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GRIPPING
GRIPPING
GRIPPING
refers to the way the olisi is being held by the
hand/ hands.
There are four common types of gripping or
holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold,
side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold.
refers to the way the olisi is being held by the
hand/ hands.
There are four common types of gripping or
holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold,
side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold.
refers to the way the olisi is being held by the
hand/ hands.
There are four common types of gripping or
holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold,
side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold.
refers to the way the olisi is being held by the
hand/ hands.
There are four common types of gripping or
holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold,
side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold.
refers to the way the olisi is being held by the
hand/ hands.
There are four common types of gripping or
holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold,
side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold.
Underthum
b
Underthum
b
The inside of the thumb is
pressed against the olisi to
balance the pressure or energy
coming from the four other
fingers, to secure the stick from
slipping
The inside of the thumb is
pressed against the olisi to
balance the pressure or energy
coming from the four other
fingers, to secure the stick from
slipping
The inside of the thumb is
pressed against the olisi to
balance the pressure or energy
coming from the four other
fingers, to secure the stick from
slipping
The inside of the thumb is
pressed against the olisi to
balance the pressure or energy
coming from the four other
fingers, to secure the stick from
slipping
Side
thumb
Side
thumb
The side of the thumb serves
the same purpose, the middle
of the thumb is bent to provide
the needed strength to ensure
control of the elisi.
The side of the thumb serves
the same purpose, the middle
of the thumb is bent to provide
the needed strength to ensure
control of the elisi.
The side of the thumb serves
the same purpose, the middle
of the thumb is bent to provide
the needed strength to ensure
control of the elisi.
The side of the thumb serves
the same purpose, the middle
of the thumb is bent to provide
the needed strength to ensure
control of the olisi.
The side of the thumb serves
the same purpose, the middle
of the thumb is bent to provide
the needed strength to ensure
control of the olisi.
Over lap
hold
Overlap hold known as = Also the
"full grip" hold, the thumb overlaps
the index finger and pressure is
created between the first three
fingers and the thumb. This is the
most popular type of grip.
Over lap
hold
Overlap hold known as = Also the
"full grip" hold, the thumb overlaps
the index finger and pressure is
created between the first three
fingers and the thumb. This is the
most popular type of grip.
Overlap hold known as = Also the
"full grip" hold, the thumb overlaps
the index finger and pressure is
created between the first three
fingers and the thumb. This is the
most popular type of grip.
Overlap hold known as = Also the
"full grip" hold, the thumb overlaps
the index finger and pressure is
created between the first three
fingers and the thumb. This is the
most popular type of grip.
The olisi projects through the lower
portion of the gripping ha hand, with
the forward or top end pointing toward
the ground. This type of hold usually
occurs as a consequence of the
application of disalarming technique
The olisi projects through the lower
portion of the gripping ha hand, with
the forward or top end pointing toward
the ground. This type of hold usually
occurs as a consequence of the
application of disalarming technique
The olisi projects through the lower
portion of the gripping ha hand, with
the forward or top end pointing toward
the ground. This type of hold usually
occurs as a consequence of the
application of disalarming technique
Reverse
hold
Reverse
hold
The olisi projects through the lower
portion of the gripping ha hand, with
the forward or top end pointing toward
the ground. This type of hold usually
occurs as a consequence of the
application of disalarming technique
Generally, two inches or more of the olisi is
allowed to extend from the bottom of the
gripping hand. This short end of the stick is
called the "butt" or "punyo," and its desired
length depends entirely on the individual
student's preference or convenience; the use of
shorter or longer lengths have inherent
strengths and weaknesses. The longer portion
of the stick is simply called either the forward,
fore-end, or top-end.
Generally, two inches or more of the olisi is
allowed to extend from the bottom of the
gripping hand. This short end of the stick is
called the "butt" or "punyo," and its desired
length depends entirely on the individual
student's preference or convenience; the use of
shorter or longer lengths have inherent
strengths and weaknesses. The longer portion
of the stick is simply called either the forward,
fore-end, or top-end.
