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Satellites & Space-Related Systems
Satellite Communications & Telecommunications
Defense: Radar, Missiles & Electronic War...
2 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805
We are pleased to announce ...
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Table of Contents
Radar, Mi...
4 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805
Instructor
Dr. Menchem Levi...
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Instructor
Robert E. McShea...
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Instructor
Robert E. McShea...
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Instructor
Dr. Brian Jennis...
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Summary
This four-day pract...
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What You Will Learn
• Conce...
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GPS and International Comp...
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Who Should Attend
The cour...
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March 8-11, 2016
Columbia,...
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Instructor
Stan Silberman ...
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What You Will Learn
Scient...
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RADAR 201
Advances in Mode...
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What You Will Learn
• What...
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What You Will Learn
• How ...
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What You Will Learn
• How ...
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Instructor
Dr. Mark Plett ...
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ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123
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ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123

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ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123

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ATI Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Systems Engineering, Acoustics Technical Training Catalog Vol 123

  1. 1. Satellites & Space-Related Systems Satellite Communications & Telecommunications Defense: Radar, Missiles & Electronic Warfare Acoustics, Underwater Sound & Sonar Systems Engineering & Project Management Space & Satellite Systems APPLIED TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE, LLC Training Rocket Scientists Since 1984 Volume 123 Valid through July 2016 TECHNICAL TRAINING PUBLIC & ONSITE SINCE 1984
  2. 2. 2 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 We are pleased to announce the expansion of Applied Technology Institute International. Contact one of our international training specialists at info@aticourses.com to arrange for an on-site course at your facility in your country. See page 63 for more details. Technical and Training Professionals: For over 30 years, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) continues to earned the trust of and provide solutions to technical professionals and training departments nationally and internationally. We successfully provided on-site training at all major DoD facilities and NASA centers. We also delivered onsites for a large number of their contractors. In addition, many international students benefit from attending our open-enrollment and on-site courses at overseas facilities such as the United Nations (UN). To better serve and support our international customers, we are expanding our new division, ATI International. This division allows our overseas customers to save on travel expenses and permits us to consistently bring the ATI experience to facilities in Europe. Now all our customers, including those in the U.S. and Canada can save over 50% compared to a public course if 15 or more students attend an on-site course event. Our team of training specialists are available to assist you with addressing you training needs and requirements and are ready to send you a quote for an on-site course or enroll you in a public event. Our courses and instructors are specialized in the following subject matters: Our courses are focused in the following subject areas: • Satellites & Space-Related Systems • Satellite Communications & Telecommunications • Defense: Radar, Missiles & Electronic Warfare • Acoustics, Underwater Sound & Sonar • Systems Engineering • Project Management with PMI’S PMP® • Engineering and Signal Processing This catalog includes upcoming open enrollment dates for many of our courses. Our website, www.ATIcourses.com, lists over 50 additional courses that we offer. Contact us for a fast and free quote. Our training specialists are ready to help. Regards,
  3. 3. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 123 – 3 Table of Contents Radar, Missiles & Combat AESA Radar Applications Mar 1-3, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Aircraft Avionics Flight Test Apr 5-7, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Aircraft Electro-Optical Avionics Flight Test May 10-12, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Digital Signal Processing Introduction Apr 19-21, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Electronic Warfare - Overview of Technology & Operations Feb 22-25, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Electronic Warfare - The New Threat Enviroment NEW! May 9-12, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 GPS and International Competitors Feb 22-25, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Missile System Design Feb 22-25, 2016 • Orlando, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Modern Missile Analysis Mar 8-11, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Multi-Target Tracking & Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Jun 14-16, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Naval Weapons Principles May 9-12, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Radar 101 / Radar 201 Mar 15-16, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Radar Systems Design & Engineering Jan 25-28, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Radar Systems Fundamentals Feb 23-25, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Six Degrees of Freedom Modeling NEW! Feb 9-10, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Jul 12-13, 2016 • Orlando. Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Software Defined Radio – Practical Applications NEW! Mar 15-17, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Synthetic Aperture Radar May 17-19, 2016 • Pasadena, California . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Tactical Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) Apr 12-13, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Space & Satellite Systems Astrodynamics Jan 25-28, 2016 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . 22 Mar 1-4, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Attitude Determination & Control Apr 12-14, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Design & Analysis of Bolted Joints Mar 22-24, 2016 • Littleton, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Earth Station Design May 3-6, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Ground Systems Design & Operations Apr 25-27, 2016 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . 26 Jun 21-23, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Satellite Communications - An Essential Introduction Mar 2-4, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Satellite Communications - State of the Art Feb 9-11, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Satellite Communications Design & Engineering Apr 5-7, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Satellite Laser Communications Mar 15-17, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Satellite Link Budget Training Using SatMaster Software Mar 1-3, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Space-Based Laser Systems May 11-12, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Space Environment & Its Effects on Space Systems Feb 22-25, 2016 • Cocoa Beach, Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Space Mission Structures Apr 19-22, 2016 • Littleton, Colorado. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Space Systems Fundamentals Feb 1-4, 2016 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 35 Feb 29 - Mar 3, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . 35 Spacecraft Systems Integration and Testing May 2-5, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Engineering & Data Analysis Antenna & Array Fundamentals Apr 18-20, 2016 • California, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Jun 6-8, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Computational Electromagnetics Apr 21-22, 2016 • California, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Jun 9-10, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Data: Visualizaton Apr 5-7, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 EMI/EMC in Military Systems Mar 8-10, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Fiber Optic Communication Systems Engineering Mar 8-10, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Kalman, H-Infinity, and Nonlinear Estimation Approaches May 24-26, 2016 • Laurel, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) Feb 16-18, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 RF Engineering - Fundamentals Feb 16-17, 2016 • Laurel, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Robotics for Military & Civil Applications May 2-5, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Acoustic & Sonar Engineering Advanced Topics In Underwater Acoustics Apr 18-21, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 AUV and ROV Technology Mar 8-10, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Ocean Optics NEW! Feb 17-18, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Sonar Principles & ASW Analysis Apr 12-14, 2016 • Panama City, Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 May 17-19, 2016 • San Diego, California. . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Sonar Signal Processing Apr 5-7, 2016 • Bremmerton, Washington . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Sonar Systems Design Mar 29-31, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Jun 21-23, 2016 • Honolulu, Hawaii. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Sonar Transducer Design Fundamentals May 10-12, 2016 • Newport, Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . 52 Submarines & Submariners – An Introduction Apr 12-14, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Underwater Acoustics, Modeling and Simulation Apr 4-7, 2016 • Bay St. Louis, Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Jun 27-30, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Systems Engineering & Project Management CSEP Preparation May 17-19, 2016 • Los Angeles, California . . . . . . . . . . 55 Model-Based Systems Engineering Fundamentals Mar 1, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Model-Based Systems Engineering Applications Mar 1-3, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Modeling & Simulation in the Systems Engineering Process NEW! May 18-19, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 PMP® Certification Exam Boot Camp Feb 22-26 2016 • Online Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Feb 29 - Mar 3, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . 59 Mar 14-18 2016 • Online Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Systems Engineering - Requirements Jan 26-28, 2016 • Los Angeles, California. . . . . . . . . . . 60 Apr 12-14, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 May 17-19, 2016 • Los Angeles, California . . . . . . . . . . 60 Team-Based Problem Solving NEW! Mar 22-23, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Topics for On-site Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Applied Technology Institute International . . . . 63
