Resourcestempest

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Resourcestempest

  1. 1. Extract Two Prospero, Ariel and CalibanConsider Prosperos treatment of ArielPROSPERO Hast thou, spirit, Performd to point the tempest that I bade thee?ARIEL To every article.PROSPERO My brave spirit! Who was so firm, so constant, that this coil Would not infect his reason?ARIEL Not a soul But felt a fever of the mad and playd Some tricks of desperation.PROSPERO Why thats my spirit!Now compare this to Prosperos treatment of Caliban belowPROSPERO What, ho! slave! Caliban! Thou earth, thou! speak.CALIBAN [Within] Theres wood enough within.PROSPERO Come forth, I say! theres other business for thee: Come, thou tortoise! When? Thou poisonous slave, got by the devil himself Upon thy wicked dam, come forth! Extract ThreeCopyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  2. 2. Prospero and Ariel 2PROSPERO Ariel, thy charge Exactly is performd: but theres more work.ARIEL Is there more toil? Since thou dost give me pains, Let me remember thee what thou hast promised, Which is not yet performd me.PROSPERO How now? moody? What ist thou canst demand?ARIEL My liberty.PROSPEROBefore the time be out? no more!ARIEL I prithee, Remember I have done thee worthy service; Told thee no lies, made no mistakings, serv’d Without grudge or grumblings: thou did promise To bate me a full year.PROSPERO Dost thou forget From what a torment I did free thee?ARIEL I do not, sir.PROSPERO Thou liest, malignant thing! Hast thou forgot The foul witch Sycorax, who with age and envy Was grown into a hoop? Hast thou forgot her? Extract fourCopyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  3. 3. Prospero and CalibanPROSPERO What, ho! slave! Caliban! Thou earth, thou! speak.CALIBAN [Within] Theres wood enough within.PROSPERO Come forth, I say! theres other business for thee: Come, thou tortoise! When? Thou poisonous slave, got by the devil himself Upon thy wicked dam, come forth!Enter CALIBANCALIBAN As wicked dew as eer my mother brushd With ravens feather from unwholesome fen Drop on you both! a south-west blow on ye And blister you all oer!PROSPERO For this, be sure, to-night thou shalt have cramps, Side-stitches that shall pen thy breath up; urchins Shall, for that vast of night that they may work, All exercise on thee; thou shalt be pinchd As thick as honeycomb, each pinch more stinging Than bees that made em.Copyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  4. 4. Extract Five Calibans StoryCALIBAN I must eat my dinner. This islands mine, by Sycorax my mother, Which thou takest from me. When thou camest first, Thou strokedst me and madest much of me, wouldst give me Water with berries int, and teach me how To name the bigger light, and how the less, That burn by day and night: and then I loved thee And showd thee all the qualities o the isle, The fresh springs, brine-pits, barren place and fertile: Cursed be I that did so! All the charms Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on you! For I am all the subjects that you have, Which first was mine own king: and here you sty me In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from me The rest o the island. Extract SixCopyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  5. 5. Prosperos StoryPROSPERO Thou most lying slave, Whom stripes may move, not kindness! I have used thee, Filth as thou art, with human care, and lodged thee In mine own cell, till thou didst seek to violate The honour of my child.CALIBAN O ho, O ho! wouldt had been done! Thou didst prevent me; I had peopled else This isle with Calibans.PROSPERO Abhorred slave, Which any print of goodness wilt not take, Being capable of all ill! I pitied thee, Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour One thing or other: when thou didst not, savage, Know thine own meaning, but wouldst gabble like A thing most brutish, I endowd thy purposes With words that made them known. But thy vile race, Though thou didst learn, had that int which good natures Could not abide to be with; therefore wast thou Deservedly confined into this rock, Who hadst deserved more than a prison.Copyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  6. 6. MirandaThat dreadful, smelly, sulky beast has put my father in a bad temper again!Caliban makes my skin crawl, with his lurching limbs and those eyes alwaysstaring at me. We’ve wasted so much time on him, trying to teach him ourlanguage and make him civilised. If it weren’t for him Caliban would still becrawling around on all fours, grunting and living like a savage. Yet he stillinsists on wearing those rags and the only language he ever uses is to insultmy dear father with his foul ingratitude. It appears that he hasn’t learnt hislesson even after being tied to the rock.We cared for him and even hoped that one day he would be like the brotherI never had. Instead he did something so terrible that my dear father hadto tie him to the rock and the lessons stopped. He has yet to show hisremorse and instead appears sullen and insolent in his service of us.I can’t help but wonder what my life would be like back in Milan. Sometimesmy father will tell me of the life we lead there, the dances, the feasts,those famous masked balls and those young gallants who would take me intheir arms and dance with me. Instead I’m stuck here with a grotesquebeast and a bad-tempered father.I am so often alone, with my father at his books and spending hours withAriel who performs his tricks and makes him happy.Don’t get me wrong, this island is full of beauty; however I must confessthat there are times when I stare at the horizon longing to see a ship’s sailsin the distance.Copyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  7. 