Selling to libraries in the middle east and north africa

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This white paper can be downloaded for free at www.accucoms.com. Many publishers would like to strengthen their presence in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). This region is going through various changes and is so diverse that publishers often struggle to identify opportunities or to develop a strategy that successfully serves customers across the region. This is why ACCUCOMS decided to chart the needs and wishes of academic and scientific libraries in the MENA region.

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Selling to libraries in the middle east and north africa

  1. 1. SELLING TO LIBRARIES INTHE MIDDLE EAST ANDNORTH AFRICAAn ACCUCOMS White Paper Okan Gür okan@accucoms.com Rian van Spaandonk rian@accucoms.comCopyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS
  2. 2. CONTENTSINTRODUCTION ...................................................................... 2   WHY THIS WHITE PAPER? ..................................................... 2   METHODOLOGY.................................................................... 2   COUNTRIES AND REGIONS OF THE MENA REGION ................... 2  REGION OVERVIEW ................................................................. 3   DEMOGRAPHICS .................................................................. 4   Youth bulge ...................................................................... 5   ECONOMY ........................................................................... 6   EDUCATION......................................................................... 8   TECHNOLOGY .....................................................................10  SURVEY RESULTS ..................................................................12   PARTICIPANTS ....................................................................12   COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT .................................................14   INTERACTION WITH PUBLISHERS..........................................17  CONCLUSIONS ......................................................................21  ABOUT ACCUCOMS ................................................................22  APPENDIX .............................................................................23   A – POPULATION .................................................................23   B – POPULATION UNDER 30 .................................................24   C – GDP AND GNI PER CAPITA ..............................................25   D – LITERACY AND TERTIARY ENROLLMENT ............................26   E – PUBLIC SPENDING ON EDUCATION ..................................27   F – SOURCES & FURTHER INFORMATION................................28  Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 1
  3. 3. INTRODUCTIONWHY THIS WHITE PAPER?Many publishers would like to strengthen their presence in theMiddle East and North Africa (MENA). This region is currently goingthrough various political and economic transitions, and offersexcellent business opportunities since private investment iswelcomed both from at home and abroad. Transitions in the field ofeducation and employment are especially interesting for publishers,since an ever larger group of students is preparing to participate ina changing, and growing, economy. However, the MENA region is sodiverse that publishers often struggle to identify opportunities or todevelop a strategy that successfully serves customers in this region.In this white paper, ACCUCOMS has charted some characteristics ofthe MENA region as well as the needs and wishes of its academicand scientific libraries. Our aim is to help publishers all over theworld to better serve their customers, and to improve the customerexperiences of the libraries in this region.METHODOLOGYThe data in the REGION OVERVIEW is based on a variety ofsources, which are listed in APPENDIX F. The SURVEY RESULTSare based on an ACCUCOMS survey among academic, medical andcorporate libraries across the MENA region. The survey consisted offourteen questions that covered a diverse range of subjects. Atvarious points within the survey, librarians were given theopportunity to elaborate on their answers, which resulted in someadditional background information, issues and topics.COUNTRIES AND REGIONS OF THE MENA REGIONDefinitions of the countries and territories included in the MENAregion tend to vary and fluctuate. Part of this region is variouslyreferred to as the Middle East and as Western Asia. This white paperwill refer to the entire region as the MENA region, and includesreferences to the following countries and territories:Algeria, Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait,Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Palestinian Territories,Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, UnitedArab Emirates, Western Sahara and Yemen.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 2
