Odd pp 4.24.13

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  • This is a self-instructional PPT on Oppositional Defiant Disorder and how to deal with it in the classroom.
  • Dr. Rob Horner and Dr. George Sugai (Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports) www.pbis.org The focus
  • These are fighting words to kids with ODD. These words will send them straight to brain stem.
  • Go to www.behaviordoctor.org/files/tools/0809studentteacherratingscale.doc for directions and more examples of how to use this form.
  • http://www.pbis.org/files/newwebfiles2008/adminlicense/05BEPCICO.ppt Check out a PowerPoint from Rob Horner, George Sugai, Anne Todd, Celeste Rossetto Dickey, Cindy Anderson, Terry Scott
  • Based on Dr. Ann Corwin’s DVD “The Child Connection” (2006) She says you must do three things to make a relationship: Touch- talk- make eye contact- Bhaerman, R.D. & Kopp, K.A. (1988) says: A student is less likely to drop out of school if one adult other than their teacher knows and uses their name. I say a smile is a tool that is underused in schools today. It seems like walking through the school and listening to adults that a great majority are not happy in their current position. This is based on comments heard while walking through halls.
  • Use a secret code to let them know their behavior is inappropriate. I used “I spy someone sitting up straight and tall.” I would then say, “You just earned the class a compliment point.” My eyes always looked in a general direction but not at any one student. That way there were 8 students who swore I was talking about them. As soon as I saw the target student doing appropriate behavior, I would look specifically at that child and say “I spy someone sitting up straight and tall. You just earned the class a compliment.” I didn’t say the student’s name but everyone sitting around them knew exactly who earned the points. Compliments were points that accumulated to a magic number that earned different rewards, like extra recess, or less homework problems..things like that. The secret code was “If I say the word “I SPY” whatever I say next is what I want you to do.
  • For example: If tomorrow we will be learning how to square numbers, then teach to mastery the first one the day before. Teach them that 4 squared is 4 x 4 and that is 16. Make sure they know the answer to the first one. This will increase the odds that they will be able to do the next one and feel successful.
  • I was waiting for a parking space at the grocery store. I had my turn signal on and it was very clear I was waiting for the spot. A lady coming from the other direction knew I’d have to wait for the car pulling out to clear before I could turn so she whipped in and took my spot. I was so mad at first- but then I thought “what good would it do me to say something to this stinky old lady?” I turned on a good song and sat in my car for a few minutes once I found a spot and then went in when I was calm. I tried to do two nice things for other people while I was in there- like letting someone with only a few items get in front of me at the check-out and telling the guy bagging my groceries how much I appreciated him putting all the frozen things in one bag without my asking. It really helped.
  • Gary Lamb makes music set at 60 beats per minute which is our resting heart rate. When it appears a child is revving up their engine due to some misunderstanding- play 60 beats per minute music and talk them down.
  • Do not picture a big pink elephant- don’t do it Do not picture a big pink fluffy elephant with a purple magician’s hat- don’t do it Whatever you do, do not picture a big pink fluffy elephant with a purple magician’s hat and orange toenails- don’t do it. You can’t not imagine it can you?
  • Come in from the rear and whisper in their ear- don’t make reprimands public.
  • Odd pp 4.24.13

    1. 1. I’m not ODD; I justhave OppositionalDefiant DisorderLaura A. Riffel, Ph.D.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    2. 2. What’s the difference?• Conduct Disorder is a relentless pattern ofconduct in which the basic rights of othersand key age-appropriate societal norms orrules are violated.• Oppositional Defiant Disorder is a patternof negativistic, aggressive, and defiantbehavior without the more seriousviolations of the basic rights of others thatare seen in conduct disorder.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    3. 3. How do we teachchildren withOppositionalDefiantDisorder?Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    4. 4. First Step:• Change your mindset:– These are not problem behaviors or badbehaviors….– These are behaviors you would like to “target”for change.• When you say words like “bad behaviorand problem behavior”, a perception of thechild forms in your mind. BAD KID-PROBLEM KID- Get the kid out of here.• The child is okay; it is just the behavior youwould like to go away- so target it.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    5. 5. Design a Multimodal Treatment• One intervention is not going to changethe child’s behavior.• You will need:– Antecedent modifications• Things you do before a behavior has a chance toshow up• You determine when those need to be employed bylooking at behavior patterns:– Time of day– Day of the week– Contexts, settings, subjects being presented, certainpeers being around, certain adults being around etc.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    6. 6. Multimodal design continued• You will need to teach replacementbehaviors:– This child has learned that certain behaviorshave a pay off• The child will have to be taught ways to releaseanger and frustration in socially appropriate ways.• We cannot just tell them to “be good”, we have toactually give them techniques that will help them dosomething different.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    7. 7. Multimodal design continued• You will need to make consequencemodifications:– Everyone hates this one because it is “Whatwill you do different when the behavioroccurs?”• We don’t like to think about changing ourselves.• How will we avoid paying off with attention or escapefrom work consequences and yet still manage thebehavior?• How do we refrain from going to brain stem?Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    8. 8. Discipline withouta relationshipleads to rebellion.Dr. Josh McDowellRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    9. 9. Let’s look at thereason behindbehavior first:Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    10. 10. Functions in BehaviorPositive Reinforcement• To get:– Attention• Adults• Peers– Access to:• Materials• SensoryNegative Reinforcement• To escape:– Work– Adults– Peers– Sensory Overload– Pain• Emotional• PhysicalRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    11. 11. How to CARE for behavior• Control– How can I make it appear the child has more controlover situations?• Attention– Does the child want the adult attention or peer attention?• Revenge– What social skills can we give the child to help themrefrain from reactive strategies?• Escape– Why does the child want to get out of work or get awayfrom a situation? (low self-esteem, inadequate skills,etc.)Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    12. 12. Functional Behavior Assessment- FBARiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changesWhat behaviordo you want totarget forchange?What settingor contexttypicallyprecedes thisbehavior?What is thepayoff for thechild?What behaviorcould replacethis behavior?What couldyou doproactivelythat wouldchange this?What can theadults dodifferent toavoid payingoff?