  4. 4. 4 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructor Dr. Menchem Levitas has forty four years of experience in science and engineering, thirty six of which have consisted of direct radar and weapon systems analysis, design, and development. Throughout his tenure he has provided technical support for many shipboard and airborne radar programs in many different areas including system concept definition, electronic protection, active arrays, signal and data processing, requirement analyses, and radar phenomenology. He is a recipient of the AEGIS Excellence Award for the development of a novel radar cross- band calibration technique in support of wide-band operations for high range resolution. He has developed innovative techniques in many areas e.g., active array self-calibration and failure-compensation, array multi-beam-forming, electronic protection, synthetic wide-band, knowledge-based adaptive processing, waveforms and waveform processing, and high fidelity, real-time, littoral propagation modeling. He has supported many AESA programs including the Air Force’s Ultra Reliable Radar (URR), the Atmospheric Surveillance Technology (AST), the USMC’s Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR), the 3D Long Range Expeditionary Radar (3DLRR), and others. Prior to his retirement in 2013 he had been the chief scientist of Technology Service Corporation’s Washington Operations. What You Will Learn • The evolution of radar systems from mechanical rotators to ESA and AESA. • Fundamental principles and concepts of ESA and AESA. • Major advantages and challenges of AESA radar systems. • Required support technologies of AESA arrays. • Key applications of AESA radar in surface and airborne platforms. • State-of-the-art advances in related radar technologies – i.e., radar waveforms. Course Outline 1. Introduction. The evolution of radar from mechanical rotators through ESA to AESA. The driving elements, the benefits, and the challenges. Applications that benefit from the new technology. 2. Radar Subsystems. Transmitter, antenna, receiver and signal processor ( Pulse Compression and Doppler filtering principles, automatic detection with adaptive detection threshold, the CFAR mechanism, sidelobe blanking angle estimation), the radar control program and data processor. 3. Electronically Scanned Antenna (ESA). Fundamental concepts, directivity and gain, elements and arrays, near and far field radiation, element factor and array factor, illumination function and Fourier transform relations, beamwidth approximations, array tapers and sidelobes, electrical dimension and errors, array bandwidth, steering mechanisms, grating lobes, phase monopulse, beam broadening, examples. 4. Solid State Active Phased Arrays (AESA). What is AESA, Technology and architecture. Analysis of AESA advantages and penalties. Emerging requirements that call for AESA, Issues at T/R module, array, and system levels. Emerging technologies. Examples. 5. Module Failure and Array Auto-compensation. The ‘bathtub’ profile of module failure rates and its three regions, burn-in and accelerated stress tests, module packaging and periodic replacements, cooling alternatives, effects of module failure on array pattern. Array failure-compensation techniques. 6. Auto-calibration of Active Phased Arrays. Driving issues, types of calibration, auto-calibration via elements mutual coupling, principal issues with calibration via mutual-coupling, some properties of the different calibration techniques. 7. Multiple Simultaneous Beams. Why multiple beams, independently steered beams vs. clustered beams, alternative organization of clustered beams and their implications, quantization lobes in clustered beams arrangements and design options to mitigate them. Relation to AESA. 8. Surface Radar. Principal functions and characteristics, nearness and extent of clutter, anomalous propagation, dynamic range, signal stability, time, and coverage requirements, transportation requirements and their implications, bird/angel clutter and its effects on radar design. The role of AESA. 9. Airborne Radar. Principal functions and characteristics, Radar bands, platform velocity, pulse repetition frequency (PRF) categories and their properties, clutter spectrum, dynamic range, sidelobe blanking, mainbeam clutter, clutter filtering, blindness and ambiguity resolution post detection STC. The role of AESA. 10. Modern Advances in Waveforms. Traditional Pulse Compression: time-bandwidth and range resolution fundamentals, figures of merit, existing codes description. New emerging requirements, arbitrary WFG with state of the art optimal codes and filters in response. MIMO radar. MIMO waveform techniques and properties, relation to antenna architecture, and the role of AESA in the implementation of the above. 11. Synthetic Aperture Radar. Real vs. synthetic aperture, real beam limitations, derivations of focused array resolution, unfocused arrays, motion compensation, range-gate drifting, synthetic aperture modes, waveform restrictions, processing throughputs, synthetic aperture 'monopulse' concepts.. MIMO SAR and the role of AESA. 12. High Range Resolution via Synthetic Wideband. Principle of high range resolution - instantaneous and synthetic, synthetic wideband generation, grating lobes and instantaneous band overlap, cross-band dispersion, cross-band calibration, examples. 13. Adaptive Cancellation and STAP. Adaptive cancellation overview, broad vs. directive auxiliary patterns, sidelobe vs. mainbeam cancellation, bandwidth and arrival angle dependence, tap delay lines, space sampling, and digital arrays, range Doppler response example, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), system and array requirements, STAP processing alternatives. Digital arrays and the role of AESA. 14. Radar Modeling and Simulation Fundamentals. Radar development and testing issues that drive the increasing reliance on M&S, purpose, types of simulations - power domain, signal domain, H/W in the loop, modern simulation framework tools, examples: power domain modeling, signal domain modeling, antenna array modeling, fire finding modeling. 15. Radar Tracking. Functional block diagram, what is radar tracking, firm track initiation and range, track update, track maintenance, algorithmic alternatives (association via single or multiple hypotheses, tracking filters options), role of electronically steered arrays in radar tracking. 16. Key Radar Challenges and Advances. Key radar challenges, key advances (transmitter, antenna, signal stability, digitization and digital processing, waveforms, algorithms). March 1-3, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $1790 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary While offering performance that is inherently superior to conventional systems, AESA radar is technologically and architecturally more complex. In this three-day course, participants will learn why the AESA radar has become the system of choice on modern platforms by understanding its capabilities and constraints, and how these capabilities and constraints come about as a result of the AESA approach. This course will then proceed to describe in detail several key surface and airborne radar applications that have been used in traditional radar systems, in which performance is enhanced by the AESA class of radar. Essential support technologies such as antenna auto calibration, antenna auto compensation, and radar modeling and simulation will also be covered. AESA Radar Applications Course # D350
  5. 5. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 123 – 5 Instructor Robert E. McShea, Aeronautical Engineering, Syracuse University, is a leading Aircraft Avionics Flight Consultant. Previous positions include Director, Avionics and Systems Academic Programs at the National Test Pilot School, Mojave, CA, Senior Technical Specialist at the Northrop Grumman Corporation in Palmdale, California. He was employed by the Grumman Corporation in Calverton Long Island as a Group Manager for Avionics and Weapons Systems Test, He is the author of the text, Test and Evaluation of Aircraft Avionics and Weapons systems, which is used as a text for this course. What You Will Learn • Be familiar with types of Data Busses, Avionic systems specifications and regulations, and the causes of EMI. • Understand the unique problems associated with Avionics and Weapons Testing,1553 data bus architectures, Data collection, reading, and data analysis procedures. Course Outline 1. Why Systems Flight Test. What are the Differences between Systems Test and P&FQ Testing? What is the difference between Development versus Demonstration Programs? What are the differences between Contractor, DT, and OT Testing. 2. Time, Space, Position Information (TSPI). What drives TSPI Requirements; and what are the accuracies of TSPI systems in use today. 3. Data Bus Architecture. How is data transferred amongst avionics systems? Description, operation and applications of the following data bus types are described: 1553 Data Busses, 1760, ARINC 429/629, EBR 1553, STANAG 3910, Fiber Channel, and TCP/IP. 4. Data Acquisition, Reduction and Analysis. How is data acquired from the aircraft? Typical Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) systems are explained as well as digital data and video capture systems. 5. Whenever current is flowing EM fields are present. These fields can wreak havoc on aircraft avionics systems. The lectures will cover EMI/EMC, how to test for it (bonding, Victim/Source, Near and Far Field) and how to avoid interference. Summary This three-day course emphasizes the fundamental knowledge needed by evaluators for all aircraft avionics systems evaluations. The lectures lay the foundation on which all avionics systems evaluations are accomplished. Evaluations are accomplished. This module is designed to provide the “big picture” of Systems testing. The course identifies the differences between systems and vehicle testing with emphasis on digital architecture. 1553 Data Bus architecture is described in detail, and the student is also exposed to ARINC 429, Mil-Std 1760, Firewire, EBR-1553 and other future applications. Time, Space, Position Information is described in its relation and importance to Systems testing. The audience for this course includes flight test engineers, program managers, flight test range and instrumentation support, military and civilian aerospace workers. Flight Test Range and Instrumentation support. The course is appropriate for newly hired or assigned personnel at these locations as well as seasoned veterans in the Test and Evaluation areas. April 5-7, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $1790 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Aircraft Avionics Flight Test Course # D187
  6. 6. 6 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructor Robert E. McShea, Aeronautical Engineering, Syracuse University, President, Aircraft Avionics Flight Test Consultants, LLC. Previous positions include Director, Avionics and Systems Academic Programs at the National Test Pilot School, Mojave, CA, Senior Technical Specialist at the Northrop Grumman Corporation in Palmdale, California. He was employed by the Grumman Corporation in Calverton Long Island as a Group Manager for Avionics and Weapons Systems Test, He is the author of the text, Test and Evaluation of Aircraft Avionics and Weapons systems, 2nd edition which is used as a text for this course. What You Will Learn • Be familiar with the history, evolution and application of EO and IR systems. • Understand the theory, flight test procedures, techniques and data analysis associated with electro-optic systems. • You will also understand atmospheric propagation, target signatures. sources of radiation. • Spatial frequency and range predictions. • Electro-optic and infra-red test techniques, lasers and laser range finders. Course Outline 1. Radiation Theory. Reviews radiation theory while the remainder presents a detailed analysis of typical active and passive Electro-optical systems components. The instruction stresses the most correct and efficient means of evaluating these systems and predicting systems performance in both ground and flight environments. 2. History, Evolution and Current Applications of EO Systems, EO Components (to include choices of detector elements) and Performance Requirements of Active and Passive EO Devices. 3. Sources of Radiation. Atmospheric Properties of Radiation, Target Signatures, Target Tracking and Automatic Target Recognition. 4. Target Discrimination and Range Predictions. 5. Passive EO Systems Flight Test Techniques and Active EO Systems Flight Test. 6. Two In-Class Exercises allow the students to calculate spatial frequencies and predict target discrimination ranges for multiple Imaging Systems. Summary This three-day course emphasizes the fundamental knowledge needed by evaluators to successfully demonstrate functionality and performance of aircraft installed Electro-optical systems. This course is designed to provide the first the theoretical concepts behind EO systems and to then cover the testing necessary to verify system performance. The lectures will cover Infra-red, TV and LASER systems: physics behind the design, types of thermal imaging devices, spatial frequency, range finders and designators, importance of optics and Modulation Transfer Functions (MTF). The audience for this course includes Flight Test Engineers, Program Managers, military and civilian aerospace workers, and DT/OT evaluators. The course is appropriate for newly hired or assigned personnel at these locations as well as seasoned veterans in the Test and Evaluation areas. Aircraft Electro-Optical Avionics Flight Test Course # D188 May 10-12, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $1790 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition.
