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So Help Me God

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There is a relationship between the use of mood altering substances and the belief in a higher power. This presentation was made at conference at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, …

There is a relationship between the use of mood altering substances and the belief in a higher power. This presentation was made at conference at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. I used information from a white paper prepared at the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (my former employer).

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  • The number of Christians is dropping from 32%
  • Sacred books: Torah, Tanach, & Talmud
    Religious leader is the Rabbi
    Less than 1% of the world’s population
  • Jewish Texts
    The Tanakh corresponds to the Jewish Scriptures, (often referred to as the Old Testament by Christians). It is composed of three groups of books:
    the Torah (aka Pentateuch): Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. the Nevi'im: Joshua, Judges, Samuel (2), Kings (2), Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zachariah, and MalachiIsaiah. the Ketuvim, the "Writings" including Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, Ruth, Esther, Lamentations, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, Chronicles (2).
    The Talmud contains stories, laws, medical knowledge, debates about moral choices, etc. It is composed of material which comes mainly from two sources:
    the Mishnah's, 6 "orders" containing hundreds of chapters, including series of laws from the Hebrew Scriptures. It was compiled about 200 CE. the Gemara (one Babylonian and one Palestinian) is encyclopedic in scope. It includes comments from hundreds of Rabbis from 200 - 500 CE, explaining the Mishnah with additional historical, religious, legal, sociological, etc. material. It often records many different opinions on a topic without giving a definitive answer.
  • Some Jews view Jesus as a great moral teacher. Others see him as a false prophet or as an idol of Christianity. Some sects of Judaism will not even say his name due to the prohibition against saying an idol's name.  The Jews are often referred to as G-d's chosen people. This does not mean that they are in any way to be considered superior to other groups. Biblical verses such as Exodus 19:5 simply imply that G-d has selected Israel to receive and study the Torah, to worship G-d only, to rest on the weekly Sabbath, and to celebrate the festivals. Jews were not chosen to be better that others; they were simply selected to receive more difficult responsibilities, and more onerous punishment if they fail.  The 613 commandments found in Leviticus and other books regulate all aspects of Jewish life The Ten commandments, as delineated in Exodus 20:1-17 and Deuteronomy 5:6-21, form a brief synopsis of the Law The Messiah (the anointed one of G-d) will arrive in the future and gather Jews once more into the land of Israel. There will be a general resurrection of the dead at that time. The Jerusalem Temple, destroyed in 70 CE, will be rebuilt. A fetus gains full personhood when it is half-emerged from its mother's body. Boys reach the status of Bar Mitzvah on their 13th birthday; girls reach Bat Mitzvah on their 12th birthday. This means that they are recognized as adults and are personally responsible to follow the Jewish commandments and laws. Males are allowed to lead a religious service; they are counted in a "minyan" (a quota of men necessary to perform certain parts of religious services). Following their Bar Mitzvah or Bat Mitzvah they can sign contracts; they can testify in religious courts; theoretically, they can marry, although the Talmud recommends 18 to 24 as the proper age for marriage.
    The more liberal movements within Judaism differ from some of the above beliefs concerning the source of the Torah, the concept of direct reward and punishment according to one's behavior, etc.
  • Some Jews view Jesus as a great moral teacher. Others see him as a false prophet or as an idol of Christianity. Some sects of Judaism will not even say his name due to the prohibition against saying an idol's name.  The Jews are often referred to as G-d's chosen people. This does not mean that they are in any way to be considered superior to other groups. Biblical verses such as Exodus 19:5 simply imply that G-d has selected Israel to receive and study the Torah, to worship G-d only, to rest on the weekly Sabbath, and to celebrate the festivals. Jews were not chosen to be better that others; they were simply selected to receive more difficult responsibilities, and more onerous punishment if they fail.  The 613 commandments found in Leviticus and other books regulate all aspects of Jewish life The Ten commandments, as delineated in Exodus 20:1-17 and Deuteronomy 5:6-21, form a brief synopsis of the Law The Messiah (the anointed one of G-d) will arrive in the future and gather Jews once more into the land of Israel. There will be a general resurrection of the dead at that time. The Jerusalem Temple, destroyed in 70 CE, will be rebuilt. A fetus gains full personhood when it is half-emerged from its mother's body. Boys reach the status of Bar Mitzvah on their 13th birthday; girls reach Bat Mitzvah on their 12th birthday. This means that they are recognized as adults and are personally responsible to follow the Jewish commandments and laws. Males are allowed to lead a religious service; they are counted in a "minyan" (a quota of men necessary to perform certain parts of religious services). Following their Bar Mitzvah or Bat Mitzvah they can sign contracts; they can testify in religious courts; theoretically, they can marry, although the Talmud recommends 18 to 24 as the proper age for marriage.
