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State of the University Web Version
WAU Board Chair Dave Weigley and WAU President
Weymouth Spence at the National Mall in Washington, D.C.
2WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
OUR VISION
THANK YOU
For your continued support!
MESSAGE FROM WAU BOARD
CHAIRMAN DAVE WEIGLEY
In 1904 Seventh-day Adventist Church leaders established
a training college in Takoma Park, Md., just outside
the United States capital, to prepare young men and
women for service to God and the community. At the first
commencement, held May 22, 1915, five students received
Bachelor of Arts degrees.
Last May that school, now Washington Adventist
University (WAU), celebrated its 100th commencement
with 289 graduates who walked under the famed Gateway
to Service arch. They joined the ranks of some 12,000
alumni who have matriculated at our Columbia Union
Conference’s flagship university and accepted the call to a
life of service. What a blessing!
During a century of ministry, WAU has experienced
growth, change and many, many blessings from the Lord.
Today we operate a fully accredited institution of higher
education offering 41 undergraduate and eight graduate
degrees. More than 1,000 students are enrolled from
across the Columbia Union and around the world. We
have been recognized for diversity, music, athletics and
service. And in four of the past five years, US News & World
Report ranked the university among the best schools in
the northern region.
I’m thankful for the leadership and ministry of
Dr. Weymouth Spence and his dedicated team of
administrators, faculty, staff, and for our stalwart WAU
Board of Trustees. Despite the economic climate and
some difficult times during the last five years, we’ve
worked hard and our university has been blessed.
We continue to foster a strong spiritual environment with
ongoing opportunities for students to grow in their walk
with Jesus, publicly commit their lives to Him through
baptism and experience the mission of sharing our faith
with others through mission trips, evangelism efforts and
service days in the community.
We continue to promote academic excellence, seek
internships and secure opportunities that will prepare
students to land a job and achieve success in today’s
competitive work environment.
We continue to seek partnerships —locally and abroad—
that expand and enhance our ability to grow the
university, revitalize our campus with new facilities and
make Adventist education accessible on a global scale.
As we continue to deliver and pursue excellence at WAU,
my prayer is that we will also continue to “be blessed … to
be a blessing” (see Gen. 12:2).
Courage,
Dave Weigley,
Chairman
Blessed to be a Blessing
3 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
Dave Weigley
CHAIR
Rob Vandeman
VICE-CHAIR
Weymouth Spence
SECRETARY
Seth Bardu
Hanna Blake
Larry Boggess
Bruce Boyer
Hamlet Canosa
Vijayan Charles
José Cortés
William Cox
Duane Dorch
Phyllis Edmonds
Terry Forde
Henry Fordham, III
Joan Francis
Ron Halvorsen
Ray Hartwell
Deborah Hill
Sandra Loughlin
Margaret McFarland
Donald Melnick
Bill Miller
Lois Peters
Albert Reece
Rick Remmers
Carol Stewart
Charles Tapp
Aaron Wilson
Erik Wangsness
Board of Trustees
4WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
Thank You for Your Service
RAJ ATTIKEN HAMLET CANOSA CHARLES L. CHEATHAM
JOAN FRANCIS MARGARET MCFARLAND WILLIAM G. ROBERTSON
5 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
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State of the University Web Version

  • 2. WAU Board Chair Dave Weigley and WAU President Weymouth Spence at the National Mall in Washington, D.C. 2WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 3. OUR VISION THANK YOU For your continued support!
  • 4. MESSAGE FROM WAU BOARD CHAIRMAN DAVE WEIGLEY In 1904 Seventh-day Adventist Church leaders established a training college in Takoma Park, Md., just outside the United States capital, to prepare young men and women for service to God and the community. At the first commencement, held May 22, 1915, five students received Bachelor of Arts degrees. Last May that school, now Washington Adventist University (WAU), celebrated its 100th commencement with 289 graduates who walked under the famed Gateway to Service arch. They joined the ranks of some 12,000 alumni who have matriculated at our Columbia Union Conference’s flagship university and accepted the call to a life of service. What a blessing! During a century of ministry, WAU has experienced growth, change and many, many blessings from the Lord. Today we operate a fully accredited institution of higher education offering 41 undergraduate and eight graduate degrees. More than 1,000 students are enrolled from across the Columbia Union and around the world. We have been recognized for diversity, music, athletics and service. And in four of the past five years, US News & World Report ranked the university among the best schools in the northern region. I’m thankful for the leadership and ministry of Dr. Weymouth Spence and his dedicated team of administrators, faculty, staff, and for our stalwart WAU Board of Trustees. Despite the economic climate and some difficult times during the last five years, we’ve worked hard and our university has been blessed. We continue to foster a strong spiritual environment with ongoing opportunities for students to grow in their walk with Jesus, publicly commit their lives to Him through baptism and experience the mission of sharing our faith with others through mission trips, evangelism efforts and service days in the community. We continue to promote academic excellence, seek internships and secure opportunities that will prepare students to land a job and achieve success in today’s competitive work environment. We continue to seek partnerships —locally and abroad— that expand and enhance our ability to grow the university, revitalize our campus with new facilities and make Adventist education accessible on a global scale. As we continue to deliver and pursue excellence at WAU, my prayer is that we will also continue to “be blessed … to be a blessing” (see Gen. 12:2). Courage, Dave Weigley, Chairman Blessed to be a Blessing 3 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 5. WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY Dave Weigley CHAIR Rob Vandeman VICE-CHAIR Weymouth Spence SECRETARY Seth Bardu Hanna Blake Larry Boggess Bruce Boyer Hamlet Canosa Vijayan Charles José Cortés William Cox Duane Dorch Phyllis Edmonds Terry Forde Henry Fordham, III Joan Francis Ron Halvorsen Ray Hartwell Deborah Hill Sandra Loughlin Margaret McFarland Donald Melnick Bill Miller Lois Peters Albert Reece Rick Remmers Carol Stewart Charles Tapp Aaron Wilson Erik Wangsness Board of Trustees 4WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 6. Thank You for Your Service RAJ ATTIKEN HAMLET CANOSA CHARLES L. CHEATHAM JOAN FRANCIS MARGARET MCFARLAND WILLIAM G. ROBERTSON 5 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 7. OUR ACHIEVEMENTS OVER THE LAST FIVE YEARS HAVE BEEN GROUNDED ON GREAT LEADERSHIP. WE ARE GRATEFUL FOR THE TIME AND SUPPORT OUR FORMER BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEMBERS HAVE PROVIDED OVER THE YEARS. FREDRICK RUSSELL MARK YOUNG AARON WILSON NANCY BAILEY VIOLET COX SCOTT MCCLURE 6WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 8. Washington Adventist University has strategically transformed education and learning since its founding in 1904. In our 112th year, we continue on the pathway of growing with excellence on the solid foundation that was established by our founders, who acted on their vision to establish an institution of higher education in the nation’s capital. We are still committed to the original mission of challenging students to seize the opportunities for learning in the nation’s capital in order to become moral leaders in communities throughout the world. I extend a special welcome and appreciation to the members of our constituency. With significant contributions from our amazing faculty, staff and students, this document