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Oxfam petionville   shelter & nfi proposal
 

Oxfam petionville shelter & nfi proposal

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Created a CIDA proposal for Petionville, Haiti in the Shelter and NFI Sector

Created a CIDA proposal for Petionville, Haiti in the Shelter and NFI Sector

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    Oxfam petionville   shelter & nfi proposal Oxfam petionville shelter & nfi proposal Document Transcript

    • Team Members: Dipti Joseph, Kyle Taylor, Nancy Tran EMERGENCY SHELTER AND NFI PROVISION TO EARTHQUAKE AFFECTED REGIONS IN HAITI THROUGH OXFAM PETIONVILLE, HAITI PROPOSAL DATE January 17, 2010 Submitted to: CIDA/IHA Submitted by: OXFAM QUEBEC Contacts: Montreal, Canada Jacques Corbeau, Country Director Maria Vasquez, Team Leader - Central America & Caribbean Emergency Relief and Disaster Mitigation International & Canadian Programs Telephone: 011- 514-937-9452 Ext #: 3253/3671 Facsimile: 011-514-937-1614 jacques.corbeau@oxfam.qc.ca maria.vasquez@oxfam.qc.ca
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS/ACRONYMS ................................................................................. 2 MAP OF COUNTRY ..................................................................................................................... 3 1. PROJECT PROPOSAL SUMMARY SHEET ........................................................................ 4 2. PROJECT OVERVIEW........................................................................................................... 5 2.1. Background .................................................................................................................... 5 2.2. Project Rationale ............................................................................................................ 5 2.3. Oxfam Capacity.............................................................................................................. 6 3. PROJECT DESCRIPTION...................................................................................................... 6 3.1. Purpose and Expected Results........................................................................................ 6 3.1.1. Purpose........................................................................................................................ 6 3.1.2. Expected Results......................................................................................................... 6 3.2. Beneficiaries................................................................................................................... 7 3.3. Planned Activities .......................................................................................................... 7 3.3.1. Activity 1000 – Provision of Emergency Shelters...................................................... 7 3.3.2. Activity 2000 - Provision of Non-Food Items ............................................................ 9 3.4. Assumptions and Risk Mitigation Strategy.................................................................. 10 3.4.1. Security Management Strategy ................................................................................. 11 3.5. Project Management..................................................................................................... 12 3.6. Public Engagement and Benefits to Canada................................................................. 12 4. CROSS-CUTTING THEMES AND PRINCIPLES .............................................................. 12 4.1. Gender.......................................................................................................................... 12 4.2. Participation of Beneficiaries....................................................................................... 13 4.3. Local Delivery Partnerships and Capacity Building .................................................... 13 4.4. Convergence and Coordination.................................................................................... 13 4.5. Sustainability................................................................................................................ 14 4.6. Environment................................................................................................................. 14 5. MONITORING AND REPORTING ..................................................................................... 15 5.1. Performance Measurement Plan................................................................................... 15 6. FINANCIAL INFORMATION.............................................................................................. 16 6.1. Projected Expenditures................................................................................................. 16 6.2. Sources of Income........................................................................................................ 16 APPENDIX I – Performance Framework..................................................................................... 16 APPENDIX II – Performance Measurement Plan ........................................................................ 17 BIBLIOGRAPHY..........................................................................................................................18
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 2 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS/ACRONYMS ADP Area Development Plan CIDA Canadian International Development Agency CEAA Canadian Environmental Assessment Act CRC Canadian Red Cross DDR Disaster Risk Reduction ERDM Emergency Rehabilitation and Disaster Mitigation FAO Food & Agriculture Organization HH Households ICRC International Committee of the Red Cross IDPs Internally Displaced Persons IFRC International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies IHA International Humanitarian Assistance IHA Division International Humanitarian Assistance Division of CIDA IHA Unit One of the three units within the IHA Division at CIDA IHL International Humanitarian Law INGO International Non-Governmental Organization IRC International Refugee Council NGO Non-Governmental Organization OCHA Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs PF Performance Framework PLA Participatory Leaning and Action Methodology PMP Performance Measurement Plan RBM Results-Based Management UN United Nations UNHCR United Nations High Commission for Refugees UNICEF United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund UNOCHA United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs UNSECORD United Nations Security Coordinator WBS Work Breakdown Structure WFP World Food Program WHO World Health Organization WVI World Vision International
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 3 MAP OF COUNTRY
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 4 1. PROJECT PROPOSAL SUMMARY SHEET Project Title Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Type of Crisis Earthquake Country and Specific Location Petionville, Haiti Project Dates Date of submission January 17, 2010 Expected start-up January 27, 2010 Expected completion July 27, 2010 Agency Details Name Oxfam Quebec Contact officer Jacques Corbeau Telephone/fax/e-mail Tel: 011-514-937-9452 Ext #: 3253 Facsimile: 011-514-937-1614 Email: jacques.cossette@oxfam.qc.ca Budget ($CAD) Total budget $2,210,000 CAD Funds from CIDA $2,000,000 CAD Funds from Oxfam $210,000 CAD Expected contribution to CIDA’s IHA program - list most relevant outcome(s)  Improved or maintained health  Improved physical security Expected contribution to CIDA’s IHA program - list most relevant output(s)  Access to shelter and household items improved  Services to reduce physical risks Number and description of expected male and female beneficiaries: Total: 300,000 Male: 148,000 Female: 152,000 Narrative summary of the project and planned activities: To provide emergency shelter and basic NFIs for survival to 10 IDP camps in Petionville, Haiti, totalling 300,000 people. Oxfam plans to provide shelter kits (including tarpaulin, timber poles, rope, shovel and tools, and shelter instructions) and NFI kits including mosquito nets and bedding to address immediate needs relating to adequate shelter, personal security, and maintaining health with particular attention to vulnerable populations including women and children. Oxfam will also be procuring materials for shelter and NFI kits locally where possible and hiring locals as daily workers for security, manual labour and transportation to build on local capacities. Perspectives and priorities of beneficiaries will also be included throughout Oxfam’s response plan in the planning, implementation and monitoring and evaluation phases.
