The Housing Pathways of Central and East European Migrant Workers living in Wales
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

The Housing Pathways of Central and East European Migrant Workers living in Wales

on

  • 241 views

Presentation given by Peter Mackie, Paul Milbourne, Cardiff University and John Pritchard, Shelter Cymru, UK at a FEANTSA Research Conference on "Understanding Homelessness and Housing Exclusion in ...

Presentation given by Peter Mackie, Paul Milbourne, Cardiff University and John Pritchard, Shelter Cymru, UK at a FEANTSA Research Conference on "Understanding Homelessness and Housing Exclusion in the New European Context", Budapest, Hungary, 2010

Statistics

Views

Total Views
241
Views on SlideShare
241
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Introduction FEANTSA Information from FEANTSA’s members Specific look at some countries (not IE and UK)
  • Introduction FEANTSA Information from FEANTSA’s members Specific look at some countries (not IE and UK)

The Housing Pathways of Central and East European Migrant Workers living in Wales The Housing Pathways of Central and East European Migrant Workers living in Wales Presentation Transcript

  • The housing pathways of central and eastEuropean migrant workers living in Wales Peter Mackie, Cardiff University Paul Milbourne, Cardiff University John Pritchard, Shelter Cymru European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN THE ENHR NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT
  • Introduction and context In 2004 the EU expanded 989,085 registrations on the Worker Registration Scheme in the UK (25,000 in Wales), 72% Polish Central and east European migrants living in Wales may face restrictions to housing and homelessness support Anecdotal evidence suggested that central and east European migrants were facing housing difficulties European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN ENHR THE NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT
  • Research methods In-depth interviews with 93 central and east European migrants, representing a mix of housing experiences and household types. Self-completion questionnaires sent to all Welsh local authorities (13 responses) Interviews conducted with 28 key people (including local authority housing and homelessness officers, voluntary sector organisations) European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN ENHR THE NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT
  • Motivation for migrationMotivation for Number PercentagemigrationEconomic 48 51%Joining family/partner 21 23%Explore the world 12 13%Other 11 12%Unknown 1 1%Total 93 100 European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN ENHR THE NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT
  • Facilitation of migrationFacilitator of Percentag Numbermigration eFamily 37 40%Employment agency 28 30%Friends 20 21%No support 8 9%Total 93 100 European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN ENHR THE NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT
  • Housing conditions and issues Initially, most (83%) migrant workers were in poor accommodation, or homeless. “There were mushrooms everywhere, it was a joke. Plaster was falling down, the floor was horrible and mattress was old.” [Truda, 25-34, from Poland] Many people managed to improve their housing as they became established. Approximately three quarters (73%) were in reasonable or good housing. There were issues regarding tied accommodation, Houses of Multiple Occupation and landlord management European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN ENHR THE NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT
  • 60 50 40 houselessFrequency poor 30 mixed good 20 10 0 1st house 2nd house 3rd house current house Housing European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN ENHR THE NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT
  • Homelessness What percentage of Migrant Workers had experienced homelessness in the UK? A. 15% B.30% C. 45% The main reasons for homelessness were job loss, losing tied accommodation, disputes with housemates and fear of crime No recourse to public funds was a significant problem for those who found themselves homeless. Many who found themselves homeless stayed with friends until they found new accommodation, but others slept rough European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN ENHR THE NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT
  • Reflections and future directions Explore the extent to which these pathways are a result of individual agency and structural constraints Investigate divergences from the general pathway from poor quality to better quality housing Future research might consider the housing experiences of people who have returned to eastern Europe European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN ENHR THE NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT
  • The housing pathways of central and eastEuropean migrant workers living in Wales Peter Mackie, Cardiff University Paul Milbourne, Cardiff University John Pritchard, Shelter Cymru European Research Conference, Budapest, 17th September 2010 UNDERSTANDING HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING EXCLUSION IN ENHR THE NEW EUROPEAN CONTEXT