will provide you with a synopsis of our outstanding growth and accomplishments over the past five years. The Board of Trustees was diligent in setting the measurable goals and standards for a thriving institution of higher education. I am proud to report that with divine support and a hard working faculty and staff we were able to exceed many of these standards and move the institution forward from surviving to thriving. We have used the six pillars of excellence — Quality, People, Finance, Growth, Service, and Community — to create a strategic plan that guides us on the journey to create a learning community of excellence that produces outstanding graduates to serve the world. During this period we received the maximum accreditation possible from our regional accrediting agency, Middle States Commission on Higher Education. We experienced the highest enrollment ever. One hundred and seventy students were involved with 19 national and international mission trips, resulting in 1469 individuals being baptized. Ninety-six students accepted Jesus as their personal savior and were baptized. We supported the project to translate the Bible from its original language into modern Russian. We helped Bugema University in Uganda develop a program in metro ministry. During this period 1589 students graduated from WAU. We also introduced an academic realignment that leverages the strength of our undergraduate, graduate and professional programs to attract and retain the best and brightest students, making way for the creation of new academic programs. I am happy to report that many of our academic programs received external recognitions of excellence. We are actively building partnerships with Adventist academies, local K-12 institutions and with potential employers of our graduates. This past period also marked a watershed moment in WAU philanthropy history, with several transformational gifts that are helping the university fulfill Vision 2020, providing much- needed scholarships and infrastructure support. I am proud to report that we were beneficiaries of gifts that were each $1 million, dedicated to two new buildings. The strength of our financial status, based on the enclosed audited statements, allowed us to offer annually over $6 million in scholarships to need and/or merit based students. Our location, diversity, dedicated faculty, and staff continue to be our strength. With these advancements currently under way, our commitment to the Seventh-day Adventist Christian vision of excellence and service, and our State of the University 7 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 9. plans for continued growth with excellence, WAU is poised to play a pivotal role in educating professionals equipped to be transformative moral leaders in the 21st century and for eternity. We have always been acknowledged as a teaching, service, and learning institution that is now reclassified as a private not-for-profit Master’s University by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. We are moving forward with a single shared vision – Vision 2020 – that will bring recognition to the institution by accrediting agencies, the academic community and the general public as a premier university of quality and distinction. Members of the Board of Trustees, alumni, faculty, staff, and students thank you for making these past five years a transformative period for Washington Adventist University. WAU is on track to become a learning community of the highest caliber and to be recognized nationally and internationally for its academic excellence in many fields and in preparing students for service to humanity. To God be the glory! This is Washington Adventist University! Weymouth Spence President WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY IS A LEARNING COMMUNITY COMMITTED TO THE SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHRISTIAN VISION OF EXCELLENCE AND SERVICE. THIS COSMOPOLITAN INSTITUTION CHALLENGES STUDENTS TO SEIZE THE OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNING IN THE NATION’S CAPITAL IN ORDER TO BECOME MORAL LEADERS IN COMMUNITIES THROUGHOUT THE WORLD 8WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 10. Balanced Scorecard In measuring our performance and guiding our strategic plan, we have focused on the six pillars of excellence -- Quality, People, Finance, Growth, Service and Community. Over the past five years, these principles have helped pave the path for increased performance and outcomes, and our learning community remains dedicated to these standards of excellence. We strive to produce outstanding graduates who are committed to service and excellence. People Quality Finance Growth Service Community Vision Mission - Core Values 9 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 11. WAU President Weymouth Spence with students in front of Morrison Hall. 10WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 12. Balanced Scorecard KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS - BALANCED SCORECARD APRIL 2016 – FINAL Pillar Key Performance Indicator (KPI) 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 5-year Trend Goal Target Date Leader Quality Student Retention1 72% 70% 60% 68% Avg 75% 2017 Provost Graduation Rate2 36% 40% 36% 34% Avg 55% 2020 Provost Program Placement3 Employment in Field Grad School Learning Outcomes Program Outcomes4 Licensure/Certification5 67%iv 72%i 69%iv 51%iv 80%iv 82%iv 76%i 96% 74%iii 68% Avg 80% 80% 90% 100% 2020 Provost People Employee Engagement6 3.9i 3.8 3.6 3.8 Avg 4 Annual AVPHR Performance Appraisal Score7 Staff Appraisals Faculty Appraisals 4.0 3.9 4.2 4.1 3.9 4.3 4.1 3.8 4.4 4.1 Avg 3.9 Avg 4.3 Avg 4 4 4 Annual AVPHR AVPHR Provost Employee Retention8 85.0% 95.0% 92.0% 90.8% Avg >90% Annual AVPHR Service Student Satisfaction9 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7 Avg 4 2020 VPSL Customer Satisfaction10 4.1 4.3 4.4 4.3 Avg 4 Annual President Finance Composite Financial Index11 3.0i 2.2 2.3 3.8 Avg 4.5 2020 EVPF Dept. of Education Financial Responsibility12 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 Avg 2.0 to 3.0 2020 EVPF SDA Working Capital Percentage13 118% 102% 88% Up 877% 100% 2020 EVPF Growth Gifts and Grants14 Institutional Grants Private Donations $11.2M 1.1M $10.8M 1.0M $12.5M 2.9M $12.3M Avg N/A Up 93% $14M 2020 VPA Fundraising Cost to Private Donations15 48% 35% 10% 30% Avg <33% Annual VPA Enrollment Headcount16 Undergraduate (UG)Graduate (GR) 1402 1222 180 1185 1011 174 1057 876 181 1287 Avg 1122 Avg 165 Avg 1600 1380 220 2020 VPEM New UG Students17 Freshmen Transfers 220 134 86 250 126 124 175 114 61 256 Avg 132 Avg 124 Avg 300 2020 VPEM Community Student Community Service18 7,972 5,368 5,026 6,122 Avgii N/A 2020 VPM Organizational Relationships19 28i 31i 33i Up 38% 20 2020 President i Restated from prior reports. ii 5-year average not available; 3-year average/trend used. iii 5-year average not available; 4-year average/trend used. ivPartial data; not all programs reported. 11 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 13. NOTES QUALITY 1 The Student Retention KPI reports the retention rate for full-time degree- seeking freshmen from the Fall of the previous year who returned in the reported Fall timeframe. For 2014/15, n=126 (2013 cohort). 2 The Graduation Rate KPI reports completers within 150% of the standard time to complete Baccalaureate programs (i.e., 6 years). This rate is calculated from the starting cohort of native first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen. For 2014/15, n=144 (2009 cohort). 3 Program Placement KPIs measure the percentage of prior year graduates who report employment in their field (for 2014/15, Education and Chemistry) and graduate school enrollment (for 2014/15, Music). 