desktop os windows7

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Windows 7 is the best OS for enterprise use from Microsoft and improves on 3 major pain points. Info-Tech recommends organizations running Windows XP as the primary desktop OS migrate to Windows 7 by end-of-year 2012. This storyboard addresses the following migration success factors:

•Preparation and planning are key to a successful deployment – focus on application, driver, and peripheral compatibility.
•Version selection is important to ensure that necessary features and functionality are deployed.
•Selecting the most appropriate deployment methodology will maximize resource allocation and minimize time and cost.
Take advantage of Microsoft’s free resources to help simplify and ensure the success of your Windows 7 deployment.

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desktop os windows7

  1. 1. Windows 7 Planning & Deployment Done Right Info-Tech Research Group
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>Windows XP is nearing end-of-life, with final support for the OS ending by April 8, 2014. </li></ul><ul><li>If your organization is already using an alternative to Windows and have no plans to move to Windows 7, this solution set is not for you. </li></ul><ul><li>Application and driver support for Windows XP will largely cease before the Microsoft date, forcing most enterprises to move to Windows 7 to ensure ongoing application and peripheral support. </li></ul><ul><li>Enterprises must begin preparing for Windows 7 migration by selecting a version, testing compatibility, and planning a deployment methodology. </li></ul>Info-Tech Research Group
  3. 3. Executive Summary <ul><li>If you use Windows XP, there is a >90% chance you will be moving to Windows 7. By 2012, 79% of enterprises plan to make the move. Those are big odds – start planning now. </li></ul><ul><li>Why Windows 7? It’s the best enterprise desktop OS available, improving on the following functionality: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Federated Search functionality consolidates file servers, Intranet, and Internet sources into a single search interface, significantly reducing the time and resources spent searching. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>DirectAccess and BranchCache improve remote and branch connectivity with Windows Server 2008 R2 on the backend. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>BitLocker, BitLocker-to-go, and AppLocker secure data, applications, and protect against malware – again, with a Windows 2008 R2 backend. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>In addition to the tangible features above, Microsoft has taken great care to provide the necessary tools to prepare, plan, and effectively and efficiently deploy Windows 7 – administration and management are significantly improved as well. </li></ul><ul><li>Are there alternatives to Windows? Yes, but for Windows shops the TCO of moving to Linux or OS X will almost certainly be higher than migrating to Windows 7. </li></ul><ul><li>You’ve decided to migrate to Windows 7 - 56% of organizations are moving to Windows 7 due to XP end-of-life, 54% of organizations cited application testing as the most successful way to mitigate deployment issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Get the right version, decide how to prepare and plan, and settle on the most appropriate deployment methodology. </li></ul>Info-Tech Research Group
  4. 4. XP shops: start planning now for a complete migration by 2012 8 Info-Tech Research Group 1 Includes fully and partially deployed respondents Source: Info-Tech Research Group n=231 2010 1 2012 Windows XP Windows 7 As Windows XP end-of-life approaches, Windows 7 adoption will skyrocket ‘ 01 ‘ 06 ‘ 08 ‘ 09 ‘ 14 Windows XP is launched. 400,000,000 copies in use. Direct OEM & retail sales of XP end. XP moves to extended support phase. Microsoft discontinues XP support. Less than 1% of survey respondents that deployed Vista plan to stay on it indefinitely; only 8% of respondents plan on staying with XP. Similarly, less than 1% plan on moving to an alternate OS. Info-Tech recommends organizations on Vista move to Windows 7, though with less urgency. If an EA with SA for desktop OS is in place and current hardware is sufficient, migrate sooner rather than later. Organizations running XP beyond 2014 can expect to pay $200K/year for security patches and support from Microsoft.
