CHPA  Your Health at Hand: Perceptions of over-the-counter medicine in the U.S.                                           ...
Research Methodology                                         U.S. Adults, ages 18+             Who                        ...
Key Findings               3
Key Findings - PhysiciansOTC medicines are an important part of healthcare management• 93% of physicians agree that it is ...
Key Findings - Consumers                                  80% of consumers have used an over-the-counter medicine in the l...
Overview of OTCPerceptions                  6
Importance of OTC MedicinesConsumers and physicians agree that over-the-counter medicines are an important part of overall...
Evaluating Over-the-Counter Medicines   Both audiences also agree that OTCs are safe, effective medicines. Consumers are m...
First Responses to Adult Minor Ailments     81% of consumers use over-the-counter medicines as a first response to symptom...
First Responses to Children’s Minor Ailments   Over-the-counter medicine use is also the most common first response option...
Unnecessary Medical VisitsOn average, physicians believe about 10% of visits to their office result from minor ailments wh...
Increasing the Burden on Physicians  Most physicians believe the new FSA regulations, which require consumers to obtain a ...
Physicians DetailedFindings                  13
Physicians:Perceptions of OTC Medicines                     14
Importance of OTC Medicines Across Professional Roles  87% of physicians agree that over-the-counter medicines are importa...
Importance of OTC Medicines        Physicians recognize a number of different reasons that make over-the-counter medicines...
Importance of Other Health Care Options      Although a majority of physicians see OTCs as important, they are more likely...
Importance of Health Care Options for Uninsured Families     OTC medicines are just as important for uninsured families as...
Recommended First Responses to Minor Ailments      Physicians seen OTC medicines as a first response option for the treatm...
Recommended First Responses to Adult Minor Ailments  For adults, OTC medicines are the primary first response recommendati...
Recommended First Responses to Child Minor Ailments For children’s minor ailments, physicians (particularly internists and...
Prescriptions vs. OTCs In general, physicians view both prescription medicines and their OTC counterparts as safe and effe...
Benefits of OTC Medicines        Physicians recognize that the availability of OTC medicines benefits the patients, themse...
Physicians:Office Wait Times                    24
Office Visit Wait Times     More than half (57%) of physicians (including 50% of those practicing for over 10 years) belie...
Reasons for Changing Wait Times  In the near future, physicians predict that the growing PCP shortage and the resulting di...
Lengthening of Patient Wait Times    Physicians see the lengthening of wait times more significantly affecting patient sat...
Office Visits that Could be Avoided by OTC Medicines      On average, physicians say about 10% of office visits result fro...
Physicians:New FSA Legislation                      29
New FSA Legislation Effects   Most physicians believe the new FSA regulations, which require consumers to obtain a prescri...
Demographics                                                                                                       Total %...
Consumer DetailedFindings                32
Consumers:Self-Treatment of Minor Ailments                      33
Self-Treating Minor Ailments   Most US adults are comfortable treating their own minor ailments before seeking professiona...
Self-treating Children’s Minor Ailments     Parents in the US are also comfortable seeking their own treatments (including...
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.
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Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.

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Your Health at Hand Survey: Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medicine in the U.S.