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 5 2. PROJECT OVERVIEW 2.1. Background On January 12, 2010 a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck near Port au Prince (PaP), affecting an estimated 3,500,000 people. The quake has killed approximately 220,000 people and injured more than 300,000. Due to poor construction standards and local soil conditions, many houses, schools and larger buildings collapsed, leading to most of the injury and death. Over 188,000 houses have been badly damaged and 105,000 destroyed (293,383 in total), leaving 1.5 million people homeless and largely living in unplanned camps. Many have also headed to other parts of Haiti to live with friends and family. Sixty percent of government and administrative buildings, 80% of schools in Port-au-Prince and 60% of schools in the South and West Departments were destroyed or damaged. All of this damage and destruction has resulted in an estimated 19 million cubic metres of rubble and debris that must be removed in order for reconstruction to take place. The earthquake also significantly affected the capacity of the national and municipal governments, the UN and NGOs. Approximately 25% of civil servants in Port-au-Prince died, including several cabinet ministers and police officers. The UN headquarters was destroyed, resulting in the deaths of several senior UN officials and other staff. Many NGO buildings were also destroyed or affected and many Haitian and expatriate staff either died or lost family members in the disaster. All of this has significantly impacted the ability of the government and humanitarian organizations to respond quickly. 2.2. Project Rationale On January 15th, 2010, Oxfam was able to send an assessment team into one of the worst hit areas of Port au Prince (PaP), one of the most densely populated areas in Haiti. They were able to get an overview of the situation and started liaising with the UN, other NGOs and the Haitian government. It is roughly estimated that 300,000 people (148,000 males and 152,000 females) are left homeless and in urgent need of emergency temporary shelter and NFIs. In addition, many have been reported to be living and sleeping on the streets in fear of aftershocks even if their homes are intact.1 Though some people have been able to return home, they continue to need assistance with materials and shelter packages in order to ensure that their return is sustainable. Pre-earthquake, there were virtually no social safety nets and many living PaP and its surrounding areas lived in slums or shanty towns.2 The recent earthquake has exacerbated the lack of housing situation in PaP and further diminished living conditions for families that have been displaced. However, the weather in Haiti is currently dry with average minimum/maximum temperatures of 23ºC/33ºC, which are favourable conditions for those currently living and sleeping on the streets or in temporary shelters. In coordination with Haitian authorities and other NGOs, it has been highlighted the need to build CCCM elements into the Typical Emergency Shelter Cluster (ESC) format. It has also been determined that population movements and displacement need to be better managed through the 1 United Nations. UNOCHA. Haiti Earthquake Flash Appeal. New York: 2010. Web. 2 Ibid.