4 Program outcomes include measures such as embedded assessments, exit exams, portfolio reviews, etc. (n=698). Programs whose data could be included from the annual program review include Business, Education, Religion, Biology, Chemistry, Bio-Chemistry, Computer Science, Math, and Respiratory Care. 5 For Licensure/Certification, the 2013/14 pass rates for Respiratory (CRT n=8, 100%; WRRT n=8, 88%); Psychology (NCE n=7, 86%); Nursing (NCLEX n=84, 40%) all external professional exams. For 2014/15, Education (PRAXIS II n=23; 96%) PEOPLE 6 The Employee Engagement KPI reports a composite score from the annual employee job satisfaction survey. Likert scale 1 thru 5. 7 Employee Performance Appraisal Score – The current Faculty Performance Appraisal (FPA) was piloted in 2011/12, and used since. Both staff and faculty evaluations are reported on a Likert scale 1 thru 5. For 2014-15, employee appraisals were: staff n=51; faculty n=40. 8 The Employee Retention KPI is based on the number of voluntary and involuntary departures vs. WAU/WGTS full- and part-time employees. SERVICE 9 The Student Satisfaction is based on the annual Graduating Student Satisfaction Survey – Likert scale 1 thru 5. In addition to this survey, we utilize NSSE to assess student satisfaction and engagement. For 2014/15, n=102. 10 The Customer Satisfaction KPI reports on feedback provided by internal customers, students, alumni, and external vendors. For 2014/15, the surveys were conducted for Accounting (n=23), Admissions (n=26), Bookstore (n=34), Facilities (n=43), COIRE (n=14), Registrar (n=19), SGPS (n=131), SHPSW (n=10), Weis Library (n=15), and departments under n=10 include BHCSS, Financial Administration, HR, ITS, Provost Office, and Student Financial Services. Likert scale 1 thru 5. FINANCE 11 The Composite Financial Index is a comprehensive measurement of the financial health of an educational institution. 12 The Department of Education Financial Responsibility KPI is a quantitative econometric measurement of the ability of an institution to manage Title IV funds. The score ranges from -1.0 to 3.0. A score greater than 1.5 indicates the institution is financially responsible. 13 SDA Recommended Working Capital – The church requires that working capital is equal to or exceeds 20% of operating expenses. This KPI is equal to working capital / 20% of operating expenses. GROWTH 14 Gifts and Grants from the annual Independent Auditors’ Report – Financial Statement. It includes State & Federal Grants & Contracts (including Federal and State Financial Aid), Private Gifts & Grants, and Church Subsidies & Gifts. The sub- categories were revised in 2015 to include Institutional Grants in place of State and Federal while keeping Private Donations the same. 15 The Development Cost to Private Donations KPI is the ratio of the cost of raising donations to private donations. 16 Enrollment Headcount is the number of undergraduate and graduate students as of the official Fall Census date. 17 New UG Students is the total number of new traditional undergraduate students in the Fall semester. Freshmen are First Time, Full Time, Degree-Seeking students and Transfers are any student that has previously not attended WAU at any time. COMMUNITY 18 Student Community Service is the total number of community service hours by students for the year. For 2014-15, n=1175. 19 Organizational Relationships is the total number of the University’s partnerships, memorandums of understanding, and articulation agreements 12WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 14. Balanced Scorecard KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS - BENCHMARK COMPARISONS Comparison group data provides a context for Key Performance Indicators. Comparison against peer data is as close to 2013/14 as possible, as this is the latest data that is publicly available. Key Performance Indicator (KPI) WAU 2013/14 National Averages Similar Institutions 20 Competitors 21 SDA Institutions 22 Aspirants 23 Goal Student Retention24 70% 71%25 67% 70% 74% 86% 81% Graduation Rate24 40% 49%25 48% 42% 48% 71% 55% Outcomes Scores Licensure/Certification 51% 75%26,40 100% Employee Engagement 3.8 4.327 4 Employee Retention 95% 84%28 >90% Student Satisfaction 3.9 3.729 4 Customer Satisfaction 4.3 3.730 4 Composite Financial Index31,40 2.2 2.5 2.032 2.833 4.234 4.5 Dept. of Education Financial Responsibility35,40 3.0 2.3 2.4 2.7 2.7 2.9 2.0 to 3.0 Gifts and Grants24,36 $10.8M $6.1M37 $4.4M $5.0M $4.9M $17.4M $14M Development Cost to Private Donations 35% 20%38 <33% Enrollment Headcount24 Undergraduate Graduate 1185 1011 174 183439 1739 95 1123 1057 66 10733 8946 1787 1957 1660 297 4187 2852 1335 1600 1380 220 24 Source: National Center for Educational Statistics/IPEDS Data Center. 25 The national benchmark for Student Retention and for Graduation Rates is for 4-year institutions only. For the Retention Rate, n=2321; for the Graduation Rate, n=2467. Source: IPEDS Data Center. 26 For Licensure/Certification exams, the national pass rate for BSN programs the Nursing (NCLEX) exam is 87.7%, and for Respiratory Therapy first-time test takers (CRT Entry Level – 72.6%, Advanced – 78.7%) Source: NBRC Horizons. There is no national average pass rate for Praxis II, as this exam varies by state. 27 The national benchmark for Employee Engagement and Job Satisfaction is across all industries. Source: Society for Human Resource Management. Retrieved from 2015 report, which covers 2014 results. 28 The national benchmark for Employee Retention is based on all industries. Source: compensationforce.com. 29 The national benchmark for Student Satisfaction is for 4-year private institutions only. Source: Noel Levitz. 30 The national benchmark for Customer Satisfaction is across all industries, as a benchmark for higher education is not available. Source: ACSI (American Customer Satisfaction Index). 31 Source: Council of Independent Colleges – Financial Indicators Tool. The CFI lags a year behind the other benchmarks. 32 The Similar Institutions benchmark for the Composite Financial Index is based on institutions similar to WAU in Carnegie Classification, and not on the following Similar Institutions Peer Group. 33 Competitors benchmark for the CFI is for the mid-east region, and not the following Competitor Peer Group, as this is the closest benchmark available. 34 For the 75th percentile nationally, and not the following Aspirants group, as this is the closest benchmark. 35 Source: studentaid.ed.gov. Not all schools are available in each group. 36 No public institutions were included in the Gifts and Grants benchmark, as these receive more state and federal grants than private institutions. 13 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 15. 37 The national benchmark for Gifts and Grants is based on Title IV degree-granting institutions with a master’s degree as the highest degree granted. n=549. 38 Source: affinityresources.com. 39 National schools’ benchmark is based on the Carnegie Classification of WAU, Baccalaureate-Diverse; n=379. 40 The IPEDS auto-generated peer group is based on WAU’s Carnegie Classification. After 2015/2016, this peer group will be upgraded to other Masters level institutions. BENCHMARKING COMPARISON GROUPS: WAU has selected four evolving comparison groups: an aspirant group of institutions that are similar in some respects but exceed our tracked KPIs in several areas; a group of competitive peers with which we cross student applicants; a peer group automatically generated from the federal database of institutions of higher education (IPEDS) based on similar institutional characteristics including but not exclusive to Carnegie Classification, enrollment, religious governance, teaching faculty size, and endowment; and the NAD SDA colleges and universities. A single institution may be listed in more than one group. 