  1. 1. CHPA Your Health at Hand: Perceptions of over-the-counter medicine in the U.S. November 24, 2010 1 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  2. 2. Research Methodology U.S. Adults, ages 18+ Who Practicing Physicians in the U.S. (Specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) Consumers (Gen Pop): n=1,000 • African American Oversample: n=200 How many • Hispanic Oversample: n=200 Physicians: n=500 Consumers (Gen Pop): ± 3.1% in 95 out of 100 cases Margin of • African American Oversample: ± 5.8% in 95 out of 100 Error cases • Hispanic Oversample: ± 5.8% in 95 out of 100 cases Physicians: ± 4.9% in 95 out of 100 cases Consumers: Telephone Survey How Physicians: Online Survey When Data collected between November 5, 2010 and November 15, 2010 2 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  3. 3. Key Findings 3
  4. 4. Key Findings - PhysiciansOTC medicines are an important part of healthcare management• 93% of physicians agree that it is important that medicines for minor ailments be available over the counter.• 87% of physicians believe OTC medicines are an important part of overall health care.OTC medicines help reduce the burden on medical professionals• On average, physicians say about 10% of office visits result from minor ailments which could be self-managed by patients, including by the use of OTC medicines.• 89% of physicians agree that responsible use of over-the-counter medicines can help to ease the burden on medical professionals.• 76% of physicians agree that the availability of over-the-counter medicines help make managing patient health easier. Physicians trust OTC medicines to help consumers safely and effectively care for their minor ailments • 92% of physicians believe OTC medicines are effective and 91% believe these medicines are safe. • 88% of physicians agree that they recommend patients try to address minor ailments with self-care interventions, including the use of OTC medicines, before seeking professional care. • Physicians are more likely to recommend over-the-counter medicines as a first response treatment option for adult’s minor ailments than options like calling a physician or scheduling a doctor’s appointment. 4 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010, involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  5. 5. Key Findings - Consumers 80% of consumers have used an over-the-counter medicine in the last yearOTC medicines provide consumers with affordable, accessible and convenient health care options• 86% of U.S. adults believe responsible, over-the-counter medicine use helps lower health care costs for people like them.• 68% of U.S. parents have given their child an OTC medicine late at night to help treat a sudden medical symptom.• 46% of U.S. adults who believe OTC medicines are important believe so because they do not need a doctor’s visit to use them.Consumers trust over-the-counter medicines to provide relief for minor ailments• 89% believe over-the-counter medicines are an important part of their overall family health care.• 81% of U.S. adults use OTC medicines as a first response to minor ailments.• U.S. adults believe over-the-counter medicines are just as safe and effective as prescription medicines when taken according to directions.Over-the-counter medicines empower consumers to take charge of their own health• 96% of U.S. adults believe over-the-counter medicines make it easy for individuals to care for minor medical ailments.• 93% of U.S. adults prefer to treat their minor ailments with over-the-counter medicines before seeking professional care.• 86% of U.S. adults agree that medical visits for minor ailments are unnecessary because of the availability of over-the- counter medicine.• 85% of U.S. parents prefer to treat their children’s minor ailments with an OTC medicine before seeking professional care. 5 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010, involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  6. 6. Overview of OTCPerceptions 6
  7. 7. Importance of OTC MedicinesConsumers and physicians agree that over-the-counter medicines are an important part of overall health care. These medicines are important because they empower consumers to effectively treat their own minor ailments, don’t require a doctor’s visit and are accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 46% A doctors visit isnt necessary to use them 89% 27% 87% They empower (patients/me) to treat minor health issues 44% (themselves/myself) 51% They can be purchased 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in a 39% variety of stores 26% 29% They are effective for many health issues 34% 25% They are less expensive than prescription medicines 17% OTC Medicines are Important 7% They dont require a health insurance claim 5% 6% They have fewer side-effects than prescription medicines 2% Consumers (Gen Pop) Physicians 7 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010, involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  8. 