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 6 establishment of camps. Those families whose houses have been completely destroyed will be in need of medium-term temporary shelter support while enhanced return or reconstruction solutions are identified, or alternately, transitional or relocation support.3 Thus, procuring emergency shelter supplies and essential non-food items for the set-up and maintenance of temporary settlement camps is the current priority for the Shelter and NFI cluster post-earthquake in Haiti. 2.3. Oxfam Capacity Oxfam is a large international NGO which has a strong track record in providing emergency shelters and NFIs. Oxfam has been working in Haiti for the past 50 years, focusing on rural development projects and responding to humanitarian emergencies as needed. Oxfam has a staff of 100 expats and 500 national staff in Haiti and has rapid response team that has been deployed to provide further assistance. Oxfam has also been able to send in an assessment team to conduct an initial rapid needs assessment of the worst hit areas of PaP. They have expat and national staff on their teams who are able to communicate in French, the local language, and have existing relationships and contacts with the local population. This enables Oxfam to reach as many affected populations and communities as possible in Haiti quickly and efficiently. 3. PROJECT DESCRIPTION 3.1. Purpose and Expected Results 3.1.1. Purpose Oxfam will provide emergency shelters and essential non-food items to ensure that up to 300,000 people (148,000 males and 152,000 females) in Petionville have protection from the elements, safety and security, and access to essential services such as healthcare, WASH facilities, and cooking facilities. Oxfam has charted out the expected age ranges for the beneficiaries allowing Oxfam to provide the required supplies for the proper age groups for each household. The provision of emergency shelters and non-food items will create improved access for Haitians who have had their homes and possessions destroyed by the earthquake. With these set activities, Oxfam strives to meet basic human needs of earthquake-affected communities in Haiti as their ultimate impact. 3.1.2. Expected Results Improved Physical Security Earthquake-affected families in Petionville, totalling 300,000 are in immediate need of access to adequate shelter. Oxfam will improve physical security of these affected families with the provision of shelter kits (consisting of tarpaulin, timber poles, rope, shovel and tools and shelter instructions) for adequate protection from weather conditions as well as for providing private spaces to increase their overall sense of physical security and safety. Improved and Maintained Health Oxfam plans to improve and maintain health for 300,000 people in Petionville by providing basic NFIs including mosquito nets and bedding to reduce the spread of mosquito infected diseases (e.g. 3 Ibid.
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 7 malaria) and minimize vector risks. 3.2. Beneficiaries The direct beneficiaries who will be reached out to by the program activities are a large subset of male and female refugees, most of which are internally displaced persons including pregnant women, women, men, children, youth, elderly persons and people with disabilities. These categories show within a single household the representativeness of family members under 20 years old, active household members between ages 20-59, and finally, elderly people over 59. The average household size is 5-6 people based on the initial needs assessment. Woman-headed households and child-headed households will be consulted and their needs prioritized. In addition, the indirect beneficiaries are the host communities where the settlement camps are set up. Beneficiaries targeted by Age and Gender segregated categories are as follows: Age < 20 150,000 20-59 135,000 > 59 15,000 Gender Female 152,000 Male 148,000 3.3. Planned Activities 3.3.1. Activity 1000 – Provision of emergency shelters Activity 1000 – Provision of emergency shelters Expected Output #1 – Improved access to temporary shelter for 60,000 affected families (300,000 people). Narrative Description & Strategy Ensure that up to 60,000 displaced families (300,000 people) have access to healthy and safe emergency shelter that has adequate covered living space to allow for essential household and livelihood activities (i.e. sleeping, washing, dressing; caring for infants, children and the ill or infirm; storage of food and water; cooking and eating) to be carried out. Shelter kits will be distributed that will include materials that are familiar to the disaster-affected population and procured locally and regionally where possible. All members of each affected household will be involved in determining the amount of covered living space to meet minimum standards (of 3.5m2 per person) and the forms of shelter construction, including the type of materials needed and the design, to maximize ventilation and minimize entry of direct sunlight. Sub-activities 1010 - Settlement Planning – Consultations with local authorities and displaced families to agree on locations for temporary emergency shelters through identifying land and property ownership/rights, ensuring safe accessibility to settlement locations that are within easy access to essential services (i.e. healthcare, water and sanitary facilities, cooking facilities, schools, etc.) and to receive relief supplies as well as ensuring sufficient surface area for covered living space (3.5m2 per person). 1020 - Registration System – Develop a beneficiary targeting strategy through consultations with local authorities and affected populations to assess families that are in most need of emergency shelters, with particular attention to female and child-headed households. Develop a registration system to enable efficiency for shelter distribution.