    The more liberal movements within Judaism differ from some of the above beliefs concerning the source of the Torah, the concept of direct reward and punishment according to one's behavior, etc.
  • Observation of the weekly Sabbath as a day of rest, starting at sundown on Friday evening. Strict discipline, according to the Law, which governs all areas of life Regular attendance by Jewish males at Synagogue Celebration of the annual festivals including: Passover, or Pesach is held each Spring to recall the Jews' deliverance out of slavery in Egypt circa 1300 BCE. A ritual Seder meal is eaten in each observant Jewish home at this time. Six different foods are placed on the seder plate in the order in which they area eaten: Karpas (vegetables dipped in salt water) recalls the bitter tears shed during slavery Maror (bitter herbs) to symbolize the bitterness of slavery. Chazeret (bitter vegetables) also to symbolize the bitterness of slavery. Choroset (apple, nuts & spices with wine) represents the mortar used by Hebrew slaves.
    Also placed on the seder plate, but uneaten during the Seder meal: Zeroa (lamb shankbone) to recall the Passover sacrifice in the ancient temple. Beitzah (roasted egg) symbolizes mourning, sacrifice, spring, and renewal.
    Not placed on the Seder plate, but often eaten, is a boiled egg.
    After women were first allowed to become Rabbim, some Jews commented: "A woman belongs as a Rabbi like an orange belongs on a seder plate." As such, many Reform Jews now include an orange with their Seder Plate to commemorate female Rabbim. Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year, and is the anniversary of the completion of creation, about 5760 years ago. It is held in the fall. The 10 days from Rosh Hashanah to Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, are days of penitence. Yom Kippur is a day of fasting until sundown. Sukkoth or the Feast of Booths is an 8 day harvest festival; a time of thanksgiving. Hanukkah or the Feast of Lights is an 8 day feast of dedication. It recalls the war fought by the Maccabees in the cause of religious freedom. It also commemorates a miracle in the Temple, when one-day's worth of oil lasted eight days. It is typically observed in December. Originally a minor Jewish holy day, it has become more important in recent years. Purim, the Feast of Lots recalls the defeat by Queen Esther of the plan to slaughter all of the Persian Jews, circa 400 BCE. Shavout, the Feast of Weeks recalls G-d's revelation of the Torah to the Jewish people. It is held in late May or early June.
    Rules for calculating Rosh Hashanah and Passover are available online at: http://quasar.as.utexas.edu/ The local synagogue is governed by the congregation and is normally led by a rabbi who has been chosen by the congregation. A rabbi is a teacher who has been well educated in Jewish law and tradition. Any adult male with sufficient knowledge can lead religious services. In reform and some conservative congregations, a woman can also preside. This is often done in those Jewish communities who lack a rabbi. The Chief Rabbis in France and Great Britain have authority only by the agreement of those who accept it. Two Chief Rabbis in Israel have civil authority in areas of family law.
  • There are five main forms of Judaism in the world today. However, the most conservative traditions do not necessarily recognize the most liberal as being part of Judaism. This is a common problem among many of the world's great religions.