8. Evaluating Over-the-Counter Medicines Both audiences also agree that OTCs are safe, effective medicines. Consumers are more likely to see over-the-counter medicines as offering high value for the price. Consumers (Gen Pop) PhysiciansTop 2 Box: 92% 93% 78% Top 2 Box: 91% 92% 70%100% 100% Very 16% 80% 27% 80% Safe/Effective/High 30% 37% Value for the Price 18% 12% 60% 60% Somewhat Safe/Effective/High 40% Value for the Price 40% 76% 66% 60% 61% 58% 55% Somewhat 20% Unsafe/Ineffective/ 20% Low Value for the Price 0% 0% 7% 5% Very 9% 7% 2% 18% Unsafe/Ineffective/ 27% 1% 1% 4% Low Value for the Price -20%-20% Value for 3%-40% Safe Effective -40% the Price Safe Effective Value for the Price 8 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010, involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  9. 9. First Responses to Adult Minor Ailments 81% of consumers use over-the-counter medicines as a first response to symptoms of minor ailments for adults. OTC use is also the first response treatment recommended most by physicians. 81% 64% Consumers (Gen Pop) 62% 62% Physicians 48% 40% 27% 27% 28% 27% 26% 24% 22% 21% 13% 14% 1% 8% 5% 7% Use an OTC Seek other Use dietary Look up Call a family Schedule a Consult a Use Call a doctor Visit the medicine self- supplements symptoms member or doctor’s pharmacist alternative or for medical hospital or treatment or at-home online to friend for appointment holistic advice emergency options such remedies educate advice medicines or room as resting or themselves treatments special diet about possible conditions 9 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  10. 10. First Responses to Children’s Minor Ailments Over-the-counter medicine use is also the most common first response option for parents when their children display symptoms of minor ailments. However, parents are far more likely to suggest calling a doctor as a first response treatment for their children’s ailments than their own, which is the response physicians recommend most (41% and 47% respectively). 78% 63% 57% 47% 42% 45% 42% 42% 41% 34% Parents (Gen Pop) Physicians 22% 24% 20% 21% 20% 17% 14% 2% 3% 5% Use an OTC Seek other Use dietary Look up Schedule a Call a family Call a doctor Consult a Use Visit the medicine self- supplements symptoms doctor’s member or for medical pharmacist alternative hospital or treatment or at-home online to appointment friend for advice or holistic emergency options such remedies educate advice medicines or room as resting or themselves treatments special diet about possible conditions 10 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  11. 11. Unnecessary Medical VisitsOn average, physicians believe about 10% of visits to their office result from minor ailments which could be self-managed. More than one-quarter (28%) of consumers say they visited a doctor’s office for a medicalailment only to receive an over-the-counter medicine to treat it. Additionally, consumers agree that many office visits are actually unnecessary crediting both personal experience and the availability of OTC medicines. Medical visits for minor ailments are oftenunnecessary because I know from experience 90% More than 50% of my office visits how to self-diagnose and self-treat them result from minor ailments which 5% could be self-managed Medical visits for minor ailments are often unnecessary because of the availability of 86% 26% - 50% of my office visits result over-the-counter medicines from minor ailments which could 17% be self-managed 16% - 25% of my office visits result from minor ailments which could 32% be self-managed In the past 12 months, I have visited adoctors office for the sole purpose of getting 49% 5% - 15% of my office visits result or renewing a prescription from minor ailments which could 36% be self-managed In the past 12 months, I have visited a doctors office or hospital for a medical Less than 5% of my office visits ailment and received an over-the-counter 28% result from minor ailments which 9% medicine to treat it could be self-managed Consumers (Gen Pop) Physicians 11 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  12. 12. Increasing the Burden on Physicians Most physicians believe the new FSA regulations, which require consumers to obtain a prescription for over-the-counter medicines in order to be reimbursed for these expenses, will increase the burden on medical professionals. However, slightly more than one-third of consumers with an FSA say they are likely to seek a prescription for these medicines. Slightly Significantly increase the 20% increase the burden burden 30% 18% 63% 26% Not impact the burden 36% Significantly 7% Slightly reduce the reduce the burden burden 0% 0% Not at all likely Not very likely Somewhat likely Very likely 12 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  13. 13. Physicians DetailedFindings 13