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 8 1030 - Warehousing – Find and set up warehouses using local contacts and resources available to build on local capacities. 1040 - Procurement – Procure supplies from international and local sources where possible. Hire daily local workers to aid in transporting shelter supplies to designated warehouses to build local livelihood opportunities. 1050 - Assembling Shelter Kits – Hire daily local workers to aid in assembling shelter kits to include tarpaulin enough for 5 members per household with 3.5m2 per person, timber poles, rope, shovel and tools, and simple instructions on shelter construction to encourage self- reliance and initiatives. 1060 – Transportation to Sites – Rent transport vehicles and hire local drivers to transport shelter kits from warehouses to distribution sites located near camp settlements. 1070 - Distribution – Distribute shelter supplies and control supply movements by prioritizing needs of women and child-headed households and hiring local security guards to provide safe and equitable access during distribution. 1080 - Ongoing Technical Assistance & Shelter Management – Provide technical assistance to emergency shelter responses and for ongoing repairs and maintenance of temporary shelters. 1090 - Monitoring and Evaluation – Monitor and evaluate emergency shelter structures in all settlement camps to ensure their performance remain adequate for at least 6 months. 1100 - Transition Strategy – Consult with local authorities and displaced families to develop preferred transition and long-term shelter strategies to be included in a new project proposal for long-term shelter solutions. Expected Issues, Risks and Considerations  Shelter materials are not meant for long-term use and may need some repair if used longer than expected.  Climatic conditions may pose risks to shelter structures including flooding, hurricanes, and landslides.  Sustained minimum covered living space may increase vector risks.  Civil unrest and gender based violence may cause instability and insecurity within and around settlement camps.  Land tenure issues and hostility from host communities may arise due to sustained self-settled camps.  The insecure, unsettled working conditions and lack of infrastructure will be a constant challenge for all staff and workers.  Approval from local authorities and Haitian government to receive and use supplies and equipment will be slow due to diminished government capacities.  Coordination with other relevant clusters for camp management and distribution may be a challenge and slow. Key Inputs Required  Shelter kits for 60,000 families including tarpaulin, timber poles, rope, shovel and tool kit  10 transport vehicles and drivers  22 expat staff and 50 national staff to implement emergency shelter distributions  100 local daily workers to maintain security and aid in warehousing, assembling, transporting, distributing shelter kits, and shelter management
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 9 3.3.2. Activity 2000 - Provision of Non-Food Items Activity 2000 – Provision of Non-Food Items Expected Output #1 – Improved access to non-food items including mosquito nets and bedding for up to 300,000 people (60,000 households) Narrative Description & Strategy Up to 300,000 people (60,000 HH) will have benefited from the distribution of non-food items including mosquito nets and bedding. Mosquito nets will contribute to preventing the spread of mosquito-transmitted diseases such as malaria. Bedding will provide adequate comfort for families and can provide separation and privacy between different sexes within a household. Mosquito nets and bedding will be procured locally and regionally where possible to build on local/regional capacities. Affected households will be consulted and involved in the monitoring and evaluation process to assess the effectiveness of the NFIs to determine when replenishment is needed. Sub-activities 2010 - Registration System – Develop a beneficiary targeting strategy through consultations with local authorities and affected populations to assess families that are in most need of NFIs, with particular attention to female and child-headed households. Develop a registration system to enable efficiency for NFI distribution. 2020 - Warehousing – Find and set up warehouses using local contacts and resources available to build on local capacities. 2030 - Procurement – Procure NFIs from international and local sources where possible. Hire daily local workers to aid in transporting NFIs to designated warehouses to build local livelihood opportunities. 2040 - Assembling NFI Kits – Hire daily local workers to assemble NFI kits to include two mosquito nets and two sets of bedding per household. 2050 - Transportation to Sites – Rent transport vehicles and hire local drivers to transport NFI kits from warehouses to distribution sites located near camp settlements. 2060 - Distribution – Distribute NFIs and control supply movements by prioritizing needs of women and child-headed households and hiring local security guards to provide safe and equitable access during distribution. 2070 - Monitoring & Evaluation – Monitor and evaluate the use of relief items and activities to replenish NFI supplies as needed. 2080 - Transition Strategy – Consult with local authorities and displaced families to assess new NFI needs to be addressed in a new project proposal for additional NFIs. Expected Issues, Risks and Considerations  The insecure, unsettled working conditions and lack of infrastructure will be a constant challenge for all staff and workers.  Approval from local authorities and Haitian government to receive and use supplies and equipment will be slow due to diminished government capacities.  Coordination with other relevant clusters for camp management and distribution may be a challenge and slow.  Theft of NFIs may cause instability and insecurity within and around settlement camps. Key Inputs Required  Mosquito nets and bedding for 60,000 families  10 transport vehicles and drivers  22 expat staff and 50 national staff to implement NFI distributions
