The Bristol Port Company
Bristol Deep Sea Container Terminal
Finding Consensus & Win-Win Solutions

Jerry Stanford
Haven M...
–
Bristol Maritime History
By the Middle Ages
Bristol City Docks
was a major port
Hazards of navigation
in the River Avon
...
The Evolution of Bristol Port
The Future

Royal Edward
Dock 1908

Bristol Deep Sea
Container Terminal

Royal Portbury
Dock...
The Bristol Deep Sea Container Terminal
•
•

Ultra large container ships

•

1.2 km long quay wall

•

15 x super post-Pan...
Capital Dredging and Disposal
• Deepen navigation channel & create turning /berth area
• Channel: 14m deep (below chart da...
BDSCT Compensation
The Severn Estuary is
designated for its
internationally important
marine habitats, birds &
other wildl...
Compensation
Scheme
•

192 ha site on Steart Peninsula

•

Creation of over 130 ha of intertidal
wetlands

•

More sustain...
A Transformational Project
•

Provide deep-water container capacity for UK on
the West Coast

•

Unrestricted access for d...
Environmental Impact Assessment
A full Environmental Impact Assessment was undertaken by a team of experts
in 2007 and 200...
Key Issues & Concerns
Environment

Ports & navigation

Fishing and Angling Activities

Traffic & Transport

Marine Aggrega...
Consultation & Agreement
• Regular meetings of sector interest groups throughout EIA process
• Pulling together regulators...
Environmental Issues & Concerns
•

Port worked in partnership with Natural England, RSPB & EA to develop a
Mitigation, Com...
Summary of Harbour Revision Order
Approval Process
2006-2008 – Design & Environmental Assessment

2008
• Harbour Revision ...
HRO Approval
In granting the HRO the Secretary of State
(SoS) concluded that:
•

There is an economic need for container
p...
Habitats Regulations Assessment
In considering impacts on European sites SoS concluded:
•

impacts agreed by Applicant, Na...
Summary of TBPC approach to developing in a
designated estuary
• Consult extensively throughout EIA process, setting up an...
Habitat Creation Partnerships
•

TBPC & RSPB - design & deliver habitat creation together
– RSPB’s extensive experience of...
Compensation Timescales
Assess development impacts and agree compensation requirement

2007-2008

Select compensation site...
The Way Forward?
•
•
•
•
•
•

•

Timing for progressing proposals is uncertain
Container shipping market yet to recover fr...
Conclusions
•

Effective consultation pays off – but takes
some effort for all concerned

•

Gradual building of consensus...
Thank you
jerry.stanford@bristolport.co.uk
http://www.bristolport.co.uk/
2013   06 bristol deep sea container terminal - jerry stanford
2013   06 bristol deep sea container terminal - jerry stanford
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2013 06 bristol deep sea container terminal - jerry stanford

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The Severn Estuary Forum is a key annual event in its eighth year and hosted by the Severn Estuary Partnership: an independent, estuary-wide initiative, involving all those interested in the management of the estuary, from planners to port authorities, fishermen to farmers.

This year’s Forum was opened by the Lord Mayor of Gloucester and supported by CIWEM. It focussed on a number of diverse topics, including the upper estuary; renewable energy possibilities; a review of the Severn Estuary Flood Risk Management Strategy; an overview of the operations and maintenance of the Severn River Crossings; Local Enterprise Partnerships; The Bristol Deep Sea Container Terminal; proposals for a Severnside Airport and Fisheries amongst others.

These engaging and exciting events are intended for all interested in learning about the latest research and policy developments dealing with the Severn Estuary and its future, and always guarantee a lively and informative day of presentations and talks. They offer a unique opportunity to learn from others, share ideas and participate in the management of the Severn Estuary.