    In alphabetic order, the main traditions active in North America are:
    Conservative* Judaism: This began in the mid-nineteenth century as a reaction against the Reform movement. It is a main-line movement midway between Reform and Orthodox. Humanistic Judaism: This is a very small group, mainly composed of atheists and agnostics, who regard mankind as the measure of all things. Orthodox* Judaism: This the oldest, most conservative, and most diverse form of Judaism. Modern Orthodox, Chasidim and Ultra Orthodox share a basic belief in the derivation of Jewish law, even as they hold very different outlooks on life. They attempt to follow the original form of Judaism as they view it to be. They look upon every word in their sacred texts as being divinely inspired. Reconstructionist Judaism: This is a new, small, liberal movement started by Mordecai Kaplan as an attempt to unify and revitalize the religion. They reject the concept that Jews are a uniquely favored and chosen people. They have no connection at all with Christian Reconstructionism, which is an ultra-conservative form of Christianity. Reform* Judaism: They are a liberal group, followed by many North American Jews. The movement started in the 1790's in Germany. They follow the ethical laws of Judaism, but leave up to the individual the decision whether to follow or ignore the dietary and other traditional laws. They use modern forms of worship. There are many female rabbis in reform congregations.
  • Sacred text is the Bible
    Places of worship include: Church, Cathedral, Kingdom Hall, Temple, Mission, etc
    Relgious Leader is an Elder, Priest, Pastor or Minister
  • Sacred texts – Quaran and Hadith – growing from 19%
    Mosque is the place of worship. Reiigious leader is the imam
    Origin of Islam:
    The name of this religion, Islam, is derived from the Arabic word "salam," which is often interpreted as meaning "peace." However "submission" would be a better translation. A Muslim is a follower of Islam. "Muslim" is an Arabic word that refers to a person who submits themselves to the will of God. Many Muslims are offended by the phrases "Islamic terrorist" or "Muslim terrorist," which have been observed so often in the media; they are viewed as oxymorons.
    Most religious historians view Islam as having been founded in 622 CE by Muhammad the Prophet (peace be upon him).* He lived from about 570 to 632 CE). The religion started in Mecca, when the angel Jibril (a.k.a. Jibreel; Gabriel in English) read the first revelation to Muhammad (pbuh). (Mohammed and Muhammed (pbuh) are alternative spellings for his name.) Islam is the youngest of the world's very large religions -- those with over 300 million members -- which include Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. 
    * Muslims traditionally acknowledge respect for Muhammad, Jesus and other prophets (peace be upon them) by adding this phrase or an abbreviation "(pbuh)" after their names. 
    However, many if not most of the followers of Islam believe that:
    Islam existed before Muhammad (pbuh) was born, The origins of Islam date back to the creation of the world, and Muhammad (pbuh) was the last and by far the greatest of a series of Prophets.
    Followers of Islam are called Muslims. "Allah" is an Arabic word which means "the One True God." An alternative spelling for "Muslim" that is occasionally used is "Moslim"; it is not recommended because it is often pronounced "mawzlem": which sounds like an Arabic word for "oppressor". Some Western writers in the past have referred to Islam as "Mohammedism"; this is deeply offensive to many Muslims, as its usage can lead some to the concept that Muhammad the Prophet (pbuh) was in some way divine.
  • About Muhammad (pbuh) :
    Unlike other great religious leaders, like the Buddha, Moses, and Yeshua of Nazareth (Jesus Christ), Muhammad was born relatively recently, in the late 6th century CE, about the year 570. Omid Safi, assistant professor of religion and philosophy at Colgate University, commented that Muhammad was probably the first religious leader to rise up in the full glare of history. 6
    Many unusual events have been recorded about Muhammad's (pbuh) birth and childhood:
    His mother said "When he was born, there was a light that issued out of my pudendum and lit the places of Syria." Also at the time of his birth, "...fourteen galleries of Kisra's palace cracked and rolled down, the Magians' sacred fire died down and some churches on Lake Sawa sank down and collapsed." His foster family had many experiences of amazingly good luck while he was in their care. As a young child, the angel Jibril visited the boy, ripped his chest open, removed his heart, extracted a blood clot from it, and returned him to normalcy. 4
    While still young, he was sent into the desert to be raised by a foster family. This was a common practice at the time. He was orphaned at the age of 6 and brought up by his uncle. As a child, he worked as a shepherd. He was taken on a caravan to Syria by his uncle at the age of 9 (or perhaps 12). Later, as a youth, he was employed as a camel driver on the trade routes between Syria and Arabia. Muhammad (pbuh) later managed caravans on behalf of merchants. He met people of different religious beliefs on his travels, and was able to observe and learn about Judaism, Christianity and the indigenous Pagan religions.
