Final colombia presentation

580 views

Published on

Geography 323 Colombia Case Study-- Brad, Breanne Claassen, Cam Klassen

Published in: Business, Travel
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
580
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Final colombia presentation

  1. 1. COLOMBIA: 1948 – Brad Quiring | Breanne Claassen | October 15, 2013 Cam Klassen
  2. 2. WHAT IS THE CONFLICT ALL ABOUT? AND WHEN DID IT HAPPEN?
  3. 3. COLOMBIA: BACKGROUND 1948-58: “La Violencia” 1970’s: “War of LowIntensity” 1948 : 1965: Leftist Jorge National Gaiten Liberation assassinat Army (ELN) ed established 1958: Conservatives and Liberals agree to form National Front 1966: Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) established 2000 : “Plan Colombia” wins almost $1 Billion US in military aid from US 1980 : Drug boom
  4. 4. WHO IS INVOLVED?
  5. 5. COLOMBIA: WHO? Left-Wing Guerrillas -FARC-Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia -Largest revolutionary guerilla movement in conflict -ELN-National Liberation Army -Second largest guerilla movement in conflict The United States -Provided aid to Colombia as they were one of few who supported Vietnam War - Made Colombia largest recipient of US aid this year Right-Wing Paramilitary Groups -Created in 1980 by Colombian Army with help from US aid - Created to combat revolutionary groups—became heavily involved in drug war, kidnapping and other movements - Paramilitary has become the most relentless
  6. 6. HOW IS IT BEING FINANCED?
  7. 7. COLOMBIA: HOW? FARC Financing EXTORTION IN US $ AUC Financing 30% 22% $140, 000, 000 (The sum extorted from Oil Companies each year by the ELN and FARC) 70% Narcotics 78% Data: (Barahona, 2011) and (Svante, 2005) Other
  8. 8. WHY ARE THESE PARTIES INVOLVED?
  9. 9. COLOMBIA: WHY? Left-Wing Guerrillas - An expression of the people… a political and military organization whose aim is the solution of the problems that affect the more than 30 million Colombians who live in poverty The United States - Cold War geopolitics - Natural Resources Right-Wing Paramilitary Groups - Established following US recommendation - Are the hired hands of those who have the most to lose in change
  10. 10. WHERE IS THIS HAPPENING?
  11. 11. COLOMBIA: WHERE? FARC Guerrilla Actions 1998 - 2005 - Conflicts located away from city centers and government areas No. of actions - Guerrilla exploit more remote and inaccessible areas - Proximity to resources Source: Government of Colombia, 2007
  12. 12. COLOMBIA: SUMMARY
  13. 13. REFERENCES Anonymous. (2013). Columbia’s Chance for Negotiated Settlement. Stratfor Geopolitical Diary. 3. Business Source Complete, EBSCOhots (accessed October 9, 2013) Barahona, Carlos (2011). Colombia: FARC profiting from narco-trafficking. Infosurhou. Available at http://infosurhoy.com/en_GB/articles/saii/features/main/2011/11/21/feature-02 Buhaug, Halvard and Scott Gates (2002). The Geography of Civil War. Journal of Peace Research no. 4: 417. Buhaug, Halvard and Scott Gates, and PaiviLujala. (2009). Geography, Rebel Capability, and the Duration of Civil Conflict. The Journal of Conflict Resolution no. 4: 544. Chomsky, Noam (2004). On Colombia: an introduction to Doug Stokes’ America’s Other War: Terrorizing Colombia. Zed Books. Collier, Paul and AnkeHoeffler (2004). Greed and Grievance in Civil War. Economic Papers 56(4): 563–595. Cornell, Svante (2005). The Interaction of Narcotics and Conflict. Journal of Peace Research, Vol. 42, No. 6, pp. 751-760. Available at http://www.jstor.org.proxy.ufv.ca:2048/stable/30042417 Government of Colombia (2007). Human Rights. Available at http://www.derechoshumanos.gov.co/Paginas/DDHH.aspx Griffith, Ivelaw (1994). From Cold War Geopolitics to Post-Cold War Geonarcotics. International Journal, Vol. 49, No.1, pp. 1-36. Published by the Canadian International Council. Available at http://www.jstor.org.proxy.ufv.ca:2048/stable/40202912 Johnson, Kyle, and Michael Jonsson. (2013). Colombia: Ending the Forever War? Survival 55 (1):67–86. doi:10.1080/00396338.2013.767407. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00396338.2013.767407. Lopez, Giselle. (2011). Potential for Justice in a Culture of Violence. Department of Washington:Education2 (1): 1–20. http://depts.washington.edu/jsjweb/wpcontent/uploads/2011/05/JSJPRINTv1n2.-Lopez-G.pdf. Petras, James (2001). Geopolitics of Plan Colombia. Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 35/ No. 52/53 pp. 4617-4623. Available at http://www.jstor.org.proxy.ufv.ca:2048/stable/4410105 Restrepo, J, M Spagat, and JF Vargas. (2003). The Dynamics of the Colombian Civil Conflict: A New Data Set. Homo Oeconomicus. Vol. 21. Ssrn. http://personal.rhul.ac.uk/uhte/014/Research.htm. Ross, Michael (2004). How Do Natural Resources Influence Civil War? Evidence from Thirteen Cases. International Organization, Vol. 58, No. 1, pp. 35-67. Cambridge University Press. Available at http://www.jstor.org.proxy.ufv.ca:2048/stable/3877888 Vargas, Gonzalo (2011). Drugs, Hearts and Minds: Irregular War and the Coca Economy in South Bolivar, Colombia. Civil Wars 13, no.1:21-39.

×