7. SCENE I. Before PROSPEROS cell. Enter PROSPERO in his magic robes, and ARIELPROSPERO Now does my project gather to a head: My charms crack not; my spirits obey; and time Goes upright with his carriage. Hows the day?ARIEL On the sixth hour; at which time, my lord, You said our work should cease.Ill fetch them, sir. Solemn music Re-enter ARIEL before: then ALONSO, with a frantic gesture, attended by GONZALO; SEBASTIAN and ANTONIO in like manner, they all enter the circle which PROSPERO had made, and there stand charmed; whichPROSPERO Behold, sir king, The wronged Duke of Milan, Prospero: For more assurance that a living prince Does now speak to thee, I embrace thy body; And to thee and thy company I bid A hearty welcome.ALONSO Whether thou best he or no, Or some enchanted trifle to abuse me, As late I have been, I not know: Thy dukedom I resign and do entreat Thou pardon me my wrongs. But how should Prospero Be living and be here?PROSPERO First, noble friend, Let me embrace thine age, whose honour cannot Be measured or confined.GONZALO Whether this be Or be not, Ill not swear.SEBASTIAN [Aside] The devil speaks in him.PROSPERO No. For you, most wicked sir, whom to call brother Would even infect my mouth, I do forgive Thy rankest fault; all of them; and requireCopyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  8. 8. My dukedom of thee, which perforce, I know, Thou must restore.MIRANDA O, wonder! How many goodly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, That has such people int!CALIBAN Ill be wise hereafter And seek for grace. What a thrice-double ass Was I, to take this drunkard for a god And worship this dull fool!PROSPERO Go to; away! Exeunt CALIBAN, STEPHANO, and TRINCULOPROSPERO Sir, I invite your highness and your train To my poor cell, where you shall take your rest For this one night; which, part of it, Ill waste With such discourse as, I not doubt, shall make it Go quick away; the story of my life And the particular accidents gone by Since I came to this isle: and in the morn Ill bring you to your ship and so to Naples, Where I have hope to see the nuptial Of these our dear-beloved solemnized; And thence retire me to my Milan, where Every third thought shall be my grave.ALONSO I long To hear the story of your life, which must Take the ear strangely.PROSPERO Ill deliver all; And promise you calm seas, auspicious gales And sail so expeditious that shall catch Your royal fleet far off. Aside to ARIEL My Ariel, chick, That is thy charge: then to the elements Be free, and fare thou well! Please you, draw near. ExeuntCopyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  9. 9. The Tempest Sequencing the plot1. Prospero and Miranda are shipwrecked on a desert island.2. Miranda meets and falls in love with Ferdinand.3. Ariel is imprisoned in a tree by a sorceress named Sycorax.4. Prospero is double-crossed and usurped by his brother Antonio.5. Prospero uses his magic powers to bring all his enemies to the island.6. Antonio and Alonso are caught in a terrible storm on their return fromattending Alonsos daughters wedding.7. Gonzalo puts vital provisions in the boat for Miranda and Prospero.8. Stephano and Trinculo, two drunken members of the castaways believeCaliban is a god.9. Prospero decides to forgive his brother.10. Caliban and Ariel are given their freedom. The Tempest Sequencing the plot1. Prospero and Miranda are shipwrecked on a desert island.2. Miranda meets and falls in love with Ferdinand.3. Ariel is imprisoned in a tree by a sorceress named Sycorax.4. Prospero is double-crossed and usurped by his brother Antonio.5. Prospero uses his magic powers to bring all his enemies to the island.6. Antonio and Alonso are caught in a terrible storm on their return fromattending Alonsos daughters wedding.7. Gonzalo puts vital provisions in the boat for Miranda and Prospero.8. Stephano and Trinculo, two drunken members of the castaways believeCaliban is a god.9. Prospero decides to forgive his brother.10. Caliban and Ariel are given their freedom.Copyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  10. 10. Caliban: Victim or Villain? Prospero: Saint or Sinner? Whose side are you on? 1. Caliban is the rightful ruler of the island, as he inherited it from his mother Sycorax. 2. Prospero has tricked Caliban into being his slave. 3. Caliban is only aggressive towards Prospero because he is treated so cruelly. 4. Caliban should be free to go wherever he pleases rather than being cruelly shackled to a rock. 5. Caliban is a lying villain who is not to be trusted. 6. Caliban deserves all the punishments he gets for what he tried to do to Miranda. 7. Prospero tried his best to educate Caliban; all he has received in return has been insults. 8. Caliban must be kept a prisoner; he is incapable of behaving in a civilised manner. 9. Caliban could never become a part of civilised society; evil is in his nature.Copyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk
  11. 11. ENGLISH FACULTY Year 8 Self-Assessment SheetName: Form:8Task: Empathetic Response: A Character Monologue. Moving Can do Can do towards wellI can adopt a convincing style and toneto create a characterI can experiment with figurative languageto convey characterI can take part in a class debate,offering a clear point of viewI canWhat are the strengths of your work?What are the weaknesses of your work?Teacher CommentSpellings to learn: Writing Skill toimprove:Target:In future, I need toCopyright © 2005 www.englishteaching.co.uk + www.english-teaching.co.uk

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