Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Peru: New potato varieties prove vital for the survival of mountain communities. CIP
Peru: New potato varieties prove vital for the survival of mountain communities. CIP
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Peru: New potato varieties prove vital for the survival of mountain communities. CIP

897

Published on

Excessive rains and an increased presence of late blight disease devastated the Cusco region of Peru in 2010, which was declared a national emergency area. The following season, the food security of …

Excessive rains and an increased presence of late blight disease devastated the Cusco region of Peru in 2010, which was declared a national emergency area. The following season, the food security of communities in the Paucartambo province of that
region was maintained in large part thanks to two improved potato varieties, called Pallay Poncho and Puka Lliclla.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
897
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Photo: S. de Haan/CIP STORIES OF CHANGE potato harvest of a large farming community in Paucartambo, Peru. It was the first time that late blight had occurred at such a high altitude. “The rise in temperature due to climate change makes formerly untouched areas fall victim to the potatoes most feared disease, late blight, which is causing more damage with each year,” says CIP agronomist, Manuel Gastelo. The improved varieties were chosen through a participatory selection process with 200 farming families in the affected area from 20 Andigena clones with expected late blight resistance. After 5 years of testing, the two clones with the best properties and performance were chosen in collaboration with the community. They were officially released by INIA as Pallay Poncho and Puka Lliclla.Peru: Long-term investments equal big payoffsNew potato varieties prove vital for While this example is notable, it is not unique. All over the world, the investment in breeding of improved varieties is showing huge payoffs. A recent study from CIP analyzing survey data fromthe survival of mountain communities 23 national potato breeding programs in developing countries showed that a rate of return on investment in breeding of approximately 20% per one dollar spent. The net economic benefits were equal to more than $121 million. The study also found that more than one million hectares of land in developing countries were planted with CIP-linked varieties, with most of the benefits (e.g., increased yields, better nutrition, food security, and higher incomes) accruing to poor producers and consumers.Excessive rains and an increased presence of late blight disease devastated the However, the trend toward lower investment in long-term global research initiatives, such asCusco region of Peru in 2010, which was declared a national emergency area. The breeding, is threatening to compromise such advances. Likewise, pressures from donors tofollowing season, the food security of communities in the Paucartambo province of that produce short-term results for targeted programs are moving investment away from upstreamregion was maintained in large part thanks to two improved potato varieties, called Pallay Science for a food secure future research that takes numerous years, but may produce the biggest impacts in the longer run.Poncho and Puka Lliclla.Developed by the International Potato Center (CIP), these two varieties are resistant tolate blight disease. Late blight is particularly severe in warm, humid conditions and isincreasingly threatening potato production in the Andes. Story prepared byMaking the difference“Three years after their formal release, the yield of these two potatoes was about 8-timeshigher than any of the 150 native potato varieties grown in the Cusco region,” explains Stef deHaan, CIP potato breeder, adding “It made the difference between having enough to eat, ornot.” a CGIAR ConsortiumPallay Poncho and Puka Lliclla give yields of approximately 15-16 tons per hectare, Research Centercompared to 5 tons per hectare with the traditional native potatoes. Following the floods CGIAR is a global research partnership for a foodof 2010, the improved variety yields held strong, while those of the traditional varieties secure future. Its sciencewas only around 2 tons per hectare, due to high damage from late blight. is carried out by the 15 research centers of the It made the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration withGoing up the mountain difference between hundreds of partner organizations.Back in 2003, CIP joined forces with the Peruvian Ministry of Agriculture and Peru’s having enough to www.cgiar.orgNational Institute of Agrarian Innovation (INIA) after late blight wiped out the native eat, or not. M A R C H 2012
  • 2. Photo: S. de Haan/CIP. STORIES OF CHANGE potato harvest of a large farming community in Paucartambo, Peru. It was the first time that late blight had occurred at such a high altitude. “The rise in temperature due to climate change makes formerly untouched areas fall victim to the potatoes most feared disease, late blight, which is causing more damage with each year,” says CIP agronomist, Manuel Gastelo. The improved varieties were chosen through a participatory selection process with 200 farming families in the affected area from 20 Andigena clones with expected late blight resistance. After 5 years of testing, the two clones with the best properties and performance were chosen in collaboration with the community. They were officially released by INIA as Pallay Poncho and Puka Lliclla.Peru: Long-term investments equal big payoffsNew potato varieties prove vital for While this example is notable, it is not unique. All over the world, the investment in breeding of improved varieties is showing huge payoffs. A recent study from CIP analyzing survey data fromthe survival of mountain communities 23 national potato breeding programs in developing countries showed that a rate of return on investment in breeding of approximately 20% per one dollar spent. The net economic benefits were equal to more than $121 million. The study also found that more than one million hectares of land in developing countries were planted with CIP-linked varieties, with most of the benefits (e.g., increased yields, better nutrition, food security, and higher incomes) accruing to poor producers and consumers.Excessive rains and an increased presence of late blight disease devastated the However, the trend toward lower investment in long-term global research initiatives, such asCusco region of Peru in 2010, which was declared a national emergency area. The breeding, is threatening to compromise such advances. Likewise, pressures from donors tofollowing season, the food security of communities in the Paucartambo province of that produce short-term results for targeted programs are moving investment away from upstreamregion was maintained in large part thanks to two improved potato varieties, called Pallay Science for a food secure future research that takes numerous years, but may produce the biggest impacts in the longer run.Poncho and Puka Lliclla.Developed by the International Potato Center (CIP), these two varieties are resistant tolate blight disease. Late blight is particularly severe in warm, humid conditions and isincreasingly threatening potato production in the Andes. Story prepared byMaking the difference“Three years after their formal release, the yield of these two potatoes was about 8-timeshigher than any of the 150 native potato varieties grown in the Cusco region,” explains Stef deHaan, CIP potato breeder, adding “It made the difference between having enough to eat, ornot.” a CGIAR ConsortiumPallay Poncho and Puka Lliclla give yields of approximately 15-16 tons per hectare, Research Centercompared to 5 tons per hectare with the traditional native potatoes. Following the floods CGIAR is a global research partnership for a foodof 2010, the improved variety yields held strong, while those of the traditional varieties secure future. Its sciencewas only around 2 tons per hectare, due to high damage from late blight. is carried out by the 15 research centers of the It made the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration withGoing up the mountain difference between hundreds of partner organizations.Back in 2003, CIP joined forces with the Peruvian Ministry of Agriculture and Peru’s having enough to www.cgiar.orgNational Institute of Agrarian Innovation (INIA) after late blight wiped out the native eat, or not. M A R C H 2012

×