  14. 14. Physicians:Perceptions of OTC Medicines 14
  15. 15. Importance of OTC Medicines Across Professional Roles 87% of physicians agree that over-the-counter medicines are important for overall health care.Those who self-identify as primary care physicians are more likely than internists or pediatricians to feel this way – particularly when thinking about uninsured families. Primary Care Physician Internist 95% Pediatrician 90% 88% 85% 83% 83% Overall health care Families without insurance 15 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  16. 16. Importance of OTC Medicines Physicians recognize a number of different reasons that make over-the-counter medicines an important part of health care including patient empowerment, reduced physician burden, OTC effectiveness and accessibility. 50% 93% of Physicians agree it is important that medicines for minor ailments are available over the counter. 39% 34% Primary Reason 29% 27% 25% Second Reason 22% 20% 17% 9% 10% 5% 2% 7% 21% 18% 1% 17% 14% 15% 2% 10% 1% 3%They empower My patients can They are A doctors visit They can be They are less They dont They have fewerpatients to treat avoid a doctors effective for isnt necessary to purchased 24/7 expensive than require a health side effects than minor health visit by safely many health use them prescription insurance claim prescription issues using OTCs issues medicines medicines themselves 16 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  17. 17. Importance of Other Health Care Options Although a majority of physicians see OTCs as important, they are more likely to see the importance in their own roles, preventative measures (like daily exercise), health insurance and prescription medicines as health care options. Still, the high levels of importance attributed to each indicate that all these elements, together, are important to overall health care. Top 2 Box (Strongly Agree; Somewhat Agree) Primary Care Physicians 90% 9% 1% 99% Daily Exercise 87% 12% 1% 99% Health Insurance 76% 20% 3% 1% 96% Prescription Medicines 67% 31% 2% 98% OTC Medicine 23% 64% 12% 1% 87% Multivitamins 13% 48% 32% 7% 61% Very important Somewhat important Not very important Not at all important 17 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  18. 18. Importance of Health Care Options for Uninsured Families OTC medicines are just as important for uninsured families as they are for overall patient health care in the eyes of these physicians. They still believe primary care and prescription are more important, even though these families are paying out of pocket. Important for overall health care OTCs 99% 98% 99% 97% 98% 96% 96% Important for overall health care for uninsured families 88% 87% 89% 61% 55% Primary Care Daily Exercise Prescription Health Insurance OTC Medicine Multivitamins Physicians Medicines 18 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  19. 19. Recommended First Responses to Minor Ailments Physicians seen OTC medicines as a first response option for the treatment for symptoms of minor ailments in both children and adults. In fact, OTC medicine use is the primary first response recommendation for adult symptoms. Physicians are more likely to suggest consulting with a doctor first for children’s symptoms. Although only about one-quarter (23%) of physicians consider OTC medicines as a very important part of overall family health care, most recommend these medicines as the first response to adults’62% symptoms of minor ailments more so than other treatments. 48% 47% 42% 34% 27% 27% 26% Adults 22% 20% 21% 17% Children 14% 13% 8% 2% 1% 5% 5% 3% Seek other Look up Call a family UseUse an OTC Use dietary Call a doctor Schedule a Consult a Visit the self-treatment symptoms online member or alternative or medicine supplements for medical doctor’s pharmacist hospital or options such to educate friend for holistic or at-home advice appointment emergency as resting or themselves about advice medicines or remedies room special diet possible treatments conditions 19 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  20. 20. Recommended First Responses to Adult Minor Ailments For adults, OTC medicines are the primary first response recommendation when it comes to minor ailments. In fact, physicians suggest a number of self-treatment measures to take before calling a69% doctor or scheduling an appointment. 