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2013 06 bristol deep sea container terminal - jerry stanford

  1. 1. The Bristol Port Company Bristol Deep Sea Container Terminal Finding Consensus & Win-Win Solutions Jerry Stanford Haven Master
  2. 2. – Bristol Maritime History By the Middle Ages Bristol City Docks was a major port Hazards of navigation in the River Avon Roman Port at Sea Mills (Portus Abonae)
  3. 3. The Evolution of Bristol Port The Future Royal Edward Dock 1908 Bristol Deep Sea Container Terminal Royal Portbury Dock 1977 Avonmouth Dock 1877
  4. 4. The Bristol Deep Sea Container Terminal • • Ultra large container ships • 1.2 km long quay wall • 15 x super post-Panamax gantry cranes • 150 acre handling & storage area • Approved March 2010 1.5 million TEU per year (about 900,000 containers) Excellent road & rail links
  5. 5. Capital Dredging and Disposal • Deepen navigation channel & create turning /berth area • Channel: 14m deep (below chart datum) • Berth pocket: 18m deep (below chart datum) • 24 million cubic metres to be dredged • Sands & gravels used in construction • New disposal site in outer estuary
  6. 6. BDSCT Compensation The Severn Estuary is designated for its internationally important marine habitats, birds & other wildlife SAC – Special Area of Conservation SPA – Special Protection Area Ramsar – Wetlands of International Importance SSSI – Site of Special Scientific Interest Compensate for temporary adverse affect on designated intertidal habitat & birds here (sediment deposition & smothering) Compensate for loss of designated intertidal habitat here COMPENSATION OBJECTIVES: Create 120ha of Intertidal habitat in Severn Estuary Support over 3,000 birds over winter Habitat functioning before impact at Avonmouth
  7. 7. Compensation Scheme • 192 ha site on Steart Peninsula • Creation of over 130 ha of intertidal wetlands • More sustainable approach to managing flood risk & improved defences • Enhanced access network & education facilities • Partnership with RSPB • Together with Environment Agency’s project next-door, its one of largest created wetlands in UK (over 600ha) Approved April 2012
  8. 8. A Transformational Project • Provide deep-water container capacity for UK on the West Coast • Unrestricted access for deep-draft vessels • Enable the efficient distribution of cargo, reducing road miles and emissions • Maintain and improve Port’s standing, ensuring growth and providing new opportunities (creating about 1,500 new jobs) • Generate additional regional GDP and support developing local distribution market • Create new wetland habitat for both wildlife and people to enjoy long into the future
  9. 9. Environmental Impact Assessment A full Environmental Impact Assessment was undertaken by a team of experts in 2007 and 2008. Including potential impacts on the following: • Hydrodynamic & sediment regime • Ports & navigation • Water, soil & sediment quality • Recreation & tourism • Marine/Coastal Ecology & Ornithology • Traffic & transport • Nature Conservation • Noise & vibration • Archaeology & Heritage • Coastal protection & flood defence • Landscape & visual setting • Other activities (aggregate dredging, fishing)
  10. 10. Key Issues & Concerns Environment Ports & navigation Fishing and Angling Activities Traffic & Transport Marine Aggregates Archaeology & Heritage Photo: British Marine Aggregate Producers Association
  11. 11. Consultation & Agreement • Regular meetings of sector interest groups throughout EIA process • Pulling together regulators, statutory consultees, NGO’s and local interest groups • Objectives: – to fully inform – identify & address concerns each step of the way – gradually reach consensus (e.g from scoping & identifying potential impacts, to agreeing scale & consequence of impacts and finally developing proposed mitigation measures, monitoring programmes and where necessary required compensation measures) Overall aim was that when the Environmental Statement was submitted there was NO SURPRISES for stakeholders or the port
  12. 12. Environmental Issues & Concerns • Port worked in partnership with Natural England, RSPB & EA to develop a Mitigation, Compensation & Monitoring Agreement • In consultation with CCW, Cefas, Avon Wildlife Trust and Bristol City Council – Legal agreement implementing Habitats Regulations – Agreed statement of impacts on Severn Estuary – Commitment to the implementation of: • • • • an agreed outline mitigation plan a compensation scheme with agreed objectives an agreed outline monitoring plan an Environmental Steering Group
  13. 13. Summary of Harbour Revision Order Approval Process 2006-2008 – Design & Environmental Assessment 2008 • Harbour Revision Order and Environmental Statement submitted to DfT - July • 42 day statutory consultation period • Addressing concerns and objections • Agreements reached & all objections removed by end of year 2009 - Public Inquiry planned for January cancelled 2010 - HRO granted – March Very rare for a Major Port Development not to have a Public Inquiry
