Effecting change by the use of emerging technologies in healthcare: A future vision for u-nursing in 2020

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Effecting change by the use of emerging technologies in healthcare: A future vision for u-nursing in 2020 …

Effecting change by the use of emerging technologies in healthcare: A future vision for u-nursing in 2020

Michelle Honey, School of Nursing, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Karl Øyri, Interventional Centre, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway
Susan Newbold, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville TN, USA
Amy Coenen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, USA
Hyeoun-Ae Park, College of Nursing, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
Anneli Ensio, Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Kuopio, Finland
Elvio Jesus, Nursing Research Group of Madeira, Portugal

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  • 1. Effecting change by the use of emerging technologies in healthcare: A future vision for u-nursing in 2020 Michelle Honey, School of Nursing , University of Auckland, New Zealand Karl Øyri, Interventional Centre, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Susan Newbold, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville TN, USA Amy Coenen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, USA Hyeoun-Ae Park, College of Nursing, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Anneli Ensio, Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Kuopio, Finland Elvio Jesus, Nursing Research Group of Madeira, Portugal
  • 2. Background
    • Authors - an international group of nurse informatics leaders at the International Medical Informatics Association – Nursing Informatics Working Group (IMIA-NIWG) Post Congress held in Korea 2006.
    • Considered the potential trends in health informatics, with particular regard to technology and health care for the future (2020).
    • Focus on how technology could be used to provide health care in tomorrow’s world and the impact this might have for nursing.
  • 3. Our assumptions for 2020
    • Technology use will increase, be everywhere and part of everyday life – technology will be ubiquitous.
    • This will impact significantly on nursing practice and we propose that ubiquitous nursing (u-nursing) will be the future trend.
  • 4. U-Nursing
    • Definition
    • “ Provision of nursing for anyone or any organization, anytime, anywhere, through any networks and any devices”.
  • 5. Trends
    • International trends of the aging population and the increase in chronic diseases indicate that the consumers of the future are likely to be older and many may have chronic diseases.
    • An additional focus will be on health promotion and maintenance to reduce the burden on the health services.
  • 6. Nursing in 2020
    • Patients are redefined as consumers
      • users and partners in health care.
    • Nurse as info-mediator
      • facilitates the consumers’ use of technology.
  • 7. Scenario for healthcare in 2020
    • A consumer with diabetes is discharged from the Clinical Care Facility after bypass surgery with personal sensors in a wristwatch to their ‘smart house’.
    • The wristwatch monitors blood glucose, pH, ECG, BP, peripheral arterial oxygen saturation, carbon dioxide, electrolytes, and peripheral temperature.
    • The radio frequency identification (RFID) medication cabinet monitors prescribed medication use and need for supplies.
  • 8.  
  • 9. Community based U-Health Centre
    • Sensors in chest and leg dressings send messages to the nurse when it is time to change them.
    • Sensor data is processed and any values outside the range are returned to consumer with correctional suggestions.
    • Nurse can see data and is sent alerts.
  • 10.
    • Consumer’s daily exercise program and diet appears on screen.
    • The consumer can log onto a chronic disease support / post operative education group.
    • Consumer supported by a communication system (voice activated - video phone) between home and nurse at U-Health Center.
    Supported in their ‘smart house’
  • 11. Issues
    • Current nursing education will not adequately prepare the nurse we envisage for the future.
    • Focus should be on consumers and not the technology.
    • Consumers and health priorities should drive technology development.
  • 12. Contact details
    • Michelle Honey
    • School of Nursing , University of Auckland
    • Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1010
    • New Zealand
    • Email: M.honey@auckland.ac.nz
    Acknowledgements The authors wish to acknowledge the organisers and participants of the IMIA-NI SIG Post Conference held in Pyung-Chang, Korea, June 2006.