    13. 13. Functional Behavior Assessment- FBARiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changesSaying “F..ingB….ch” outloud in class.Assignment towriteparagraphs ona topic.Gets sent tooffice; whichallows him toescape.Writing a3-2-8-paragraphafter beingtaught.Pre-teach awritingtechnique inprivate.Let them earnsome freehomework passesfor appropriatework.
    14. 14. The multi-modal plan:• Does not just put one statement in place:– Consider if your doctor said, “Get better.”– No different to tell a child with a medicaldiagnosis to “Be Good.” (it only works for ET)Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    15. 15. Let’s look atsome specificexamples:Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    16. 16. School-wide PBIS• The focus of Sw-PBIS is on teachingappropriate behavior by the TIPP method:–Teach the behavior–Imprint the behavior by modeling it for thestudents–Practicing the behavior–Praising the behavior when you see it.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    17. 17. Label appropriate behavior• Instead of telling the child what “NOT” todo- tell them what to do by labeling it whenyou see it.– I like the way you….(the more you say- themore you’ll see.)• Get rid of the totalitarian rules:– Don’t __________– No ____________– Quit ____________– Stop ____________Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    18. 18. Sticks and Stones• Children with Oppositional DefiantDisorder need to learn bonding strategiesin order to build relationships:– Teach the ODD child to respond to othersrather than react to others.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    19. 19. Teach the “I” strategy for Independence• Share the emotion (feeling)• Explain the why (the cause)• Make a request (the solution)• I feel frustrated when I don’t know theanswer to a question. Please teach me atrick to make it easy.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    20. 20. Cool down technique for YOU• Children with ODD seem to be able tosend us from frontal cortex to brain stem in20 seconds flat.• This happens because we have beentrained to think, “I must react immediatelyto this situation because that’s what wedo.”• The truth is…we don’t think best when weare upset.• Train yourself to do the following:Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    21. 21. Use the late night host technique• If you don’t have enough information yetask an open ended question like:– “Tell me more.”Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    22. 22. When you do deal with it….• Handle all problems with compassion first.– “Oh, man I can totally understand why you feltlike doing that.– But the rules for that are x,y, and z at thisschool.– So we’ll see you in detention on what day?– After that, let’s get together and talk.– Be sure to come see me the next day.”Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    23. 23. Use a Point System• How many of you collect frequent flyermiles or reward points for hotels?• It makes you want to engage in aparticular behavior.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    24. 24. Student-Teacher Rating FormDate:Student Hour One Hour Two Hour Three Hour Four Hour Five Hour SixRespectSelfRespectOthersRespectPropertyTotalPoints3= Great Day- No or very few behavioral learning opportunities occurred2= Pretty Good Day- few behavioral learning opportunities occurred1= This day could have been better- more than a few behavioral learning opportunities occurredStudent Signature: _________________________________________________Teacher Signature: _________________________________________________Parents Signature: _________________________________________________For younger students use smiling faces:Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    25. 25. Check In- Check Out Program• The most critical factor influencing thedevelopment of prosocial behavior is theattachment to at least one prosocial adultwho believes in the child and providesunconditional acceptance and support• (Horner et.al., 2008; Hawkins, 1995; Bernard,1995; Brooks, 1994; & Katz, 1995)Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    26. 26. ODD- First instinct is to not trust adults• TUMS for the ODD Child:–Touch them- High five or gentle touch on forearmwhen talking to them. Message: We touch people welike.–Use their name–Make eye contact–SmileRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    27. 27. Focus on the Four “P’s”• Public Relations• Proficiency• Power• PhilanthropyRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    28. 28. Public Relations• All children need to feel that they belong.• Be their public relations person by lettingtheir appropriate behavior earn the class areward.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    29. 29. Proficiency• Many behavioral issues occur because thestudent feels inadequate academically.• Pre-teach part of the lesson in a studysession, an online learning lab, orresource room.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    30. 30. Power• Give the child the power to control theirdestiny by giving them independence.• Using options, teaching them to think“How’s this next decision going to affectme?”Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    31. 31. Philanthropy• You will be surprised that these studentsare generally great working with youngerstudents or students with disabilities.– Their behavior is typically more appropriatewith younger and less able students.