20SIMILAR INSTITUTIONS (AUTO-GENERATED) PEER COMPARISON GROUP40 Barton College (Wilson, NC) Bluffton University (Bluffton, OH) Briar Cliff University (Sioux City, IA) Cazenovia College (Cazenovia, NY) Central Methodist University-College of Liberal Arts & Sciences (Fayette, MO) Coker College (Hartsville, SC) Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art (New York, NY) Corban University (Salem, OR) Crown College (Saint Bonifacius, MN) East Texas Baptist University (Marshall, TX) Franklin College (Franklin, IN) Hannibal-LaGrange University (Hannibal, MO) Hilbert College (Hamburg, NY) Humphreys College-Stockton and Modesto Campuses (Stockton, CA) Huntingdon College (Montgomery, AL) Huntington University (Huntington, IN) LaGrange College (Lagrange, GA) Maranatha Baptist University (Watertown, WI) Martin Methodist College (Pulaski, TN) McMurry University (Abilene, TX) Midway College (Midway, KY) Newberry College (Newberry, SC) Olivet College (Olivet, MI) Paul Smiths College of Arts and Science (Paul Smiths, NY) Tennessee Wesleyan College (Athens, TN) Thiel College (Greenville, PA) Thomas College (Waterville, ME) Thomas University (Thomasville, GA) University of Great Falls (Great Falls, MT) University of Jamestown (Jamestown, ND) 23ASPIRANT PEER COMPARISON GROUP Catholic University of America (Washington DC) Elon University (Elon, NC) La Sierra University (Riverside CA) Loyola University (Baltimore, MD) St. John’s College (Annapolis, MD) Stevenson University (Owings Mills, MD) 21COMPETITOR PEER COMPARISON GROUP Adventist University of Health Sciences (Orlando, FL) Andrews University (Berrien Springs, MI) Bowie State University (Bowie, MD) La Sierra University (Riverside, CA) Miami Dade College (Miami, FL) Oakwood University (Huntsville, AL) Pacific Union College (Angwin, CA) Southern Adventist University (Collegedale, TN) Southwestern Adventist University (Keene, TX) Strayer University (Washington, DC) Union College (Lincoln, NE) University of Maryland, University College (Adelphi, MD) University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD) University of Maryland, Eastern Shore (Princess Anne, MD) University of Phoenix (Phoenix, AZ) University of the District of Columbia (Washington, DC) Walla Walla University (College Place, WA) 22SDA PEER COMPARISON GROUP Adventist University of Health Sciences (Orlando, FL) Andrews University (Berrien Springs, MI) Kettering College of Medical Arts (Kettering, OH) La Sierra University (Riverside, CA) Oakwood University (Huntsville, AL) Pacific Union College (Angwin, CA) Southern Adventist University (Collegedale, TN) Southwestern Adventist University (Keene, TX) Union College (Lincoln, NE) Walla Walla University (College Place, WA) 14WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 16. CORE VALUES A t Washington Adventist University, learner success comes first. Excellence in teaching, learning, and service makes up the core of our mission. We dedicate ourselves as a learning community to the continued pursuit of excellence and recognition of the dignity and worth of our individual members. With these as fundamental principles, the following values guide our actions: EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING, LEARNING AND SERVICE MAKES UP THE CORE OF OUR VISION.” INTEGRATION OF THE LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF JESUS CHRIST: We will model the life and teachings of Jesus Christ in all aspects of the learning community. COMMITMENT TO QUALITY: We take personal responsibility for continuous improvement and commitment to lifelong learning as we celebrate creativity, innovation, service, and the success of learners. RESPECT: We insist on an environment of respect. Our actions reflect the respect we hold for our students, our colleagues, our community, and ourselves. We trust each member of the community as an individual deserving of kindness, dignity, and fairness. All are gifted; all are valued. TRUST: We honor the trust placed in us by our students, the community, and our colleagues. With trust, we act openly and ethically, motivated by cooperation and a collaborative spirit. CONSIDERATE, OPEN COMMUNICATION: We take responsibility to share information, encourage the exchange of ideas, listen without judgment, and speak with honesty and candor. ACCOUNTABILITY AND INTEGRITY: We hold ourselves and others accountable for our professional and personal actions, acting responsibly and conducting our business with integrity. “ 15 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 18. Growing with Excellence WAU OFFERS INCENTIVE FOR FIRST-TIME FRESHMEN TO GRADUATE ON TIME The 8th Semester Free Program, launched in 2014, encourages students to stay on track and complete their degrees on time. Those who do are eligible to receive free tuition in their last semester, which saves costs. ENROLLMENT PIPELINES ATTRACT NEW STUDENTS AND HELP GRADUATE STUDENTS GAIN THEIR DOCTORATE Enrollment pipelines, such as the articulation agreement with Montgomery College for the health science bachelor’s program, and the partnership with Argosy University in Virginia for counseling psychology graduate students offer convenient and affordable ways for students to expand their educations. ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS IN ITS MISSION TO ACHIEVE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE, WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY HAS LAUNCHED A NUMBER OF NEW INITIATIVES WITH VISIBLE RESULTS. ACADEMIC YEAR STUDENT ENGAGEMENT 2010/11 3.8 2011/12 3.7 2012/13 3.6 2013/14 3.9 2014/15 3.7 STUDENTENGAGEMENTTREND Goal 4.0 / Likert Scale 1-5 / WAU 5 year Average 3.7 Source: Balanced Scorecard FRESHMENRETENTIONRATE10YEARTREND 1st Yr Retention Rate Best fit line (1st Yr Retention Rate) 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 59% 59% 55% 63% 60% 62% 69% 69% 72% 70% 60% 69% 17 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 19. URBAN MINISTRY PROGRAM OFFERS CREDITS FOR LEARNING TO SERVE OTHERS A partnership forged in 2014 with the REACH Columbia Union Urban Evangelism School offers WAU students the opportunity to earn up to 15 credits while learning how to serve others through urban ministry. TEACHER SUPPORT IMPROVES THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION The university sponsors half-day seminars for its faculty and staff to provide inspiration and share best practices. In 2014, the Great Teacher’s Symposium featured Valencia College President Sandford C. Shugart, Ph.D., as the keynote speaker, addressing such issues as student success, progression and retention. He has been president of one of the nation’s most celebrated community colleges for 16 years, and is author of Leadership in the Crucible of Work: Discovering the Interior Life of an Authentic Leader THIS YEAR, WAU ENROLLED ITS LARGEST FRESHMEN CLASS IN FOUR YEARS A visible result of the university’s increasing reputation for excellence can be seen in its enrollment of 143 freshmen this spring – including 81 new students. THE WAU FIVE-YEAR GRADUATION RATE HAS INCREASED 67 PERCENT Fewer than a dozen other four-year colleges in the nation have achieved this graduation rate increase. Contributing to this success is the university’s Betty Howard Center for Student Success, which offers a wide range of academic support. TEACHING DEGREES Best Degree Prog rams GRADUATIONRATETREND GRAD RATE (150% OF TIME TO DEGREE) Grad Rate (150% of time to degree) Best fit line (Grad Rate (150% of time to degree)) 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 28% 2003 2002 35% 25% 39% 27% 27% 30% 28% 33% 37% 42% 36% 38% 30% ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 18WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 20. Growing with Excellence U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT America’s Best Colleges: Top 50 Best Northern Regional Colleges, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2012, 2011 BEST PSYCHOLOGY DEGREES Ranked among the “30 Great Small Colleges for a Counseling Degree (Bachelor’s) in the March 2015 online “Best Psychology Degrees: Your Guide to Top Psychology Degree Programs.” BEST BIOLOGY DEGREES Ranked in the top 50 Best Value Small Colleges for a Biology Degree by the Best Value Schools website, based on the degree programs offered and the low net price, 2015. BEST VALUE COLLEGES OF MARYLAND Ranked 12th by the Best Value Schools website, based on graduation rate, net price, acceptance rate and a 20- year return on investment, 2015. MOST AFFORDABLE SMALL SCHOOLS EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI Ranked in the top 100 by Great Value Colleges website, based on total cost of attendance, return on investment, availability