Generally, two inches or more of the olisi is
allowed to extend from the bottom of the
gripping hand. This short end of the stick is
called the "butt" or "punyo," and its desired
length depends entirely on the individual
student's preference or convenience; the use of
shorter or longer lengths have inherent
strengths and weaknesses. The longer portion
of the stick is simply called either the forward,
fore-end, or top-end.
Generally, two inches or more of the olisi is
allowed to extend from the bottom of the
gripping hand. This short end of the stick is
called the "butt" or "punyo," and its desired
length depends entirely on the individual
student's preference or convenience; the use of
shorter or longer lengths have inherent
strengths and weaknesses. The longer portion
of the stick is simply called either the forward,
fore-end, or top-end.
Gripping should be firm but not tight. Maximum
tension should occur at the precise moment of
impact. Flexibility of the wrist and the muscles
involved in a strike is diminished with a tight grip.
The lesser flexibility or rotating capability of the
wrist causes a reduction of the snapping or
whipping power of the olisi. Since the whipping
generates tremendous speed and power especially
in close range fighting, wrist flexibility is
important.
Gripping should be firm but not tight. Maximum
tension should occur at the precise moment of
impact. Flexibility of the wrist and the muscles
involved in a strike is diminished with a tight grip.
The lesser flexibility or rotating capability of the
wrist causes a reduction of the snapping or
whipping power of the olisi. Since the whipping
generates tremendous speed and power especially
in close range fighting, wrist flexibility is
important.
Gripping should be firm but not tight. Maximum
tension should occur at the precise moment of
impact. Flexibility of the wrist and the muscles
involved in a strike is diminished with a tight grip.
The lesser flexibility or rotating capability of the
wrist causes a reduction of the snapping or
whipping power of the olisi. Since the whipping
generates tremendous speed and power especially
in close range fighting, wrist flexibility is
important.
Gripping should be firm but not tight. Maximum
tension should occur at the precise moment of
impact. Flexibility of the wrist and the muscles
involved in a strike is diminished with a tight grip.
The lesser flexibility or rotating capability of the
wrist causes a reduction of the snapping or
whipping power of the olisi. Since the whipping
generates tremendous speed and power especially
in close range fighting, wrist flexibility is
important.
Footwork also known as stances,
refers to the movement and
positions of the feet in performing
armis. Generally, there are nine
basic footwork
Footwork also known as stances,
refers to the movement and
positions of the feet in performing
armis. Generally, there are nine
basic footwork
Footwork also known as stances,
refers to the movement and
positions of the feet in performing
armis. Generally, there are nine
basic footwork
Footwork also known as stances,
refers to the movement and
positions of the feet in performing
armis. Generally, there are nine
basic footwork
1. Natural or Normal
Stance - Legs spread
about shoulder width
apart, hands holding
opposite ends of the olisi.
1. Natural or Normal
Stance - Legs spread
about shoulder width
apart, hands holding
opposite ends of the olisi.
1. Natural or Normal
Stance - Legs spread
about shoulder width
apart, hands holding
opposite ends of the olisi.
1. Natural or Normal
Stance - Legs spread
about shoulder width
apart, hands holding
opposite ends of the olisi.
2. Attention or Close
Stance - Feet close
together with right hand
holding the olisi on left
chest.
2. Attention or Close
Stance - Feet close
together with right hand
holding the olisi on left
chest.
2. Attention or Close
Stance - Feet close
together with right hand
holding the olisi on left
chest.
2. Attention or Close
Stance - Feet close
together with right hand
holding the olisi on left
chest.
3. Forward stance - Move
right foot forward from a
natural stance, and
slightly bend knee, to
assume a forward
stance.
3. Forward stance - Move
right foot forward from a
natural stance, and
slightly bend knee, to
assume a forward
stance.
3. Forward stance - Move
right foot forward from a
natural stance, and
slightly bend knee, to
assume a forward
stance.
3. Forward stance - Move
right foot forward from a
natural stance, and
slightly bend knee, to
assume a forward
stance.
4. Deep stance Slide
right foot further
forward from a
forward stance, to
assume a deep stance.