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 10  100 local daily workers to maintain security and aid in warehousing, assembling, transporting, distributing NFI kits 3.4. Assumptions and Risk Mitigation Strategy Hurricanes Haiti is located in the Caribbean and thus at substantial risk of being hit or brushed by a Hurricane or Tropical Storm. Hurricane season in the Atlantic (Caribbean) starts on June 1st, therefore, overlapping with Oxfam’s planned shelters life (6 months). Since Hurricane season is still months away, Oxfam will coordinate with the UN and Haitian government to create new hurricane emergency shelters, and hurricane resistant transitional housing. However, Oxfam will also be preparing for a disaster within a disaster by stockpiling extra resources should this situation arise. Technological advances means that Oxfam will have about 7-10 days notice and time to prepare for evacuation should a significant storm approach.4 Floods Flooding is a major concern for Oxfam’s shelters. Oxfam was able to send in an assessment team into Haiti three days following the earthquake. The assessment team was able to coordinate with Haitian officials to scout potential shelter sites. This allowed Oxfam to determine which sites are prone to flooding, what the drainage situation is like and plan escape routes in case the shelter needs to evacuate on short notice (due to flash floods). Following emergency shelter construction, Oxfam can continue to mitigate the flood risk by coordinating with CCCM cluster to create new drainage ditches surrounding the site. Landslides Oxfam’s assessment team was able to coordinate with local Haitian officials to scout locations that will be at a lower risk to landslides. Oxfam will make sure that evacuation routes are well displayed around the shelters, and if possible will try have as much advanced warning as possible to begin evacuations immediately. Oxfam will coordinate with other clusters and NGOs so that if a landslide does occur, search and rescue missions can begin right after the disaster. Infrastructure Local roads have been destroyed and are currently impassible due to debris blocking them. Oxfam has therefore scouted sites that are in close proximity to transport hubs and Oxfam warehouses. Oxfam will strategically choose distribution site locations where there are accessible roads to handle substantial vehicle traffic and heavy trucks to transport supplies. Due to ports and airports being inaccessible, Oxfam has contacted the Canadian and American militaries to coordinate sharing of resources and equipment such as ships and cranes to transport international supplies. Land Tenure Issues Oxfam will coordinate with the Haitian government to make sure that Oxfam builds its emergency shelters on government property where possible. If government land is unsuitable or unavailable, Oxfam will negotiate with land owners to work out temporary agreements for placing settlement camps. 4 Charles, Jacqueline. "Haiti Unprepared for Hurricanes." Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti. McClatchy Newspapers, n.d. Web. 18 Mar. 2014. <http://www.ijdh.org/2010/06/topics/housing/haiti-unprepared-for- hurricanes/#.Uy0R5NyRPwI>.
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 11 Civil Unrest Delays resulting from civil unrest could further exacerbate the after effects of the disaster and Oxfam’s capacity to distribute aid. Should the atmosphere in Haiti turn violent due to lack of food, water, shelter, Oxfam is preparing to have a contingency plan and a crisis management team for their Rapid Response team in Haiti. Oxfam will also coordinate with the UN and Haitian government for further direction and the Canadian and American militaries for protection. Diseases Oxfam will coordinate with WVI in providing access to health services and IFRC for WASH programs through choosing adequate shelter site locations. Having adequate WASH programs will diminish the risk of diseases due to poor water quality, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene. Each shelter will also maximize ventilation, this will lower the risk of spreading diseases between the IDP. 3.4.1. Security Management Strategy Shelters Oxfam will employ security guards for the shelters and will make sure that their employees are clearly visible to the public to deter crime and provide security. Oxfam will also impose the settlement camps be a weapon-free zone. Oxfam will develop a contingency plan for their staff and beneficiaries in coordination with the Haitian government and the Canadian and American militaries should the situation in the shelters turn violent. Warehouses and Transport Oxfam has contacts in Haiti to rent warehouses and hire local security guards to watch over them, with emphasis during nighttime. Only the supervising security guard and Petionville Team Leader will have a key to access the warehouse. This will reduce the risk to the supplies that Oxfam will have stored. After each shipment, the Logistics Manager will report to the Petionville Team Leader when all supplies have arrived. All drivers and trucks leaving the warehouses will be quickly searched to ensure that the supplies leaving the warehouse have been approved for transportation and distribution to reduce risks of theft and corruption. Distribution Crowd control will be administered by hired security guards under the direction of the Logistics Manager and Settlement Camp Coordinators. If crowds become too unruly Oxfam will halt the distribution of supplies until they can restore stability to the situation before re-distributing supplies. Crisis Management Team The Petionville Team Leader will update all of its staff regularly about Oxfam’s policies on contingency and evacuation plans in case a crisis unfolds. The risk of hostage-taking and personal injury is low; however, should these events occur, the Rapid Response Team will coordinate with the Crisis Management Team at Head Office and contact local authorities, the Canadian embassy and the respective families to coordinate a plan of action. In case of civil unrest, hurricanes and other unforeseen circumstances Oxfam’s Crisis Management Team will coordinate with the Canadian and American militaries to have our staff safely evacuated either by air or by sea. In all cases of evacuation, we will have our staff brought to the Dominican Republic or Miami, Florida depending on the severity of the situation. Once the staff are there, Oxfam will monitor the situation and bring the staff back as soon as the situation becomes stabilized to continue delivering relief assistance.