    After marriage, he was able to spend more time in meditation. At the age of 40, (610 CE), he was visited in Mecca by the angel Gabriel. He developed the conviction that he had been ordained a Prophet and given the task of converting his countrymen from their pagan, polytheistic beliefs and what he regarded as moral decadence, idolatry, hedonism and materialism.
    He met considerable opposition to his teachings. In 622 CE he moved north to Medina due to increasing persecution. The trek is known as the hegira. Here he was disappointed by the rejection of his message by the Jews. Through religious discussion, persuasion, military activity and political negotiation, Muhammad (pbuh)  became the most powerful leader in Arabia, and Islam was firmly established throughout the area.
    About Islam:
    By 750 CE, Islam had expanded to China, India, along the Southern shore of the Mediterranean and into Spain. By 1550 they had reached Vienna. Wars resulted, expelling Muslims from Spain and Europe. Since their trading routes were mostly over land, they did not an develop extensive sea trade (as for example the English and Spaniards). As a result, the old world occupation of North America was left to Christians.
    Believers are currently concentrated from the West coast of Africa to the Philippines. In Africa, in particular, they are increasing in numbers, largely at the expense of Christianity.
    Many do not look upon Islam as a new religion. They feel that it is in reality the faith taught by the ancient Prophets, Abraham, David, Moses and Jesus (Peace be upon them). Muhammad's (pbuh) role as the last of the Prophets was to formalize and clarify the faith and to purify it by removing foreign ideas that had been added in error.
  • Important texts:
    There are two main texts consulted by Muslims:
    the Qur'an (Recitation) are the words of God. Muslims believe that it was revealed to Muhammad by the archangel Jibril. This was originally in oral and written form; they were later assembled together into a single book, the Qur'an. Its name is often spelled "Koran" in English. This is not recommended, as some Muslims find it offensive. The Hadith, which are collections of the sayings of Muhammad (pbuh). They are regarded as the Sunnah (lived example) of Muhammad.  The Quran gives legitimacy to the Hadith. It states: "Nor does he say aught of his own desire. It is no less than inspiration sent down to him" (53:3-4). However, the writings are not regarded as having the same status as the Holy Qur'an; the latter is considered to be God's word. The great Islamic scholar Yahya bin Sharaf Ul-Deen An-Nawawi compiled a collection of 43 sayings of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). It is is now known as "Al-Nawawi's Forty Hadiths" 5
    Islamic beliefs:
    Islam considers six fundamental beliefs to be the foundation of their faith:
    A single, indivisible God. (God, the creator, is just, omnipotent and merciful. "Allah" is often used to refer to God; it is the Arabic word for God.)
    The angels.
    The divine scriptures, which include the Torah, the Psalms, the rest of the Bible, (as they were originally revealed) and the Qur'an (which is composed of God's words, dictated by the Archangel Gabriel to Muhammad).
    The Messengers of God, including Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, David, Jesus and Muhammad -- the last prophet; (peace be upon them). Muhammad's message is considered the final, universal message for all of humanity.
    The Day of Judgment when people will be judged on the basis of their deeds while on earth, and will either attain reward of Heaven or punishment in Hell. They do not believe that Jesus or any other individual can atone for another person's sin. Hell is where unbelievers and sinners spend eternity. One translation of the Qur'an, 98:1-8, states: "The unbelievers among the People of the Book and the pagans shall burn for ever in the fire of Hell. They are the vilest of all creatures." ("People of the Book" refers to Christians, Jews and Muslims). Paradise is a place of physical and spiritual pleasure where the sinless go after death
    The supremacy of God's will.
