Health and safety training standards and requirements    for personnel in the offshore wind power industryIntroductionWith...
RenewableUK (formerly the BWEA) studies in 2008 showed that 5,000 people wereemployed in the UK in the wind power industry...
pressure; low voltage electricity; and substances such as chemicals and lubricants. Theelectro-mechanical systems are cons...
They found that the predominant injury was a fracture, and that younger workers wereinvolved in fewer incidents than older...
References    (1) http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/ewea_documents/documents/publications/Wind_at_        work_FINAL.pdf    (2...
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Health and safety training standards and requirements for personnel in the offshore wind power industry

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Health and safety training standards and requirements for personnel in the offshore wind power industry

  1. 1. Health and safety training standards and requirements for personnel in the offshore wind power industryIntroductionWith the rapid growth of the wind power industry in recent years, and the expectedcontinued expansion to meet EU targets by 2050, the sector is in danger of suffering a skillsshortage throughout the various types of employment within the industry.The EWEA’s wind at work report of 2009 (1) concluded that on average 15.1 jobs for a yearare created in the EU for every MW of power installed per year, and 0.4 long term jobs arecreated per MW of cumulative capacity in operations and maintenance and other activities.The EWEA data from 2007 showed that 108,000 people were employed in the wind industrythroughout the EU; 37% of which were employed by wind turbine manufacturers and 22%by component suppliers. The report also estimated that a further 42,000 people wereemployed indirectly as a result of the wind energy industry; making it responsible for150,000 jobs in total. That figure is expected to double by 2020, based on estimates of atotal of 180GW of installed wind power, and half of those jobs are expected to be basedoffshore.Source: Siemens press picture----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3330 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3263 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit IQPC for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses, seminars and conferences: www.iqpc.de
  2. 2. RenewableUK (formerly the BWEA) studies in 2008 showed that 5,000 people wereemployed in the UK in the wind power industry (2). With an expected increase to 34GW ofinstalled power by 2020, the employment figure is estimated to rise to 57,000. Among theprofessions to be singled out as being in danger of a shortage were health and safetyspecialists.With the increase in wind energy continuing over the coming decades the shortage ofskilled staff is an issue which the industry must address, and one of the key issues withinthat shortage is developing not only the safety standards for these employees to work to,but the professionals to implement and uphold those standards.Wind energy specific health and safety issuesDue to the specific nature of the operation of a wind farm there are several issues thatrelate particularly to the wind industry, although some of the types of work, and thereforeguidelines, can be borrowed from other more established industries. RenewableUK is one ofthe leading organisations in Europe in terms of training for health and safety on offshorewind farms. It details some of the specific issues in its model training course, designed toassist with training to aid implementation of the WTSR’s (Wind Turbine Safety Rules) (3),and in its Approved training standard for ‘Working at Height and Rescue – Wind Turbines’(4).The model training course breaks down the areas of health and safety to be considered intoto clear sections: • The wind turbine, its plant, and its associated low voltage (LV) infrastructure. Low voltage means equal to, or less than 1000V AC / 1500V DC. The WTSR’s apply to this section. • The high voltage (HV) infrastructure, where high voltage is greater than 1000V AC / 1500V DC. Separate HV rules apply to this section.The plant includes the mechanical parts, and the low voltage apparatus includes theelectrical parts. Safety issues within these systems include rotating parts, temperature and----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3330 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3263 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit IQPC for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses, seminars and conferences: www.iqpc.de
  3. 3. pressure; low voltage electricity; and substances such as chemicals and lubricants. Theelectro-mechanical systems are considered to be relatively simple and are virtually identicalin each turbine. They are usually operated on by small working parties, often in isolatedlocations; and most of the work is isolated to one turbine not affecting others on the windfarm. The dangers are associated with either the system itself or the work environment andin the vicinity of the work yet not related to the actual tasks being carried out.The ‘Working at Height and Rescue’ approved training standards cover wind turbine specificissues such as, pre-entry, entry, ascending and descending within the tower and base,working in the yaw platform, and working in or on the nacelle. The training standardsinclude detail on the use of harnesses, work positioning, work restraint, inertia reels,lanyards and shock absorbers (including calculation of clearance distances), placement ofanchors and suitability of anchor points, CE markings and applicable EN standards, theprinciples and methods of 100% attachment, and working at height PPE and restraintequipment. The standards also set out training on emergency rescue techniques related towind turbines, including the selection, inspection and use of rescue equipment, rescuetechniques for recovery of a casualty (both conscious and unconscious) from a verticalladder and from the nacelle side, rescue from within or on the side of the hub, and casualtyhandling techniques.Common types of offshore incidentsThe Offshore Safety Division (OSD) produced a report for the Health and Safety laboratoryin 2009, relating to the underlying causes of offshore incidents (5). The aim of which was toidentify the causes of offshore incidents which resulted in fatalities, major injuries andmajor dangerous occurrences, and to determine any trends arising from the research. Theyanalyzed 67 major incidents, of which 5 resulted in fatalities and 62 resulted in majorinjuries. The findings are of benefit to the wind industry as it looks to improve on the healthand safety measures it can take to prevent these types of occurrence.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3330 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3263 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit IQPC for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses, seminars and conferences: www.iqpc.de
  4. 4. They found that the predominant injury was a fracture, and that younger workers wereinvolved in fewer incidents than older workers. 11 were aged 21-30, 18 from 31-40, 17from 41-50, and 15 from the 51-60 age group. It was also noted that the majority of theinjured parties, 42, worked for a contractor, where only 25 worked for the installationoperator.The most common incidents were: • Struck by a moving, flying or falling object; the injury sustained by the impact. • Injured while handling, lifting or carrying equipment. • Falls from height. • Slips or falls on the same level.The most common underlying causes of reported incidents were interpreted as: • Inadequate risk assessment or hazard analysis. • Lack of supervision. • Lack of, or inadequate operating procedures. • Inadequacies in permit-to-work.The report recommended targeted inspection activity in several issues; permit-to-work,supervision, monitoring, audit and review, operating procedures, planning andimplementation, reference to MHSWR (Management of Health and Safety at WorkRegulations), and reference to LOLER (Lifting Operations and Lifting EquipmentRegulations). Want to learn more about health and safety standards for the offshore wind power industry? Visit our download centre for more articles, white papers and interviews: http://bit.ly/hse-offshore----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3330 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3263 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit IQPC for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses, seminars and conferences: www.iqpc.de
  5. 5. References (1) http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/ewea_documents/documents/publications/Wind_at_ work_FINAL.pdf (2) http://www.thecrownestate.co.uk/round3_supply_chain_gap_analysis.pdf (3) http://www.bwea.com/pdf/safety/WTSR-007.pdf (4) http://www.bwea.com/pdf/safety/RenewableUK_WAH_2010_v5.pdf (5) http://www.hse.gov.uk/offshore/offshore-incidents.pdf----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3330 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3263 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit IQPC for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses, seminars and conferences: www.iqpc.de

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