  5. 5. XP end-of-life matters most 0 Info-Tech Research Group   Branch / Remote Access Functionality 27% 47% 26% TCO/ROI 28% 46% 26% Security Features 36% 49% 15% Hardware Refresh 40% 42% 18% Administrative Management Functionality 48% 41% 11% XP End of Life 56% 28% 17% 1 Very Important Important Not Important Source: Info-Tech Research Group n=189 61% of large organizations cite XP end-of-life as the most important factor in their decision to move to Windows 7, while 72% of smaller organizations ranked improved administrative and management functionality as a significant pull factor. Smaller organizations are drawn to the improved administrative and management functionalities due to IT resource constraints. While Microsoft touts the TCO and ROI benefits of Windows 7, Info-Tech data suggests it to be a less important migration driver. 1 Sums greater than 100% are due to rounding
  6. 6. Don’t get fooled by TCO & ROI; cost avoidance is real for some Most organizations will not see enough of a reduction in support and administration requirements to eliminate payroll. Reduced support and administrative burden could result in reduced future hires or re-allocation of payroll. If advanced security and remote connectivity features are utilized, it may be possible to avoid the costs of third-party centralized encryption, VPN, and/or remote connectivity solutions. Assuming a six-year desktop OS life, the monthly cost per desktop for Windows 7 Professional (at retail pricing) is less than five dollars. Info-Tech Research Group TCO <ul><li>The cost of supporting XP past end-of-life will decimate the potential short-term reduced TCO. Extending XP to 2014 may result in a lower direct OS cost, but going beyond 2014 will be very expensive – into six-figures for many organizations – to purchase support from Microsoft. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Windows 7 improves on 3 significant feature silos Info-Tech Research Group Search Windows 7 provides users with a consolidated search function known as Federated Search that allows users to search for a file on their desktops, the network or on the Internet from a single search. Jump Lists provide quick access to recent files and applications. Security With the Enterprise and Ultimate versions of Windows 7, enhanced security features such as BitLocker and AppLocker can be activated to ensure security of corporate data and application control. Connectivity With the addition of a Windows Server 2008 R2 backend, DirectAccess provides seamless remote and mobile connectivity, while BranchCache can store commonly accessed files locally in branch offices for much faster local access.
  8. 8. Federated Search is a drastic improvement over its predecessor Info-Tech Research Group Federated Search functionality is standard in all business versions of Windows 7 and does not conflict with existing enterprise search solutions. Federated Search <ul><li>Users can search for a file on their desktops, the network or on the Internet from a single search interface in Windows Explorer. </li></ul><ul><li>Several federated search connectors are available, including YouTube, Google News, and leading Internet search engines. </li></ul>Search Specificity <ul><li>Users are able to specify which SharePoint sites are available for searching or, conversely, IT can use Enterprise Search Scopes to populate user menus with links to commonly-used internal sites. </li></ul>
  9. 9. DirectAccess & BranchCache simplify remote connectivity Info-Tech Research Group “ From an end-user perspective, DirectAccess just makes things much easier and more transparent for us. Why go through the extra steps of VPN when there is no need?” IT Manager, Manufacturing DirectAccess <ul><li>DirectAccess allows mobile users to securely connect to the corporate network without a VPN client, increasing flexibility and significantly easing the administrative and management burden on IT. </li></ul>BranchCache <ul><li>BranchCache stores files on local branch servers or PCs, reducing bandwidth consumption and allowing much faster file access, which improves user productivity and can significantly reduce WAN costs. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Improved security features ensure safety of corporate data Info-Tech Research Group “ It’s difficult to sell the security department of an organization on BitLocker, but it is fantastic. Every case study we’ve done shows it to be just as strong as Pointsec and Ademco.” IT Consultant, Windows 7 Deployment Expert BitLocker <ul><li>BitLocker encrypts the contents of hard drives on desktops and laptops that have Trusted Platform Modules (TPM) embedded in hardware. </li></ul><ul><li>BitLocker To Go encrypts and protects data on removable media. </li></ul>AppLocker <ul><li>AppLocker allows IT to exercise control over the applications users are allowed to install and run, decreasing the potential for malware infections. </li></ul><ul><li>The function also allows IT to define specific applications and digital signatures users can install autonomously, reducing the need for constant IT support. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Application, hardware & peripheral compatibility drive architecture selection 0 Info-Tech Research Group n=190 <ul><li>Info-Tech recommends that organizations maintain uniformity by deploying a single architecture, but cautions that Windows 7 may be Microsoft’s final 32 bit operating system. </li></ul><ul><li>Info-Tech data shows that 58% of organizations that cited hardware requirements as a major pain point for deploying Windows 7 are moving forward with a 32 bit deployment, highlighting the urgency with which organizations are moving due to XP end-of-life. </li></ul>Professional Enterprise Ultimate Most organizations continue to deploy a 32 bit OS, however, 64 bit adoption is gaining Source: Info-Tech Research Group Aggregate n=190 32 Bit 64 Bit Professional Enterprise Undecided Ultimate
