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These apps can make patients more apt to follow doctor’s orders

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The Smartphone app he's designing is supposed to help patients adhere to the recommendations of their doctors.

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These apps can make patients more apt to follow doctor’s orders

  1. 1. These apps can make patients more apt to follow doctor’s ordersThese apps can make patients more apt to follow doctor’s ordersAfter all, we can all use a little nudge to stay on track with a healthylifestyle.By Ann Tracy Mueller | Posted: October 5, 2011When the National Institutes of Health recently announced more than $140million in grants "to encourage creative ideas in science," C. Jason Wang,M.D., Ph.D. was among the 79 grant recipients.The Smartphone app hes designing is supposed to help patients adhere tothe recommendations of their doctors.Stanford School of Medicines Scope blog reports that Wang plans toconduct a study where patients will choose rewards that motivate them.During the study, participants will randomly be chosen to receive differenttypes of "nudges" encouraging healthy behavior, such as "remindermessages or information about the benefits of the good behavior." http://www.healthcarecommunication.com/Mobile/Articles/7643.aspx
  2. 2. These apps can make patients more apt to follow doctor’s ordersThe research will target these areas with poor treatment adherence: Flossing teeth Diet and exercise modification in obese patients Asthma treatment Diabetes treatment"This is the last mile of health-care delivery," Wang says in the Scope article."Doctors can follow treatment guidelines, but at the end of the day, ifpatients dont follow through, treatment recommendations are not going tobe effective."Apps for midlife and older adultsAnother Scope article tells of a Stanford team working on three smartphoneapps to "motivate midlife and older adults to improve daily health habits."The apps use the smartphones accelerometer, along with a custom programthat monitors when the user walks or runs.One app provides visual feedback of activity levels so users know "if theyremeeting daily healthy habit goals."Another app places participants in social groups with others who havesimilar goals, tracking progress as it compares them to others in the groups.And for those Angry Birds fans, the third app lets users "adopt a virtual petbird." The bird shows good or bad health symptoms based on its ownersdaily health habits.Do you know of behavior modification apps that work? How do you shareinformation on new apps with patients? http://www.healthcarecommunication.com/Mobile/Articles/7643.aspx
  3. 3. These apps can make patients more apt to follow doctor’s ordersWe have been witnessing the fast-paced advancements in the arena of smartphone apps over the past 2 years. Making it more intuitive and getting it closer tothe psicy of the user are going to be the differentiating factors in times to comefeels Dr. Chitalia of Acroseas Global Solutions. Can these apps make thepatient/consumer act on the results that pop up post interacting with the app?The day is not far away. http://www.healthcarecommunication.com/Mobile/Articles/7643.aspx

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