of financial aid and assistance, and degrees that offer economic success, 2015. GREAT SMALL COLLEGES FOR A TEACHING DEGREE Ranked 17 among the top 30 schools in the nation by the Best Degree Programs website as “one of the most selective small colleges and universities offering teaching and education degrees at the undergraduate level,” based on the programs offered and the high student retention rate, 2015. RECENT RECOGNITION AND HONORS MOST AFFORDABLE ONLINE MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAM Top 30 Master’s Degree Programs in Public Administration, ranked 29 in 2015 by Grad School Hub website, based on WAU’s graduate tuition and fees, as published by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) College Navigator. COUNCIL OF INDEPENDENT COLLEGES (CIC) Named by CIC in its Strategic Change and Innovation in Independent Colleges report as one of Nine Mission Driven Campuses, 2015. ENACTUS (FORMERLY KNOWN AS STUDENTS IN FREE ENTERPRISE) • 2015 Finalist Opening Round, Enactus United States National Exposition Award - $1,000 • 2015 3rd place Enactus Award, Coca-Cola Foundation - $3,000 • 2015 3rd place and finalist Enactus Award, Sam’s Club Step Up for Small Business - $4,000 • 2015 Finalist Plaque, Walmart Foundation - $1,000 • Maryland Comptroller’s Medallion, presented by Comptroller Peter Franchot for service to the community • Certificate of Commendation from County Executive Isaac Leggett for outstanding service to the community • Letter of Commendation from Maryland Congresswoman Donna Edwards for outstanding service to the community • 2016 Champion Award, Enactus Regional Competition, held March 29 in Washington, D.C., which qualified the team to compete in the 2016 National Expo in St. Louis, Mo., May 15-17. 19 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 21. Year Avg. 50 640 660 680 700 720 740 WASHINGTONADVENTISTUNIVERSITY MOVINGAVERAGEHEADCOUNT (1966-2015) 50 Year Avg. (1966-2015) 794 40 Year Avg. (1976-2015) 759 30 Year Avg. (1986-2015) 709 20 Year Avg. (1996-2015) 728 10 Year Avg. (2006-2015) 782 5 Year Avg. (2011-2015) 808 TraditionalHeadcountAverages STUDENTENROLLMENT 760 780 800 820 Year Avg. 40 Year Avg. 30 Year Avg. 20 Year Avg. 10 Year Avg. 5 NUMBEROFSTUDENTS ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS
  • 22. KIMBERLY PICHOT, DM, CHAIR, DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS/ COMMUNICATION Enactus team competition wins in 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013 and 2012 Growing with Excellence FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS MIKHAIL KULAKOV, DPHIL, PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION Recognized by the General Conference President, Ted Wilson, during the 2015 General Conference Session for his work with WAU, the Russian Orthodox Church and the Russian Federation on one of the first and most recent Russian Bible Translations projects to take place over the last century. BARAKA MUGANDA, EDD, VICE PRESIDENT OF MINISTRY Recognition of Outstanding Global Contribution to Youth Ministries of Seventh-day Adventist Church as Director for 15 years. BONNIE FRANCKOWIAK, DNP, PROFESSOR OF NURSING Awarded by the University of Chicago and the Conrad Hilton Foundation a grant for Integration of Screening Brief Intervention with Adolescents into Nursing Curriculum. OLIVE J. HEMMINGS, PHD, PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION Recognized by the Columbia Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists as the 2015 “Notable Person of Honor” MELINDA VILLANUEVA, PHD, PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY/CHEMISTRY Maryland College Access Challenge Grant: Higher Education Student Persistence Program in 2014 -- $55,834 21 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 23. RALPH JOHNSON, PHD, DEAN OF STUDENT SUCCESS AND FACULTY DEVELOPMENT One Step Away Grant in 2012, Maryland High Education Commission -- $60,000 BASAVA JITTA, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF NURSING 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International Founders Day Award from Catholic University of America ATHLETIC ACHIEVEMENTS MEN’S DIVISION I BASKETBALL NATIONAL CHAMPIONS 2014, UNITED STATES COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION (USCAA). • Tournament Most Valuable Player (Student Anthony Berry) • All-Tournament Team (Student Tyrus Fleetwood) ALL INDEPENDENCE COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION AWARDS 2014 • ICAA Men’s Basketball 2014 Coach of the Year (Patrick Crarey) • 2nd Team All-ICAA (Student Jawuan Lockhart) • 3rd Team All-ICAA (Student Anthony Berry) • All-ICVAA Freshman Team (Student Charles Allen) UNITED STATES COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION Men’s Soccer National All-American Team 2013, Honorable Mention (Student Abanda Nkwanyou) ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 22WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 24. Growing with Excellence ADVANTAGES “HOME” TO CURRENT WAU STUDENTS MAY MEAN ANY OF 50 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES, INCLUDING CAPE VERDE, EGYPT, ETHIOPIA, INDIA, JAMAICA, MEXICO AND SAUDI ARABIA THE FIRST WAU INTERNATIONAL STUDENT CHAT WAS LAUNCHED FEBRUARY 18, 2016 The “Global Thinkers” forum is now a regular event that encourages open discussion between students who represent the various cultures and religions on campus. President Spence noted the importance of making every student, faculty and staff member feel understood and appreciated, and he named Dr. Beulah Manuel as Director of International Students to lead the effort to build community, engage conversation, facilitate interactions and create a friendly environment. AVERAGE EARNINGS ABOVE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES The share of former students earning more than $25,000 or above the average earnings of a High School graduate age 25 to 34, 6 years after they first enroll. SDA Average 62% 63% 64% 64% 65% WAU 66% %EARNINGABOVEHSGRADUATE 67% 68% Source: U.S. President’s College Scorecard 23 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 25. DATA RECENTLY RELEASED IN THE U.S. PRESIDENT’S COLLEGE SCORECARD WAU’s Cost of Attendance is 18.7 % less than the national average. The graph below shows the average annual net price for federal financial aid recipients, after aid from the school, state, or federal government. WAU GRADUATES EARN COMPLETIVE SALARIES COMPARED TO THE AVERAGE GRADUATE Data shown is the median earnings of former students who received federal financial aid, at 10 years after attending college. SDA average of 13 North American Division of Seventh-day Adventist colleges and universities, and U.S. colleges and universities: National Average $ $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $16,853 SDA Average WAU $25,000 $20,732 $16,789 AVERAGENETCOSTOFATTENDANCE SALARYAFTERATTENDING National Average $46,800 SDA Average WAU $43,083 $34,343 $50,000 $45,000 $40,000 $35,000 $30,000 $25,000 $20,000 $15,000 $10,000 $5,000 $ Source: U.S. President’s College Scorecard Source: U.S. President’s College Scorecard ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS Students Jerin John, Rosemary Ascencio, and Carly Pereira during end of school bash. 24WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 26. MAJOR GENERAL (MD) LINDA L. SINGH ADJUTANT GENERAL OF MARYLAND, 2016 ALUMNI OF THE YEAR Major General (MD) Linda L. Singh was appointed as the 29th adjutant general of Maryland, effective January 21, 2015. The adjutant general is responsible for the daily operations of the Maryland Military Department, which includes the Maryland Army National Guard, Maryland Air National Guard, Maryland Emergency Management Agency, and Maryland Defense Force. She is a senior advisor to the governor and is responsible for the readiness, administration, and training of more than 6,700 members of the Military Department with an annual budget of more than $314 million. As the adjutant general, she serves as the official channel of communication between the governor and the National Guard