Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Drupal Camp LA 2010: Moderating Content in Drupal

3,762

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,762
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Moderating Content in Drupal
    Ashok Modi
    August 6, 2010
  • 2. Introduction (BTMash)
    • Systems Programmer
    • 3. Work for California Institute of the Arts
    • 4. Worked for zinc Roe Design; create web sites (and games) aimed at youth.
    • 5. Working with Drupal since 2006 (Drupal 4.6.x)
    • 6. Help with patches and upgrades of contrib modules on Drupal.org
    • 7. Abuse
    • 8. Data
    • 9. Decisions
    • 10. Favorites
    • 11. Flag Content
    • 12. Fivestar
    • 13. Nice Menus
    • 14. Simplenews
    • 15. Userpoints
    • 16. Userpoints Badges
    • 17. More info and details at http://drupal.org/user/60422
    • 18. Canadian (yes, we too have unruly content creators!)
  • About the presentation
    • Sharing most of my own experiences.
    • 19. Likely haven’t seen some solutions that are out there.
    • 20. How about a BOF?
    • 21. Let’s share ideas!
    • 22. Everyone will benefit.
    • 23. Say your question!
    • 24. Everyone should come out a winner
    • 25. Slides will be added online.
  • Reason for Moderation?
    • Content from ‘uncontrolled’ users
    • 26. Anonymous
    • 27. Deal with spam!
    • 28. Registered (registration and content creation open to everyone)
    • 29. Deal with spam.
    • 30. Deal with ‘bad’ content.
    • 31. Cyber Bullying
    • 32. Trolling
    • 33. Site gangs
    • 34. Dealt with the above when working on the Zimmer Twins (http://www.zimmertwins.com)
    • 35. Content from ‘controlled’ users (closed registration with fixed and/or fixed content creation team)
    • 36. People/staff you know/work with.
    • 37. Inaccurate Content
    • 38. Stale Information
    • 39. Poorly written
    • 40. and the list goes on!
    • 41. Deal with this currently.
  • Anonymous users
    • Posted by ‘users’ that allow anonymous posting.
    • 42. Posted by ‘users’ that can register via weakly protected registration forms.
    • 43. What does Drupal offer out of the box?
    • 44. Not all that much :/
    • 45. Spam bots get smarter and smarter (relatively easy to defeat
    • 46. Un-publish anonymous content until a content editor can look at the content and then mark it for submission.
    • 47. May be difficult if dealing with a site is a very large amount of anonymous content.
    • 48. Require submitting comments to be previewed (takes care of a large chunk of spam by splitting a form into multiple pages)
    • 49. Use really strict filters for anonymous content.
  • Dealing with anonymous users (contrib)
    • Captcha (http://drupal.org/project/captcha)
    • 50. Provide users with a question they must respond to try and validate them as a human being.
    • 51. Many plug-ins available from project page
    • 52. ReCaptcha (http://drupal.org/project/recaptcha)
    • 53. Captcha Pack (http://drupal.org/project/captcha_pack)
    • 54. Captcha Riddler(http://drupal.org/project/riddler)
    • 55. Spam (http://drupal.org/project/spam)
    • 56. Can block spammer urls and IP addresses, detect repeat postings, check for bad content via custom filters.
    • 57. Use a combination of spam + captcha to rule out most spam comments, contact notifications, anonymous content postings.
  • Dealing with anonymous users (contrib)
    • Use 3rd party services from contrib.
    • 58. Antispam (http://drupal.org/project/antispam)
    • 59. Validate content against services offered by Akismet, Defensio, or TypePad Antispam where content sent to their servers
    • 60. Comes with a antispam helper module which adds a user role which would allow a user to continue
    • 61. No Supplemental captchas
    • 62. More information at http://www.pixture.com/drupal/node/76
    • 63. Mollom
    • 64. Similar to antispam but only works with Mollom servers.
    • 65. Only display a captcha to user if it believes the content to be spam and user not human.
  • Dealing with anonymous users (contrib)
    • Views Bulk Operations (http://drupal.org/project/vbo)
    • 66. Create views of various types of content (whatever views supports)
    • 67. Provides operations for content (similar to the content list edit page, but much more useful since it uses views).
    • 68. Can update multiple content at once.
    • 69. Used on Drupal.org
    • 70. We will be using it to manage our photo archives.
  • Registered users
    • Slightly different issue
    • 71. Can post spam via spam bots.
    • 72. Can also spam by hand (children in particular can be VERY persistent)
    • 73. Worry about quality of content (inappropriate content can be a huge concern).
    • 74. Moderating content was a large issue when working on the Zimmer Twins (at the time, over 700k user generated movie clips and over 660k comments – both are over 1M now)
    • 75. Mass spam (by hand) to gain interest in watching their movie clip
    • 76. Trolling other users
    • 77. Inappropriate language and themes.
  • Dealing with registered users (core)
    • Ability to leave content unpublished until a moderator first looks at the content.
    • 78. Both nodes or comments.