    Other beliefs include: God did not have a son. Jesus (pbuh) is a prophet, born of the Virgin Mary. They regard the Christian concept of the deity of Jesus (pbuh) to be blasphemous; it is seen as a form of polytheism. Jesus (pbuh) was not executed on the cross. He escaped crucifixion and was taken up into Paradise. The existence of Satan drives people to sin. Muslims who sincerely repent and submit to God return to a state of sinlessness. All people are considered children of Adam. Islam officially rejects racism. All children are born on Al-Fitra (a pure, natural state of submission to Islam). His parents sometimes make him Christian, Jewish, etc. When a child reaches puberty an account of their deeds is opened in Paradise. When the person dies, their eventual destination (Paradise or Hell) depends on the balance of their good deeds (helping others, testifying to the truth of God, leading a virtuous life) and their bad deeds. Alcohol, illegal drugs, eating of pork, etc. are to be avoided. Gambling is to be avoided.
  • To recite at least once during their lifetime the shahadah (the creed: "There is no God but God and Muhammad is his Prophet"). Most Muslims repeat it at least daily.
    To perform the salat (prayer) 5 times a day, if possible. This is recited while orienting one's body with qibia (the shorter of the two great circle routes towards the Kaaba at Mecca) This is generally North East in the U.S. 4 The five prayers are: Fajr (Morning Prayer) which is performed some time between the break of dawn and just before sunrise. Zuhr (Noon Prayer) offered from just after midday to afternoon. 'Asr (Afternoon Prayer) offered from late afternoon until just before sunset Maghrib (Sunset Prayer) offered between sunset and darkness Isha (Night Prayer) offered at night time, often just before sleeping. 1
    To donate regularly to charity through zakat. This is a 2.5% charity tax on the income and property of middle and upper class Muslims. Believers are urged to make additional donations to the needy as they feel moved.
    to fast during the lunar month of Ramadan. This is believed to be the month that Muhammad (pbuh) received the first revelation of the Qur'an from God.
    if economically and physically able, to make at least one hajj (pilgrimage) to Mecca.
  • Jihad (struggle) is probably the most misunderstood religious word in existence. It often mentioned on Western TV and radio during news about the Middle East, where it is implied to be a synonym of "holy war" - a call to fight against non-Muslims in the defense of Islam. The vast majority of Muslims have an entirely different definition of Jihad. It is seen as a personal, internal struggle with one's self. The goal may be achievement in a profession, self-purification, the conquering of primitive instincts or the attainment of some other noble goal.
  • Calendar: Muslims follow a lunar calendar which started with the hegira, a 300 mile trek in 622 CE when Muhammad (pbuh) relocated from Mecca to Medina. Al-Hijra/Muharram is the Muslim New Year, the beginning of the first lunar month. The beginning of the year 1434H occurred on 2002-MAR-15 of the Gregorian calendar. Separation of church and state: Originally, in Islamic countries, there was no separation between religious and civil law, between Islam and the state. Muhammad and his successors were both religious and political leaders. Turkey became a secular state during the 20th century. This is a controversial move in conservative Islamic circles. Proselytizing: Muslims are not required to actively recruit others to Islam. In the Qur'an, Allah told Muhammad that "You certainly cannot guide whomever you please; It is Allah who guides whom He will. He best knows those who accept guidance." (28:56). Muslims are expected to explain Islam to followers of other faiths, but it is up to Allah to guide those whom he wishes to. Suicide: This is forbidden. The Qur'an clearly states: "Do not kill yourselves as God has been to you very merciful" (4:29). Only Allah is to take a life. Since death must be left up to Allah, physician assisted suicide is not allowed. On the other hand, Muslim physicians are not "encouraged to artificially prolong the misery [of a person who is] in a vegetative state
  • Schools within Islam:
    There are different schools of jurisprudence within Islam.  The main divisions are:
    Sunni Muslims: These are followers of the Hanifa, Shafi, Hanibal and Malik schools. They constitute a 90% majority of the believers, and are considered to be main stream traditionalists. Because they are comfortable pursuing their faith within secular societies, they have been able to adapt to a variety of national cultures, while following their three sources of law: the Qur'an, Hadith and consensus of Muslims. Shi'ite Muslims: These are followers of the Jafri school who constitute a small minority of Islam. They split from the Sunnis over a dispute about the successor to Muhammad (pbuh). Their leaders promote a strict interpretation of the Qur'an and close adherence to its teachings. They believe in 12 heavenly Imams (perfect teachers) who led the Shi'ites in succession. Shi'ites believe that the 12th Imam, the Mahdi (guided one), never died but went into hiding waiting for the optimum time to reappear and guide humans towards justice and peace. Sufism: This is a mystic tradition in which followers seek inner knowledge directly from God through meditation and ritual and dancing. They developed late in the 10th century CE as an ascetic reaction to the formalism and laws of the Qur'an. There are Sufis from both the Sunni and Shi'ite groups. However, some Sunni followers to not consider Sufiism as a valid Islamic practice. They incorporated ideas from Neoplatonism, Buddhism, and Christianity. They emphasize personal union with the divine. In the Middle East, some Sufi traditions are considered to be a separate school of Islam. In North and sub-Saharan Africa, Sufism is more a style and an approach rather than a separate school.