4. Deep stance Slide
right foot further
forward from a
forward stance, to
assume a deep stance.
4. Deep stance Slide
right foot further
forward from a
forward stance, to
assume a deep stance.
5. Deep Diagonal stance
Slide right foot slightly to
the right from the deep
stance, to assume a
diagonal stance.
5. Deep Diagonal stance
Slide right foot slightly to
the right from the deep
stance, to assume a
diagonal stance.
5. Deep Diagonal stance
Slide right foot slightly to
the right from the deep
stance, to assume a
diagonal stance.
6. Back stance From
forward stance, slide right
foot slightly to the left until
heels are in the same line,
bend both knees slightly,
and shift much of your
weight to the rear leg.
6. Back stance From
forward stance, slide right
foot slightly to the left until
heels are in the same line,
bend both knees slightly,
and shift much of your
weight to the rear leg.
6. Back stance From
forward stance, slide right
foot slightly to the left until
heels are in the same line,
bend both knees slightly,
and shift much of your
weight to the rear leg.
7. Cat stance By retracting
right foot closer to the left foot
from back stance, toe of right
foot on the floor, heel up with
(90%) of body weight on the left
foot, to assume cat stance.
7. Cat stance By retracting
right foot closer to the left foot
from back stance, toe of right
foot on the floor, heel up with
(90%) of body weight on the left
foot, to assume cat stance.
7. Cat stance By retracting
right foot closer to the left foot
from back stance, toe of right
foot on the floor, heel up with
(90%) of body weight on the left
foot, to assume cat stance.
8. HOOK STANCE
From a natural stance, place
right foot behind left, right heel
off the ground. and most of the
weight on the left foot.
8. HOOK STANCE
From a natural stance, place
right foot behind left, right heel
off the ground. and most of the
weight on the left foot.
8. HOOK STANCE
From a natural stance, place
right foot behind left, right heel
off the ground. and most of the
weight on the left foot.
9. Straddle stance
Spread your legs to about
width twice of the the
shoulder, weight evenly
distributed between the legs..
9. Straddle stance
Spread your legs to about
width twice of the the
shoulder, weight evenly
distributed between the legs..
9. Straddle stance
Spread your legs to about
width twice of the the
shoulder, weight evenly
distributed between the legs..

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FUNDAMENTALS OF ARNIS ARNIS ARNIS ARNIS ARNIS

  • 1.
  • 2. GRIPPING GRIPPING GRIPPING refers to the way the olisi is being held by the hand/ hands. There are four common types of gripping or holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold, side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold. refers to the way the olisi is being held by the hand/ hands. There are four common types of gripping or holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold, side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold. refers to the way the olisi is being held by the hand/ hands. There are four common types of gripping or holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold, side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold. refers to the way the olisi is being held by the hand/ hands. There are four common types of gripping or holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold, side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold. refers to the way the olisi is being held by the hand/ hands. There are four common types of gripping or holding an olisi namely: the under thumb hold, side-thumb hold, overlap hold and reverse hold.
  • 3. Underthum b Underthum b The inside of the thumb is pressed against the olisi to balance the pressure or energy coming from the four other fingers, to secure the stick from slipping The inside of the thumb is pressed against the olisi to balance the pressure or energy coming from the four other fingers, to secure the stick from slipping The inside of the thumb is pressed against the olisi to balance the pressure or energy coming from the four other fingers, to secure the stick from slipping The inside of the thumb is pressed against the olisi to balance the pressure or energy coming from the four other fingers, to secure the stick from slipping
  • 4. Side thumb Side thumb The side of the thumb serves the same purpose, the middle of the thumb is bent to provide the needed strength to ensure control of the elisi. The side of the thumb serves the same purpose, the middle of the thumb is bent to provide the needed strength to ensure control of the elisi. The side of the thumb serves the same purpose, the middle of the thumb is bent to provide the needed strength to ensure control of the elisi. The side of the thumb serves the same purpose, the middle of the thumb is bent to provide the needed strength to ensure control of the olisi. The side of the thumb serves the same purpose, the middle of the thumb is bent to provide the needed strength to ensure control of the olisi.
