School-wide Standard Citation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

School-wide Standard Citation

  • 1,409 views
Uploaded on

This presentation is about how and why KIS is using MLA as the standard for citation. Brief explanations of MLA in-text citation is provided, along with resources for clarification on MLA citation......

This presentation is about how and why KIS is using MLA as the standard for citation. Brief explanations of MLA in-text citation is provided, along with resources for clarification on MLA citation methods.

More in: Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,409
On Slideshare
1,402
From Embeds
7
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 7

http://www.scoop.it 7

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Explain some experienced from the IDL class- students not sure of what the appropriate citation standard is, also feeling that in-text citation was too hard, and several students expressing a wish that the school clearly delinated and standardized what was expected from them.
  • It is really important to remember that the MLA citation system, as any other system is quite specific, and has different nuanced rules for different kinds of resources. Every time I interact with a student about citation, we always have to do a bit of research together because their has its own specificities- like the image they are citing has no name, or the play they are using has no line numbers. Therefore it is really important that you know where to go to find information for when unique situations come up.

Transcript

  • 1. School-Wide Standardized Citation
    What does it mean for you as a teacher?
  • 2. School-Wide Standardized Citation
    The School-Wide Standardized Citation plan is to implement the instruction of citation to both faculty and students from 5th-12th grade in the most recent revision of citation and reference rules of the MLA (Modern Language Association) which uses parenthetical citation for in-text citation, and uses footnotes exclusively for explanatory or clarifying notes. Additionally, the proposal advocates implementing instruction in the 11th and 12th grade in the APA (American Psychology Association) and CSE (Council of Scientific Editors) citation systems in the appropriate subjects.
  • 3. In grades 5-12 at KIS in-text citation will be taught by the teaching staff, and also expected in all student papers. Also, this will be utilized in IB papers.
    In all classes from 5th grade and up, MLA will be the expected standard. In the 11th and 12th class, several departments will be specified to use CSE/CBE and APA.
    All of these methods utilize in-text citation or parenthetical citation.
    What does this mean?
  • 4. Why did this come about?
    -Student confused about how to ensure their own academic integrity when writing a paper.
    -Variety of citation methods being taught, therefore students are confused about what the citation expectations are from one teacher to the other.
    -Lack of reference material on citation methods such as footnotes.
    -To prepare the students for their academic life beyond KIS, as in-text citation is the standard in most higher education institutions.
  • 5. Departmental Breakdown
  • 6. When do we start this?
    The answer is now!
    However, within this year we will be focusing more on making sure that the school has a uniform understanding of what we expect in terms of citation.
    For all grades, except the current 12th graders, you can immediately begin communicating the standard of in-text or parenthetical citation to them.
    For the 12th graders it has been decided that as they are already deep into their diploma programme coursework, and that it would be difficult and stressful for them to adapt to the new citation style.
  • 7. Quick Note:
    Today we are going to just go over MLA in-text citation style, as this is the most commonly used method, and the most relevant to today’s attendees.
  • 8. What does MLAin-text citation look like?
    ParthaChatterjee writes in his book The Nation and its Fragments about how women became integral to the anti-colonial Indian Nationalist argument. Chatterjee writes that women were expected to be upholders of tradition, and needed to symbolically, “preserve, and strengthen the inner core of the national culture, its spiritual essence” (121).
    In UravashiButalia’s article Community, State and Gender: Some Reflections on the Partition of India she examines the abduction, recovering and “rehabilitation” of women within the narrative of Partition. As she begins, she writes, “ I also believed (and this view has been considerably qualified since) that in times of communal strife and violence women remain essentially non-violent and are at the receiving end of violence as victims” (Butalia 180).
  • 9. In-Text Citation
    All of the references to the resources are inside the text (no notes at the bottom of the page!)
    The information that references your resource is in the text, and also within the parenthetical at the end of the sentence (some people call them brackets…)
    The references in the text are related to the information found on the works cited page. Sources that are utilized in the paper must have an entry on the works cited page.
  • 10. “The MLA In-Text Citations: The Basics” page on the Purdue OWL website provides the following as basic guidelines:
    “Basic In-Text Citation Rules
    In MLA style, referring to the works of others in your text is done by using what is known as parenthetical citation. This method involves placing relevant source information in parentheses after a quote or a paraphrase.
    General Guidelines
    The source information required in a parenthetical citation depends (1.) upon the source medium (e.g. Print, Web, DVD) and (2.) upon the source’s entry on the Works Cited (bibliography) page.
    Any source information that you provide in-text must correspond to the source information on the Works Cited page. More specifically, whatever signal word or phrase you provide to your readers in the text, must be the first thing that appears on the left-hand margin of the corresponding entry in the Works Cited List.”