    Islam does not have denominational mosques. Members are welcome to attend any mosque in any land.
  • Transcript

    • 1. So Help Me God Glenda Clare, Ph.D. G. Portlynn Clare & Associates
    • 2. Training Objectives:  The role of the faith based community in the prevention and treatment of substance use disorders  Understand the basic beliefs of Judiasm, Christianity and Islam  Discuss core competencies for religious leaders providing services to prevent and treat substance use disorders
    • 3. Training Objectives:  Discuss strategies to work more effectively with faith based organizations  Need for established GROUND RULES
    • 4. Why this is important?  God, religion and spirituality are key factors for many  Individuals frequently make a connection to God and religion as a part of the recovery process  Prayer by others has been shown to have a positive impact on treatment outcomes
    • 5. In comparison to those who attend religious services weekly, teens who never attended a religious service are…  Twice as likely to drink  More than twice as likely to smoke  More than three times likelier to smoke marijuana or binge drink  Almost four times more likely to use illegal drugs other than marijuana
    • 6. In comparison to those who attend religious services weekly, adults who never attended a religious service are…  Almost twice as likely to drink  Three times more likely to smoke  Five times more likely to use illegal drugs other than marijuana  Seven times more likely to binge drink  Eight times more likely to use marijuana
    • 7. So Help Me God!
    • 8. What is the largest religion in the world?
    • 9. Three Religions Serving the Same God  Judaism  Christianity  Islam
    • 10. Judaism  Name for God  Place of Worship  Basic Tenets of the Religion
    • 11. Jewish Texts  The Tanakh corresponds to the Jewish Scriptures, (Christian Old Testament) - It is composed of three groups of books:  the Torah (aka Pentateuch)  the Nevi'im  the Ketuvim  The Talmud contains stories, laws, medical knowledge, debates about moral choices, etc
    • 12. Jewish Beliefs  G-d exists.  G-d is one and unique.  G-d is incorporeal.  G-d is eternal.  Prayer is to be directed to G-d alone and to no other.  The words of the prophets are true.  Moses was the greatest of the prophets, and his prophecies are true.
    • 13. Jewish Beliefs  The Written Torah (first 5 books of the Bible) and Oral Torah (teachings now contained in the Talmud and other writings) were given to Moses.  There will be no other Torah.  G-d knows the thoughts and deeds of men.  G-d will reward the good and punish the wicked.  The Messiah will come.  The dead will be resurrected.