  14. 14. HRO Approval In granting the HRO the Secretary of State (SoS) concluded that: • There is an economic need for container port expansion at Bristol to help meet national need • Assisting market flexibility & resilience by providing capacity outside SE England and closer to main inland freight destinations • Reducing inland journey miles and saving fuel and carbon emissions • Global economic downturn has deferred (but not removed) need for additional capacity
  15. 15. Habitats Regulations Assessment In considering impacts on European sites SoS concluded: • impacts agreed by Applicant, Natural England & RSPB • it cannot be ascertained there will not be an adverse impact • there are imperative reasons of overriding public interest why the works should be permitted • no other alternative within the Applicant’s control is more suitable for meeting the identified need • adequate compensation measures can be secured to offset the adverse impact on European and international sites of conservation importance
  16. 16. Summary of TBPC approach to developing in a designated estuary • Consult extensively throughout EIA process, setting up an Environmental Steering Group (ESG) of regulators and key NGOs at the start • Try to design a project and mitigation measures to avoid/reduce adverse affects wherever possible • Accept from onset that mitigation for loss of designated intertidal habitat is probably not possible and requirement for compensation is likely • Start to investigate possible compensation schemes early in process • Develop a Mitigation, Compensation and Monitoring Agreement to formalise the process in partnership with key environmental regulators and NGO’s • Investigate opportunities for a partnership approach in designing, delivering and managing the compensation schemes
  17. 17. Habitat Creation Partnerships • TBPC & RSPB - design & deliver habitat creation together – RSPB’s extensive experience of planning, designing, delivering & managing wetland creation projects throughout the UK – Optimisation of ecological design for birds and other wildlife – Providing enhanced access and observation areas, whilst minimising visitor disturbance – Long-term site management & maintenance (including opportunities for sustainable farming, education and training) – Win-win: for Port, wildlife and local communities • TBPC & EA – cooperation over 2 compensation schemes – Masterplan for consistency and integration between two projects, enabling delivery of schemes in a phased approach – Additional joint mitigation e.g. New sea wall protecting road to village – Joint surveys/assessments e.g. ecology, archaeology & visitors – Developing mutually beneficial solutions to shared problems
  18. 18. Compensation Timescales Assess development impacts and agree compensation requirement 2007-2008 Select compensation site, secure land options & scoping/feasibility 2008-2009 Design Scheme, Environmental Impact Assessment & Consultation 2010-2011 Secure planning permissions 2012-2013 Secure funding for BDSCT and associated Compensation Scheme ? We are here Compensation construction (1 to 2 years) Indicative* 2015/2016? Created habitat develops to provide functioning habitat (2 winters) Indicative* 2016/2017? * Indicative dates depend on construction start – earliest dates shown – currently delayed pending funding of BDSCT and recovery of global container market Around 8-10 year process for 130ha compensation scheme on a site where consultation had been taking place for many years in advance and land owners & stakeholders generally supportive Planning and delivering compensation schemes take long periods of time Implications for other large development proposals in the Severn Estuary?
  19. 19. The Way Forward? • • • • • • • Timing for progressing proposals is uncertain Container shipping market yet to recover from global recession & need improvement to secure funding Construction at Steart & Avonmouth unlikely to start within next few years Construction consents valid until 2020 As soon as there is a definitive view on when we will proceed, TBPC will write to all stakeholders & publicise in the local media Once decision is made to proceed much work has to be done prior to construction: – Detailed construction planning and programmes – Obtaining further consents and licences – Agreeing details of mitigation & monitoring plans We trust we can count on your continued co-operation when the time comes
  20. 20. Conclusions • Effective consultation pays off – but takes some effort for all concerned • Gradual building of consensus and trust - no surprises • Challenges of limited resources & consultation overload • Partnership approaches between developers, regulators & NGOs work: – negotiating agreements to address concerns – in planning and delivering compensation schemes – delivering real benefits & better environmental and socio-economic outcomes (win-win) – avoiding expensive public inquiries is in everyone’s interests – if possible
  21. 21. Thank you jerry.stanford@bristolport.co.uk http://www.bristolport.co.uk/

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