  7. 7. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 123 – 7 Instructor Dr. Brian Jennison is a Principal Engineer at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, where he has worked on signal processing efforts for radar, sonar, chemical detectors, and other sensor systems. He holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University and a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Missouri University of Science and Technology. He currently serves as Chair of the Electrical and Computer Engineering program for the Johns Hopkins University Engineering for Professionals, where he has taught courses in signals and systems, multi-dimensional and multi-rate digital signal processing. Summary This 3-day course provides an overview of digital signal processing (DSP) tools and techniques used to analyze digital signals and systems while also treating the design of DSP systems to perform important DSP operations such as signal spectral estimation, frequency selective filtering, and sample rate conversion. In contrast to typical DSP courses that needlessly focus on mathematical details and intricacies, this course emphasizes the practical tools utilized to create state-of-the-art DSP systems commonly used in real-world applications. MATLAB is used throughout the course to illustrate important DSP concepts and properties, permitting the attendees to develop an intuitive understanding of common DSP functions and operations. MATLAB routines are used to design and implement DSP filter structures for frequency selection and multirate applications. The course is valuable to engineers and scientists who are entering the signal processing field or as a review for professionals who desire a cohesive overview of DSP with illustrations and applications using MATLAB. A comprehensive set of notes and references as well as all custom MATLAB routines used in the course will be provided to the attendees. What You Will Learn • Compute and interpret the frequency-domain content of a discrete-time signal. • Design and implement finite-impulse response (FIR) and infinite-impulse response (IIR) digital filters, to satisfy a given set of specifications. • Apply digital signal processing techniques learned in the course to applications in multirate signal processing. • Utilize MATLAB to analyze digital signals, design digital filters, and apply these filters for a practical DSP system. Course Outline 1. Discrete-Time Signals & Systems. Frequency concepts in continuous- and discrete- time. Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms. Linear time-invariant systems, convolution, and frequency response. 2. Sampling. The Sampling Theorem, Aliasing, and Sample Reconstruction. Amplitude Quantization and Companding. 3. The Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and Spectral Analysis. Definition and properties of the DFT, illustrated in MATLAB. Zero-padding, windowing, and efficient computational algorithms – the Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs). Circular Convolution and Linear Filtering with the FFT. Overlap-add and overlap-save techniques. 4. Design of Digital Finite-Impulse Response (FIR) Filters. Filter Specifications in Magnitude and Phase. Requirements for linear phase. FIR filter design in MATLAB with Windows and Optimum Equiripple techniques. 5. Design of Digital Infinite-Impulse Response (IIR) Filters. The z-transform and system stability. Butterworth, Chebyshev, and Elliptic filter prototypes. IIR filter design in MATLAB using impulse invariance and the Bilinear Transformation. 6. Applications in Multirate Signal Processing. Signal decimation and interpolation. Sample rate conversion by a rational factor. Efficient implementation of narrowband filters. Polyphase filters. April 19-21, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $1790 (8:30am - 4:30pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 each Off The Course Tuition." Digital Signal Processing Introduction With Practical Applications in MATLAB Course # E137
  8. 8. 8 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Summary This four-day practical, comprehensive course addresses the latest technology for EW and ELINT. It also addresses critical operational employment of EW/ELINT systems. Additional targeted focus is directed to digital signal processing theory, methods, proven techniques and algorithms with practical applications to ELINT lessons learned. Directed primarily to ELINT/EW engineers and scientists responsible for new EW and ELINT digital signal processing system software and hardware design, installation, operation and evaluation, it is also appropriate for those having management or technical leadership responsibility. Instructor Dr. Clayton Stewart has over 30 years of experience performing across the spectrum of research direction, line management, program management, system engineering, engineering education, flight operations, and research and development. He is currently Visiting Professor, Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, University College London, and is consultant on international S&T engagement with clients including DARPA, NSF, and JHU Applied Physics Lab. He recently served as the Technical Director for ONR Global. He managed the Reconnaissance and Surveillance Operation at SAIC. He was Associate Professor of ECE and Associate Director of the C3I Center at George Mason University. He served as an Electronic Warfare officer and engineer in the USAF. What You Will Learn • State-of-the-Art EW/ELINT techniques and technologies. • The latest technology and systems used for electronic attack. • Practical operational considerations in the employment of EW. • Highlights of targeted threat radars. • New ELINT receivers and direction finding systems. • Critical Digital Signal Processing Techniques. • Application of proven DSP techniques to EW/ELINT systems. • Fundamental performance analysis and error estimating. From this course you will obtain comprehensive, practical knowledge and understanding of modern EW/ELINT systems and operations with applications of digital signal processing while highlighting the balance between theory with practice. February 22-25, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $2145 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Electronic Warfare - Overview of Technology & Operations A Comprehensive Look at Modern EW/ELINT Technology, Systems, & Applications Course # D135 Course Outline 1. Electronic Warfare Overview. State-of -the-Art ELINT/ESM (ES). Intelligence processes. Types of ELINT. Critical Operational Considerations. Targeted ELINT and EW platforms. Latest Technology for Electronic Attack: Jamming, Chaff, New Antiradiation Missiles. Proven Types of Jamming: Spot, Barrage, Deception. Self Defense and Support Jamming Lessons Learned. Practical Operational Employment of EW Against Integrated Air Defense Systems. 2. Signals and the EM Environment. EM waves. State-of -the-Art Radar Systems. Radar Waveforms. Advances in Types of Antennas. Antenna Patterns. Targeted Types of Radars. Radar cross section (RCS) and stealth. Some Threat Radars. Critical Communications Threats. Practical EW Against Radar. 3. Antennas and Receivers. Highlight Latest Technology for Radar Warning Receivers and ELINT Receivers. Receiver Performance Parameters: Sensitivity, Dynamic Range, Noise Figure. Critical Detection Fundamentals - Pd, Pfa, SNR. Comprehensive Look at Proven Receiver Architectures: Crystal Video, IFM, Channelized, Superheterodyne, Compressive, and New Acousto–Optic. Relative Advantages of Different Practical Receiver Architectures. 4. Architectures for Direction Finding. State-of -the- Art DF and Location Techniques: DOA, Amp. Comparison, TDOA, Interferometer. EM Propagation. Performance Comparisons. Trends: New Wideband, Multi-Function, Digital. Practical Operational employment of DF Systems Lessons Learned and Avoiding Common Mistakes. 5. Digital Signal Processing. Basic DSP Operations, Sampling Theory, Quantization: Nyquist. Aliasing, FFT, Z- Transform, Quadrature Demodulation: Direct Digital Down-conversion. Advances in Practical Digital Receiver Components: Signal Conditioning, Anti-Aliasing, Analog- to-Digital Converters (ADC). 6. DSP Components. Demodulators, Differentiators, Interpolators, Decimators, Equalizers, Detection and Measurement Blocks, Proven Filters (IIR and FIR), Multi- Rate Filters and DSP, Clocks, Timing, Synchronization, Embedded Processors. Highlight Digital Receiver Advantages and Technology Trends. 7. Measurement Basics. Comprehensive Overview of Targeted Error Definitions, Metrics, Averaging Statistics and Confidence Levels for System Assessment. Error Sources & Statistical Distributions of Interest to System Designers. Basic Statistical Analysis. 8 Parameter Errors. Thermal Noise. Phase & Quantization Noise. Critical Noise Modeling and SNR Estimation. Parameter Errors for Correlated Samples. Simultaneous Signal Interference. A/D Performance. Proven Performance Assessment Methods.
  9. 9. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 123 – 9 What You Will Learn • Concepts and strategies of Electromagnetic Spectrum Warfare. • Important EW calculations (including J/S ratio, Burn- through range, Intercept range, etc.) • EW impact of improved capabilities of new radar and communications threat systems. • New EW systems and strategies required to counter modern threats. • Capabilities and applications of digital RF memories. • Capabilities of modern IR weapons and countermeasures. • Capabilities of radar decoys. Instructor Dave Adamy has over 50 years experience developing EW systems from DC to Light, deployed on platforms from submarines to space, with specifications from QRC to high reliability. For the last 30 years, he has run his own company, performing studies for the US Government and defense contractors. He has also presented dozens of courses in the US and allied countries on Electronic Warfare and related subjects. He has published over 250 professional articles on Electronic Warfare, receiver system design and closely related subjects, including the popular EW101 column in the Journal of Electronic Defense. He holds an MSEE (Communication theory) and has 16 books in print. Summary A new generation of threats has created a significant number of new challenges to Electronic Warfare equipment and tactics. This is a practical, hands-on course which covers Spectrum Warfare and current EW approaches, and moves on to discuss the new equipment capabilities and Tactics that are required to meet the new threat challenges. This four-day course covers Spectrum Warfare, including the nature of this newly recognized “battle- space.” It also covers legacy and next generation threat radars, digital communication theory and practice, and legacy communication threats, digital RF Memories, new developments in Infrared threats and countermeasures, and modern radar decoys. Each section of the course includes lecture, discussion and practical in-class problems. The new text book,  Electronic Warfare - Against a New Generation of Threats (2015) is included with the course. Course Outline 1. EW Principals & Overview. Review of Electronic Warfare basics and dB math. 2. Electronic Spectrum Warfare. Description of current threat systems and the EW techniques used against them. 3. Next Generation Threat Radars. Description of new threat systems developed to counter current EW techniques and equipment. 4. Digital Communication. Digital  communication theory and its application to modern communication threat systems including integrated air defense systems. 5. Legacy Comm Threats. Current hostile military communication and the countermeasures used against them. 6. Modern Comm Threats. New generation hostile communications systems – including IEDs and the EW techniques used against them. 7. DRFMs. Description of digital RF memory hardware & software and their application to EW operations. 8. IR Threats and CM. Legacy and new generation IR threats and the countermeasures used against them. 9. Radar Decoys. Modern radar decoys and how they protect airborne and shipboard assets. Electronic Warfare - The New Threat Enviroment Course # D137 May 9-12, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $2195 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. NEW!
