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Helmsman H4D 2020 Lessons Learned

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business model, business model canvas, mission model, mission model canvas, customer development, hacking for defense, H4D, lean launchpad, lean startup, stanford, startup, steve blank, pete newell, bmnt, entrepreneurship, I-Corps, Computer vision, NSIN, tercom, dsmac, gps denial

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Helmsman H4D 2020 Lessons Learned

  1. We Thought we Understood the Problem We Achieved Product- Mission Fit No Solutions Worked The Right People are Interested We Believe this could be a Viable Business PIVOT PIVOT Found Existing Solution for Waypoint Navigation
  2. MISSION BUDGET/COST (ordered by magnitude) 1. Materials for prototyping and R&D: sensors, structural components, tools (number of materials can be loaned at zero cost from key resources) 2. Testing 3. Computing resources 4. Data access (NASA gravity, US government, Stanford GIS, Descartes/Planet GIS) DEPLOYMENT - Test flight at Moffett Federal Airfield, Mountain View - Mass production by integrating to General Atomic, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Northrop Grumman assembly lines BUY-IN & SUPPORT DoD Joint Artificial Intelligence Center: approve the design and prototype Manufacturers: adopt design, mass produce our product, and integrate it into their existing systems KEY RESOURCES - Access to beneficiaries - Stanford faculty - Experts on drone warfare - Joint Artificial Intelligence Center - Access to self-driving, drone, and IoT tech in Silicon Valley KEY ACTIVITIES - Framing the problem - Conducting research and speaking with experts (military, academic, and industry) - Designing solution - Prototyping + Testing KEY PARTNERS - US Air Force - H4D team - Joint Artificial Intelligence Center - Stanford Research Labs (AA, geophysics departments) and Stanford Community - Drone manufacturers: General Atomic, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Boeing MISSION ACHIEVEMENT/IMPACT FACTORS - Design approved by DoD or defense manufacturers - Deployment on at least one military-grade UAV and when tested, features with favourable processing time compared to current systems, reduced location uncertainty, improved F1 score on detections, and full functionality in GPS- denied environments We Started by Understanding Our Beneficiaries VALUE PROPOSITIONS 1. Reduced Risk of Drone Loss 1. Higher quality data and better decisions 1. Lower risk of detection BENEFICIARIES ● USAF UAV pilots ● USAF UAV commanders ● UAV manufacturers for DoD We Started by Understanding Our Beneficiaries MISSION BUDGET/COST (ordered by magnitude) 1. Materials for prototyping and R&D: sensors, structural components, tools (number of materials can be loaned at zero cost from key resources) 2. Testing 3. Computing resources 4. Data access (NASA gravity, US government, Stanford GIS, Descartes/Planet GIS) DEPLOYMENT - Test flight at Moffett Federal Airfield, Mountain View - Mass production by integrating to General Atomic, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Northrop Grumman assembly lines BUY-IN & SUPPORT DoD Joint Artificial Intelligence Center: approve the design and prototype Manufacturers: adopt design, mass produce our product, and integrate it into their existing systems BENEFICIARIES ● USAF UAV pilots ● USAF UAV commanders ● UAV manufacturers for DoD KEY RESOURCES - Access to beneficiaries - Stanford faculty - Experts on drone warfare - Joint Artificial Intelligence Center - Access to self-driving, drone, and IoT tech in Silicon Valley KEY ACTIVITIES - Framing the problem - Conducting research and speaking with experts (military, academic, and industry) - Designing solution - Prototyping + Testing KEY PARTNERS - US Air Force - H4D team - Joint Artificial Intelligence Center - Stanford Research Labs (AA, geophysics departments) and Stanford Community - Drone manufacturers: General Atomic, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Boeing MISSION ACHIEVEMENT/IMPACT FACTORS - Design approved by DoD or defense manufacturers - Deployment on at least one military-grade UAV and when tested, features with favourable processing time compared to current systems, reduced location uncertainty, improved F1 score on detections, and full functionality in GPS- denied environments VALUE PROPOSITIONS 1. Reduced Risk of Drone Loss 1. Higher quality data and better decisions 1. Lower risk of detection