  • 5. Over lap hold Overlap hold known as = Also the "full grip" hold, the thumb overlaps the index finger and pressure is created between the first three fingers and the thumb. This is the most popular type of grip. Over lap hold Overlap hold known as = Also the "full grip" hold, the thumb overlaps the index finger and pressure is created between the first three fingers and the thumb. This is the most popular type of grip. Overlap hold known as = Also the "full grip" hold, the thumb overlaps the index finger and pressure is created between the first three fingers and the thumb. This is the most popular type of grip. Overlap hold known as = Also the "full grip" hold, the thumb overlaps the index finger and pressure is created between the first three fingers and the thumb. This is the most popular type of grip.
  • 6. The olisi projects through the lower portion of the gripping ha hand, with the forward or top end pointing toward the ground. This type of hold usually occurs as a consequence of the application of disalarming technique The olisi projects through the lower portion of the gripping ha hand, with the forward or top end pointing toward the ground. This type of hold usually occurs as a consequence of the application of disalarming technique The olisi projects through the lower portion of the gripping ha hand, with the forward or top end pointing toward the ground. This type of hold usually occurs as a consequence of the application of disalarming technique Reverse hold Reverse hold The olisi projects through the lower portion of the gripping ha hand, with the forward or top end pointing toward the ground. This type of hold usually occurs as a consequence of the application of disalarming technique
  • 7.
  • 8. Generally, two inches or more of the olisi is allowed to extend from the bottom of the gripping hand. This short end of the stick is called the "butt" or "punyo," and its desired length depends entirely on the individual student's preference or convenience; the use of shorter or longer lengths have inherent strengths and weaknesses. The longer portion of the stick is simply called either the forward, fore-end, or top-end. Generally, two inches or more of the olisi is allowed to extend from the bottom of the gripping hand. This short end of the stick is called the "butt" or "punyo," and its desired length depends entirely on the individual student's preference or convenience; the use of shorter or longer lengths have inherent strengths and weaknesses. The longer portion of the stick is simply called either the forward, fore-end, or top-end. Generally, two inches or more of the olisi is allowed to extend from the bottom of the gripping hand. This short end of the stick is called the "butt" or "punyo," and its desired length depends entirely on the individual student's preference or convenience; the use of shorter or longer lengths have inherent strengths and weaknesses. The longer portion of the stick is simply called either the forward, fore-end, or top-end. Generally, two inches or more of the olisi is allowed to extend from the bottom of the gripping hand. This short end of the stick is called the "butt" or "punyo," and its desired length depends entirely on the individual student's preference or convenience; the use of shorter or longer lengths have inherent strengths and weaknesses. The longer portion of the stick is simply called either the forward, fore-end, or top-end.
  • 9. Gripping should be firm but not tight. Maximum tension should occur at the precise moment of impact. Flexibility of the wrist and the muscles involved in a strike is diminished with a tight grip. The lesser flexibility or rotating capability of the wrist causes a reduction of the snapping or whipping power of the olisi. Since the whipping generates tremendous speed and power especially in close range fighting, wrist flexibility is important. Gripping should be firm but not tight. Maximum tension should occur at the precise moment of impact. Flexibility of the wrist and the muscles involved in a strike is diminished with a tight grip. The lesser flexibility or rotating capability of the wrist causes a reduction of the snapping or whipping power of the olisi. Since the whipping generates tremendous speed and power especially in close range fighting, wrist flexibility is important. Gripping should be firm but not tight. Maximum tension should occur at the precise moment of impact. Flexibility of the wrist and the muscles involved in a strike is diminished with a tight grip. The lesser flexibility or rotating capability of the wrist causes a reduction of the snapping or whipping power of the olisi. Since the whipping generates tremendous speed and power especially in close range fighting, wrist flexibility is important. Gripping should be firm but not tight. Maximum tension should occur at the precise moment of impact. Flexibility of the wrist and the muscles involved in a strike is diminished with a tight grip. The lesser flexibility or rotating capability of the wrist causes a reduction of the snapping or whipping power of the olisi. Since the whipping generates tremendous speed and power especially in close range fighting, wrist flexibility is important.