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 12 3.5. Project Management Oxfam’s Rapid Response team managing the disaster response in Petionville, Haiti consists of 22 expats and 50 national staff. The Management Team consists of one Country Director, one Team Leader for Petionville and 10 Settlement Camp Coordinators who are all expat staff. In addition, 100 security personnel and daily workers will be hired as national staff to provide security within the settlement camps as well as to aid with warehousing, transporting and distributing relief supplies. Within the Operations Team, there are 50 national field operation staff and 2 Shelter & NFI technical experts. The Support Team consists of one Logistics Manager responsible managing the procurement and distribution of shelter and NFI kits, one Human Resources Manager to hire and manage daily workers, one Communications Manager to coordinate with Head Office, other clusters and NGOs, as well as a Finance Manager to ensure Oxfam stays within budget. In the Program Team, we have a Design, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer as well as an Accountability Officer to ensure that Oxfam’s objectives and indicators are being met in accordance with priorities set by the beneficiaries and local authorities. There is also one Government Liaison Officer on the Liaison Team responsible for meeting with government officials, and a Media Liaison Officer responsible for reporting to the media and advocating on Oxfam’s projects being undertaken in Haiti. 3.6. Public Engagement and Benefits to Canada Oxfam’s liaison team will communicate and provide information for government officials and the general public on their work on the ground in Haiti. This will build awareness and garner support among Canadians through learning about the effects of such a large earthquake and the progress that Oxfam is undertaking to respond to this emergency situation. Canadians can also learn more about disaster management on how to reduce vulnerabilities to prepare for disaster events. In addition, providing relief assistance to Haiti will increase positive relations with the Haitian government and increase Canada’s prominence on the world stage on its capacity to respond to global humanitarian disasters quickly and efficiently. 4. CROSS-CUTTING THEMES AND PRINCIPLES 4.1. Gender Oxfam recognizes that women, girls, boys and men all have very different needs, interests and vulnerabilities. Vulnerable groups such as women, children, people with disabilities and the elderly can be taken advantage of and stigmatized. Oxfam will target and ensure that perspectives from these vulnerable groups are included in the consultation and decision making processes as well as implementing a system for people to submit complaints and issues that arise. This will allow the participation of women and other vulnerable groups to set humanitarian priorities and ensure their access to humanitarian goods. Through Oxfam’s registration system and M&E plan of regular camp check-ups, they will be able to collect sex and age disaggregated data and monitor whether these vulnerable groups are receiving adequate humanitarian assistance. Oxfam will also be vigilant among its staff to detect any issues regarding gender based violence such as forced prostitution, rape and domestic violence. Furthermore, while developing the beneficiary targeting strategy and the registration system, Oxfam will allow female and child-headed households
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 13 priority access during distribution times and have security guards to ensure safety and equitable access for these vulnerable groups. Distribution sites will also be placed in easily accessible areas near settlement camps. In addition, Oxfam will have a cash-for-work program to increase livelihood opportunities where they will hire men and women as daily workers to help with security as well as procuring, warehousing, transporting, and distributing relief supplies. 4.2. Participation of Beneficiaries The key stakeholders of the project are internally displaced persons who have been affected by the earthquake. The particular vulnerable and minority groups are women, children, elderly people and those suffering from disabilities. The affected population will be informed and consulted with in the beginning stages and throughout the project phase to determine their changing needs and preferences for the design and implementation of Oxfam’s response plans for emergency shelter and NFIs. Skills training programmes and apprenticeship schemes through hiring daily workers can maximise opportunities for participation during shelter construction, particularly for individuals lacking the required building skills or experience. Women of all ages will also be encouraged to participate in shelter and construction-related activities and training. Contributions from those less able to undertake physical tasks or those without specialist technical expertise can participate in site monitoring and inventory control, the provision of childcare, temporary accommodation or the preparation of food for those engaged in construction works and administrative support. Beneficiary participation is also crucial in to Oxfam’s monitoring and evaluation plan where Ops team members and leaders will perform weekly check-ups to observe and listen to affected families on their needs, their progress and any issues that may arise. This will allow direct beneficiaries to be involved in the planning, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation phases of the response. 4.3. Local Delivery Partnerships and Capacity Building Oxfam will not be able to harness complete use the indigenous systems and services of Haiti, since the earthquake has significantly affected the capacity of the national and municipal governments. Since many NGO offices in Haiti were destroyed and many Haitian employees died or lost family members in the disaster, the capacities of these agencies are severely diminished. Oxfam will coordinate with the Haitian government, local officials, and the military of the United States and Canada. Oxfam will also coordinate with other agencies already on the ground including IFRC (WASH), WVI (Health), Save the Children (Children) and Concern (CCCM). Coordination with all these agencies will enable Oxfam to create liveable conditions for the IDPs in Petionville where they are able to receive essential relief services. 4.4. Convergence and Coordination Haitian Government Oxfam will coordinate and consult with the Haitian government and local authorities to support local capacities and help organize the emergency response and distribution of relief supplies. This will include settlement planning to determine appropriate, accessible site locations and spacing of emergency shelters as well as logistics coordination to procure and distribute existing shelter supplies and NFIs already available in the country and those arriving from international sources.