  4. 4. REGION OVERVIEWIn 2010, the MENA region had approximately 350 millioninhabitants. These 350 million people are spread out over a diverseterritory that covers 6 time zones between Mauritania and Iran.Most of the land has an arid climate, but many coastal areas havemore favourable climates.Economically, the countries andterritories are also diverse. Some MENA Q&Acountries are rich in natural Q What is the largest growthresources such as oil and gas, market in the Middle East forothers have few. publishers? A Education (academic, schools andBefore 2009, outlooks for the English language teaching)MENA region were mostlypositive. The combination of anoil boom and a large number of young people seemed a recipe foreconomic success. In 2009, commentators noted that the MENAregion was entering a post-oil boom phase as a result of the globaleconomic downturn. Although economic growth was accelerating(from 2.1% in 2009 to 3.9% in 2010), there were not enough jobs.Since 2010, the region has been shaken up by the political turmoilvariously referred to as Arab Spring or Arab Uprising. Reasons forthe unrest include poverty, social inequalities, state corruption,impunity, and rising numbers of unemployed youngsters. Satellitetelevision and mobile technology brought other regions of the worldinto the MENA region, and MENA countries closer together.The uprisings have affected different countries in different ways.Tunisia, Egypt and Libya have seen a regime change; Morocco andJordan have made a move towards free elections, and Saudi Arabiahas appeased its people with largesse. In Bahrain, Syria and Yementhe effects of local uprisings are still developing at the moment ofwriting. The long-term effects of the uprisings are uncertain. Incountries where regimes were toppled, the new democratic order isstill developing (e.g. Egypt). The protestors might find that freeelections result in an elected government that represents the wishesof a different generation and/or existing groups that were betterprepared for the election process.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 3
  5. 5. Politics are not the only reason the MENA Q&Aworld is captivated by the recentdevelopments in the MENA region. Q Why is the MENA regionBecause the region is rich in oil, interesting for English-language publishers?the situation in the region affectsthe oil price and, by extension, the A Proximity, increased use ofworld economy. Equally, the English in MENA region, increased interest in and output of the regionworldwide recession and the Euro due to the Arab Spring.crisis affect the oil price. In June2012, the price of crude oil haddecreased but there were still concerns about the possibility ofworldwide economic recovery if these prices were not to come downfurther.DEMOGRAPHICSMENA region in numbers (2009/10)*Population MENA +/- 350,000,000 Highest Egypt 81,121,000 Lowest Djibouti 889,000Urban population MENA 58% Highest Kuwait 98% Lowest Yemen 32%Population under 30 MENA 62% Highest Yemen 75% Lowest Qatar 45%Life expectance 72 yearsCountries in the MENA region vary in population size from small(Djibouti, Bahrain) to large (Egypt). The population density in theregion as a whole is about 38 people per km2. Countries whosepopulation density lies far below the average are Western Sahara,Mauritania, Libya, Oman and Saudi Arabia. At the other side of thespectrum, the population density of Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, Syria,Israel and Bahrain lies far above average. The population of theMENA region is growing at about 2% per year.* For country-specific details, see TABLES A and B in the APPENDIX.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 4
