Asperger's Syndrome Franklinville Central School
People with Autism <ul><li>&quot;People with autism spend more time doing things they are not good at than anyone else.&qu...
Definition <ul><li>Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) is a developmental  </li></ul><ul><li>disability that is defined by impairment...
Background <ul><li>Identified in 1944 by Hans Asperger. (Austria)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Brought to the attention of the Engli...
Causes <ul><li>There seems to be a hereditary component  </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental factors that affect brain develop...
Incidence Rates in New York 1 in every 91 children
Increasing Prevalence Autism, strictly defined 4-6 in 10,000 prior to 1980’s  (Lotter 1967)‏ 16-20 in 10,000 today  (Chakr...
Think SPENCER <ul><li>S  Sensory Sensitivities </li></ul><ul><li>P  Pragmatic Language Skills Impaired </li></ul><ul><li>E...
S  Sensory Sensitivities <ul><li>Don't excuse it or make the child feel bad about feeling bad </li></ul><ul><li>Intense or...
P  Pragmatic Skills Impaired <ul><li>They see language as a way to share information </li></ul><ul><li>They want to receiv...
E  Emotional Connection Impaired <ul><li>He was not born with the “sixth” sense.  </li></ul><ul><li>Since you cannot teach...
N  Narrow Interest Range <ul><li>Few interests but they dominate </li></ul><ul><li>Special interest </li></ul><ul><li>Enco...
C  Clumsy Motor Skills <ul><li>Let the schedule work for you </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage trying new things </li></ul>
E  Environment Predictability <ul><li>Importance of structure and routine </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about changes way before ...
R  Rigidity of Thought <ul><li>Mindblindedness – inability to determine what others are thinking. </li></ul><ul><li>They t...
Instructional Ideas <ul><li>Be careful in classroom seating assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Use the “peer buddy” system </li...
Other treatments <ul><li>Parent education and training  </li></ul><ul><li>Social skills training  </li></ul><ul><li>Langua...
Technology <ul><li>Visuals </li></ul><ul><li>Graphics </li></ul><ul><li>Models, manipulatives </li></ul><ul><li>Computers ...
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Aspergers Presentation for Special Education

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Aspergers Presentation for Special Education

  1. 1. Asperger's Syndrome Franklinville Central School
  2. 2. People with Autism <ul><li>&quot;People with autism spend more time doing things they are not good at than anyone else.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Toni Atwood </li></ul>
  3. 3. Definition <ul><li>Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) is a developmental </li></ul><ul><li>disability that is defined by impairments in social relationships, verbal and nonverbal communication, and by restrictive, repetitive patterns of behaviors, interests, and activities. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Background <ul><li>Identified in 1944 by Hans Asperger. (Austria)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Brought to the attention of the English-speaking world in 1980 by Dr. Lorna Wing. </li></ul><ul><li>Was not added to the Diagnostic and Statistics Manual of the American Psychiatric Association until 1994. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Autism’s Shadow” </li></ul>
  5. 5. Causes <ul><li>There seems to be a hereditary component </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental factors that affect brain development might play a role </li></ul><ul><li>Not caused by </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional deprivation </li></ul><ul><li>Bad parenting </li></ul>
  6. 6. Incidence Rates in New York 1 in every 91 children
  7. 7. Increasing Prevalence Autism, strictly defined 4-6 in 10,000 prior to 1980’s (Lotter 1967)‏ 16-20 in 10,000 today (Chakrabarti & Fombonne 2001)‏ Autism spectrum disorders 10 in 10,000 in 1990’s (Bryson et al 1988)‏ 60-70 in 10,000 today (Chakrabarti & Fombonne 2001)‏
  8. 8. Think SPENCER <ul><li>S Sensory Sensitivities </li></ul><ul><li>P Pragmatic Language Skills Impaired </li></ul><ul><li>E Emotional Connection </li></ul><ul><li>N Narrow Interest Range </li></ul><ul><li>C Clumsiness with Motor Skills </li></ul><ul><li>E Environment that is Predictable </li></ul><ul><li>R Rigidity of Thought </li></ul>
  9. 9. S Sensory Sensitivities <ul><li>Don't excuse it or make the child feel bad about feeling bad </li></ul><ul><li>Intense or under reactive to a sensation </li></ul><ul><li>Clothing </li></ul><ul><li>Slight bump by another </li></ul><ul><li>Florescent lights </li></ul><ul><li>Hug = squeeze </li></ul>
  10. 10. P Pragmatic Skills Impaired <ul><li>They see language as a way to share information </li></ul><ul><li>They want to receive information correctly, sussincly and without emotion. </li></ul><ul><li>May use diologue from pop culture to communicate </li></ul><ul><li>They have a profound interest in words. </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge him to memorize </li></ul><ul><li>Provide music, theater and nonfiction books </li></ul>
  11. 11. E Emotional Connection Impaired <ul><li>He was not born with the “sixth” sense. </li></ul><ul><li>Since you cannot teach him to emote, appeal to other senses. </li></ul><ul><li>Conversation turn-taking </li></ul><ul><li>Perspective taking </li></ul><ul><li>They can be overly dependent on care-giver </li></ul><ul><li>Point out how he slips up </li></ul><ul><li>Explain what others are doing socially </li></ul>
  12. 12. N Narrow Interest Range <ul><li>Few interests but they dominate </li></ul><ul><li>Special interest </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage reading </li></ul><ul><li>Use his special interest to teach social skills </li></ul><ul><li>An enriched environment will encourage broadening of the interest range </li></ul><ul><li>Protect him. Be aware of the special dangers of early sexuality. </li></ul>
  13. 13. C Clumsy Motor Skills <ul><li>Let the schedule work for you </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage trying new things </li></ul>
  14. 14. E Environment Predictability <ul><li>Importance of structure and routine </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about changes way before they happen so he can plan. </li></ul><ul><li>If you have to be spontaneous, communicate to him the reasons so he can have some control. </li></ul>
  15. 15. R Rigidity of Thought <ul><li>Mindblindedness – inability to determine what others are thinking. </li></ul><ul><li>They tend to take things literally. </li></ul><ul><li>Need for time alone to reconstruct social interactions. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Instructional Ideas <ul><li>Be careful in classroom seating assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Use the “peer buddy” system </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid self-selection in group work </li></ul><ul><li>Carefully consider the maturity of the group members involved </li></ul><ul><li>Provide “safe haven” or quiet area </li></ul><ul><li>Explain metaphor and sarcasm use concretely </li></ul><ul><li>Use “social stories” for providing directions </li></ul><ul><li>Vigorously but respectfully maintain class rules and other boundaries </li></ul>
  17. 17. Other treatments <ul><li>Parent education and training </li></ul><ul><li>Social skills training </li></ul><ul><li>Language therapy </li></ul><ul><li>Sensory integration training for younger children, usually performed by an occupational therapist, in which a child is desensitized to stimuli to which he is overly sensitive </li></ul><ul><li>Psychotherapy or behavioral/cognitive therapy for older children </li></ul>
  18. 18. Technology <ul><li>Visuals </li></ul><ul><li>Graphics </li></ul><ul><li>Models, manipulatives </li></ul><ul><li>Computers </li></ul><ul><li>The Internet </li></ul>

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