  • 11. Basic MLA Rule
    The basic rule for MLA is whatever is the first piece of information that would appear in your works cited or bibliography, is the information that would appear in the parentheticals in your text.
    The exception to this would be plays- where the part of the play, and the line number are what appear in the parentheticals.
  • 12. Quick Video
    Many student struggle with when they should cite. In all in-text citation styles you must cite direct quotes and paraphrased/summarized ideas.
    This video helps explain that briefly and succinctly- and can be a very useful resource for when explaining citation to your students.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atTRlg6iaGo
  • 13. MLA Style
    So, what are the types of MLA in-text citation formats for books or articles?
    Bibliography:
    Godbole, Madhav. The Holocaust of Indian Partition. New Delhi: Rupa Publications, 2006. Print.
    In-Text Citation:
    Example 1: Quoting the author.
    The Holocaust of Indian Partition states, “United India would have been a large common market and globalisation would have given it a more competitive edge” (Godbole 477).
    Example 2: Paraphrasing the author’s idea.
    The Holocaust of Indian Partition argues that a united India, Pakistan and Bangladesh would have provided the nation more leverage in the globalized market (Godbole 477).
  • 14. MLA Style
    What about MLA in-text citation for electronic sources?
    If it is an article from an online journal or an ebook, you would cite it the same as a physical book with the author’s name and page number parenthetically.
    However, if it were a page on a website, you would write it as the following:
    Bibliography:
    “Human Rights”. United Nations, 2011. Web. 23 Aug 2011.
    In-Text Citation:
    On the United Nations webpage there is a list of thematic issues such as: “Genocide”, “Disability and the UN” and “Human Trafficking”(“Human Rights”).
  • 15. MLA Formatting Oddities…
    The title of the book, whether in-text or in the bibliography or works cited is italicized.
    Example:
    Bibliography:
    Godbole, Madhav. The Holocaust of Indian Partition. New Delhi: Rupa Publications, 2006. Print.
    The Holocaust of Indian Partition states, “United India would have been a large common market and globalisation would have given it a more competitive edge” (Godbole 477).
  • 16. MLA Formatting Oddities
    In MLA if you mention the author’s last name in the sentence you don’t need to put it in the parenthetical. However, if in a proceeding sentence you do not mention the author’s name, however are using the same author’s ideas or work then the name should appear in the parenthetical.
    Example:
    No Author in Sentence
    The Holocaust of Indian Partition states, “United India would have been a large common market and globalisation would have given it a more competitive edge” (Godbole 477).
    Author in Sentence
    In The Holocaust of Indian Partition Godbole writes, “United India would have been a large common market and globalisation would have given it a more competitive edge” (477).
  • 17. MLA Formatting Oddities
    In the parenthetical there is no comma or period between the author’s last name and page number. Also, there is no page or p. in front of the page number.
    Example:
    The Holocaust of Indian Partition states, “United India would have been a large common market and globalisation would have given it a more competitive edge”(Godbole 477).
  • 18. MLA Formatting Oddities
    The parenthetical comes at the end of the sentence, and the period is always, always, always outside of the parenthetical. The end quotation mark comes before the first parenthetical.
    Example:
    The Holocaust of Indian Partition states, “United India would have been a large common market and globalisation would have given it a more competitive edge” (Godbole 477).
  • 19. MLA Formatting Oddities
    In the bibliography or works cited entry for a resource, you always need to specify the source, for example web or print.
    Example:
    Godbole, Madhav. The Holocaust of Indian Partition. New Delhi: Rupa Publications, 2006. Print.
    Jacobson, Matthew Frye. Barbarian Virtues. 2000. New York: Hill and Wang, 2010. Questia. Web. 1 September 2011.
  • 20. MLA Formatting Oddities
    When citing internet sources in MLA, the URL is not required. This is due to several things, including:
    -The source of the text is already clear, as in the bibliographic entry “Web” or “Print” has been entered.
    -URLs (for example: http://www.thisismywebsource.com ) can change at any time, and therefore giving the URL is not a reliable or useful way of citing a source.
  • 21. What do I put in parentheticals when some information is missing?
    (Author pg. number)
    (Book Title pg. number)
    (Publisher pg. number)
    (Author)
    (Website name or Article Title)
    (Organization)
    Print resource
    Online resource
  • 22. So how do I find information on MLA style?
    The two most reliable and recommended resources are the following:
    Purdue Online Writing Lab, which is found at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/
    And
    The Little, Brown Essential Handbook, 7th Edition
    (now available in the Library!)
  • 23. Students and MLA Citation
    Whenever students are receiving their assignments for formal writing projects, it can really help them if you make clear to them every time what your expectations for citation are. While it may seem repetitive, it can really help the students to be getting several reminders of what is expected.
  • 24. What is ahead…
    Over this academic year, we will come together for Pro-Ds on several occasions. Also, within this month, a variety of publications will be produced that you can then use in your classes, and also for your own reference.
    If you have any questions about in-text citation, please do not hesitate to contact me in the Library, or to email me at Headlibrarian@gmail.com.