61% 55% 53% 52% Primary Care Physician 34% 33% 32% 31% 31% Internal Medicine 26% Pediatrician 25% 23% 19% 20% 17% 15% 12% 13% 10% 10% 10% 5% 6% 4% 7% 6% 0% 4% 0%Use an OTC Use dietary supplements/at- Call a doctor Schedule a doctors appt Use alternative/holistic home remedies Look up medicinesUse an OTC Seek other Use dietary Call a doctor Call a family Schedule a Consult a Use Visit the symptoms medicine self- supplements for medical member or doctor’s pharmacist alternative or hospital or online to treatment or at-home advice friend for appointment holistic emergency educate options such remedies advice medicines or room themselves as resting or treatments about possible special diet conditions 20 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  21. 21. Recommended First Responses to Child Minor Ailments For children’s minor ailments, physicians (particularly internists and pediatricians) recommend that parents and caregivers call a doctor as their first response to symptoms. Although they prefer parents consult with physicians first, they still recognize OTCs as one of the first response options for these symptoms. 53% 52% 51% 41%39% 38% 36% 35% 27% Primary Care Physician 24% 23% 22% 23% 19% 20% 19% Internal Medicine 17% 16% 15% 15% 14% Pediatrician 11% 9% 7% 7% 2% 2% 1% 5% 7% 1% 3% 3%Call a doctorCall a doctor Seek other Use an OTC Use an OTC Look up Use dietary Call a family Schedule a appt Use dietary Schedule a doctors Search other Consult a Consult a pharmacist Use Visit the hospital/ER Visit thefor medical self- medicine symptoms online supplements member or supplements/at-home doctor’s information pharmacist alternative or hospital or advice treatment to educate remedies or at-home friend for appointment sources holistic emergency options such themselves remedies advice medicines or room as resting or about possible treatments special diet conditions 21 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  22. 22. Prescriptions vs. OTCs In general, physicians view both prescription medicines and their OTC counterparts as safe and effective andboth categories of medicines are seen as offering high value for the price. However, these positive perceptions are higher for prescription medicine. Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines100% 91% 92% 95% 98% 100% 16% 70% 79%80% 30% Very 80% Safe/Effective/High 34% 12% Value for the Price 17%60% 65% 60% Somewhat Safe/Effective/High40% 76% Value for the Price 40% 61% 58% Somewhat 61% 62%20% Unsafe/Ineffective/ 20% Low Value for the Price 33% 0% 9% 7% Very 0% 1% 5% 1% 27% Unsafe/Ineffective/ Low Value for the Price 19%-20% -20% 3% 2%-40% Safe Effective Value for the -40% Safe Effective Value for the Price Price 22 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010, involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  23. 23. Benefits of OTC Medicines Physicians recognize that the availability of OTC medicines benefits the patients, themselves as physicians and the health care system overall. 88% of Physicians recommend that patients try to address minor ailments with self-care interventions, including the use of OTC medicines, before seeking professional care. Patient Benefits Physician Benefits System Benefits 32% 19% 36% 35% 36% 57% 56% 54% 53% 57% 10% 5% 21% 10% 9% 2% 2% 3% 1% 2% Managing a patient’s Responsible use of OTC Responsible use of OTCOTC medicines contribute OTC medicines make it easy health is easier because of medicines can help to medicines helps lowerto patients’ ability to take for individuals to care for the availability of OTC ease the burden on health care costs in general care of their own health minor medical ailments medicines medical professionals Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Strongly Disagree 23 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010, involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  24. 24. Physicians:Office Wait Times 24
  25. 25. Office Visit Wait Times More than half (57%) of physicians (including 50% of those practicing for over 10 years) believe office wait times are longer now than they were 10 years ago. Another one-quarter believe wait times have remained unchanged. 46% 26% 15% 11% 2% Much longer Somewhat longer About the same as 10 Somewhat shorter Much shorter years ago 25 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  26. 26. Reasons for Changing Wait Times In the near future, physicians predict that the growing PCP shortage and the resulting disparitybetween the number of patients and the number of available physicians will cause office wait times to get even longer. Few (10%) believe wait times will get shorter. These physicians believe technology like electronic medical records and online scheduling will increase efficiency. Patient wait time will stay about the same 23% Patient wait time will get longer 67% Patient wait time will get shorter 10% 26 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  27. 