  12. 12. Understand your requirements & select accordingly Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>Windows 7 Professional maps to Windows XP Professional. </li></ul><ul><li>Federated Search is, however, included in Windows 7 Professional, allowing the organization to take advantage of Enterprise Search Scopes and improved search functionality. </li></ul><ul><li>Advanced Connectivity and Security functionality is not included in Windows 7 Professional. </li></ul><ul><li>Windows 7 Ultimate and Windows 7 Enterprise contain the same enterprise feature set. </li></ul><ul><li>BitLocker, BitLocker –to-go, AppLocker, DirectAccess, and BranchCache are only available in these versions. </li></ul><ul><li>Windows 7 Enterprise is only available to those with an Enterprise Agreement , while Windows 7 Ultimate is available to those without an EA. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Based on your answers to a series of questions about your environment, Info-Tech’s “ Windows 7 Version Selection Tool ” recommends an appropriate Windows 7 edition for your organization. </li></ul><ul><li>The tool focuses on the following factors: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Current systems and hardware. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current peripherals and applications. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to make capital investments. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Security requirements. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Connectivity requirements. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Search requirements. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Licensing agreements. </li></ul></ul>Select the Windows 7 version you require based on enterprise functionality & hardware status Info-Tech Research Group
  14. 14. Preparation & planning are vital to success Info-Tech Research Group Microsoft Application Compatibility Toolkit 5.5 Windows Automated Installation Kit Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Windows Deployment Services Windows 7 Springboard Series <ul><li>Info-Tech recommends extensive testing of all enterprise applications on Windows 7 prior to deployment. Manually inventory and test applications in addition to using Microsoft tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide IT with advanced access to encourage familiarity with Microsoft’s deployment tools as part of the planning phase. </li></ul><ul><li>Most end-users familiar with Windows XP or Vista will quickly adapt to Windows 7. Some familiarization and training may be required for features such as the updated taskbar, jump lists, and federated search. Expect to deliver a short 30-60 minute training session for new users. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Case Study: Preparation & Planning Info-Tech Research Group Industry: Segment: Source: Healthcare/Education Small Enterprise Independent Consultant Pain Point <ul><li>Application testing is the largest potential pitfall in a Windows 7 deployment. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not underestimate the time and resources necessary to properly test application compatibility. The cost of unplanned rework and remediation can be significant . </li></ul>Solution <ul><li>Created a separate process – Application Compatibility Planning Service – that precedes the actual deployment process. </li></ul><ul><li>Used Microsoft’s tools, as well as interviews with department heads and power users to create an exhaustive inventory of business critical apps. </li></ul><ul><li>When it comes to business critical applications, an organization-wide view is vital. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand that many users are unaware of the details of the operating system they work in, but have intimate knowledge of the critical apps they use. </li></ul>Insight <ul><ul><li>Interview questions were really the most successful way to identify business critical applications across the entire organization. </li></ul></ul>“ “ IT Consultant, Windows 7 Deployment Expert