  6. 6. Youth bulgeThree out of every five inhabitants of the MENA region are under30. This phenomenon is often referred to as a ‘youth bulge’. TheMENA region has been experiencing this phenomenon since the1970s. The number of youth aged 15-24 doubled between 1980 and2010, but is expected to increase by only 5% between 2010 and2040. By 2050, about a third of the population in the entire MENAregion is expected to be younger than 25, 15% older than 65 andthe rest (about half) between 25 and 65 years of age.The consequences of a youth bulge depend on other factors in thecountry. Many young workers can create a very healthy economy,but a youth bulge can also result in widespread unemploymentwhen education and/or jobs are lacking (see ECONOMY andEDUCATION)Although the entire MENA region is experiencing a youth bulge, thespecifics differ in individual countries. In 2010, the median age washighest in Qatar (32), United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Israel (all30) and lowest in Yemen (17), Iraq and the Palestine Territories(both 18). In the oil-producing countries, however, the median agetends to be higher due to the influx of (relatively) older foreignworkers. And whereas 37% of the population in North Africa wasaged 15-24 in 2010, this group comprised 15% on the ArabianPeninsula. SIDENOTE - WAITHOOD “Shabab is a popular word in Arabic which means youth. The Middle East Youth Initiative defines youth as those between the ages of 15 and 29. This range has been selected to reflect the prolonged transitions to adulthood faced by many youth in the region. For many young people in the Middle East, the transition to adulthood is no longer as smooth and predictable as it once was. "Waithood" refers to the long and bewildering phase of time that a large proportion of Middle Eastern youth spend waiting for a full state of adulthood. Waithood conveys the multifaceted reality of the transition experience. Successful transitions require young people to gain the right skills while in school, engage in a purposeful search for a job or career, avoid risky behavior and, in good time, start an independent family. Because outcomes in one sphere spill over into another, failure in one or more of these transitions may cause multiple failures and result in youth exclusion.” From: Dhillon, N. & Yousef, T. Inclusion: Meeting the 100 Million Youth Challenge. Middle East Youth Initiative, 2007.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 5
  7. 7. ECONOMYMENA region in numbers (2010)†GDP MENA region $1,206,982,758,169 Latin America & Caribbean $4,982,626,648,235 United States $14,586,736,313,339 European Union $16,241,135,492,143GNI/capita MENA region $3,874 Latin America & Caribbean $7,741 United States $47,340 European Union $33,948Youth unemployment MENA region 25% World 14% ‡ Lower middle Upper middle Low income High income income income Djibouti, Egypt Israel, Bahrain, Iraq, Morocco, Algeria, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Mauritania Palestinian Jordan, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Territories, Sudan, Libya, Tunisia Arabia, UAE Syria, YemenThe economic differences between countries in the MENA region aremany. Djibouti, Mauritania, Sudan and Yemen are among the leastdeveloped countries in the world.Contrastingly, countries such as Bahrain, MENA FACTSIsrael, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Organization ofUnited Arab Emirates have GDPs and Petroleum ExportingGNIs well above the regional average. Countries (OPEC) MENA: Algeria, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya,The MENA region has the highest youth Qatar, Saudi Arabia,employment rate and the lowest youth United Arab Emirates Other: Angola, Ecuador,labour force participation (especially Nigeria, Venezuelaamong women). In 2011, the World Bank† For country-specific details, see TABLE C in the APPENDIX.‡ World Bank Country Classification - Economies are divided according to 2009 GNI per capita,calculated using the World Bank Atlas method. The groups are: low income, $995 or less; lowermiddle income, $996 - $3,945; upper middle income, $3,946 - $12,195; and high income, $12,196 ormore.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 6
  8. 8. estimated that the region will need an additional 40 million jobs inthe next ten years. However, if labour participation increases, sowill that estimate.In oil-producing countries, unemployment MENA FACTSis also influenced by the global economy;a weaker global economy goes hand in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC)hand with a lower price per barrel, which Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman,negatively affects employment. Similarly, Qatar, Saudi Arabia andpolitical instability in the MENA region United Arab Emirates have signed aninfluences the supply of oil as well as intergovernmentalinternational trading opportunities, and agreement and created a multilateral free tradeby extension the oil price and the global area.economy. SIDENOTE – EURO CRISIS “At the margin, demand for oil and oil products in the Euro area will be weaker in 2012 than it would otherwise have been. This does