    • 14. Additional Jewish Beliefs  Some Jews view Jesus as a great moral teacher. Others see him as a false prophet or as an idol of Christianity.  The Jews are often referred to as G-d's chosen people.  The 613 commandments found in Leviticus and other books regulate all aspects of Jewish life  The Ten commandments, as delineated in Exodus 20:1-17 and Deuteronomy 5:6-21, form a brief synopsis of the Law
    • 15. Additional Jewish Beliefs  The Messiah (the anointed one of G-d) will arrive in the future and gather Jews once more into the land of Israel.  A fetus gains full personhood when it is half- emerged from its mother's body.  Boys reach the status of Bar Mitzvah on their 13th birthday; girls reach Bat Mitzvah on their 12th birthday.  The more liberal movements within Judaism differ from some of the above beliefs concerning the source of the Torah, the concept of direct reward and punishment according to one's behavior, etc.
    • 16.  Jews are strict monotheists: they view G-d as a single, indivisible entity.  Jews generally consider actions and behavior to be of primary importance; beliefs come out of actions.  Jewish belief does not accept the Christian concept of original sin (the belief that all people have inherited Adam and Eve's sin when they disobeyed G-d's instructions in the Garden of Eden).
    • 17.  Judaism affirms the inherent goodness of the world and its people as creations of G-d.  Jewish believers are able to sanctify their lives and draw closer to G-d by performing fulfilling mitzvot (divine commandments).  Jews do not recognize the need for a savior as an intermediary with G-d.
    • 18.  Observation of the weekly Sabbath as a day of rest, starting at sundown on Friday evening.  Strict discipline, according to the Law, which governs all areas of life  Regular attendance by Jewish males at Synagogue  Celebration of the annual festivals Rules for calculating Rosh Hashanah and Passover are available online at: http://quasar.as.utexas.edu/  The local synagogue is governed by the congregation and is normally .  Any adult male with sufficient knowledge can lead religious services.
    • 19. Five Current Forms of Judaism:  Conservative* Judaism  Humanistic Judaism  Orthodox* Judaism  Reconstructionist Judaism  Reform * Judaism
    • 20. Christianity  Name for God  Place of Worship  Basic Tenets of the Religion  75% of all American adults identify themselves as Christians
    • 21. Classifications of Christians  History  Theological and social views  Past schisms  Denominations  Specific belief  A group of beliefs
    • 22. Name that Denomination How many Christian denominations can you name? The person with the longest list wins
    • 23. Who Is Christian?  Heard the Gospel in a certain way, and accepted its message  Become "saved" -- i.e. they have trusted Jesus as Lord and Savior)  Been baptized as an infant  Gone to church regularly
    • 24. Who Is Christian?  Recited and agreed with a specific church creed or creeds  Simply tried to understand and follow Jesus' teachings  Led a decent life
    • 25. Beliefs Many Christian Denominations Have in Common  The Trinity  The deity of Jesus  Jesus' bodily resurrection  Jesus' atonement
    • 26. Beliefs Many Denominations Have in Common  Personal salvation by grace  The inspiration of God on the Bible's authors  The virgin birth  The anticipated second coming of Jesus
    • 27. Common Christian Practices
    • 28. Islam  Name for God  Place of Worship  Basic Tenets of the Religion
    • 29.  The second largest religion in the world and growing
    • 30. Islamic Beliefs  A single, indivisible God.  The angels.  The divine scriptures,  The Messengers of God  The Day of Judgment  The supremacy of God's will.
    • 31. Beliefs about Jesus (pbuh), within Islam Muslims believe: His birth was miraculous. He was the Messiah. He cured people of illness & restored dead people to life. Muslims do not believe: In original sin (that everyone inherits a sinful nature because of Adam and Eve's transgression) That Jesus (pbuh) was killed during a crucifixion. Muslims believe that he escaped being executed, and later reappeared to his disciples without having first died. That Jesus (pbuh) was resurrected (or resurrected himself) circa 30 CE. Salvation is dependent either upon belief in the resurrection of Jesus (pbuh) (as in Paul's writings) or belief that Jesus (pbuh) is the Son of God (as in the Gospel of John).
    • 32. Other Beliefs  God did not have a son.  Jesus (pbuh) is a prophet, born of the Virgin Mary.  Jesus (pbuh) was not executed on the cross.  The existence of Satan drives people to sin.  Muslims who sincerely repent and submit to God return to a state of sinlessness.