  16. 16. Preparation 101: Application Compatibility Info-Tech Research Group Application Compatibility Toolkit <ul><li>The ACT identifies which enterprise applications are compatible with Windows 7 and provides reporting to help guide remediation for non-compatible applications. </li></ul>Windows 7 XP Mode <ul><li>A virtual instance of Windows XP running inside a Windows 7 desktop environment, XP mode allows users to run applications that are incompatible with Windows 7. </li></ul><ul><li>Windows XP mode is a free download for Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate. </li></ul>Microsoft Enterprise Desktop Virtualization <ul><li>MED-V is essentially the enterprise version of Windows 7 XP Mode. It allows organizations to centrally manage applications that are not compatible with Windows 7 in an XP virtual machine in a mode that is essentially transparent to end users. MED-V is part of the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP) and requires a Microsoft Enterprise Agreement. </li></ul>Microsoft Application Virtualization <ul><li>App-V allows for the deployment of virtual applications in isolation (virtual bubbles) which remediates applications that may be compatible with Windows 7 but do not “play nicely” together. App-V is part of the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP) and requires a Microsoft Enterprise Agreement. </li></ul>Project managers often miscalculate the time and effort it takes to test application compatibility with Windows 7; we’ve found this area to be the most difficult and cost-inducing area of deployment. “ “ IT Consultant, Windows 7 Deployment Expert
  17. 17. 54% of organizations cited application testing as the most successful way to mitigate deployment issues Info-Tech Research Group n= 190 22% Deployment Methodology 20% End-User Training 54% Application Testing 1% Peripheral Testing 3% Other
  18. 18. Case Study: End-user Training Info-Tech Research Group Industry: Segment: Source: Municipal Services Small Enterprise IT Director IT Director, Municipal Services Pain Point <ul><li>IT was reluctant to roll out Windows 7 due to the perceived inability of end-users to quickly adapt and remain productive. </li></ul>Solution <ul><li>Created a separate instance of Windows 7 on a terminal server or virtual machines. </li></ul><ul><li>Provided end-users with unrestricted access to the machines in an effort to drive acceptance. </li></ul><ul><li>Resulted in significant testing by end-users, especially of critical applications across departments. </li></ul><ul><li>End-users find the Windows 7 interface to be familiar and are comfortable with the OS. </li></ul><ul><li>Rolling out testing systems to end-users is a great way to test critical applications thoroughly while simultaneously increasing buy-in for adoption. </li></ul>Insight What we found that worked great was for people using a terminal server or virtual machines to set up machines and let users really bang on them. We used the people we were going to roll it out to and, once they got familiar with it, they were our best testers. “ “
  19. 19. Roadmap Info-Tech Research Group Stay on Vista Migrate to an Alternate OS Upgrade on Existing Hardware Upgrade via Hardware Refresh
  20. 20. Deploy through hardware refresh with standard images – installed in-house or pre-installed by the VAR Info-Tech Research Group Not recommended 1 In-House Standard Images Standard images are created with all of the functionality, settings, and applications required. The images can be deployed to multiple PCs without having to make additional changes before rolling machines out to end-users. Images can be deployed by the IT group as new hardware arrives. 2 Pre-Installed Standard Images Standard images are created by IT and provided to the PC manufacturer or VAR. Dell ImageDirect and HP Workplace Software Management Services, for example, will install provided images during the manufacturing process, eliminating the need for IT to deploy images on new hardware. 3 Maintain Standard OEM Install Maintaining the standard OEM installation is an option, however, manual configuration and application installations are required for each machine. This is a time-consuming and onerous process.
  21. 21. Roadmap Info-Tech Research Group Stay on Vista Migrate to an Alternate OS Upgrade on Existing Hardware Upgrade via Hardware Refresh
  22. 22. Preparation 101: Hardware Compatibility Info-Tech Research Group Microsoft Assessment & Planning Toolkit Most desktops and laptops manufactured in 2008 or later will run Windows 7 without issue. In fact, even older hardware (up to 5 years old) will run Windows 7 32-bit handily, but there is some risk of driver incompatibility. The Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit (MAP) inventories PCs on the corporate network and identifies those capable of running Windows 7. Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit Corporate Network Hardware Assessment Results Compatible with Windows 7 Incompatible with Windows 7
  23. 23. Preparation 101: Deployment Planning Info-Tech Research Group Deployment Image Servicing & Management DISM lets you build a variety of standard images for deployment. Windows Automated Installation Kit This tool allows for automated deployment using pre-configured answer files, as well as incorporating the User State Migration Tool (USMT) (allows the migration of user files and settings from the previous OS). Microsoft Deployment Toolkit This tool extends the WAIK functionality to include deployment options like network configuration and settings, and functionality like BitLocker. It essentially allows for zero-touch implementations. Windows Deployment Services WDS allows for a higher level of automation. Run on Windows Server 2008, it centralizes images and image management, and allows for multicast (one-to-many) deployment.