not remove the primary driver of oil prices, namely secular oil demand from [emerging market] economies, but it does act as a brake on price increases in the near term. [...] The tsunami of deleveraging that is being triggered in the Euro area will not take long to reach the financial shores of the GCC. The implication is a steady shrinkage in balance sheets for internationally oriented bank sectors of the region, which are primarily located in Bahrain, the UAE and Qatar. There are two implications: first, contribution to domestic value-added by the financial sectors will shrink, as bank profit margins are related to the size of their balance sheets. Secondly, the days of easy money arising from leveraged financing are threatened to the extent that linkages to international financial markets expose banks in the area to deleveraging Euro-area financial sectors. However, this does not yet constitute a “perfect storm” for the region. Liquidity is being generated locally from a combination of dramatically expanded government spending and slackening economic activity in the Gulf itself.” From: Nakhjavani, M. “The European Debt Crisis and Bank Reform: Implications for MENA Financial Markets.” Energy & Political Risk 3/1 (January 2012): 16-20.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 7
  9. 9. EDUCATIONMENA region in numbers§Literacy rate (% of people 15+) MENA 74 Highest Qatar 95 Lowest Morocco 56Public spending on education (% of gov. exp) MENA 20 Highest Morocco 25.7 Lowest Lebanon 7.2School enrollment, tertiary (% gross) MENA 27 Highest Israel 62 Lowest Djibouti 3Since 1980, countries in the MENA region have on average investeda larger percentage of their GDP (nearly 5%) in education thanother developing regions. Across the region, the number of enrolledpupils and students has increased. According to the World Bank, theprimary completion rate in the MENA region was 88% in 2009, and74% of all those over 15 years of age are could read and write. Thegender gap has decreased in most countries, with equal numbers ofboys and girls enrolled in secondary schools. In some countries(e.g. Saudi Arabia), more women than men are now enrolled atuniversities. Tertiary enrollment is above average in Israel,Lebanon, the Palestine Territories, Iran, Jordan, Saudi Arabia,Tunisia, Algeria and Egypt.Before 2010, public spending on education (as % of GDP) wasabove average in Syria, Yemen, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Israel,Tunisia and Djibouti. Of those countries, some also have the highestGDPs and therefore more money to spend in general (Saudi Arabia,Israel). When taken as a percentage of government expenditure,public spending on education before 2010 was above average inMorocco, United Arab Emirates, Djibouti, Tunisia and Algeria. Again,some of these countries were among those with higher GDPs(United Arab Emirates, Algeria).§ For country-specific details, see TABLES C, D and E in the APPENDIX.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 8
  10. 10. The education system in many MENA countries is currentlychanging. In the past, graduates would automatically flow into thepublic sector, especially in oil-rich countries. This situation becamemore and more untenable as the number of youths increased andeconomic systems were reformed. Nowadays, increasing numbersof graduates need to flow into the private sector. As a result, theeducational systems in some countries are adapting their programsand courses in order to equip their students with the skills neededin the modern, international private sector (e.g. Egypt, Tunisia).Popular courses include Economics and Technology. However, manyof the oil-rich countries are still creating public sector jobs instead(e.g. Bahrain, Saudi Arabia).The region is rich in consortia. Some of the most activeorganisations are: • Saudi Arabia o Saudi Digital Library (SDL) o King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) • United Arab Emirates o UAE Health Library Consortium – TAWAM Medical Library o UAE Higher Education Library Consortium / Library Information Web Access (LIWA) • Egypt o Egyptian Universities Library Consortium (EULC) • Jordan o Jordanian Consortium o Center of Excellence • Lebanon o Lebanese Academic Library Consortium (LALC) • Qatar o Hamad Medical Corporation o Qatar FoundationCopyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 9