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    32. 32. Cooking Spray- Be “PAM”• Don’t let words from other students stick toyou. Be:–Proactive not reactive–Affirmative–Move AwayRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    33. 33. Proactive not reactive• Teach the child to have a plan to keepthemselves in frontal cortex:– Teach them breathing techniques– Give them an outlet for tensing muscles suchas a stress ball they keep in their pocket– Teach them how to go to their “zen” placeRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    34. 34. Affirmative• Teach the child to tell themselves positivestatements:– I can handle this.– I am better than this.– This is not worth losing privileges over.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    35. 35. Move Away• Teach the child to say something like:– “Thanks for sharing your opinion and moveaway.”• Teach the child to not make eye contactwhen saying the above statement.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    36. 36. Ice it down….• Know how you can add ice to a hot cup of cocoaand it cools it down to “just right”? Or ice aninflamed muscle and it calms down.• Learn what to say to bring the child down to “justright.”• For example:– If the child likes to set up the overhead projector and yousee they are about to go over the edge, ask them to setup the overhead projector for you.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    37. 37. Music calms the inner “beast”• We all have times when our inner beastcomes out.– Share with the student what you do….Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    38. 38. 60 beats per minute• Our resting heart rate is 60 beats perminute– Heart rates during aggressive behaviors reachas high as 147 beats per minute and theyreach that rate a full 45-90 seconds prior to theaggressive behaviorRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    39. 39. Rules for parents & teachers• Have clear expectations- not rules– Don’t say don’t, stop, quit, or noRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    40. 40. Keep the expectations simple and positive• Respect Relationships• Respect ResponsibilitiesRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    41. 41. Routines• Changes in routine can be justas upsetting to a child withODD as to a child withAsperger Syndrome or Autism• Stick to the routine and letthem know about changes inadvance.• Give them “heads up”reminders– When the music stops you willhave two minutes before the bell.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    42. 42. Q-TIP• Get yourself a Q-tip– (Quit Taking It Personally)– You are not the cause of the defiance- you arean outlet for the childRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    43. 43. Find out what floats their boatRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    44. 44. Focus on StrengthsRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permission to copy with no changes
    45. 45. Be ColumboRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    46. 46. KISS• Don’t give a lot of words….blah, blah, blah– Be quick, be quiet, be goneRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    47. 47. Love Notes• Children with ODD will do the opposite ofwhat you want if you tell the world they aredoing a “good job”. Give them love notesprivately telling them what they did well.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    48. 48. You catch more flies with….• Never yell at a child with ODD- rememberNewton’s Law of Inertia?– A body persists in its state of … uniform motionunless acted upon by an external unbalancedforce.” In other words, if a child is yelling, thenyelling at them is not going to change theirbehavior.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    49. 49. Safe place• Have a place for the child to go if theyabsolutely need to- do not call it “time out”and do not use it as a punishment• One school I visited had the igloo room. Itwas staffed and students could go there tode-puff when they were ready to explode.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    50. 50. Parents- take turns• The wiggling pinky….it’s my last nerve soit’s your turn….– Have a signal- have someone you can talk to.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    51. 51. Communication between home and school• Work out a signal between home andschool about how the child went out thedoor- both ends.• This lets the other end get prepared andhave some techniques ready to go– Dimmed lights– 60 beats per minute music– Lavender oilRiffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes
    52. 52. References• Riley, D. (1997). The defiant child: A parent’s guide to oppositional defiant disorder.Dallas: Taylor Publishing.• Kern, L., Bambara, L., & Fogt, J. (2002). Class-wide curricular modifications toimprove the behavior of students with emotional or behavioral disorders. BehavioralDisorders, 27, 317-326.Mayer, G.R. (2000). Classroom management: A California resource guide. LosAngeles, CA: Los Angeles County Office of Education and California Department ofEducation.Miller, K.A., Gunter, P.L., Venn, M.J., Hummel, J., & Wiley, L.P. (2003). Effects ofcurricular and materials modifications on academic performance and taskengagement of three students with emotional or behavioral disorders. BehavioralDisorder, 28, 130-149.Riffel, L.A. (2009)© - permissionto copy with no changes

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