  24. 24. Deployment is a function of infrastructure & expertise 3 Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>Manual, hands-on deployment is the best option when end-user machines number less than 100. </li></ul><ul><li>Automate client computer configuration to lower cost further. </li></ul>High Touch with Retail Media <ul><li>As end-user machines increase, consider moving towards a similar deployment, but with more standardized images for various users. </li></ul>High Touch with Standard Image <ul><li>With a Software Assurance agreement and Configuration Manager 2007 R2, this strategy can limit user interaction at the beginning of an installation. </li></ul><ul><li>Lower costs by deploying over a network to minimize interaction. </li></ul>Light Touch High Volume <ul><li>With an Enterprise Agreement the organization can take advantage of fully automated deployment. </li></ul><ul><li>Lower costs significantly by minimizing user and IT interaction, and leverage standardized images with network access via push automation. </li></ul>Zero Touch High Volume Investment Internal Expertise 100-500 client computers 500+ client computers
  25. 25. <ul><li>Based on your answers to a series of questions about your infrastructure and complexity, Info-Tech’s “ Windows 7 Deployment Strategy Selection Tool ” recommends an appropriate deployment method for your organization. </li></ul><ul><li>The tool focuses on the following factors: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Size of the organization. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experience level of current IT staff, especially as it pertains to deployment. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current status and setup of the infrastructure within the organization. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Licensing agreements and forms of media available to the organization. </li></ul></ul>Select the most appropriate deployment method by focusing on current infrastructure & IT complexity Info-Tech Research Group
  26. 26. Roadmap Info-Tech Research Group Stay on Vista Migrate to an Alternate OS Upgrade on Existing Hardware Upgrade via Hardware Refresh
  27. 27. Vista holdouts should consider moving to Windows 7, especially if you have Software Assurance If Vista is partially deployed and there is a mix of XP and Vista, finish the Vista migration and deploy Windows 7 when the migration is complete – avoid supporting 3 OSes if possible. Info-Tech Research Group If Vista is deployed and desktop OS SA is not in place, try to get your money’s worth – but Windows 7 should be on a 3-4 year planning horizon. If Vista is deployed and desktop OS SA is in place, follow the 2012 deployment guidance. Compatibility <ul><li>If apps are Vista compliant, there is a very high likelihood that they will also be Windows 7 compliant. </li></ul><ul><li>Similarly, if peripherals, drivers, and hardware are Vista compliant, they will almost certainly be Windows 7 compliant. </li></ul>
  28. 28. Roadmap Info-Tech Research Group Stay on Vista Migrate to an Alternate OS Upgrade on Existing Hardware Upgrade via Hardware Refresh
  29. 29. Linux looks free, but support, administration & user training increase TCO & eliminate ROI Alternative desktop OSes, particularly Linux variations like Ubuntu, Xandros, SUSE, and Red Hat, are open source and look financially attractive on the surface. The costs associated with administrator and end-user training will be significant for those moving from XP to open source. Many enterprise applications will not work with alternative OSes, requiring a work-around like virtual desktops or terminal servers. Apple has outstanding hardware and a fantastic OS, but with few exceptions in verticals like education and desktop publishing, the cost is simply too high. Info-Tech Research Group Licensing Costs <ul><li>Even with licensing costs, Windows has the lowest TCO, supports critical enterprise applications, and Microsoft continues to hone the management, administration, and support functionality of the OS. </li></ul>
  30. 30. The future of the desktop OS Info-Tech Research Group In a recent survey, respondents were asked to comment on the following provocative statement: Desktop OSes as we know them will be extinct in 5 years as all applications and services will be available in a browser through cloud-based offerings As expected, the responses were varied and passionate. “ This is absolutely silly. Many services will be delivered through the cloud, but even phone OSes today are &quot;thicker&quot; than desktop OSes were 10 years ago. That trend will not even reverse that soon much less have come to that fruition.” “ No, desktop Os will not be dead - too many business applications will still require them. End users, especially younger ones, will not be constrained by desktops in the future - although 5 years is a little soon to see that.” “ False, desktop OS will still exist very similar to today, however usage within the enterprise will change. In 5 years expect today's desktop OS to represent about 40% to 45% of the fleet with browser based at 55 to 60% climbing at a rate of 5-10% per year.” “ It may be the case for small or medium size companies, but for large corporations, the Network bandwidth is a constant struggle. The network has to be upgraded multiple times to run a cloud-based organization, and for global corporations that will take much more than 5 years.” “ True. We are already planning large implementations of virtual desktops, virtualized central services (servers).” “ While I think that is possible, it will depend on the extent to which cloud computing and related security, bandwidth and infrastructure matures to support that. I think it's likely that cloud computing and apps will be prominent as described in the next three years. However there will still be desktop OSes for longer than five years.”