  11. 11. TECHNOLOGY +*,-.*-,"/-*-,.()#*"012234" *)# !"# !)# $)# $%# ")# "&# )# (# )# %*# %!# %)# %# %&# !"#$"%#%&()#*" &$# &)# &# &)# ()# (%# ()# $# (# )# -# 3# # # ;# # /# 6# # # # # # L# # # 98 ?1 /? 1 ; 0?1 0?1 26 H1 16 10 12 1? HI 0?2 +, 1 .01 @ ; K?@ 89 0> 5 45 B <H G2 6? ./0 01 :1 -G 8 A= J2 C= F8 80 0?; ,3 ? #, 7 20 => #C <1 16 6? E 2/3 D1Technologically, the MENA region is MENA FACTSdeveloping at a rapid pace. The The number of mobile subscriptionsuprisings in the MENA region have in the Middle East grew by 6.3also been referred to as the million in the first quarter of 2012.“Facebook Revolution” because the This equals nearly 70000 new subscriptions per day.young protestors used Facebook,other social media and mobile Source: Ericsson Traffic and Market Report, Junedevices to find information, 2012organise themselves and publishnews. Access to mobile technologyand the internet, as well as exposure to satellite tv have resulted in an informed, connected and technology-savvy region. MENA FACTS Electronic books are an excellent Additionally, social media appear way for publishers to avoid less to be a “gender equalizer”, with efficient distribution networks and similar use among male and increase revenues. female users. There is, however, still a gap in women’s usage of social media, which is linked tocontinuing societal and cultural constraints.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 10
  12. 12. !"#$"%#%&()#*" )# "# &)# &"# %)# %"# $)# $"# !)# !"# *+ ")# ,# -./ !"# 01 2# !$# 30 4 0/ # $!# 56 7 08Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 4# %&# 96 :8 .8 0 # &# ;< /= 0 :# &(# >0 6= @0 8 #+ 2 1. /0 A ? 80 :8 # &%# 0: #9 1/ /8411 < /81 .# &&# BC 0: # # +(,-.##/"0-*-12()#*"345657" D </ <E E< # # ,F GH 4 "# # I8? G0 !# # +2 F1 /80 !# # -/0 &# J# K1 C 1: &# #
  13. 13. SURVEY RESULTSPARTICIPANTS Type of Organisation Other 8% Corporate 8% Medical 11% Academic 73%The majority of participating institutions (73%) are part of anacademic organisation. The others are connected to medicalinstitutions (11%), corporations (8%), or other types oforganizations such as research and technology centers. Allacademic disciplines are represented, although the field ofProfessions & Applied Sciences (incl. Education, Health Science,Law) is mentioned most often as a focus area, followed by theFormal Sciences (incl. Computer Sciences, Mathematics) and theSocial Sciences. Humanities and Natural Sciences are mentionedleast often as fields of specialisation. Most of the respondents areinformation specialists and library directors. Just over a third of theparticipating institutions serve between 1000 and 5000 patrons. Anequal portion serve more than 5000 (up to 25000) patrons. The restserve fewer than 1000 patrons.Effects of Arab SpringThe participating institutions were mostly situated on the ArabianPeninsula, as was to be expected considering the recent politicalCopyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 12
  14. 14. developments and changes in North Africa. Nearly three out of fiverespondents indicated that their institution had not been affected byrecent political events. The other respondents stated that theirinstitutions had been affected minimally or mildly. Thoserespondents who specified the manner in which their institutionshad been affected by recent political developments mentionedvarious effects. In what way was your institution affected by recent political events? • Improved governance and management (Tunisia) • More students, library services and usage in order to cover geopolitical changes (Lebanon) • Budget cuts (Bahrain) • Budget cuts due to oil price fluctuations (United Arab Emirates) Has your institution been affected by recent (since 2010) political events? Yes, strongly 0% Yes, mildly 19% Minimally Not at all 23% 58%Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 13
  15. 15. COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT Current Collection 81-100% Books E-books Journals 61-80% E-journals Databases 41-60% % of collection 21-40% 0-20%Collections largely consist of books, e-journals and databases. Printjournals are clearly less popular. Although the percentage of e-books is still relatively low, it has increased since 2009.** Priority for Future Collection Audio/Visual Digital Archives/ Repositories Databases High Medium E-journals Low Journals E-books Books** ACCUCOMS held a similar survey among librarians in the MENA region in 2009.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 14