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 14 Cluster System As part of the Shelter and NFI cluster, Oxfam will have a designated liaison member to attend all cluster and inter-cluster meetings regularly to obtain and share important information about the work and progress of UN agencies and other international and local NGOs providing relief assistance. This will enable better coordination with the UN and other NGOs to prevent duplication of efforts and address gaps in relief responses and unmet needs by using standardized reporting formats and working from shared baseline information. In particular, Oxfam will coordinate with the Camp Coordination and Camp Management cluster to ensure the proper planning and management of settlement camps as well as the Food Security cluster to ensure complementing distribution systems, and WASH and Health clusters to ensure equitable access to essential relief services. 4.5. Sustainability Oxfam IDP shelters will be sustainable for a short period of time following the disaster, however, they are not meant to be a suitable replacement for permanent residency. Oxfam realizes that the shelters may be used for a period of time over 3-6 months; therefore, Oxfam will also provide basic tools that will allow for the occupants to administer basic maintenance as required. Oxfam will try to procure shelter items locally and regionally where possible such as timber poles and simple tools. This will create an ideal situation in supporting the local economy and having necessary replacements nearby. During the shelters existence, Oxfam will coordinate with other agencies to ensure that the transition from temporary shelter to more permanent shelter structures will be as smooth as possible for affected families. 4.6. Environment Due to the poor construction standards and local soil conditions, many houses, schools and larger buildings collapsed, resulting in huge collections of debris. All of this damage and destruction has resulted in an estimated 19 million cubic metres of rubble and debris that must be removed in order for reconstruction to take place. Timely action in the removal of rubble should be prioritized and coordinated among clusters so as to minimize the negative, adverse effects it could have on the environment. In addition, sickness and disease outbreaks can spread due to people living in close quarters to each other in settlement camps. Appropriate measures should be taken to ensure that families have adequate covered living space to reduce vector risks. Coordination with Health and WASH sectors will be necessary to ensure proper medical attention and WASH needs are met to prevent diseases from spreading. Moreover, other natural disaster risks play a huge factor in the management of Oxfam’s project activities. The landscape may be destroyed as fires can spread due to gas pipe explosions, damaging areas of woodland. There are also risks of landslides and hurricanes from occurring that may cause flooding. These factors need to be considered before and during settlement planning and implementation. Environmental planning sustainability will be a major priority post-earthquake. There is an immediate need for emergency temporary shelter, and Oxfam’s objectives related to the environment are:
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 15 a) To reduce the immediate well-being risks associated with the environmental impacts of the disaster. b) To manage the damaged infrastructure in a safe and environmentally sound manner. c) To identify and rectify secondary disaster risks as well as longer term recovery needs such as the appropriate removal and cleanup of temporary shelter. d) To make sure that negative environmental impacts do not develop during the relief and recovery operations. Strategy and Proposed Activities Oxfam proposes to consult with the other sectors such as WASH and CCCM in order to consider the environmental impacts it will have on the region. In regards to the waste management and damaged infrastructure, an assessment of immediate human and equipment needs will be undertaken, particularly focusing on the quantity and character of rubble that could result in a possible damage to the port and main industrial facilities, affecting the procurement of relief supplies. In the short-term, an environmental review of the proposed relief and recovery programmes will also be conducted. A post-earthquake needs assessment will also be carried out, to identify the medium and long-term needs for an environmentally-sound post-disaster recovery, as well as forward-looking Disaster Risk Reduction (DDR). The expected outcomes from this initiative are:  To preserve the life, health and safety of the affected population  Generate effective management of damaged infrastructure and rubble quantities  Reduce secondary disaster risks and avoid unintended negative impacts from aid activities  Ensure a sustainable recovery for the affected population 5. MONITORING AND REPORTING 5.1. Performance Measurement Plan Oxfam’s Design, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer will oversee Oxfam’s Monitoring and Evaluation activities and ensure that their project indicators (as seen in Appendix II) will be met. Oxfam will develop records for registering IDPs by households and record when shelter and NFI kits are distributed to registrants. Petionville’s Team Leader will post weekly totals on a simple cumulative record sheet and post it at the Project Coordination Office to track their progress and reach each week. In addition, Oxfam’s Settlement Camp Coordinators will perform weekly check-ups of at least 150 shelters per week in their designated settlement camp to observe and determine that at least 75% of them perform adequately for a minimum of 3 months with minimal repairs until new shelter kits are needed. They will also try to gage and determine their sense of security and to listen to any complaints affected families may have. They will log their findings and data and report to the Design, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer on a bi-weekly basis who will post a brief monthly summary sheet in the Project Coordination office on beneficiary satisfaction. Lastly, Oxfam’s Communication Officer will attend inter-cluster meetings regularly to obtain information from Petionville’s Health Cluster Leader (WVI) regarding any new cases of mosquito-transmitted diseases (e.g. malaria).