  31. 31. Summary Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>Windows 7 is the best OS for enterprise use from Microsoft and improves security, connectivity, and search for the enterprise. </li></ul><ul><li>Organizations currently on Windows XP must move to Windows 7 by 2012 to avoid the costs associated with a lack of support for the OS and applications. </li></ul><ul><li>Thoroughly testing applications and providing end-users with early access to the OS are critical to the success of a Windows 7 rollout. </li></ul><ul><li>Take the time upfront to understand the organization’s functionality requirements to avoid unnecessary licensing costs. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Appendix A: Related Research Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>Info-Tech resources that relate to Windows 7 include the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Select and Deploy Windows 7 the Right Way </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows 7 Version Selection Tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows 7 Deployment Strategy Selection Tool </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. Appendix B: Detailed Preparation & Planning Guide Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>Executive Summary </li></ul><ul><li>Recent interviews with early Windows 7 implementers have clearly pointed to proper preparation and planning as keys to a successful migration. Particular attention should be paid to application compatibility, deployment methodology, and end user training. This research note focuses on the preparation and planning organizations should engage in prior to deploying Windows 7, including: </li></ul><ul><li>Application compatibility testing and remediation tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Hardware compatibility testing and tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Deployment planning and tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Pilot testing and end user training. </li></ul><ul><li>Preparation and planning, with a focus on application compatibility, deployment methodology, and end user training, are critical to a successful Windows 7 deployment. </li></ul>Planning Point Preparation and planning are important for almost any enterprise technology deployment, but over 90 percent of all organizations will go through a Windows 7 migration before Windows XP officially becomes unsupported (end-of-life) in 2014. If you’re reading this there’s a very high likelihood that your organization will be migrating to Windows 7 by 2012, and a near certainty that a migration will happen by 2014. Key Considerations There are three primary planning considerations for organizations deploying Windows 7: application compatibility, deployment methodology, and end user training and acceptance. Fortunately, Microsoft wants you to implement Windows 7, so they have made a number of very useful tools available for planning and deployment. All of the tools and resources identified below are free from Microsoft. Hardware Compatibility Most desktops and laptops manufactured in 2008 or later will run Windows 7 without issue. In fact, even older hardware (up to 5 years old) will run Windows 7 32-bit handily, but there is some risk of driver incompatibility. The Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit (MAP) inventories PCs on the corporate network and identifies those capable of running Windows 7.
  34. 34. Appendix B: Continued Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>Application Compatibility </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t let incompatible applications derail a Window 7 migration. Here’s what’s available: </li></ul><ul><li>Application Compatibility Toolkit (ACT) – this tool identifies which enterprise applications are compatible with Windows 7 and provides reporting to help guide remediation for non-compatible applications. </li></ul><ul><li>Windows 7 XP Mode – this is a virtual instance of Windows XP running inside a Windows 7 desktop environment. It allows users to run applications that are incompatible with Windows 7 in a virtualized Windows XP environment on the Windows 7 desktop. Windows XP mode is a free download for Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate. </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Enterprise Desktop-Virtualization (MED-V) – MED-V is essentially the enterprise version of Windows 7 XP Mode. It allows organizations to centrally manage applications that are not compatible with Windows 7 in an XP virtual machine in a mode that is essentially transparent to end users. MED-V is part of the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP) and requires a Microsoft Enterprise Agreement. </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Application Virtualization (App-V) - App-V allows for the deployment of virtual applications in isolation (virtual bubbles) which remediates applications that may be compatible with Windows 7 but do not “play nicely” together. App-V is part of the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP) and requires a Microsoft Enterprise Agreement. </li></ul>While Microsoft has made tools available to test application compatibility, Info-Tech recommends testing all enterprise applications on Windows 7 prior to deployment. In other words, don’t take Microsoft’s word for it – do application compatibility testing in addition to using Microsoft tools. <ul><li>Deployment Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft has several tools to make a Windows 7 deployment less onerous. While these tools will be used in deployment, IT should be aware of them and test them while preparing and planning a deployment. Put these tools in your