  16. 16. Librarians in the MENA region mostly expect to add databases, e-journals and e-books too their collections. Audio/visual resourcesand print journals have low priority. Preferred Formats 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% Print + online 50% Online only 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Journals BooksNone of the participating institutions prefer the print-only format.Institutions indicate a mixed preference for print-and-online andonline-only. The online-only format is mostly preferred for journals,whereas usually both print and online copies of books arepurchased. The choice for online-only or online-and-print journalsappears to be related to the size of the institution; online-and-printjournals are mostly preferred by smaller institutions.The main reasons given to explain a preference for online-onlyjournals is that they are easy to find and handle, accessible frommultiple locations, and save space. The accessibility of online-onlyresources has improved since 2009. Several respondents note thatprinted copies are still preferred in the Social Sciences andHumanities, and also for books.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 15
  17. 17. Why do you prefer this format? “Science & technology users prefer online only, whereas humanities & social sciences still request printed resources.” - Academic library, Bahrain “Decisions are made based on price and availability. If a journal is too expensive in its electronic format, we will purchase in print. The same is true for books.” - Academic library, United Arab Emirates Library Budget for 2013-2015 Decrease 12% Increase 48% Stay same 40%Libraries in the MENA region mostly expect their budget to stay thesame (40%) or to increase (48%). The most optimistic respondentsare from Lebanon, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Librarians seem to bemore positive about budget prospects compared to 2009.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 16
  18. 18. INTERACTION WITH PUBLISHERS How do you prefer to receive information about products and services? Conferences Website/social media Listservs/forums/etc Prefer Neutral Dislike Consortium Subscription agent Publisher and/or Dedicated RepresentativeInstitutions in the MENA region prefer to receive information aboutproducts and services directly from the publisher or a dedicatedrepresentative, or via a website / social media. Preferences havechanged since 2009, when receiving information via thesubscription agent was strongly preferred. Whereas conferenceswere not very popular as a source of information in 2009 (stronglydisliked), they are seen as neutral-to-positive in 2012. I would like to see... “... more focus from international publishers on the Gulf region & Middle East libraries, including attendance of regional library conferences and sponsoring of medium-sized librarian meetings.” - Academic library, QatarCopyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 17
  19. 19. Respondents were asked to put the communication methods listedabove in order of preference. Based on the order indicated, eachcommunication method received a score per respondent. Theoverall scores were then compared. Although preferences obviouslyvary, email is the most popular communication method for librariesin the MENA region. The next popular sources of information arewebsites / social media and personal visits. Postal mail, telephoneand fax were not ranked as preferred methods as often. Theseresults have not changed much compared to 2009.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 18
  20. 20. Preferred Incentives Sample issues First-year discount Trial period Valued-client discounts Free online access with print Package discounts No annual price riseRespondents were asked to list the three incentives they preferredmost. Trial periods, package discounts and the absence of anannual price rise are the most appreciated incentives amonglibraries in the MENA region. In 2009, valued client discounts andfree online access with a print subscription were most popular. "Publishers should re-examine the fte subscription model when dealing with academic libraries in the MENA region as most universities are only just starting to offer postgraduate and research courses. This means that usage is in no way comparable to usage in other countries like the US, UK, etc. The language factor is also very important as English is the not the first or native language in this part of the world. A new subscription model based on usage volume (bands) may be an option; it could become more affordable and would act as an incentive to encourage libraries to acquire more resources." - Academic institution, BahrainCopyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 19
