InteropNet LV 2013Intro to Wide Area Routing1Network Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342...
Agenda• Introduction• Review concepts• Goals of BGP• BGP in Practice• ConclusionNetwork Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace...
Introduction• The Internet is made up of a bunch of differentorganizations– Big ISPs– Little ISPs– Enterprises• Everyone n...
Concept Review• What is routing?– Forwarding• Every packet has a destination IP address• Address is looked up in the local...
Goals of BGP• Tell your organization’s neighbors about thedestinations you are able to reach• Provide controls to influenc...
BGP Concepts• AS– An autonomous system is a network typicallycontrolled by a single entity, usually one percompany– Assign...
BGP Concepts• iBGP (internal BGP)– Distributes information throughout your AS– All iBGP routers must talk directly to all ...
BGP Concepts• eBGP (external BGP)– eBGP is used to speak to your network neighbors,usually your upstream transit provider–...
BGP in practice• Globally all ISPs “peer” with each other• An entire ecosystem has developed aroundBGP peering, mostly bas...
Routing Table Growth• Size of the global routing table is currentlyaround 455,000 routes for v4 and 12,600 v6routes• Deple...
Network Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Introduction to Wide Area Network Routing

687 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
687
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
289
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Introduction to Wide Area Network Routing

  1. 1. InteropNet LV 2013Intro to Wide Area Routing1Network Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2012,Network Utility Force LLC Companyconfidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only
  2. 2. Agenda• Introduction• Review concepts• Goals of BGP• BGP in Practice• ConclusionNetwork Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2012,Network Utility Force LLC Companyconfidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 2
  3. 3. Introduction• The Internet is made up of a bunch of differentorganizations– Big ISPs– Little ISPs– Enterprises• Everyone needs to exchange traffic with everyoneelse…mostly• Need to be able to create policy for how traffic issent and received, over what paths and deal withredundancyNetwork Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013,Network Utility Force LLC Company confidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 3
  4. 4. Concept Review• What is routing?– Forwarding• Every packet has a destination IP address• Address is looked up in the local router’s routing table (FIB –Forwarding Information Base)• Packet is routed (forwarded) out the proper interface– Routing Protocol• Proscribes a method for how routes get into the FIB• Many are available that fulfill different needs and situations– Static– IGP» RIP» EIGRP» OSPF & ISIS– EGP» BGPNetwork Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013,Network Utility Force LLC Company confidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 4
  5. 5. Goals of BGP• Tell your organization’s neighbors about thedestinations you are able to reach• Provide controls to influence the path traffictakes to get to you as well as how it leavesyour network• Distribute global routing informationthroughout your network• Easily filter what you send and what youreceiveNetwork Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013,Network Utility Force LLC Company confidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 5
  6. 6. BGP Concepts• AS– An autonomous system is a network typicallycontrolled by a single entity, usually one percompany– Assigned a 4 byte (was 2 byte) number to identifyit, an ASNNetwork Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013,Network Utility Force LLC Company confidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 6
  7. 7. BGP Concepts• iBGP (internal BGP)– Distributes information throughout your AS– All iBGP routers must talk directly to all otherrouters or use scalability features such as routereflectors or confederations– iBGP is NOT an IGP, it is not intended to tell everyrouter about the paths in your AS, instead it tellsrouters about global connectivity– You must still run an IGP such as OSPF, as BGPdepends on it for local connectivityNetwork Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013,Network Utility Force LLC Company confidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 7
  8. 8. BGP Concepts• eBGP (external BGP)– eBGP is used to speak to your network neighbors,usually your upstream transit provider– Your network neighbors use eBGP to send yourouting information about reachability in the restof the worldNetwork Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013,Network Utility Force LLC Company confidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 8
  9. 9. BGP in practice• Globally all ISPs “peer” with each other• An entire ecosystem has developed aroundBGP peering, mostly based on the amount oftraffic exchanged• Exchanges where multiple service providerscome together are located in many majorcities across the world, known as IX (InterneteXchange)Network Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013,Network Utility Force LLC Company confidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 9
  10. 10. Routing Table Growth• Size of the global routing table is currentlyaround 455,000 routes for v4 and 12,600 v6routes• Depletion of IPv4 address space may cause“deaggregation” of the IPv6 global routingtable, which could result in explosive growth• Growth of IPv6 also could result in rapidgrowth of the global routing tableNetwork Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013,Network Utility Force LLC Company confidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 10
  11. 11. Network Utility Force LLC, 15 Wieuca Trace Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia, 30342 -- +1-404-635-6667 -- sales@netuf.net © 2013,Network Utility Force LLC Company confidential information, transmittal to third parties by prior permission only 11Brandon Ross – Chief Network Architect – Network Utility Force – bross@netuf.net

×