  10. 10. 10 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 GPS and International Competitors International Navigation Solutions for Military, Civilian, and Aerospace Applications Course # D162 "The presenter was very energetic and truly passionate about the material" " Tom Logsdon is the best teacher I have ever had. His knowledge is excellent. He is a 10!" "Mr. Logsdon did a bang-up job explaining and deriving the theories of special/general relativity–and how they are associated with the GPS navigation solutions." "I loved his one-page mathematical deriva- tions and the important points they illus- trate." Summary An astonishing total of 128 radionavigation satellites will soon be in orbiting along the space frontier.  They will be owned and operated by six different sovereign nations hoping to capitalize on the financial success of the GPS constellation. In this four-day short course,Tom Logsdon describes in detail how these various international navigation systems work and reviews the many practical benefits they are providing to civilian and military users scattered around the globe.  Logsdon will explain how each radionavigation system works and how you can use it in practical situations . February 22-25, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $1990 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. International Radionavigation Satellites. The Russian Glonass. The American GPS. The European Galileo. The Chinese Biedou. The Indian IRNSS. The Japanese QZSS. Geosynchronous overlay satellites. 2. Radionavigation Concepts. Active and passive radionavigation systems. Positions and velocity solutions.  Maintaining nanosecond timing accuracies. Today’s spaceborne atomic clocks. Websites and other sources of information. Building today’s $200 billion radionavigation empire in space. 3. Introducing the GPS. Signal structure and pseudorandom codes. Modulation techniques. Practical performance-enhancements. Relativistic time dilations.  Inverted navigation solutions. 4. Russia’s Highly Capable Glonass Constellation. Performance capability. Orbital mechanics considerations. The Glonass subsystems. Russia’s SL-12 Proton booster. Building dual-capability receivers.  Glonass featured in the evening news. 5. Navigation Solutions and Kalman Filtering Techniques. Taylor series expansions. Numerical iteration. Doppler shift solutions. Kalman filtering algorithms. 6. Designing Radionavigation Receivers. The functions of a modern receiver. Antenna design techniques. Code tracking and carrier tracking loops. Commercial chipsets. Military receivers. Navigation solutions for orbiting satellites. 7. Military Applications. Military test ranges. Tactical and strategic applications. Autonomy and survivability enhancements. Smart bombs and artillery projectiles. The special Paveway weapon systems. 8. Integrated Navigation. Strapdown Implementaions. Ring lasers and fiber-optic gyros. Integrated navigation systems. Those amazing MIMS devices. 9. Differential Navigation and Pseudosatellites. Special committee 104’s data exchange protocols. Global data distribution. Wide-area differential navigation.  Pseudosatellites. 10. Carrier-Aided Solutions. Attitude- determination receivers. Spaceborne systems. Accuracy comparisons.  Dynamic and kinematic orbit determination. Motorola’s spaceborne monarch receiver. Relatiivistic time-dilation derivations. Relativistic effects due to orbital eccentricity. Instructor Tom Logsdon has worked on the GPS radionavigation satellites and their constellation for more than 20 years. He helped design the Transit Navigation System and the GPS and he acted as a consultant to the European Galileo Spaceborne Navigation System. His key assignments have included constellation selection trades, military and civilian applications, force multiplier effects, survivability enhancements and spacecraft autonomy studies. Over the past 30 years Logsdon has taught more than 300 short courses. He has also made two dozen television appearances, helped design an exhibit for the Smithsonian Institution, and written and published 1.7 million words, including 29 non fiction books. These include Understanding the Navstar, Orbital Mechanics, and The Navstar Global Positioning System. www.aticourses.com/gps_technology.htm Video!
  11. 11. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 123 – 11 Who Should Attend The course is oriented toward the needs of missile engineers, systems engineers, analysts, marketing personnel, program managers, university professors, and others working in the area of missile systems and technology development. Attendees will gain an understanding of missile design, missile technologies, launch platform integration, missile system measures of merit, and the missile system development process. What You Will Learn • Key drivers in the missile design and system engineering process. • Critical tradeoffs, methods and technologies in subsystems, aerodynamic, propulsion, and structure sizing. • Launch platform-missile integration. • Robustness, lethality, guidance navigation & control, accuracy, observables, survivability, safty, reliability, and cost considerations. • Missile sizing examples. • Development process for missile systems and missile technologies. • Design, build, and fly competition. Instructor Eugene L. Fleeman has 50+ years of government, industry, academia, and consulting experience in Missile Design and System Engineering. Formerly a manager of missile programs at Air Force Research Laboratory, Rockwell International, Boeing, and Georgia Tech, he is an international lecturer on missiles and the author of over 100 publications, including the AIAA textbook, Missile Design and System Engineering. Summary This four-day short course covers the fundamentals of missile design, development, and system engineering. Missiles provide the essential accuracy and standoff range capabilities that are of paramount importance in modern warfare. Technologies for missiles are rapidly emerging, resulting in the frequent introduction of new missile systems. The capability to meet the essential requirements for the performance, cost, and risk of missile systems is driven by missile design and system engineering. The course provides a system-level, integrated method for missile aerodynamic configuration/propulsion design and analysis. It addresses the broad range of alternatives in meeting cost, performance, and risk requirements. The methods presented are generally simple closed- form analytical expressions that are physics-based, to provide insight into the primary driving parameters. Typical values of missile parameters and the characteristics of current operational missiles are discussed as well as the enabling subsystems and technologies for missiles and the current/projected state-of-the-art. Daily roundtable discussion. Design, build, and fly competition. Over seventy videos illustrate missile development activities and missile performance. Attendees will vote on the relative emphasis of the material to be presented. Attendees receive course notes as well as the textbook, Missile Design and System Engineering. Course Outline 1. Introduction/Key Drivers in the Missile System Design Process: Overview of missile design process. Examples of system-of- systems integration. Unique characteristics of missiles. Key aerodynamic configuration sizing parameters. Missile conceptual design synthesis process. Examples of processes to establish mission requirements. Projected capability in command, control, communication, computers, intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (C4ISR). Example of Pareto analysis. Attendees vote on course emphasis. 2. Aerodynamic Considerations in Missile System Design: Optimizing missile aerodynamics. Shapes for low observables. Missile configuration layout (body, wing, tail) options. Selecting flight control alternatives. Wing and tail sizing. Predicting normal force, drag, pitching moment, stability, control effectiveness, lift-to-drag ratio, and hinge moment. Maneuver law alternatives. 3. Propulsion Considerations in Missile System Design: Turbojet, ramjet, scramjet, ducted rocket, and rocket propulsion comparisons. Turbojet engine design considerations, prediction and sizing. Selecting ramjet engine, booster, and inlet alternatives. Ramjet performance prediction and sizing. High density fuels. Solid propellant alternatives. Propellant grain cross section trade-offs. Effective thrust magnitude control. Reducing propellant observables. Propellant aging prediction. Rocket motor performance prediction and sizing. Solid propellant rocket motor combustion instability. Motor case and nozzle materials. 4. Weight Considerations in Missile System Design: How to size subsystems to meet flight performance requirements. Structural design criteria factor of safety. Structure concepts and manufacturing processes. Selecting airframe materials. Loads prediction. Weight prediction. Airframe and motor case design. Aerodynamic heating prediction and insulation trades. Thermalstress. Dome material alternatives and sizing. Power supply and actuator alternatives and sizing. 5. Flight Performance Considerations in Missile System Design: Flight envelope limitations. Aerodynamic sizing-equations of motion. Accuracy of simplified equations of motion. Maximizing flight performance. Benefits of flight trajectory shaping. Flight performance prediction of boost, climb, cruise, coast, steady descent, ballistic, maneuvering, divert, and homing flight. 6. Measures of Merit and Launch Platform Integration: Achieving robustness in adverse weather. Seeker, navigation, data link, and sensor alternatives. Seeker range prediction. GPS / INS integration.  Electromagnetic compatibility. Counter-countermeasures. Warhead alternatives and lethality prediction. Approaches to minimize collateral damage. Fuzing alternatives and requirements for fuze angle and time delay. Alternative guidance laws. Proportional guidance accuracy prediction. Time constant contributors and prediction. Maneuverability design criteria. Radar cross section and infrared signature prediction. Survivability considerations. Insensitive munitions. Enhanced reliability. Cost drivers of schedule, weight, learning curve, and parts count. EMD and production cost prediction. Logistics considerations. Designing within launch platform constraints. Standard launchers. Internal vs. external carriage. Shipping, storage, carriage, launch, and separation environment considerations. Launch platformand fire control system interfaces. Cold and solar environment temperature prediction. 7. Sizing Examples and Sizing Tools: Trade-offs for extended range rocket. Sizing for enhanced maneuverability. Developing a harmonized missile. Lofted range prediction. Ramjet missile sizing for range robustness. Ramjet fuel alternatives. Ramjet velocity control. Correction of turbojet thrust and specific impulse. Turbojet missile sizing for maximum range. Turbojet engine rotational speed. Guided bomb performance. Computer aided sizing tools for conceptual design. Design, build, and fly competition. Pareto, house of quality, and design of experiment analysis. 8. Missile Development Process: Design validation/technology development process. Developing a technology roadmap. History of transformational technologies. Funding emphasis. Cost, risk, and performance tradeoffs. New missile follow-on projections. Examples of development tests and facilities. Example of technology demonstration flight envelope. Examples of technology development. New technologies for missiles. February 22-25, 2016 Orlando, Florida $2195 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. www.aticourses.com/tactical_missile_design.htm Video! Missile System Design Course # D190