  21. 21. Most Important Services Frequent phone calls about subscriptions Being contacted in own language Information via email Technical assistance (e.g. about news and changes activation) Quick response to questions and complaintsRespondents were asked which of the listed services were mostimportant to them. They overwhelmingly selected technicalassistance, email updates and quick responses to questions andcomplaints. Being contacted in one’s own language has become lessimportant to librarians in the MENA region since 2009, whiletechnical assistance has increased in importance.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 20
  22. 22. CONCLUSIONS • Although the MENA region is currently undergoing economic and political changes which make it hard to predict the future, it is clear that the region has much to offer: it is a large regional market with a favourable geographic location as well as a young and dynamic population. • Despite economic stagnation in the MENA region (especially in oil-importing countries), now is the time for publishers to increase their presence in the region. Chances for publishers lie in the increased regional importance of job creation and economic diversification. Education and job skills, especially those which prepare workers for the private sector, are priorities across the region. The largest growth market for publishers is education, in English and Arabic. • No two countries in the MENA region are the same, and publishers should take language, culture as well as economic and political structures into account when contacting (potential) customers. Personal introductions and relationships are indispensable when doing business in the MENA region. • Libraries in the MENA region are mostly planning to add digital resources to their collections. Journals are preferred as online only, and e-books are increasingly popular. However, in many cases price differences between print and online copies are decisive. Databases remain a popular content solution. • Scientific, technical and medical (STM) works are the biggest market for international publishers. These works are mostly purchased in English, and occasionally in French. • Trial periods and package discounts are welcomed as incentives for purchase. An annual price rise is experienced as negative. Some institutions suggest a separate subscription model for libraries in the MENA region, since models used in the United States and United Kingdom are experienced as incomparable and less affordable. • Libraries are eager for publishers to dedicate time, personnel and resources to the MENA region. Personal visits and conference attendance are highly appreciated.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 21
  23. 23. ABOUT ACCUCOMSACCUCOMS is an independent provider of services to academic andprofessional publishers around the world. Established in 2004,ACCUCOMS now offers services in Europe, North America, LatinAmerica, the Middle East, North Africa and India.OUR SERVICES • sales and conference representation • telemarketing • content strategiesOUR STRENGTHS • industry expertise • local knowledge • multilingual staff • insightful reporting • dialog, not scripts • customer contactsHEADQUARTERSDellaertweg 7B2316 WZ LeidenThe NetherlandsT +31 88 4100 400F +31 88 4100 401W www.accucoms.comE info@accucoms.comCopyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 22
  24. 24. APPENDIXA – POPULATION Urban Population population Country (2010) (% of total) Algeria 35468000 67 Bahrain 1262000 89 Djibouti 889000 88 Egypt 81121000 43 Iran 73973000 70 Iraq 32031000 66 Israel 7624000 92 Jordan 6047000 79 Kuwait 2736000 98 Lebanon 4227000 87 Libya 6355000 78 Mauritania 3460000 41 MENA region 331263000 58 Morocco 31951000 57 Oman 2783000 72 Palestinian Territories 4152000 72 Qatar 1759000 96 Saudi Arabia 27448000 84 Sudan 43552000 45 Syria 20447000 55 Tunisia 10549000 67 UAE 7512000 78 Yemen 24053000 32Source: World Bank, http://data.worldbank.org/region/MNA, June 2012. No data was available forSouth Sudan and Western Sahara.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 23
  25. 25. B – POPULATION UNDER 30 Total Population population under 30 in in % of thousands thousands population Country (2010) (2010) under 30 Algeria 20524 35711 57 Bahrain 626 1266 49 Djibouti 587 892 66 Egypt 48937 81675 60 Iraq 22322 31809 70 Israel 3698 7631 48 Jordan 4216 6218 68 Kuwait 1494 2744 54 Lebanon 2180 4276 51 Libya 3746 6393 59 MENA region 217092 352658 62 Morocco 18151 32207 56 Palestinian Territories 2886 4052 71 Oman 1760 2797 63 Qatar 788 1761 45 Saudi Arabia 15730 27610 57 Sudan 29509 43719 67 Syria 13358 20544 65 Tunisia 5452 10603 51 United Arab Emirates 3730 7517 50 Yemen 17985 24125 75Source: United Nations Population Division, http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/, June 2012. No data wasavailable for South Sudan and Western Sahara.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 24