planning and deployment toolkit: </li></ul><ul><li>Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) – DISM lets you build a variety of standard images for deployment. </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK) – This tool allows for automated deployment using pre-configured answer files, as well as incorporating the User State Migration Tool (USMT) (allows the migration of user files and settings from the previous OS). </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) – This tool extends the WAIK functionality to include deployment options like network configuration and settings, and functionality like BitLocker. It essentially allows for zero-touch implementations. </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Deployment Services (WDS) – Again, WDS allows for a higher level of automation. Run on Windows Server 2008, it centralizes images and image management, and allows for multicast (one-to-many) deployment. </li></ul>
  35. 35. Appendix B: Continued Info-Tech Research Group Pilot Testing & End-user Training The majority of end users familiar with Windows XP or Vista will not find Windows 7 to be a big leap. The user interface is largely recognizable, although some familiarization/training may be required for features like the updated taskbar, jump lists, and federated search. Expect to deliver a short 30-60 minute training session for new users. Many of the organizations Info-Tech interviewed are piloting Windows 7 for savvy users – in the IT group, for instance. To get end users familiar with the OS prior to deployment, it makes sense to setup a virtual desktop to help end users get comfortable prior to deploying to their desktops. Set up a virtual desktop or terminal server running Windows 7 and schedule time for users to jump in and “kick the tires”. <ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Early implementers are saying that Windows 7 is the easiest Microsoft desktop OS to deploy, but some preparation and planning is required. Focus on these three key planning areas: </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure applications work. A majority of survey respondents (54%) listed application compatibility as the most significant planning requirement, and biggest potential pitfall. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan your deployment methodology. Inventory hardware and Microsoft’s tools and identify the most appropriate deployment methodology and tools available. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan for light end user training. Giving end users a virtual desktop to get familiar with Windows 7 will ease the transition and help mitigate the need for extensive end user training. Plan to spend 30-60 minutes training end users on Windows 7. </li></ul><ul><li>Bottom Line </li></ul><ul><li>Windows 7 will be installed on almost 80 percent of enterprise desktops and laptops by 2012. It is replacing an aging and soon to be unsupported Windows XP as the de facto standard desktop OS. Preparation and planning is the key to a successful Windows 7 deployment. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Appendix C: Deployment & Execution Guide Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>Executive Summary </li></ul><ul><li>Info-Tech’s recent Windows 7 survey contained some clear messages about pitfalls to avoid when deploying the OS. Second on the list of important pitfall mitigation strategies is selecting the most appropriate deployment methodology. This research note focuses on Windows 7 deployment, in particular: </li></ul><ul><li>Four high-level deployment methodologies. </li></ul><ul><li>The right tools for each deployment methodology. </li></ul><ul><li>Validating the deployment methodology. </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft has given enterprises a wealth of tools and resources to ease the Windows 7 deployment burden. </li></ul>Implementation Point Preparing for organization-wide deployment is critical. When it comes time to deploy, much of the heavy lifting has already been done. Selecting the appropriate deployment methodology and toolkit will simplify the implementation. Early adopters Info-Tech has spoken with almost unanimously agreed that Windows 7 deployment has been relatively painless. <ul><li>Key Considerations </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft identifies 4 basic Windows 7 deployment methodologies. They are: </li></ul><ul><li>High-Touch with Retail Media . A hands-on, manual deployment, where you installing the Windows operating system on each client computer by using the retail installation DVD, and you manually configure each computer. </li></ul><ul><li>High Touch with Standard Image . This strategy is similar to the High Touch with Retail Media strategy, but it uses an operating system image that includes your customizations and application configurations. </li></ul><ul><li>Light-Touch, High-Volume Deployment . This strategy requires limited interaction during deployment. Interaction occurs at the beginning of the installation, but the remainder of the process is automated. </li></ul><ul><li>Zero-Touch, High-Volume Deployment . This strategy requires no interaction during deployment. The process is fully automated through Configuration Manager 2007 R2. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Microsoft TechNet </li></ul>