  12. 12. 12 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 March 8-11, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $1990 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Instructor Dr. Walter R. Dyer is a graduate of UCLA, with a Ph.D. degree in Control Systems Engineering and Applied Mathematics. He has over thirty years of industry, government and academic experience in the analysis and design of tactical and strategic missiles. His experience includes Standard Missile, Stinger, AMRAAM, HARM, MX, Small ICBM, and ballistic missile defense. He is currently a Senior Staff Member at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and was formerly the Chief Technologist at the Missile Defense Agency in Washington, DC. He has authored numerous industry and government reports and published prominent papers on missile technology. He has also taught university courses in engineering at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. What You Will Learn You will gain an understanding of the design and analysis of homing missiles and the integrated performance of their subsystems. • Missile propulsion and control in the atmosphere and in space. • Clear explanation of homing guidance. • Types of missile seekers and how they work. • Missile testing and simulation. • Latest developments and future trends. Summary This four-day course presents a broad introduction to major missile subsystems and their integrated performance, explained in practical terms, but including relevant analytical methods. While emphasis is on today’s homing missiles and future trends, the course includes a historical perspective of relevant older missiles. Both endoatmospheric and exoatmospheric missiles (missiles that operate in the atmosphere and in space) are addressed. Missile propulsion, guidance, control, and seekers are covered, and their roles and interactions in integrated missile operation are explained. The types and applications of missile simulation and testing are presented. Comparisons of autopilot designs, guidance approaches, seeker alternatives, and instrumentation for various purposes are presented. The course is recommended for analysts, engineers, and technical managers who want to broaden their understanding of modern missiles and missile systems. The analytical descriptions require some technical background, but practical explanations can be appreciated by all students. U.S. citizenship is required for this course. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Brief history of Missiles. Types of missiles. Introduction to ballistic missile defense. Endoatmospheric and exoatmospheric missiles. Missile basing. Missile subsystems overview. Warheads, lethality and hit-to-kill. Power and power conditioning. 2. Missile Propulsion. Rocket thrust and the rocket equation. Specific impulse and mass fraction. Solid and liquid propulsion. Propellant safety. Single stage and multistage boosters. Ramjets and scramjets. Axial propulsion. Thrust vector control. Divert and attitude control systems. Effects of gravity and atmospheric drag. 3. Missile Airframes, Autopilots And Control. Purpose and functions of autopilots. Dynamics of missile motion and simplifying assumptions. Single plane analysis. Missile aerodynamics. Autopilot design. Open-loop and closed loop autopilots. Inertial instruments and feedback. Pitch and roll autopilot examples. Autopilot response, stability, and agility. Body modes and rate saturation. Induced roll in high performance missiles. Adaptive autopilots. Rolling airframe Missiles. Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle autopilots. Pulse Width Modulation. Limit cycles. 4. Missile Seekers. Seeker types and operation for endo- and exo-atmospheric missiles. Passive, active and semi active seekers. Atmospheric transmission. Strapped down and gimbaled seekers. Radar basics. Radar seekers and missile fire-control radar. Radar antennas. Sequential lobing, monopulse and frequency agility. Passive sensing basics and infrared seekers. Figures of merit for detectors. Introduction to seeker optics and passive seeker configurations. Scanning seekers and focal plane arrays. Dual mode seekers. Seeker comparisons and applications to different missions. Signal processing and noise reduction. 5. Missile Guidance. Phases of missile flight. Boost and midcourse guidance. Lambert Guidance. Homing guidance. Zero effort miss. Proportional navigation and augmented proportional navigation. Predictive guidance. Optimum homing guidance. Homing guidance examples and simulation results. Gravity bias. Radomes and their effects. Blind range. Endoatmospheric and exoatmospheric missile guidance. Sources of miss and miss reduction. Miss distance comparisons with different homing guidance laws. Guidance filters and the Kalman filter. Early guidance techniques. Beam rider, pure pursuit, and deviated pursuit guidance. 6. Simulation and Testing. Current simulation capabilities and future trends. Hardware in the loop. Types of missile testing and their uses, advantages and disadvantages of testing alternatives. Modern Missile Analysis Propulsion, Guidance, Control, Seekers, and Technology Course # D193 www.aticourses.com/missile_systems_analysis.htm Video!
  13. 13. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 123 – 13 Instructor Stan Silberman is a member of the Senior Technical Staff at the Johns Hopkins Univeristy Applied Physics Laboratory. He has over 30 years of experience in tracking, sensor fusion, and radar systems analysis and design for the Navy,Marine Corps, Air Force, and FAA. Recent work has included the integration of a new radar into an existing multisensor system and in the integration, using a multiple hypothesis approach, of shipboard radar and ESM sensors. Previous experience has included analysis and design of multiradar fusion systems, integration of shipboard sensors including radar, IR and ESM, integration of radar, IFF, and time-difference-of- arrival sensors with GPS data sources. Summary The objective of this three-day course is to introduce engineers, scientists, managers and military operations personnel to the fields of target tracking and data fusion, and to the key technologies which are available today for application to this field. The course is designed to be rigorous where appropriate, while remaining accessible to students without a specific scientific background in this field. The course will start from the fundamentals and move to more advanced concepts. This course will identify and characterize the principle components of typical tracking systems. A variety of techniques for addressing different aspects of the data fusion problem will be described. Real world examples will be used to emphasize the applicability of some of the algorithms. Specific illustrative examples will be used to show the tradeoffs and systems issues between the application of different techniques. What You Will Learn • State Estimation Techniques – Kalman Filter, constant-gain filters. • Non-linear filtering – When is it needed? Extended Kalman Filter. • Techniques for angle-only tracking. • Tracking algorithms, their advantages and limitations, including: - Nearest Neighbor - Probabilistic Data Association - Multiple Hypothesis Tracking - Interactive Multiple Model (IMM) • How to handle maneuvering targets. • Track initiation – recursive and batch approaches. • Architectures for sensor fusion. • Sensor alignment – Why do we need it and how do we do it? • Attribute Fusion, including Bayesian methods, Dempster-Shafer, Fuzzy Logic. June 14-16, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $1790 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Introduction. 2. The Kalman Filter. 3. Other Linear Filters. 4. Non-Linear Filters. 5. Angle-Only Tracking. 6. Maneuvering Targets: Adaptive Techniques. 7. Maneuvering Targets: Multiple Model Approaches. 8. Single Target Correlation & Association. 9. Track Initiation, Confirmation & Deletion. 10. Using Measured Range Rate (Doppler). 11. Multitarget Correlation & Association. 12. Probabilistic Data Association. 13. Multiple Hypothesis Approaches. 14. Coordinate Conversions. 15. Multiple Sensors. 16. Data Fusion Architectures. 17. Fusion of Data From Multiple Radars. 18. Fusion of Data From Multiple Angle-Only Sensors. 19. Fusion of Data From Radar and Angle-Only Sensor. 20. Sensor Alignment. 21. Fusion of Target Type and Attribute Data. 22. Performance Metrics. Revised With Newly Added Topics Multi-Target Tracking and Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Course # D210
  14. 14. 14 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 What You Will Learn Scientific and engineering principles behind systems such as radar, sonar, electro-optics, guidance systems, explosives and ballistics. Specifically: • Analyze weapon systems in their environment, examining elements of the “detect to engage sequence” from sensing to target damage mechanisms. • Apply the concept of energy propagation and interaction from source to distant objects via various media for detection or destruction. • Evaluate the factors that affect a weapon system’s sensor resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Including the characteristics of a multiple element system and/or array. • Knowledge to make reasonable assumptions and formulate first-order approximations of weapons systems’ performance. • Asses the design and operational tradeoffs on weapon systems’ performance from a high level. From this course you will obtain the knowledge and ability to perform basic sensor and weapon calculations, identify tradeoffs, interact meaningfully with colleagues, evaluate systems, and understand the literature. Instructors Craig Payne is currently a principal investigator at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. His expertise in the “detect to engage” process with emphasis in sensor systems, (sonar, radar and electro-optics), development of fire control solutions for systems, guidance methods, fuzing techniques, and weapon effects on targets. He is a retired U.S. Naval Officer from the Surface Warfare community and has extensive experience naval operations. As a Master Instructor at the U. S. Naval Academy he designed, taught and literally wrote the book for the course called Principles of Naval Weapons. This course is provided to all U.S. Naval Academy Midshipmen, 62 colleges and Universities that offer the NROTC program and taught abroad at various national service schools. Dr. Menachem Levitas has 44 years of experience in direct radar and weapon systems analysis, design, and development. Throughout his tenure he has provided technical support for shipboard and airborne radar programs in many different areas including system concept definition, electronic protection, active arrays, signal and data processing, requirement analyses, and radar phenomenology. He is a recipient of the AEGIS Excellence Award.  