27. Lengthening of Patient Wait Times Physicians see the lengthening of wait times more significantly affecting patient satisfaction than the effective practice of health care. Still, 95% see these longer wait times as a barrier to effective health care. Effective Health Care Patient Satisfaction 63% 46% 31% 29% 18% 7% 1% 5% Significant Barrier Moderate Barrier Minor Barrier Not a Barrier 27 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  28. 28. Office Visits that Could be Avoided by OTC Medicines On average, physicians say about 10% of office visits result from minor ailments which could be self-managed by patients, including by the use the of OTC medicines. 36% 32% 17% 9% 5% Less than 5% 5-15% 16-25% 26-50% More than 50% 28 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  29. 29. Physicians:New FSA Legislation 29
  30. 30. New FSA Legislation Effects Most physicians believe the new FSA regulations, which require consumers to obtain a prescription for over-the-counter medicines in order to be reimbursed for these expenses, will increase the burden on medical professionals. 63% Significantly increase the burden 60% 64% 37% 29% Slightly increase the burden 32% 30% Very likely 7% 39% Somewhat likely Not impact the burden 8% Not very likely 6% Primary Care Not at all likely Internal Medicine 0% 19% Significantly reduce the burden 0% Pediatrician 5% 0% Likelihood to write a prescription for an 0% OTC medicine Slightly reduce the burden 0% 0% 30 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  31. 31. Demographics Total % Total % Male 64% 18-24 0% Gender Female 36% 25-34 15% Primary Care Physician 43% 35-44 32% Professional Age Internal Medicine 21% 45-54 30% Role Pediatrician 36% 55-64 21% 1-5 15% 65+ 3% 6-10 22% Northeast 30% Years 11-15 21% Central 22% Practicing Region 16-24 23% South 30% 25+ 20% West 18% 31 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  32. 32. Consumer DetailedFindings 32
  33. 33. Consumers:Self-Treatment of Minor Ailments 33
  34. 34. Self-Treating Minor Ailments Most US adults are comfortable treating their own minor ailments before seeking professional care. They prefer to find their own solutions for their symptoms first and 93% prefer to treat themselves with an over-the-counter before going to a doctor. Comfort with using OTCs before seeking professional care is lower among African-Americans and Hispanics, but still over three-quarters of each group treat their ailments with OTCs before visiting a doctor. Top 2 Box (Strongly Agree; Somewhat Agree) African- Gen Pop Hispanic American I am comfortable making treatment decisions for my 78% 19% 2% 2% 97% 87% 81% minor ailments before seeking professional care I prefer to try to find a solution for my minor ailments 96% 83% 80% myself before seeking professional care 80% 16% 2% 1% I prefer to treat my minor ailments with an over-the- 72% 21% 3% 4% 93% 78% 76% counter medicine before seeking professional careIndividuals should try to treat minor ailments themselves 88% 75% 74% before seeking professional care 51% 37% 9% 3% Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Strongly Disagree 34 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010, involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.
  35. 35. Self-treating Children’s Minor Ailments Parents in the US are also comfortable seeking their own treatments (including over-the-counter medicines) for their children’ s minor ailments. However, Hispanic parents are far less likely than other groups to treat their child’s symptoms with OTCs before seeking professional care. Gen Pop African-American Hispanic I am comfortable making treatment 97% 87% 81% decisions for (my/my childrens) minor ailments before seeking professional care 91% 77% 64% I prefer to try to find a solution for 96% 83% 80% (my/my childrens) minor ailments myself before seeking professional care 87% 74% 61% I prefer to treat (my/my childrens) 93% 78% 76% minor ailments with an over-the- counter medicine before seeking professional care 85% 77% 57% My symptoms/ailments My childs symptoms/ailments 35 StrategyOne is a global strategic consulting firm that provides market research, media and conversation analytics, and competitive intelligence services. The Your Health At Hand (YHH) Survey, conducted from November 5–15, 2010,involved 1,000 U.S. consumers aged 18 or over with a margin-of-error of ± 3.1%, and 500 U.S. practicing physicians (specializing in primary care, internal medicine or pediatrics) with a margin-of-error of ± 4.9%. The survey was sponsored by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.

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