  37. 37. Appendix C: Continued Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>High Touch With Retail Media </li></ul><ul><li>This deployment methodology is best suited for small enterprises with the following characteristics: </li></ul><ul><li>Fewer than 100 Windows desktops/laptops. </li></ul><ul><li>No Enterprise Agreement/Software Assurance with Microsoft (i.e. retail media is the only available option). </li></ul><ul><li>IT generalists with little or no OS deployment experience will be implementing. </li></ul><ul><li>A relatively simple IT and network infrastructure. </li></ul><ul><li>Other than the retail media, the only tool required for this type of deployment is the Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK) which can be used to create standard answer files for unattended installation. </li></ul><ul><li>High Touch With Standard Image </li></ul><ul><li>While also well suited for smaller enterprises, this deployment method is more “cookie cutter” and is well suited for the following types of organizations: </li></ul><ul><li>Up to 200 Windows desktops/laptops. </li></ul><ul><li>May have a Software Assurance (SA) agreement with Microsoft, but using retail media is also an option. </li></ul><ul><li>IT staff deploying using this method are more specialized and have some experience implementing desktop OSes. </li></ul><ul><li>A relatively simple IT and network infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Tools used in this method include: </li></ul><ul><li>Retail or Volume License (VL) media </li></ul><ul><li>Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK) </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) </li></ul>
  38. 38. Appendix C: Continued Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>Light Touch, High Volume </li></ul><ul><li>This deployment method is suited for more sophisticated small and mid-sized organizations. Key characteristics of organization using this methodology include: </li></ul><ul><li>Up to 500 Windows desktops/laptops </li></ul><ul><li>An SA agreement with Microsoft </li></ul><ul><li>IT professionals with OS deployment experience. </li></ul><ul><li>A relatively sophisticated managed IT and network infrastructure. </li></ul><ul><li>Tools used in this method include: </li></ul><ul><li>Volume License media </li></ul><ul><li>Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK) </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit (MAP) </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Deployment Services (WDS) </li></ul><ul><li>Zero Touch, High Volume </li></ul><ul><li>This deployment option is best for mid-sized and large organizations with sophisticated IT environments. It is suited for organizations that have: </li></ul><ul><li>More than 500 Windows desktops/laptops </li></ul><ul><li>An SA agreement with Microsoft </li></ul><ul><li>IT professionals with OS and experience using a System and Asset Management solution (i.e. Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), Symantec Altiris, LANDesk, Novell Zenworks). </li></ul><ul><li>A sophisticated, managed IT and network infrastructure with a System and Asset Management solution. </li></ul><ul><li>Tools used in this method include: </li></ul><ul><li>Volume License media </li></ul><ul><li>Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK) </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit (MAP) </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Deployment Services (WDS) </li></ul><ul><li>A System and Asset Management solution (i.e. Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), Symantec Altiris, LANDesk, Novell Zenworks) </li></ul>Variants, Alternatives, and Optional Tools Many Windows 7 implementers that Info-Tech interviewed are in the process of deploying through hardware refresh. This is a very valid, and common deployment methodology. Those deploying Windows 7 strictly through hardware refresh typically fall outside of the above deployment methodologies because they likely refreshing hardware cyclically rather than all at once. In this case, an organization with 900 desktops may replace 300/year over the next 3 years, and are often deploying using the high touch, standard image methodology. Another option for those deploying through hardware refresh is to have the PC VAR carry the standard OS images and deploy them prior to delivering new hardware. There is a cost associated with this option, but it will save IT some time and resources. Finally, organizations with an SA agreement with Microsoft should explore the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP) . This toolkit is available only to those that have an Enterprise Agreement with Microsoft (including SA).
  39. 39. Appendix C: Continued Info-Tech Research Group <ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Early implementers are saying that Windows 7 is the easiest Microsoft desktop OS to deploy, but deployment methodology is an important consideration. Assess your situation for the most appropriate deployment method. </li></ul><ul><li>Size matters. Using a more complex deployment methodology will not be appropriate for smaller shops, and using a high touch deployment methodology will be too onerous for larger shops. Pick the optimal deployment method for your organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Make use of available tools. Credit where credit is due – Microsoft has made a plethora of tools available to simplify enterprise deployment of Windows 7. Build a deployment toolkit that suits your methodology. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t forget the preparation and planning. The majority of deployment issues can be avoided with well thought out preparation and planning. </li></ul><ul><li>Bottom Line </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft has made Windows 7 easier to deploy than any previous OS. There are a wealth of tools available to simplify preparation, planning, and execution. The key is selecting the most appropriate deployment methodology and using the right toolkit. </li></ul>

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