  • 10.
  • 11. Footwork also known as stances, refers to the movement and positions of the feet in performing armis. Generally, there are nine basic footwork Footwork also known as stances, refers to the movement and positions of the feet in performing armis. Generally, there are nine basic footwork Footwork also known as stances, refers to the movement and positions of the feet in performing armis. Generally, there are nine basic footwork Footwork also known as stances, refers to the movement and positions of the feet in performing armis. Generally, there are nine basic footwork
  • 12. 1. Natural or Normal Stance - Legs spread about shoulder width apart, hands holding opposite ends of the olisi. 1. Natural or Normal Stance - Legs spread about shoulder width apart, hands holding opposite ends of the olisi. 1. Natural or Normal Stance - Legs spread about shoulder width apart, hands holding opposite ends of the olisi. 1. Natural or Normal Stance - Legs spread about shoulder width apart, hands holding opposite ends of the olisi.
  • 13. 2. Attention or Close Stance - Feet close together with right hand holding the olisi on left chest. 2. Attention or Close Stance - Feet close together with right hand holding the olisi on left chest. 2. Attention or Close Stance - Feet close together with right hand holding the olisi on left chest. 2. Attention or Close Stance - Feet close together with right hand holding the olisi on left chest.
  • 14. 3. Forward stance - Move right foot forward from a natural stance, and slightly bend knee, to assume a forward stance. 3. Forward stance - Move right foot forward from a natural stance, and slightly bend knee, to assume a forward stance. 3. Forward stance - Move right foot forward from a natural stance, and slightly bend knee, to assume a forward stance. 3. Forward stance - Move right foot forward from a natural stance, and slightly bend knee, to assume a forward stance.
  • 15. 4. Deep stance Slide right foot further forward from a forward stance, to assume a deep stance. 4. Deep stance Slide right foot further forward from a forward stance, to assume a deep stance. 4. Deep stance Slide right foot further forward from a forward stance, to assume a deep stance.
  • 16. 5. Deep Diagonal stance Slide right foot slightly to the right from the deep stance, to assume a diagonal stance. 5. Deep Diagonal stance Slide right foot slightly to the right from the deep stance, to assume a diagonal stance. 5. Deep Diagonal stance Slide right foot slightly to the right from the deep stance, to assume a diagonal stance.
  • 17. 6. Back stance From forward stance, slide right foot slightly to the left until heels are in the same line, bend both knees slightly, and shift much of your weight to the rear leg. 6. Back stance From forward stance, slide right foot slightly to the left until heels are in the same line, bend both knees slightly, and shift much of your weight to the rear leg. 6. Back stance From forward stance, slide right foot slightly to the left until heels are in the same line, bend both knees slightly, and shift much of your weight to the rear leg.
  • 18. 7. Cat stance By retracting right foot closer to the left foot from back stance, toe of right foot on the floor, heel up with (90%) of body weight on the left foot, to assume cat stance. 7. Cat stance By retracting right foot closer to the left foot from back stance, toe of right foot on the floor, heel up with (90%) of body weight on the left foot, to assume cat stance. 7. Cat stance By retracting right foot closer to the left foot from back stance, toe of right foot on the floor, heel up with (90%) of body weight on the left foot, to assume cat stance.
  • 19. 8. HOOK STANCE From a natural stance, place right foot behind left, right heel off the ground. and most of the weight on the left foot. 8. HOOK STANCE From a natural stance, place right foot behind left, right heel off the ground. and most of the weight on the left foot. 8. HOOK STANCE From a natural stance, place right foot behind left, right heel off the ground. and most of the weight on the left foot.
  • 20. 9. Straddle stance Spread your legs to about width twice of the the shoulder, weight evenly distributed between the legs.. 9. Straddle stance Spread your legs to about width twice of the the shoulder, weight evenly distributed between the legs.. 9. Straddle stance Spread your legs to about width twice of the the shoulder, weight evenly distributed between the legs..