Bureau and serves as a member of the governor’s cabinet. General Singh grew up in Frederick County, Md., and is a long time Maryland resident where she resides with her husband and two daughters. She received her commission in 1991 through Officer Candidate School at the Maryland Military Academy in Reisterstown, Md. Her military career spans more than 30 years of service in both the enlisted and officer ranks. She has served in staff and command assignments at every level, including deployed assignments in Kosovo and a combat tour in Afghanistan supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. Her previous military assignments include Commander of the Maryland Army National Guard and Director of the Joint Staff, Maryland National Guard. Her military decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal with 2 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters, “ AlumniHighlights the Army Commendation Medal, the National Defense Service Medal with Bronze Service Star, the Kosovo Campaign Medal, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, NATO Medal (2), the NCO Professional Development Ribbon, the Maryland Distinguished Service Cross and the Virginia National Guard Bronze Star Medal. General Singh is a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and the U.S. Army War College where she received a master’s degree in Strategic Studies. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from Columbia Union College, a master’s degree in business administration, military management from Touro International University, a master’s certificate in Six Sigma from Villanova University, is a graduate of the United States Northern Command Joint Task Force Commander’s course and is a fellow from the International Women’s Leadership program at Harvard University/INSEAD. WAU HONORS ITS ALUMNI OF THE YEAR 25 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 27. RIK SWARTZWELDER, 2015 ALUMNI OF THE YEAR Rik Swartzwelder is a writer/director/actor and also a producing partner at Skoche Films, LLC. Rik’s feature film debut was Valentine’s Day weekend 2015 with Old Fashioned. However, he has directed numerous award-winning short films and worked on several other projects as a writer and producer, participated in 145 film festivals worldwide, and garnered over 50 major awards. One of his best-known works, The Least of These—a 35mm short—was a film festival phenomenon and broke new ground in terms of secular crossover and artistic kudos for a film with a strong faith message. His other accolades include the “Student Emmy” for his graduate thesis film, Paul McCall, a CINE Special Jury Award, four ITVA-DC Peer Awards, five ICVM awards, a “Reel Spirituality” award, a Rebel Planet “Best in Show,” and the Sprint PCS Filmmaker of the Future Award. In March 2008, Rik was honored with an invitation to lead the very first filmmaking workshop offered (“The Craft of Film Directing”) by the newly launched Heartland Truly Moving Pictures Institute. Rik’s work has scored distribution deals with Freestyle Releasing, XFINITY On Demand, First Look Entertainment, PBS, Frontier Airlines, Big Film Shorts, Family Bookstores, and more. His projects have also received extensive press, including coverage in Time, The Hollywood Reporter, Variety, The Washington Post, The Guardian, Christianity Today, The Desert Sun, The Indianapolis Star, The Lakeland Ledger, The Times-Reporter, and The Grand Rapids Press. “ Rik is a graduate of Columbia Union College, where he earned a B.A. in communication, and Florida State University’s Graduate Film Conservatory, where he earned an M.F.A. in motion picture production. He grew up in New Philadelphia, Ohio, and spent many years living in both central Florida and Washington, D.C. He currently resides in Los Angeles. ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 26WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 28. AlumniHighlights FARID SROUR, 2014 ALUMNI OF THE YEAR Farid Srour has risen from modest beginnings in Syria to become a respected businessman and generous philanthropist. Born in the small harbor city of Tartous, Syria, Farid was one of five children to Hanne and Tannous Srour. After receiving his baccalaureate degree, he moved to Beirut, Lebanon, to teach in the Adventist elementary school there. He later left for Amman, Jordan, where he built the Adventist School of Amman, and he remained there as headmaster and principal. In 1946, he left Amman for America. One year later, in 1947, he was admitted to Washington Missionary College. There, he met Kathleen Baird, his English teacher, who later became his wife. They had four children. Farid Srour graduated from Washington Missionary College in 1949 with a major in French and chemistry. In 1955, he began a new career in real estate. He later established the F.S. Peoples Realty Company as a private investment real estate company focusing on development of commercial and residential real estate in Montgomery County. The generosity of others made it possible for Farid Srour to be educated in the United States. Throughout his remarkable career, he has never forgotten those who helped him, especially those connected with the Seventh-day Adventist Church. He has been a generous contributor to his church, Washington Adventist University, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital, Loma Linda University, and Johns Hopkins University. In his words, “I believe all my blessings came from God and I hope, in my small way, I can return those gifts to others.” “ 27 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 29. CHARLES MCMILLAN, 2013 ALUMNI OF THE YEAR Dr. Charles McMillan graduated from Columbia Union College in 1977 with a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics and Physics. Upon graduation, he taught for a year at Rusangu Secondary School in Zambia after which he earned his doctoral degree in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). McMillan began his career in 1983 as an experimental physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California. He later moved into computational science and management at LLNL before joining Los Alamos in 2006 as principal associate director for its weapons programs. That role involved him overseeing the safety, reliability and performance of the US nuclear deterrent, which is the lab’s main mission. He has more than 30 years of scientific and leadership experience in weapons science, stockpile certification, experimental physics, and computational science. Currently, he serves as the tenth director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, leading the laboratory in its national security scientific missions. McMillan has earned two Department of Energy Awards of Excellence; one of them for developing an innovative holographic tool that enhances the ability of scientists to predict nuclear performance. Dr. McMillan continues to see service as a central element of his professional and personal life. “ ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 28WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 30. WAU RECOGNIZES OUTSTANDING ALUMNI BLYDEN IS COLUMBIA UNION CONFERENCE’S FIRST FEMALE VICE PRESIDENT Celeste Ryan Blyden (’92) became the first female vice president in the 109-year history of the Columbia Union Conference when she was elected in March 2014 as vice president for strategic communication and public relations. Blyden is responsible for directing internal communication and spearheading external communication initiatives for the conference. She also serves as publisher of the award- winning Visitor magazine and its online platforms, which the Associated Church Press named “Best Denominational Magazine” in the United States and Canada in 2010. She previously was communication director for the conference, handling such responsibilities as crisis management/communication, training, resource development, public relations, media relations, writing and editing. Blyden has served the church as a journalist, editor, public information officer, marketing coordinator, media relations manager, corporate communication director, social media strategist and television producer. A graduate of the Blue Mountain Academy in Hamburg, Pennsylvania, Blyden earned her bachelor’s degree in communication and counseling psychology from Washington Adventist University (then known as Columbia Union College), and her master’s degree in organizational communication from Bowie State University. “ Alumni Highlights Celeste Ryan Blyden, speaking at her 25th Class Reunion at Blue Mountain Academy in 2013. Photo by Joel Avery. Blyden with her husband, Austin, and their children — Larraina (7) and Sarita (4). Photo by David Thompson. 