Christie Daniels
The University of Texas at El Paso
Creation
 Creation stories play a very important role in Native
  American culture.
 These stories, like Native American society,...
Spider-Woman/Thought-Woman

      Ts’its’tsi’nako, Thought-Woman,
             is sitting in her room
       and whatever ...
Thought-Woman, the spider,
    Named things and
   As she named them
     They appeared.

 She is sitting in her room
  Th...
Leaders and Heroes
 Native American tribes do not possess the Western
  concept of the hero.
 There are leaders, to be sure, but the tribal...
The Emergence of Fools Crow
 “And it occurred to him that the others had quit
 teasing him so unmercifully. He was no lon...
Balance
 In the movie, the supremely evil Tartutic are necessary.
  They are the force of justice. Without this evil force,
  pea...
 quot;traditional American Indian literatures possess a unity
  and harmony of symbol, structure, and articulation that i...
Importance of Stories/Storytellers
 Owing to its reliance on oral tradition, Native
  American culture values stories and storytellers.
 Stories are told a...
I will tell you something about stories
                  [he said]
   They aren’t just entertainment.
              Don’t...
Their evil is mighty
  But it can’t stand up to our stories.
    So they try to destroy the stories
Let the stories be con...
 ‘This isn’t my guitar… But I’m gonna change the world
  with it’ (Alexie 13).
 “Thomas Builds-the-Fire’s stories climbe...
Interpreting signs
 Just as in the movie, the interpretation of signs is vital
  in Native American culture and literature.
 First of all, ...
 “Junior always expected his visions to come true.
  Indians were supposed to have visions and receive
  messages from th...
Ceremonies
 Ceremonies in Native American tribes serve as a healing
  force not only in the lives of the afflicted indivi...
 The movie ends in a ceremony.
 Isolation = sickness
    Heep – isolates himself
    Leeds represents an older version...
What She Said:

The Only Cure
I know
Is a good ceremony,
That’s what she said.

                        (Silko 3)
The Native American Elements Of
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The Native American Elements Of

905 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
905
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
18
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Native American Elements Of

  1. 1. Christie Daniels The University of Texas at El Paso
  2. 2. Creation
  3. 3.  Creation stories play a very important role in Native American culture.  These stories, like Native American society, often blend the natural and the supernatural and feature animals and creatures in central roles.
  4. 4. Spider-Woman/Thought-Woman Ts’its’tsi’nako, Thought-Woman, is sitting in her room and whatever she thinks about appears.
  5. 5. Thought-Woman, the spider, Named things and As she named them They appeared. She is sitting in her room Thinking of a story now I’m telling you the story She is thinking. Silko (1).
  6. 6. Leaders and Heroes
  7. 7.  Native American tribes do not possess the Western concept of the hero.  There are leaders, to be sure, but the tribal mentality emphasizes the worth of all individuals (and creatures) as everybody has an important role to play.  Consequently, leaders often do not start as, typical Western heroes, seemingly extraordinary in many ways but rather simply, and often quietly, play the role they are meant to play when the time comes.
  8. 8. The Emergence of Fools Crow  “And it occurred to him that the others had quit teasing him so unmercifully. He was no longer the victim of jokes, at least not more so than any of the others. No one had called him dog-lover since the raid on the Crows. He hadn’t really noticed it until now, but the people seemed to respect him” (Welch 51-52).
  9. 9. Balance
  10. 10.  In the movie, the supremely evil Tartutic are necessary. They are the force of justice. Without this evil force, peace could not be kept in the Blue World.  This instance represents the ideal that balance is supremely important in Native American tribal life.  Whereas Western society emphasizes the triumph of good over evil, Native American tribes seek to keep the two forces in balance as each has their role to play.
  11. 11.  quot;traditional American Indian literatures possess a unity and harmony of symbol, structure, and articulation that is peculiar to the American Indian world. This harmony is based on the perceived harmony of the universe and on thousands of years of refinement. This essential sense of unity among all things flows like a clear stream through the songs and stories of the peoples of the western hemispherequot; (Allen 75).  “But don’t be so quick to call something good or bad. There are balances and harmonies always shifting, always necessary to maintain” (Silko 130).
  12. 12. Importance of Stories/Storytellers
  13. 13.  Owing to its reliance on oral tradition, Native American culture values stories and storytellers.  Stories are told and retold (in a variety of ways) in order to equip the next generation with the tools they need.  As such, stories are seen, not simply as frivolity, but rather as reality.
  14. 14. I will tell you something about stories [he said] They aren’t just entertainment. Don’t be fooled. They are all we have, you see, All we have to fight off Illness and death. You don’t have anything If you don’t have the stories.
  15. 15. Their evil is mighty But it can’t stand up to our stories. So they try to destroy the stories Let the stories be confused or forgotten. They would like that They would be happy Because we would be defenseless then. (Silko 2).
  16. 16.  ‘This isn’t my guitar… But I’m gonna change the world with it’ (Alexie 13).  “Thomas Builds-the-Fire’s stories climbed into your clothes like sand, have you itches that could not be scratched. If you repeated even a sentence from one of the stories, your throat was never the same again. Those stories hung in your clothes and hair like smoke, and no amount of laundry soap or shampoo washed them out” (Alexie 15).  ‘so… who’s the lead singer?’ (Alexie 52).
  17. 17. Interpreting signs
  18. 18.  Just as in the movie, the interpretation of signs is vital in Native American culture and literature.  First of all, this is essential from a survival standpoint in that a failure to read signs, makes one susceptible to lurking dangers.  Additionally, in Native American literature, characters who listen to and are able to interpret signs are often saved, protected, or redeemed, while those who ignore or fail to recognize signs often find themselves in unfortunate circumstances.
  19. 19.  “Junior always expected his visions to come true. Indians were supposed to have visions and receive messages from their dreams. All the Indians on television had visions that told them exactly what to do” (Alexie 18).  Junior eventually commits suicide.
  20. 20. Ceremonies  Ceremonies in Native American tribes serve as a healing force not only in the lives of the afflicted individual but rather for the tribe as a whole.  quot;The purpose of the ceremony is to integrate: to fuse the individual with his or her fellows…. The person shed the isolated, individual personality and is restored to conscious harmony with the universequot; (Allen 62).  quot;an isolated or alienated individual is a sick one, so the healing practice centers on reintegrating the isolated individual into the matrix of the universequot; (88).  quot;And whether the ritual traditions are in ceremony, myth, or novel, the nourish the people. They give meaning. They give lifequot; (101).
  21. 21.  The movie ends in a ceremony.  Isolation = sickness  Heep – isolates himself  Leeds represents an older version of the path Heep is on  Reintegration  Story goes home – reenters her world  Heep is healed both physically (stutter) and emotionally  Leeds is given a purpose in the group  The residents all come out of their own worlds and come together for the ceremony  Meaning and Life  Leeds and Heep finally given meaning and purpose
  22. 22. What She Said: The Only Cure I know Is a good ceremony, That’s what she said. (Silko 3)

×