He has supported many radar programs including the Air Force’s Ultra Reliable Radar (URR), the Atmospheric Surveillance Technology (AST), the USMC’s Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR), the 3D Long Range Expeditionary Radar (3DLRR), and others. He was the chief scientist of Technology Service Corporation’s Washington Operations. Summary This four-day course is designed for students who have a college level knowledge of mathematics and basic physics to gain the “big picture” as related to basic sensor and weapons theory. As in all disciplines knowing the vocabulary is fundamental for further exploration, this course strives to provide the physical explanation behind the vocabulary such that students have a working vernacular of naval weapons. This course is a fundamental course and is not designed for experts in the Navy's combat systems. Course Outline 1. Introduction to Combat Systems: Discussion of combat system attributes 2. Introduction to Radar: Fundamentals, examples, sub-systems and issues 3. The Physics of Radar: Electromagnetic radiations, frequency, transmission and reception, waveforms, PRF, minimum range, range resolution and bandwidth, scattering, target cross-section, reflectivities, scattering statistics, polarimetric scattering, propagation in the Earth troposphere 4. Radar Theory: The radar range equation, signal and noise, detection threshold, noise in receiving systems, detection principles, measurement accuracies 5. The Radar Sub-systems: Transmitter, antenna, receiver and signal processor (Pulse Compression and Doppler filtering principles, automatic detection with adaptive detection threshold, the CFAR mechanism, sidelobe blanking angle estimation), the radar control program and data processor (SAR/ISAR are addressed as antenna excursions) 6. Workshop: Hands-on exercises relative to Antenna basics; and radar range analysis with and without detailed losses and the pattern propagation factor 7. Electronic Attack and Electronic Protection: Noise and deceptive jamming, and radar protection techniques 8. Electronically Scanned Antennas: Fundamental concepts, directivity and gain, elements and arrays, near and far field radiation, element factor and array factor, illumination function and Fourier transform relations, beamwidth approximations, array tapers and sidelobes, electrical dimension and errors, array bandwidth, steering mechanisms, grating lobes, phase monopulse, beam broadening, examples 9. Solid State Active Phased Arrays: What are solid state active arrays (SSAA), what advantages do they provide, emerging requirements that call for SSAA (or AESA), SSAA issues at T/R module, array, and system levels 10. Radar Tracking: Functional block diagram, what is radar tracking, firm track initiation and range, track update, track maintenance, algorithmic alternatives (association via single or multiple hypotheses, tracking filters options), role of electronically steered arrays in radar tracking 11. Current Challenges and Advancements: Key radar challenges, key advances (transmitter, antenna, signal stability, digitization and digital processing, waveforms, algorithms) 12. Electro-optical theory. Radiometric Quantities, Stephan Botzman Law, Wein's Law. 13. Electro-Optical Targets, Background and Attenuation. Lasers, Selective Radiation, Thermal Radiation Spreading, Divergence, Absorption Bands, Beers Law, Night Vision Devices. 14. Infrared Range Equation. Detector Response and Sensitivity, Derivation of Simplified IR Range Equation, Example problems. 15. Sound Propagation in Oceans. Thermal Structure of Ocean, Sound Velocity Profiles, Propagation Paths, Transmission Losses. 16. SONAR Figure of Merit. Target Strength, Noise, Reverberation, Scattering, Detection Threshold, Directivity Index, Passive and Active Sonar Equations. 17. Underwater Detection Systems. Transducers and Hydrophones, Arrays, Variable Depth Sonar, Sonobuoys, Bistatic Sonar, Non-Acoustic Detection Systems to include Magnetic Anomaly Detection. 18. Weapon Ballistics and Propulsion. Relative Motion, Interior and Exterior Ballistics, Reference Frames and Coordinate Systems, Weapons Systems Alignment. 19. Guidance: Guidance laws and logic to include pursuit, constant bearing, proportion navigation and kappa-gamma. Seeker design. 20. Fuzing Principles. Fuze System Classifications, Proximity Fuzes, Non-proximity Fuzes. 21. Chemical Explosives. Characteristics of Military Explosives, Measurement of Chemical Explosive Reactions, Power Index Approximation. 22. Warhead Damage Predictions. Quantifying Damage, Circular Error Probable, Blast Warheads, Diffraction and Drag loading on targets, Fragmentation Warheads, Shaped Charges, Special Purpose Warheads. 23. Underwater Warheads. Underwater Explosion Damage Mechanisms, Torpedoes, Naval Mine Classification. May 9-12, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $2045 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Naval Weapons Principles Underlying Physics of Today’s Sensor and Weapons Course # D211
  15. 15. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 123 – 15 RADAR 201 Advances in Modern Radar March 16, 2016 Laurel, Maryland $700 (8:30am - 4:00pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $5000 each Off The Course Tuition." RADAR 101 Fundamentals of Radar March 15, 2016 Laurel, Maryland $700 (8:30am - 4:00pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $5000 each Off The Course Tuition." Summary This concise one-day course is intended for those with only modest or no radar experience. It provides an overview with understanding of the physics behind radar, tools used in describing radar, the technology of radar at the subsystem level and concludes with a brief survey of recent accomplish-ments in various applications. ATTEND EITHER OR BOTH RADAR COURSES! Summary This one-day course is a supplement to the basic course Radar 101, and probes deliberately deeper into selected topics, notably in signal processing to achieve (generally) finer and finer resolution (in several dimensions, imaging included) and in antennas wherein the versatility of the phased array has made such an impact. Finally, advances in radar's own data processing - auto-detection, more refined association processes, and improved auto-tracking - and system wide fusion processes are briefly discussed. Course Outline 1. Introduction. The general nature of radar: composition, block diagrams, photos, types and functions of radar, typical characteristics. 2. The Physics of Radar. Electromagnetic waves and their vector representation. The spectrum bands used in radar. Radar waveforms. Scattering. Target and clutter behavior representations. Propagation: refractivity, attenuation, and the effects of the Earth surface. 3. The Radar Range Equation. Development from basic principles. The concepts of peak and average power, signal and noise bandwidth and the matched filter concept, antenna aperture and gain, system noise temperature, and signal detectability. 4. Thermal Noise and Detection in Thermal Noise. Formation of thermal noise in a receiver. System noise temperature (Ts) and noise figure (NF). The role of a low- noise amplifier (LNA). Signal and noise statistics. False alarm probability. Detection thresholds. Detection probability. Coherent and non-coherent multi-pulse integration. 5. The sub-systems of Radar. Transmitter (pulse oscillator vs. MOPA, tube vs. solid state, bottled vs. distributed architecture), antenna (pattern, gain, sidelobes, bandwidth), receiver (homodyne vs. super heterodyne), signal processor (functions, front and back-end), and system controller/tracker. Types, issues, architectures, tradeoff considerations. 5. Current Accomplishments and Concluding Discussion. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Radar’s development, the metamorphosis of the last few decades: analog and digital technology evolution, theory and algorithms, increased digitization: multi-functionality, adaptivity to the environment, higher detection sensitivity, higher resolution, increased performance in clutter. 2. Modern Signal Processing. Clutter and the Doppler principle. MTI and Pulse Doppler filtering. Adaptive cancellation and STAP. Pulse editing. Pulse Compression processing. Adaptive thresholding and detection. Ambiguity resolution. Measurement and reporting. 3. Electronic Steering Arrays (ESA): Principles of Operation. Advantages and cost elements. Behavior with scan angle. Phase shifters, true time delays (TTL) and array bandwidth. Other issues. 4. Solid State Active Array (SSAA) Antennas (AESA). Architecture. Technology. Motivation. Advantages. Increased array digitization and compatibility with adaptive pattern applications. Need for in-place auto-calibration and compensation. 5. Modern Advances in Waveforms. Pulse compression principles. Performance measures. Some legacy codes. State-of- the-art optimal codes. Spectral compliance. Temporal controls. Orthogonal codes. Multiple-input Multiple-output (MIMO) radar. 6. Data Processing Functions. The conventional functions of report to track correlation, track initiation, update, and maintenance. The new added responsibilities of managing a multi-function array: prioritization, timing, resource management. The Multiple Hypothesis tracker. 7. Concluding Discussion. Today’s concern of mission and theatre uncertainties. Increasing requirements at constrained size, weight, and cost. Needs for growth potential. System of systems with data fusion and multiple communication links. Dr. Menchem Levitas has forty four years of experience in science and engineering, thirty six of which have consisted of direct radar and weapon systems analysis, design, and development. Throughout his tenure he has provided technical support for many shipboard and airborne radar programs in many different areas including system concept definition, electronic protection, active arrays, signal and data processing, requirement analyses, and radar phenomenology. He is a recipient of the AEGIS Excellence Award for the development of a novel radar cross-band calibration technique in support of wide-band operations for high range resolution. He has developed innovative techniques in many areas e.g., active array self-calibration and failure-compensation, array multi- beam-forming, electronic protection, synthetic wide-band, knowledge-based adaptive processing, waveforms and waveform processing, and high fidelity, real-time, littoral propagation modeling. He has supported many AESA programs including the Air Force’s Ultra Reliable Radar (URR), the Atmospheric Surveillance Technology (AST), the USMC’s Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR), the 3D Long Range Expeditionary Radar (3DLRR), and others. Prior to his retirement in 2013 he had been the chief scientist of Technology Service Corporation’s Washington Operations. Radar 101 / 201 Course # D222 - D223
  16. 16. 16 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 What You Will Learn • What are radar subsystems. • How to calculate radar performance. • Key functions, issues, and requirements. • How different requirements make radars different. • Operating in different modes & environments. • ESA and AESA radars: what are these technologies, how they work, what drives them, and what new issues they bring. • Issues unique to multifunction, phased array, radars. • State-of-the-art waveforms and waveform processing. • How airborne radars differ from surface radars. • Today's requirements, technologies & designs. Instructors Dr. Menachem Levitas has 44 years of experience in radar and weapon systems analysis, design, and development. Throughout his tenure he has provided technical support for shipboard and airborne radar programs in many different areas including system concept definition, electronic protection, active arrays, signal and data processing, requirement analyses, and radar phenomenology. He is a recipient of the AEGIS Excellence Award.  He has supported many radar programs including the Air Force’s Ultra Reliable Radar (URR), the Atmospheric Surveillance Technology (AST), the USMC’s Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR), the 3D Long Range Expeditionary Radar (3DLRR), and others. He was the chief scientist of Technology Service Corporation’s Washington Operations. Stan Silberman is a member of the Senior Technical Staff of the Applied Physics Laboratory. He has over 30 years of experience in tracking, sensor fusion, and radar systems analysis and design for the Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and FAA. Recent work has included the integration of a new radar into an existing multisensor system and in the integration, using a multiple hypothesis approach, of shipboard radar and ESM sensors. Previous experience has included analysis and design of multiradar fusion systems, integration of shipboard sensors including radar, IR and ESM, integration of radar, IFF, and time- difference-of-arrival sensors with GPS data sources, and integration of multiple sonar systems on underwater platforms. Summary This four-day course covers radar functionality, architecture, and performance. Fundamental radar issues such as transmitter stability, antenna pattern, clutter, jamming, propagation, target cross section, dynamic range, receiver noise, receiver architecture, waveforms, processing, and target detection are treated in detail within the unifying context of the radar range equation, and examined within the contexts of surface and airborne radar platforms and their respective applications. Advanced topics such as pulse compression, electronically steered arrays, and active phased arrays are covered, together with the related issues of failure compensation and auto-calibration. The fundamentals of multi-target tracking principles are covered, and detailed examples of surface and airborne radars are presented. This course is designed for engineers and engineering managers who wish to understand how surface and airborne radar systems work, and to familiarize themselves with pertinent design issues and the current technological frontiers. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Radar systems examples. Radar ranging principles, frequencies, architecture, measurements, displays, and parameters. Radar range equation; radar waveforms; antenna patterns, types, and parameters. 2. Noise in Receiving Systems and Detection Principles. Noise sources; statistical properties. Radar range equation; false alarm and detection probability; and pulse integration schemes. Radar cross section; stealth; fluctuating targets; stochastic models; detection of fluctuating targets. 3. CW Radar, Doppler, and Receiver Architecture. Basic properties; CW and high PRF relationships; dynamic range, stability; isolation requirements, techniques, and devices; superheterodyne receivers; in-phase and quadrature receivers; signal spectrum; spectral broadening; matched filtering; Doppler filtering; Spectral modulation; CW ranging; and measurement accuracy. 4. Radio Waves Propagation. The pattern propagation factor; interference (multipath,) and diffraction; refraction; standard refractivity; the 4/3 Earth approximation; sub- refractivity; super refractivity; trapping; propagation ducts; littoral propagation; propagation modeling; attenuation. 5. Radar Clutter and Detection in Clutter. Volume, surface, and discrete clutter, deleterious clutter effects on radar performance, clutter characteristics, effects of platform velocity, distributed sea clutter and sea spikes, terrain clutter, grazing angle vs. depression angle characterization, volume clutter, birds, Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) thresholding, editing CFAR, and Clutter Maps. 6. Clutter Filtering Principles. Signal-to-clutter ratio; signal and clutter separation techniques; range and Doppler techniques; principles of filtering; transmitter stability and filtering; pulse Doppler and MTI; MTD; blind speeds and blind ranges; staggered MTI; analog and digital filtering; notch shaping; gains and losses. Performance measures: clutter attenuation, improvement factor, subclutter visibility, and cancellation ratio. Improvement factor limitation sources; stability noise sources; composite errors; types of MTI. 7. Radar Waveforms. The time-bandwidth concept. Pulse compression; Performance measures; Code families; Matched and mismatched filters. Optimal codes and code families: multiple constraints. Performance in the time and frequency domains; Mismatched filters and their applications; Orthogonal and quasi-orthogonal codes; Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) radar; MIMO waveforms and MIMO antenna patterns. 8. Electronically Scanned Radar Systems. Fundamental concepts, directivity and gain, elements and arrays, near and far field radiation, element factor and array factor, illumination function and Fourier transform relations, beamwidth approximations, array tapers and sidelobes, electrical dimension and errors, array bandwidth, steering mechanisms, grating lobes, phase monopulse, beam broadening, examples. 9. Active Phased Array Radar Systems. What are solid state active arrays (SSAA), what advantages do they provide, emerging requirements that call for SSAA (or AESA), SSAA issues at T/R module, array, and system levels, digital arrays, future direction. 10. Multiple Simultaneous Beams. Why multiple beams, independently steered beams vs. clustered beams, alternative organization of clustered beams and their implications, quantization lobes in clustered beams arrangements and design options to mitigate them. 11. Auto-Calibration Techniques in Active Phased Array Radars: Motivation; the mutual coupling in a phased array radar; external calibration reference approach; the mutual coupling approach; architectural. 12. Module Failure and Array Auto-compensation: The ‘bathtub’ profile of module failure rates and its three regions, burn-in and accelerated stress tests, module packaging and periodic replacements, cooling alternatives, effects of module failure on array pattern, array auto-compensation techniques to extend time between replacements, need for recalibration after module replacement. January 25-28, 2016 • Columbia, Maryland $1990 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Radar Systems Design & Engineering Radar Performance Calculations Course # D231
  17. 17. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 123 – 17 What You Will Learn • How radars measure target range, bearing and velocity. • How the radar range equation is used to estimate radar system performance including received power, target SNR and maximum detection range. • System design and external factors driving radar system performance including transmitter power, antenna gain, pulse duration, system bandwidth, target RCS, and RF propagation. Instructor Dr. Jack Lum is currently a Radar and Electronics Warfare engineer at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. During his 10 years at JHU/APL, he has led and authored performance analyses of multiple Navy radar systems including the AN/APS-147, AN/APS-153 and the AN/SPS-74. Prior to JHU/APL, he worked at the Raytheon Corporation on ballistic missile defense. He holds a B.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering. He has over 12 years of radar systems engineering experience that includes expertise in system performance modeling, signal processing, test & evaluation, and target RCS modeling; 10 years experience prototyping and integrating high-speed radar and EW processing and recording systems; and 5 years of Electronic Warfare (EW) application development. Course Outline 1. Radar Measurements. Target ranging, target bearing, target size estimation, radar range resolution, range rate, Doppler velocity, and radar line-of-sight horizon. 2. Radar Range Equation. Description of factors affecting radar detection performance; system design choices such transmit power, antenna, signal frequency, and system bandwidth; external factors including target reflectivity, clutter, atmospheric attenuation and RF signal propagation; use of radar range equation for estimating receive power, target signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and maximum detection range. 3. Target and Clutter Reflectivity. Target radar cross section (RCS), Swerling model for fluctuating targets, volume and surface clutter, and ground and ocean clutter models. 4. Propagation of RF Signals. Free space propagation, atmospheric attenuation, ducting, and significance of RF transmit frequency. 5. Radar Transmitter / Antenna / Receiver. Antenna concepts, phased array antennas, radar signal generation, RF signal heterodyning (upconversion and downconversion), signal amplification, RF receiver components, dynamic range, and system (cascade) noise figure. 6. Radar Detection. Probability Density Functions (PDFs), Target and Noise PDFs, Probability of Detection, False Alarm Rate (FAR), constant FAR (CFAR) threshold, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. 7. Radar Tracking. Range and angle measurement errors, tracking, Alpha-Beta trackers, Kalman Filters, and track formation and gating. February 23-25, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $1790 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Radar Systems Fundamentals An Introduction to Radar Physics, System Design and Signal Processing Course # D226 Summary This 3-day course introduces the student to the fundamentals of radar systems engineering. The course begins by describing how radar sensors perform critical measurements and the limitation of those measurements. The radar range equation in its many forms is derived, and examples of its applications to different situations are demonstrated. The generation and reception of radar signals is explained through a holistic rather than piecemeal discussion of the radar transmitter, antenna, receiver and signal processing. The course wraps up with a explanation of radar detection and tracking of targets in noise and clutter. The course is valuable to engineers and scientists who are entering the field or as a review for employees who want a system level overview. A comprehensive set of notes and references will be provided to all attendees. Students will also receive Matlab scripts that they can use to perform radar system performance assessments.
  18. 18. 18 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 What You Will Learn • How to model flight dynamics with tensors. • How to formulate the kinematics and dynamics of 6 DoF aerospace vehicles. • Functional integration of aircraft and missile subsystems: Aerodynamics, propulsion, actuators, autopilots, guidance, seekers and navigation. • See in action aircraft and missile 6DoF simulations. • How to build your own 6 DoF simulations. Instructor Dr. Peter Zipfel is a graduate of the University Stuttgart, Germany, and the Catholic University of America with a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering. He founded Modeling and Simulation Technologies, which advises and instructs functional integration of aerospace systems using computer simulations. For 35 years he taught courses in modeling and simulation, guidance and control, and flight dynamics at the University of Florida and over the span of 45 years he created aerospace simulations for the German Helicopter Institute, the U.S. Army, and U.S. Air Force. He is an AIAA Associate Fellow and an internationally recognized short course instructor. Summary This is a two-day course. As modeling and simulation (M&S) is penetrating the aerospace sciences at all levels, this course will introduce you to the difficult subject of modeling aerospace vehicles in six degrees of freedom (6 DoF). Starting with the modern approach of tensors, the equations of motion are derived and, after introducing coordinate systems, they are expressed in matrices for compact computer programming. Aircraft and missile prototypes will exemplify 6 DoF aerodynamic modeling, rocket and turbojet propulsion, actuating systems, autopilots, guidance, and seekers. These subsystems will be integrated step by step into full-up simulations. For demonstrations, typical fly- out trajectories will be run and projected on the screen. The provided source code and plotting programs let you duplicate the trajectories on your PC (requires MS Visual C++ compiler, free Express version). Based on these prototype simulations you can build your own 6 DoF aerospace simulations. Course Outline 1. Concepts in Modeling with Tensors. Definitions, the M&S pyramid . 2. Matrices, Vectors, and Tensors. invariant modeling with tensors. Definition of frames and coordinate systems. 3. Coordinate Systems. Heliocentric, inertial, geographic coordinate systems. Body, wind, flight path coordinate systems. 4. Kinematics of Flight Mechanics. Rotational time derivative. Euler transformation. 5. Equations of Motion of Aircraft and Missiles. Newton’s translational equations. Euler’s attitude equations . 6. Aerodynamics of Aircraft and Missiles. Aircraft aerodynamics in body coordinates. Missile aerodynamics in aeroballistic coordinates. 7. Propulsion. Rocket, turbojet and combined cycle propulsion. 8. Autopilots for Aircraft and Missiles. Roll and heading autopilots. Attitude autopilots. Acceleration autopilots. 9. Seekers for Missiles. Radar and IR sensors. 10. Guidance and Navigation. Line guidance, proportional navigation. Optimal guidance laws . Full-up Aircraft Simulation in C++ and  Full-up Missile Simulation in C++) February 9-10, 2016 Columbia, Maryland July 12-13, 2016 Orlando. Florida $1290 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Six Degrees of Freedom Modeling Modeling & Simulations of Missile & Aircraft Course # D240 NEW!