  26. 26. C – GDP AND GNI PER CAPITA GNI per capita, GDP per Year Atlas Year Country capita ($) (GDP) method ($) (GNI) Algeria 4567 2010 4390 2010 Bahrain 17609 2009 18730 2008 Djibouti 1203 2009 1270 2009 Egypt 2698 2010 2420 2010 Iran 4526 2009 4520 2009 Iraq 2565 2010 2340 2010 Israel 28506 2010 27180 2010 Jordan 4560 2010 4340 2010 Kuwait 41365 2009 47790 2007 Lebanon 9228 2010 8880 2010 Libya 9957 2009 12320 2009 Mauritania 1044 2010 1000 2010 MENA region 3644 2010 3874 2010 Morocco 2796 2010 2850 2010 Oman 17280 2009 18260 2009 Palestinian Territories/West Bank & Gaza - - 1250 2005 Qatar 61532 2009 - - Saudi Arabia 15836 2010 16190 2009 Sudan 1425 2010 1270 2010 Syria 2893 2010 2750 2010 Tunisia 4199 2010 4160 2010 UAE 39623 2010 41930 2009 Yemen 1300 2010 1170 2010Source: World Bank, http://data.worldbank.org/region/MNA, June 2012. No data was available forSouth Sudan and Western Sahara.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 25
  27. 27. D – LITERACY AND TERTIARY ENROLLMENT Literacy School rate, adult enrollment, total (% of Year tertiary (% Year Country people 15+) (literacy) gross) (enrollment) Algeria - 31 2010 Bahrain 91 2009 - - Djibouti - - 3 2009 Egypt - - 30 2008 Iran 85 2008 43 2010 Iraq 78 2009 - - Israel - - 62 2009 Jordan 92 2007 42 2009 Kuwait 94 2008 - - Lebanon 90 2007 54 2010 Libya 89 2009 - - Mauritania 57 2009 4 2010 MENA region 74 2009 27 2009 Morocco 56 2009 13 2009 Oman 87 2008 24 2010 Palestinian Territories 95 2009 50 2010 Qatar 95 2009 10 2010 Saudi Arabia 86 2009 37 2010 Syria 84 2009 - Tunisia 78 2008 34 2009 UAE - - - - Yemen 62 2009 10 2007Source: World Bank, http://data.worldbank.org/region/MNA, June 2012. No data was available forSouth Sudan, Sudan and Western Sahara.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 26
  28. 28. E – PUBLIC SPENDING ON EDUCATION Public spending on education Public (% of spending on government Year education Year Country expenditure) (spending) (% of GDP) (spending) Algeria 20.3 2008 4.3 2008 Bahrain 11.7 2008 2.9 2008 Djibouti 22.8 2007 8.4 2007 Egypt 11.9 2008 3.8 2008 Iran 19.8 2010 4.7 2010 Iraq - - - - Israel 13.7 2008 5.9 2008 Jordan - - - - Kuwait - - - - Lebanon 7.2 2009 1.8 2009 Libya - - Mauritania 15.2 2010 4.3 2010 MENA region 20 2008 2008 Morocco 25.7 2008 5.4 2009 Oman - - 4.4 2009 Palestinian Territories - - - - Qatar 8.2 2008 2.4 2008 Saudi Arabia 19.3 2008 5.6 2008 Syria 16.7 2007 4.9 2007 Tunisia 22.7 2008 6.3 2008 UAE 23.4 2009 1.0 2009 Yemen 16 2008 5.2 2008Source: World Bank, http://data.worldbank.org/region/MNA, June 2012. No data was available forIraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Palestinian Territories, South Sudan, Sudan and Western Sahara.Copyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 27
  29. 29. F – SOURCES & FURTHER INFORMATIONArab Social Media Report, www.arabsocialmediareport.com.BBC News – Arab Uprising, www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12813859.International Monetary Fund, http://www.imf.org.Middle East Economic Survey, www.mees.com/.Middle East Youth Initiative, http://www.shababinclusion.org.OECD, www.oecd.org.Publishing Perspectives, http://publishingperspectives.com.TIME: The New Middle East, ed. Bobby Ghosh, New York: Time Books, 2012.United Nations Population Division, esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/.World Bank, data.worldbank.org/region/MNA.www2.ohchr.org/english/ohchrreport2011/web_version/ohchr_report2011_web/al legati/25_MENA.pdfwww.indexmundi.com/map/edition.cnn.com/interactive/2011/02/tech/map.mideast.tech/index.htmlDhillon, Navtej & Yousef, Tarik. Inclusion: Meeting the 100 Million Youth Challenge. Middle East Youth Initiative. 2007. www.shababinclusion.orgHappe, Frederic. “Arab Spring heralds new era for publishers.” Middle East Online http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=48542McLaughlin, Brenna. “Report from Abu Dhabi Book Fair 2011.” AAUP Net http://www.aaupnet.org/news-a-publications/aaup-publications/the- exchange/the-exchange-archive/spring-2011/392-report-from-abu-dhabi- book-fair-2011Pavel, Tal. “The internet and mobile phones in the service of the revolution.” Guardian Professional www.guardian.co.uk/media-network-partner-zone- publici/internet-mobile-revolution?newsfeed=trueRoudi, Farzaneh. Youth Population and Employment in the Middle East and North Africa: Opportunity or Challenge. 2011.www.un.org/esa/population/meetings/egm-adolescents/roudi.pdfCopyright © 2012 ACCUCOMS 28

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