  3. No Solutions Worked We Thought we Understood the Problem PIVOT PIVOT: We shifted focus to oversea, waypoint navigation only.
  4. No Solutions Worked We Thought we Understood the Problem PIVOT PIVOT Found Existing Solution for Waypoint Navigation PIVOT: Skymark’s 100m accuracy leaves the overland target-area navigation problem unsolved, so we shifted our focus there.
  5. Overland | 1m Accuracy
  6. In each frame, satellite imagery and SAR topographic matching outputs lat-long coordinates Frames are overlaid, and visual odometry outputs velocity and acceleration
  7. We Thought we Understood the Problem No Solutions Worked We Achieved Product- Mission Fit PIVOT PIVOT Found Existing Solution for Waypoint Navigation
  8. MISSION BUDGET/COST (ordered by magnitude) 1. Materials for prototyping and R&D: sensors, structural components, tools (number of materials can be loaned at zero cost from key resources) 2. Testing 3. Computing resources 4. Data access (NASA gravity, US government, Stanford GIS, Descartes/Planet GIS) DEPLOYMENT - Test flight at Moffett Federal Airfield, Mountain View - Mass production by integrating to General Atomic, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Northrop Grumman assembly lines BUY-IN & SUPPORT DoD Joint Artificial Intelligence Center: approve the design and prototype Manufacturers: adopt design, mass produce our product, and integrate it into their existing systems KEY RESOURCES - Access to beneficiaries - Stanford faculty - Experts on drone warfare - Joint Artificial Intelligence Center - Access to self-driving, drone, and IoT tech in Silicon Valley KEY ACTIVITIES - Framing the problem - Conducting research and speaking with experts (military, academic, and industry) - Designing solution - Prototyping + Testing KEY PARTNERS - US Air Force - H4D team - Joint Artificial Intelligence Center - Stanford Research Labs (AA, geophysics departments) and Stanford Community - Drone manufacturers: General Atomic, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Boeing MISSION ACHIEVEMENT/IMPACT FACTORS - Design approved by DoD or defense manufacturers - Deployment on at least one military-grade UAV and when tested, features with favourable processing time compared to current systems, reduced location uncertainty, improved F1 score on detections, and full functionality in GPS- denied environments VALUE PROPOSITIONS 1. Reduced Risk of Drone Loss 2. Ability to reach target 3. Lower risk of detection 4. Improved strategic reach BENEFICIARIES 1. USAF UAV pilots & Fighter Pilots 1. Mission Commanders MISSION BUDGET/COST (ordered by magnitude) 1. Materials for prototyping and R&D: sensors, structural components, tools (number of materials can be loaned at zero cost from key resources) 2. Testing 3. Computing resources 4. Data access (NASA gravity, US government, Stanford GIS, Descartes/Planet GIS) BUY-IN & SUPPORT DoD Joint Artificial Intelligence Center: approve the design and prototype Manufacturers: adopt design, mass produce our product, and integrate it into their existing systems KEY RESOURCES - Access to beneficiaries - Stanford faculty - Experts on drone warfare - Joint Artificial Intelligence Center - Access to self-driving, drone, and IoT tech in Silicon Valley KEY ACTIVITIES - Framing the problem - Conducting research and speaking with experts (military, academic, and industry) - Designing solution - Prototyping + Testing KEY PARTNERS ● H4D team ● Joint Artificial Intelligence Center ● 432nd command ● Planet Labs ● ISR Panel ● Air Superiority Panel ● Draper Labs ● General Atomics With Product-Mission Fit, We Shifted Our Focus to Deployment DEPLOYMENT 1. Develop software-only solution with NSF funding 2. Mature tech with MQ-9 PO funding and support 3. Purchase, Integration, and Testing by MQ-9 PO and General Atomics DEPLOYMENT 1. Develop software-only solution 2. Mature tech with MQ-9 PO 3. Purchase, Integration, and Testing by General Atomics
  9. Going forward... - Abhay, Stefano, and Freddy will continue - Incorporate - Software development - STTR Funding - Exploring dual-use + VC Funding down the line - Testing - Start deployment process in a year Contact us at: team_helmsman@lists.stanford.edu
  10. Going forward... - Abhay, Stefano, and Freddy will continue - Incorporate - Software development - STTR Funding - Exploring dual-use + VC Funding down the line - Testing - Start deployment process in a year Contact us at: team_helmsman@lists.stanford.edu

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