    • 79. Troublesome as you have to click on content to see if there are any issues and work from there.
    • 80. Can also block users.
  • Dealing with registered users (contrib)
    • Troll (http://drupal.org/project/troll)
    • 81. Block out IP and IP Ranges (has ability to import multiple block lists)
    • 82. Advanced user searching
    • 83. Can be useful in targeting user management
    • 84. Possible solution: use help of users to help with moderating content on site.
    • 85. Flag Content (http://drupal.org/project/flag_content)
    • 86. Ability to flag users, comments, and content
    • 87. User flags can notify an admin who can take a closer look at the content for removal
    • 88. Integration with views to see different parts of content issues.
    • 89. Not been updated in a while…
    • 90. Cannot get more context on why user is flagging content (users sometimes confuse flagging content for abusive reasons as flagging for support)
  • Dealing with registered users (contrib)
    • Abuse module (http://drupal.org/project/abuse)
    • 91. Written by me
    • 92. Watchlist module
    • 93. Contains list of watchlist and banned regular expressions which automatically flag content if the title, body, content contains pattern.
    • 94. Has moderation section to see content, ability to allow/hide/remove content, give users warnings, ban user.
    • 95. Also has supervisory role to assign content to first level set of moderators.
    • 96. Cannot flag users (though number of warnings, flags user content has received is shown on moderation screen)
    • 97. UI can be daunting.
    • 98. No views support (sorry guys ; its actually broken against views)
    • 99. Code could use a lot of love (now looking for a new maintainer)
  • Dealing with registered users (contrib)
    • Flag (http://drupal.org/project/flag)
    • 100. Looking like future to moderation problem.
    • 101. Ability to flag content of *any* type
    • 102. Integration with many different projects (views, rules, workflow)
    • 103. Flag Abuse Module (http://drupal.org/project/flag_abuse)
    • 104. Users must provide reasons.
    • 105. Predefined views
    • 106. Integrate with Views Bulk Operations (http://drupal.org/project/vbo) to perform mass operations.
    • 107. Not yet as robust moderator-feature-wise as abuse but some glue (particularly with functionality of watchlist and integration with notifications) could make it much more powerful.
  • Dealing with registered users (contrib)
    • Revisioning(http://drupal.org/project/revisioning)
    • 108. Content Moderation (http://drupal.org/project/content_moderation)
    • 109. New ways to ‘manage’ content (can be used in ways of moderation)
    • 110. Really uses workflow module to power moderation of content.
    • 111. Similar issues to flag abuse; how do we get some ideas about the workflow content before we even get to the moderation aspect?
  • What could mollom do?
    • Mollom actually has a very robust API (see more at http://mollom.com/API)
    • 112. Integrate mollom API to ensure bots are not flagging content.
    • 113. Integrate mollom API to get quality/profanity rating on content and decide if it should be flagged, not allowed, or allowed.
    • 114. Nothing regarding this in contrib quite yet 
    • 115. Other options for pre-moderation of content could include using spam or migrating out the watchlist module to work with the above set of solutions.
  • Working with content editors
    • Sometimes easier (sometimes not).
    • 116. Generally do not have to worry about inappropriate content.
    • 117. May be lower volume of content to check.
    • 118. Different set of problems
    • 119. Inaccurate content.
    • 120. Incorrect links.
    • 121. Expired content.
    • 122. New to Drupal (UI can be a little scary.)
  • Working with content editors
    • Create new revisions
    • 123. Know who the last content editor was if someone edits content with incorrect information.
    • 124. Check differences between revisions (use the diff module (http://drupal.org/project/diff) to see difference side-by-side).
    • 125. Using revisioning or content moderation might be very useful for publishing content in a proper manner.
    • 126. Use Link Checker? (http://drupal.org/project/linkchecker)
    • 127. Scans links in content and notifies users of any links that do not work.
  • Working with content editors
    • Could use workflow? (http://drupal.org/project/workflow)
    • 128. Set various states for content to enter
    • 129. Show end user only content that are in certain states.
    • 130. Integrates with views (try to use views bulk operations to manage content en masse).
    • 131. Integrates with flag via rules module or via workflow_flag module.
    • 132. Much easier UI for content editors to understand.
  • Working with content editors
    • Could use notifications?(http://drupal.org/project/notifications)
    • 133. Notify a set of site content managers when content is created/updated by other content editors.
    • 134. Check to make sure the content is correctly formatted.
    • 135. Use the digest notifications if there is lots of content to avoid a stuffy inbox.
  • That’s the end!
    Thank you 

×