    • 33. Other Beliefs (continued)  All people are considered children of Adam. Islam officially rejects racism.  When a child reaches puberty an account of their deeds is opened in Paradise.  When the person dies, their eventual destination (Paradise or Hell) depends on the balance of their good deeds  Alcohol, illegal drugs, eating of pork, etc. are to be avoided.  Gambling is to be avoided.
    • 34. Five Pillars of Faith 1. To recite at least once during their lifetime the shahadah (the creed: "There is no God but God and Muhammad is his Prophet"). Most Muslims repeat it at least daily. 2. To perform the salat (prayer) 5 times a day, if possible. 3. To donate regularly to charity through zakat. 4. To fast during the lunar month of Ramadan 5. If economically and physically able, to make at least one hajj (pilgrimage) to Mecca.
    • 35. Jihad (struggle) is probably the most misunderstood religious word in existence
    • 36. Calendar: Muslims follow a lunar calendar Separation of church and state: originally there was no separation between religious and civil law, between Islam and the state Proselytizing: Muslims are not required to actively recruit others to Islam "You certainly cannot guide whomever you please; It is Allah who guides whom He will. He best knows those who accept guidance." (28:56). Suicide: This is forbidden. The Qur'an clearly states: "Do not kill yourselves as God has been to you very merciful" (4:29)
    • 37. Schools within Islam:  There are different schools of jurisprudence within Islam. The main divisions are:  Sunni Muslims: These are followers of the Hanifa, Shafi, Hanibal and Malik schools. They constitute a 90% majority of the believers, and are considered to be main stream traditionalists  Shi'ite Muslims: These are followers of the Jafri school who constitute a small minority of Islam.  Sufism: This is a mystic tradition in which followers seek inner knowledge directly from God through meditation and ritual and dancing.  Islam does not have denominational mosques. Members are welcome to attend any mosque in any land.
    • 38. So Help Me God!
    • 39. The Addiction Envoy Newsletter, Vol. 2, No. 1 Faith-Based Initiatives The Addiction Envoy is organized into five sections: 1) Integrating the Sacred and Secular Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders; 2) Funding Resources Available for Faith-Based Organizations; 3) Grant-writing 101; 4) Resource of the Month and 5) What’s Happening Now. http://www.sattc.org/products.htm
    • 40. Substance Abuse, Religion and Sp This monograph provides a background paper entitled "Substance Abuse, Religion and Spirituality: Policy Issues for Prevention and Treatment" by James A. Neal, M.C.J., CSPP and Kay Gresham, LCSW, ACSW, prepared for the Leadership Institute of the SES and includes the consensus report of the participants for this event. http://www.sattc.org/products.htm
    • 41. What people say they believe and want? What health and human services believe and what they do? What faith leaders believe and what they do?
    • 42. The Disconnect  Incomplete knowledge of resources in the community and in the faith based organization  Discomfort about discussing substance use disorders and related issues  Discomfort about discussing religion
    • 43. The Disconnect  Lack of knowledge or interest in medical aspects of substance use disorders  Lack of knowledge or interest in spiritual aspects of recovery  Judging & shaming behaviors
    • 44. Incomplete knowledge of resources in the community and in the faith based organization What do you know? What do the faith based communities you want to interact with know?
    • 45. Discomfort about discussing substance use disorders and related issues Whose discomfort is it? What are the views of the faith based entities you want to work with on this matter? Has any work been done on this issue anywhere? Who are your gate keepers? And who is the best person to approach the gate?
    • 46. Discomfort about discussing religion What do you know about the religion? Are you willing to learn more about the religion or are you trying to change people to your religion? What is the religious perspective on this issue? Are you willing to accept the religious perspective on this issue?
    • 47. Lack of knowledge or interest in medical aspects of substance use disorders Is there a lack of knowledge or interest? Why might that be? How might this topic be bridged and who would be the appropriate person to bridge the topic?
    • 48. Lack of knowledge or interest in spiritual aspects of recovery Is there a lack of knowledge or interest? Why might that be? How might this topic be bridged and who would be the appropriate person to bridge the topic