction in which lobe(s) of the brain?<br />A) Frontal<br />B) Temporal<br />C) Occipital<br />D) A & B<br />E) A & C<br />
  3. 3. 2) Which of these is not a characteristic of Aspergers?<br />A) High IQ<br />B) Random fixations<br />C) Hyperactivity<br />D) Repetition in routines<br />E) Inability to understand social construction<br />
  4. 4. 3) Children with Aspergers are exceptionally more perceptive to outside stimulus than a regular child<br />A) True<br />B) False<br />
  5. 5. 4) If a neurologist explained a social situation for someone with Aspergers, it would be something like this: <br />A) Following a schedule <br />B) Seeing a picture and drawing it<br />C) Learning to play the piano<br />
  6. 6. 5) One of the defining factors of Aspergers is the exceptional ability to understand deep verbal meaning and subtle body language <br />A) True<br />B) False<br />
  7. 7. Aspergers Autism<br />A developmental and neurological disorder<br />There are studies shown that part of the disorder is a dysfunction in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. There is a possibility it is genetically linked. <br /> It is characterized by several things- <br />
  8. 8. Fine-tuned senses<br />Normally our brain can filter out stimulus<br />People with Aspergerscan also do this but to a lesser extent<br />They have high sensibility; Loud noises, bright colors, and sometimes even touching can be painful<br />
  9. 9. Fixations/Routines<br />To them, things are constantly going on, so they look for stability, often leading to fixations<br />Imagine standing in the middle of the street with cars constantly going by you<br />Surrounding them is chaos, this is why they like repetitive, easy to follow tasks and routines<br />
  10. 10. Social/Emotional Odd Behavior & Inability to interact with peers<br />To learn how to interact with peers was as if you or I were to learn how to play the piano<br />It takes steps, motivation and careful evaluation<br />They cannot empathize correctly with their peers<br />It is hard to understand someone <br />outside themselves <br />
  11. 11. Peculiarities in Speech<br />Elevated or odd speech, has varying tones/pitches<br />Slow learning with language, inability to express oneself<br />Take words literally, trouble understanding abstract terms such as figurative language<br />Need concrete examples to match words to ideas<br />
  12. 12. Inability to recognize non-verbal communication<br />They do not understand body language, and<br /> do not recognize when someone is making <br />an attempt to express non-verbally<br />Ex: I am talking to you, you’re bored, sighing, holding your head in your hands, but I keep talking because I believe that as long as I’m interested, you are too<br />
  13. 13. Intelligence/High IQ<br />They more than likely have higher than normal IQ<br />They’re often rejected for their weird lifestyle and different way of thinking by peers<br />
  14. 14. 1) In Aspergers, there is a dysfunction in which lobe(s) of the brain?<br />A) Frontal<br />B) Temporal<br />C) Occipital<br />D) A & B<br />E) A & C<br />
  15. 15. 2) Which of these is not a characteristic of Aspergers?<br />A) High IQ<br />B) Random fixations<br />C) Hyperactivity<br />D) Repetition in routines<br />E) Inability to understand social construction<br />
  16. 16. 3) Children with Aspergers are exceptionally more perceptive to outside stimulus than a regular child<br />A) True<br />B) False<br />
  17. 17. 4) If a neurologist explained a social situation for someone with Aspergers, it would be something like this: <br />A) Following a schedule <br />B) Seeing a picture and drawing it<br />C) Learning to play the piano<br />
  18. 18. 5) One of the defining factors of Aspergers is the exceptional ability to understand deep verbal meaning and subtle body language<br />A) True<br />B) False<br />
  19. 19. Bibliography<br /> R. KaanOzbayrak, MD, . &quot;Asperger&apos;s Disorder Homepage.&quot; 1/1/1996: Web. 1 Dec 2009. &lt;http://www.aspergers.com/&gt;. <br /> Martin L. Kutscher, MD, . &quot;Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Sorting It Out.&quot; Asperger&apos;s Syndrome 2006: Web. 1 Dec 2009. &lt;http://www.pediatricneurology.com/autism.htm#Asperger%E2%80%99s%20Syndrome&gt;.<br /> Office of Communications and Public Liaison, . &quot;National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.&quot; NINDS Autism Information Page. 10/19/2009. National Institutes of Health, Web. 1 Dec 2009. &lt;http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/autism/autism.htm&gt;. <br /> U.S. National Library of Medicine, . &quot;Asperger&apos;s Syndrome .&quot; Medline Plus. 7/21/09. Department of Health & Human Services, Web. 1 Dec 2009. &lt;http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/aspergerssyndrome.html&gt;. <br />

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