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 16 6. FINANCIAL INFORMATION 6.1. Projected Expenditures Line Items Personnel Supplies Transportation & Travel Training Other Direct Costs Capital Expenditures Field Administration Support Fee Canadian Administration Fee TOTAL $ CAD 480,000.00 1.560,000.00 47,000.00 5,000.00 20,000.00 7,500.00 45,000.00 45,500.00 _______________ 2,210,000.00 6.2. Sources of Income Funded by CIDA/IHA Funded by World Vision Canada TOTAL $ CAD 2,000,000.00 210,000.00 _______________ 2,210,000.00 APPENDIX I – Performance Framework Project Title: Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake Affected Regions in Haiti Project Goal: To improve and maintain health and physical security of earthquake-affected families in Petionville, Haiti Reach – 300,000 IDPs, 148,000 Male & 152,000 Female Resources – $2,000,000 CIDA, $210,000 OXFAM Planned Activities and Expected Results Over a 6-month period commencing January 27, 2010 Activities Beneficiaries Outputs Outcomes Impact 1000 – Provision of emergency shelter 2000 – Provision of non-food items 300,000 displaced people (60,000 families) in Petionville 1. Increased access to adequate emergency shelters 2. Increased access to non-food items including mosquito nets and bedding Physical security and health of 300,000 displaced people in Petionville improved. Basic human needs of earthquake- affected communities in Haiti are met.
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 17 APPENDIX II – Performance Measurement Plan Indicators Data Source Data Collection Method Responsibility Expected Outcome #1 – Physical security and health of 300,000 displaced people in Petionville improved. 1. 60,000 affected households are adequately sheltered from weather conditions for at least 6 months. Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) and Ops Teams Oxfam’s Settlement Camp Coordinators will perform weekly check-ups of at least 150 shelters in each camp per week in their designated settlement camp to observe and determine their performance and durability. They will log the number of shelters in good condition and those that need repair, reporting to the Design, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer on a bi-weekly basis who will post a brief monthly summary sheet in the Project Coordination office. Oxfam - Design, M&E Officer and Settlement Camp Coordinators 2. 80% of IDPs in settlement camps feel an increase in the level of physical security for at least 6 months. M&E and Ops Teams Oxfam’s Settlement Camp Coordinators will perform weekly check-ups of at least 150 families in each camp per week in their designated settlement camp to determine their sense of security and listen to complaints. They will log the number of families feeling secure and insecure and any specific complaints that need to be addressed, reporting to the Design, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer on a bi-weekly basis who will post a brief monthly summary sheet in the Project Coordination office. Oxfam - Design, M&E Officer and Settlement Camp Coordinators 3. 50% decrease in number of new cases of mosquito- transmitted diseases (e.g. malaria) for at least 6 months. Mobile health clinic records Coordination with Health Cluster Leader at inter-cluster meetings to obtain information on number of new cases of mosquito-transmitted diseases. World Vision International Expected Output #1 – Increased access to adequate emergency shelters 1. 60,000 displaced families are provided with temporary shelter kits enough to cover an initial minimum covered floor area of 3.5m2 per person. Oxfam Registration System Oxfam will develop records for registering IDPs by households and record when shelter kits are distributed to registrants. Petionville Team Leader will post weekly totals on a simple cumulative record sheet posted at the Project Coordination Office. Oxfam - Petionville Team Leader 2. 75% of emergency shelter provided perform for a minimum of 3 months with minimal repairs needed until new shelter kit is needed. M&E and Ops Teams Oxfam’s Settlement Camp Coordinators will perform weekly check-ups of at least 150 shelters in each camp per week in their designated settlement camp to determine their performance and durability. They will log the number of shelters in good condition and those that need repair, reporting to the Design, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer on a bi-weekly basis who will post a brief monthly summary sheet in the Project Coordination office. Oxfam - Design, M&E Officer and Settlement Camp Coordinators Expected Output #2 – Increased access to non-food items (mosquito nets and bedding) 1. 60,000 affected families are provided with 2 sets of bedding and 2 mosquito nets per family that last for at least 6 months. Oxfam Registration System Oxfam will develop records for registering IDPs by households and record when NFI kits are distributed to registrants. Petionville Team Leader will post weekly totals on a simple cumulative record sheet posted at the Project Coordination Office. Oxfam - Petionville Team Leader
    • Emergency Shelter and NFI Provision to Earthquake-Affected Regions in Haiti Oxfam Quebec January 17, 2010 Page 18 BIBLIOGRAPHY Charles, Jacqueline. “Haiti Unprepared for Hurricanes.” Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti. McClatchy Newspapers, n.d. Web. 18 Mar. 2014. <http://www.ijdh.org/2010/06/topics/housing/haiti-unprepared-for- hurricanes/#.Uy0R5NyRPwI>. Project, The Sphere. Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response. Rugby: Practical Action Publishing, 2011. United Nations. UNOCHA. Haiti Earthquake Flash Appeal. New York: 2010. Web.