  19. 19. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 123 – 19 Instructor Dr. Mark Plett has 15 years experience developing Communications Systems. He has worked at several telecommunications start-ups as well as the DoD, and Microsoft. Most recently, Dr. Plett works at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab (APL) directing the Wireless Cyber Capabilities Group. Dr. Plett has spent the last 7 years developing software-defined radios for a variety of DoD applications. He is active in the open source SDR community and has contributed source code to the GNURadio project. Dr. Plett received his Masters in Electrical Engineering from the University of Maryland in 1999 and his Ph.D. in Electro-physics from the University of Maryland in 2007. Dr. Plett is a licensed Professional Engineer in the State of Maryland. Summary This three-day course will provide the foundational skills required to develop software defined radios using the GNURadio framework. This course consists of both lecture material and worked SDR software examples. The course begins with a background in SDR technologies and communications theory. The course then covers programming in the Linux environment common to GNURadio. Introductory GNURadio is presented to demonstrate the utilization of the stock framework. Then the class will cover how to develop and debug custom signal processing blocks in the context of a work SDR modem. Finally, the advanced features of GNURadio will be covered such as RPC, data tagging, and burst (event) processing. This class will present SDR development best practices developed through the development of over a dozen SDR systems. Such practices include approaches to quality assurance coding, process monitoring, and proper system segmentation architectures. Each student will receive a complete set of lecture notes as well as a complete SDR development environment preloaded with the worked examples of GNURadio applications. What You Will Learn • What applications utilize SDR. • Common SDR architectures. • Basic communications theory (spectrum access, modulation). • Basic algorithms utilized in SDR (carrier recovery, timing recovery). • Modem structure. • Linux software development and debugging. • SDR development in GNURadio Companion. • Custom signal processing in GNURadio. • Worked examples of SDR Modems in GNURadio. • Advanced GNURadio features (stream tags, message passing, control port). March 15-17, 2016 Columbia, Maryland $1790 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Basic Communications Theory. Spectrum analysis. Media access. Carrier modulation. Bandwidth utilization. Error correcting codes. 2. Basic Radio Signal Processing. Sampling theory. Filtering. Carrier recovery. Timing recovery. Equalization. Modulation and demodulation. 3. Basic Radio Signal Processing. Sampling theory. Filtering. Carrier recovery. Timing recovery. Equalization. Modulation and demodulation. 4. The Linux Programming Environment. Introduction to the Linux operating system. Architecture of the Linux operating system (Kernel and User spaces) Features of the Linux OS useful to development such as Package managers, command line utilities, and BASH. Worked examples of useful commands and BASH scripting to provide an introduction to software development in Linux. How software is compiled and executed with worked examples of static and shared libraries. 5. Software Development in Linux. C++ and Python software development in Linux. Worked example of building a C++ program in Linux. Build systems. Debugging using GDB. Worked examples of debugging with GDB. Profiling tools to measure SDR software performance. Packaging and revision control for software distribution. Integrated Development Environments. Eclipse and LiClipse. Worked examples of Python scripting. Worked examples of the SWIG C++ to Python interface generator used in GNURadio. 6. Introduction to GNURadio. GNURadio architecture. Flowgraphs and data buffers. Stock signal processing blocks. How to set-up a GNURadio development environment (like the one provided with the class). Developing with GNURadio Companion. Worked example in GNURadio Companion. Developing a GNURadio application in python. Worked example of a python GNURadio app. Working with SDR hardware. Worked example with RTL-Dongle. 7. Custom Signal Processing in GNURadio. Worked example of how to write a GNURadio signal processing block. Generating block skeleton code. Populating the signal processing. Compiling and debugging the signal processing. Communicating with and monitoring the signal processing in operation. 8. Best Practices in GNURadio Development. Discussion of techniques for the development of deployable, maintainable and extensible SDR applications. Architectures to segment proprietary code from GPL code. Logging and monitoring techniques. Code libraries and developing for re-use. 9. Advanced GNURadio features. Overview of advanced GNURadio features. Worked examples of system logging. Worked examples of message passing and burst processing with PDUs. Worked examples of metadata passing using stream tags. Worked example of burst processing using metadata enabled tagged-streams. Worked example of external process monitoring using GNURadio control port. Worked example of hardware accelerated signal processing using the VOLK optimized kernel library. 10. Open source SDR projects. Discussion and simple demonstration of available open-source SDR projects. Scanner utilities such as GQRX, SDR#, and Baudline. SDR modems projects such as ADS-B, AIS, Airprobe and OpenBTS. Software Defined Radio – Practical Applications A beginners guide to Software Defined Radio development with GNURadio Course # D270 NEW!
  20. 20. 20 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.880520 – Vol. 123 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Course Outline 1. Introduction. Background and motivation (both scientific and political) for the rapid development of radar and SAR technology. 2. Fundamentals of Radar. The radar range equation, calculation and meaning of radar cross-section, target detection, waveform coding, thermal noise and other noise sources, RF/radar antennas and how they work, radar system block diagram. 3. Synthetic Aperture Radar Fundamentals. Description how a SAR works, synthetic aperture imaging, the difference between synthetic and real-aperture imaging, example SAR systems and performances. Various SAR modes will be described including stripmap, spotlight and various scan modes. Example SAR systems that employ these modes will be described. 4. SAR Phenomenology. SAR image interpretation, SAR layover, shadows, multi-path, types of SAR scattering: surface scattering, forward scattering, volume scattering, frequency dependency of RCS and other frequency dependent effects, SAR speckle, noise and noise sources, ambiguities (range and azimuth), visualization of SAR data. 5. SAR Systems. An overview of various SAR systems and illustrative imagery examples from those systems is presented. Both airborne and spaceborne systems are described along with their performance. 6. SAR Image Exploitation & Applications. Ways to extract information from SAR data. This section focuses on what kind of information can be derived from a single SAR image. Unique capabilities are highlighted as are various deficiencies. Further examples of exploitation using two and multiple images are described within the later sections. 7. Design-a-SAR. An interactive software tool will be used by the class to design a SAR system by setting SAR parameters such as desired resolution, power, acquisition geometry (including height and range), frequency, bandwidth, sampling rates, antenna size/gain, etc. Tool will enforce consistent SAR design constraints presented in class. Sensitivity of the resulting SAR data is calculated. This exercise clearly demonstrates the challenges and trade-offs involved when designing a SAR system for a particular mission. 8. SAR Polarimetry. Description of what polarimetry is in general, and how it can be used in the case of SAR. Examples of polarimetric SAR systems are described and example applications are presented. Single-polarization, dual-polarization and quad-polarization SAR is addressed. Compact polarization is also discussed in the context of SAR. 9. Coherent SAR Applications. Two images. SAR change detection, both coherent and incoherent. SAR interferometry for elevation mapping, SAR interferometry for measuring ground motion (differential interferometric SAR).Along-track interferometry for ocean applications and GMTI. Case study examples. 10. Coherent SAR Applications. Greater than two images. Sparse aperture processing for extraction of elevation data including 3D SAR point clouds, Coherent processing of stacks of data for estimation of scatterer motion over time, permanent scatterer (PS) interferometric techniques. Case study examples. 11. SAR Future. A description of upcoming SAR missions and systems and their capabilities. Description of key technologies and new approaches for data acquisition and processing. May 17-19, 2016 Pasadena, California $1890 (8:30am - 4:30pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 each Off The Course Tuition." Summary This three-day class will first set the historical context of SAR by tracing the rapid development of radar technology from the early part of the twentieth century through the 1950s when the Synthetic Aperture Radar techniques were first developed and demonstrated. A technical description of the important mathematical relationships to radar and SAR will be presented. The student will learn what radar cross- section is and how it applies to traditional radar and SAR. Fundamental equations governing SAR performance such as the radar range equation, SAR resolution equations, and SAR signal-to-noise equations will be developed and presented. We will design a simple SAR system in class and derive its predicted performance and sensitivities. A complete description of SAR phenomenology will be provided so that the student will better be able to interpret SAR imagery. Connections between SAR’s unique image characteristics and information extraction will be presented. Perhaps the most important and interesting material will be presented in the advanced SAR sections. Here topics such as SAR polarimetry and interferometry will be presented, along with the latest applications of these technologies. Many examples will be presented. What You Will Learn • Invention and early development of radar and SAR. • How a SAR collects data & how it is processed? • The “beautiful equations” describing SAR resolution. • What is radar cross-section? What is a SAR’s “noise equivalent sigma zero?” How do you calculate this? • Design-a-SAR: Interactive tool that shows predicted SAR performance based on SAR parameters. • SAR Polarimetry and applications. • SAR Interferometry and applications, including differential SAR and terrain mapping. Instructor Mr. Richard Carande, From 1986 to 1995 Mr. Carande was a group leader for a SAR processor development group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena California). There he was involved in developing an operational SAR processor for the JPL/NASA’s three-frequency, fully polarimetric AIRSAR system. Mr. Carande also worked as a System Engineer for the Alaska SAR Processor while at JPL, and performed research in the area of SAR Along- Track Interferometry. Before starting at JPL, Mr. Carande was employed by a technology company in California where he developed optical and digital SAR processors for internal research applications. Mr. Carande has a BS & MS in Physics from Case Western Reserve University. Synthetic Aperture Radar Course # D246

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