29 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 31. MARCEL WRIGHT CREDITS WAU FOR JUMP-STARTING HIS CAREER Marcel Wright (’98), places considerable value on the business and leadership skills he gained at Washington Adventist University. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration, with emphasis on human resource management and personnel administration. He says that WAU prepared him to apply for entry level management positions, not just entry level positions when he graduated, and his first job after graduation was a management position in Richmond, Va. He later earned his master’s degree in business administration from the University of Maryland in 2007. Wright remembers how much he loved being at a small school close to a big city, where he could really connect with professors, and with opportunities to serve the surrounding community. His experiences at WAU made him realize that non-profit work was his calling, and he is currently Associate Vice President for Behavioral Health and Wellness for Adventist Healthcare. In this role, Wright works to improve the social and emotional health of young children and their families. “ Wright with his wife, Stacia, and their children -- Jonathan (5) and Ginneh (2). Marcel Wright in his office, above, and with his family, below. ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 30WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 32. Growing with Excellence COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS SERVICE DAY EVENTS HAVE CONTRIBUTED MORE THAN 20,000 HOURS OF HELP TO THE COMMUNITY – THAT’S EQUIVALENT TO A STAFF OF NEARLY TEN FULL-TIME WORKERS FOR AN ENTIRE YEAR. The WAU Enactus team with the Champion Award at the regional competition on March 29, 2016 in Washington, D.C. 31 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 33. Since 2011, service day events have attracted students, faculty and staff, alumni and community members to approximately a dozen different projects each semester, and they’ve made a difference. This is what the university’s mission to be a “Gateway to Service” is all about. WAU’S COMMUNITY SERVICE EFFORTS GAINED THE ATTENTION OF PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA Washington Adventist University secured a place on President Barack Obama’s 2014 Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for the “extraordinary and exemplary community service contributions of its students, faculty and staff in meeting critical community and national needs.” ENACTUS BUSINESS CLUB CONTRIBUTED MORE THAN 3,700 HOURS OF SERVICE LAST YEAR Thirty-eight students helped local businesses overcome challenges and thrive, putting the struggling Rainbow Coin Laundry back on the path to success by rebranding the business, painting and cleaning the store, and developing an after-school tutoring program for the children of customers. They also hosted a local small business symposium. This and other efforts earned the club third place nationally in last year’s ENACTUS competition, and attracted the attention of Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot and other elected officials who recognized the students for their accomplishments. The Rainbow Coin Laundry project earned the WAU Enactus team a grant from Sam’s Club and recognition from Maryland State Comptroller Peter Franchot (standing 4th from right). ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 32WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 34. Growing with Excellence FINANCIAL STRENGTH IS BUILDING WITH THE REALIGNMENT OF BUDGETS AND GOALS A stronger financial position is resulting from the purposeful realignment of WAU’s budget and goals, and it is helping the university to become one of the premier small universities in the mid-Atlantic region. CAMPUS ENHANCEMENTS MADE POSSIBLE, THANKS TO GENEROUS GIFTS Through a number of fundraising enhancements such as a redesigned Advancement web page and the annual Visionaries Gala that began in 2013, gifts to Washington Adventist University have been generous and noteworthy, totaling more than $4 million. FINANCIAL STRENGTH WAU Board of Trustees member Terry Forde (left) and WAU President Weymouth Spence. Television news journalist Suzanne Malveaux (center) with donors Beverly and Ronald Anderson at the Second Annual Visionaries Gala in 2014. 33 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 35. UNRESTRICTEDNETASSETGROWTH DECEMBER GIVING IS TRENDING UPWARD More than 230 donors contributed 252 gifts in December 2015, totaling nearly $667,000. That amount is significantly higher than the December 2014 donations of $357,000, and more than the total donations for the years 2011-2013. Contributions were targeted to support the Gail S. and Bruce E. Boyer Health Professions and Wellness Center, a new annex to the music building, improvements in specific academic departments, and student aid. FY 2005 FY 2007 FY 2009 FY 2011 FY 2013 FY 2015 25.0 20.0 15.0 10.0 5.0 0.0 MILLIONS DECEMBERDONATIONS2010-2015 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000 2015 700,000 $114,132.28 $164,446.22 $107,418.60 $108,204.96 $357,235.34 $666,868.80 Instructional WGTS-FM Academic Support Student Services Institutional Support Interest on Indebtedness Depreciation - Educational Other 38% 11%8% 11% 24% 6% 2% 0% EDUCATIONEXPENSES, PERCENTAGEOFEACHEDUCATIONDOLLAR ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 34WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 36. Growing with Excellence FORBES FINANCIAL GRADES Forbes grades measure financial fitness as determined by nine components broken into three broad categories: balance sheet strength, operational soundness and certain other factors indicative of a college’s financial health, including admission yield. Additional drivers included: • Endowment Assets Per FTE (15%) • Primary Reserve Ratio (15%) • Viability Ratio (10%) • Core Operating Margin (10%) • Tuition As A Percentage of Core Revs (15%) • Return On Assets (10%) • Admission Yield (10%) • Percent Freshman Getting Institutional Grants (7.5%) • Instruction Expenses Per FTE (7.5%) WAUFY2015FINANCIALPOSITION (IN MILLIONS) NAME % GRADE Andrews University C Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences C La Sierra University B Oakwood University B Pacific Union College C Southern Adventist University C+ Southwestern Adventist University C Union College B- Walla Walla University B- Washington Adventist University B- SEVENTH-DAYADVENTISTCOLLEGESANDUNIVERSITIES STATISTICSFORPRIVATECOLLEGESANDUNIVERSITIES (FROM FORBES ARTICLE JULY 29, 2015)* Current Assets, 16 Net Assets, 32 Long-Term Assets, 32 Long-Term Debt, 10 Current Liabilities, 5 WAUFY2010FINANCIALPOSITION (IN MILLIONS) Current Liabilities, 4 Net Assets, 21 Currents Assets, 15 Long-Term Assets, 17 Long-Term Debt, 7 35 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 37. PRESIDENT SPENCE LAUNCHED THE FIRST ANNUAL VISIONARIES GALA ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 AT CONGRESSIONAL COUNTRY CLUB IN BETHESDA President Spence initiated the university’s first large fundraising event in 2013, an annual Visionaries Gala that has aligned the generosity of donors with the major giving priorities of his Vision 2020 plan. To date, three galas have been celebrated, and they have each offered alumni, faculty and staff, and university partners the opportunity to come together to honor extraordinary individuals, and to support student scholarships and the campus infrastructure needs of 21st-century higher education. YEAR AMOUNT 2015 $525,000 2014 $1,100,000 2013 $ 340,000 THEANNUALVISIONARIESGALAHASGROSSED NEARLY$2MILLION INCASHANDPLEDGES # OF SCHOOLS % GRADE 129 14% A 271 30% B 426 47% C 78 9% D 5 1% F Total: 909 100% FORBESFINANCIALGRADES FORHIGHEREDUCATIONINSTITUTIONS WAU President Weymouth Spence (left) joins Patricia and Hercules Pinkney in visiting with 2014 Gala Honoree Peggielene Bartels (King Peggy) at the Second Annual Visionaries Gala. ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 36WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 38. Growing with Excellence 2015 LARS AND JULIE HOUMANN Honored for Excellence in Health Care Leadership and Innovation. An alumnus of Washington Adventist University, Lars serves as President and Chief Executive Officer of Florida Hospital, and together with his wife Julie, they have contributed greatly to the healing ministry of Christ. MIKHAIL KULAKOV JR. A WAU Religion professor who led an inter- denominational team of biblical scholars in producing a new modern Russian translation of the Bible, honored for Excellence in Biblical Scholarship. ESTHER NEWMAN CEO and Founder of Leadership Montgomery, honored for Excellence in Leadership Development and Community Service. 2014 PEGGIELENE BARTELS (King Peggy), King of Otuam, Ghana, honored for her global contributions and Excellence in Humanitarian Service. BRUCE E. BOYER President and chairman of Sloan Management, Inc. and Premier HealthCare, Inc. who serves on the Washington Adventist University Board of Trustees, honored for Excellence in Health and Human Services. GLADSTONE P. GURUBATHAM The university’s longest-serving faculty member and architect of the adult evening program was honored for Excellence in Teaching Psychology and Social Sciences, and Excellence in Educational Leadership. Upon his death in late 2015, the Dr. Gladstone P. Gurubatham Lifelong Learning Endowment Fund was created to provide scholarships for Washington Adventist University students. MILTON AND MERRILLIE MORRIS Owners of Standard Office Supply Company and alumni of Washington Adventist University, honored for Excellence in Entrepreneurial Leadership. 2013 DIKEMBE MUTOMBO NBA legend, honored for Excellence in Humanitarian Service. EVELYN BATA Educator, businesswoman, activist and philanthropist; honored for Excellence in Service to Washington Adventist University. RORY PULLENS Head of the Duke Ellington School for the Arts, honored for Excellence in Community Transformation. JAMES BINGHAM Chair of the WAU Music Department, honored for Excellence in the Musical Arts and Humanities. ANNUAL VISIONARIES GALA HONOREES 37 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 39. ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS
  • 40. Growing with Excellence INCREASED ENGAGEMENT HIGH SATISFACTION RATES REFLECT UNIVERSITY SUPPORT Results of the annual Employee Satisfaction and Engagement Survey continue to be positive. The most recent average overall employee satisfaction score is 3.8 (on a 5-point Likert scale), which is higher than the 3.19 national average for employee engagement during the same 2011-2014 time frame, as reported by Aon Hewitt Consulting. An Employee Assistance Program launched in 2012 offers free and confidential around-the-clock access to such services as counseling support for life issues, child and elder care referrals, wellness and parent coaching, and financial and legal consultation. 78% OF WAU RESPONDENTS WOULD RECOMMEND WAU AS A PLACE TO WORK The large majority of employees surveyed say they would recommend the university as a place to work. They reported being proud to work for WAU, knowing that their jobs matter to the success of the institution, knowing what is expected of them, feeling valued by their supervisor, and believing their supervisor recognizes good work. SURVEY RESPONDENTS POINT TO MUTUAL RESPECT Overall, staff report that they respect their co-workers, respect senior leaders, and believe that others care about them personally. NEARLY ONE THIRD OF EMPLOYEES RECEIVE ANNUAL RECOGNITION A PRAISE (People Recognizing Action in Superb Employees) peer recognition system was implemented to inspire employees and reinforce service excellence, with approximately 30 percent of the workforce receiving recognition each year for making a positive difference through word or deed. FOR EMPLOYEES ACADEMIC YEAR EMPLOYEE RETENTION 2010/11 92% 2011/12 91% 2012/13 85% 2013/14 95% 2014/15 92% EMPLOYEERETENTIONTRENDS Goal - Greater than 90% / National Average - 84% WAU 5 year Average 91% ACADEMIC YEAR EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT 2010/11 3.7 2011/12 3.9 2012/13 3.9 2013/14 3.8 2014/15 3.6 EMPLOYEEENGAGEMENTTREND Goal 4.0 / Likert Scale 1-5 / WAU 5 year Average 3.8 President Spence recognizes Lisa Gant with a “Beyond the Call” award for her dedication to team work. 39 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 41. ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MILITARY FAMILIES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS BOOST SUCCESS In 2014, WAU gained the designation of being a Military Friendly School for veterans and their families, as well as that of being an Education USA School for international students. MORE CLUBS AND SERVICES Seven new clubs, the addition of mental health counseling services, a successful 24/7 health plan phone option, and access to five new endowments and five new scholarships are enhancing the college experience for students. In addition, a Parents Weekend was launched in the 2012 Spring Semester, and a “Senior Year Experience” was implemented in 2014 for graduating seniors. FOR ALUMNI A new Director of Alumni Relations position, added to the Office of Advancement and University Relations, is providing WAU alumni with information about university events and opportunities where they can make a difference. FOR STUDENTS STUDENT CLUBS 2015-2016 SCHOOL YEAR African Student Union Alpha Chi (Junior and senior Honor Societies) Amnesty International Association of Computing and Machinery *BBOM Club (Best Buddies of Maryland) (Male Nurses) Black Student Union Caribbean Student Association Chemistry Club Chess Club Commuter Student Task Force – Student Life Education Club Enactus *FCA Club (Fellowship of Christian Athletes) Filipino-American Student Association HOSA Theta Alpha International Students’ Association Latino Student Union *The MECCA Club (Middle Eastern Campus Coalition Association) Ministerial Association Music Teachers’National Association Collegiate Chapter (MTNA) Nursing Student Association – Nursing Department Phi Eta Sigma (Freshman Honor Society) Pre-Law Club Pre-Medical Society Psi Chi (Psych. Honor Society) *The PRSSR Club (Public Relations Student Society of America) Red Cross Club SHAPE Club (Society of Health and Physical Education) Sigma Beta Delta (Business Honor Society) – Business Department Sigma Tau Delta (English Honor Society) – English Department *SLA (Student Leadership Association) *SNA Club (Student National Association) Student Ministerial Association – Religion Department *new clubs this year are highlighted PRIVATEDONATIONSINCREASEBYOVER48% INTHEPAST5YEARS 2010/11 $0.00 $0.50 $1.00 $1.50 $2.00 $2.50 $3.00 $3.50 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15YEARS ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS MILLIONS 40WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 42. INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS Growing with Excellence MERGING DEPARTMENTS HAVE SPARKED NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS A merger of the university’s Business Department with its Communication and Journalism Department last summer is creating operational efficiencies and providing students with access to a wider range of resources and opportunities. The merger enables more students to participate in fieldtrips, the ENACTUS business club, and the Public Relations Society of America (PRSSA). It also provides more students with access to internship announcements. ELECTRONIC DELIVERY OF PAPERWORK IS MAKING IT EASIER AND FASTER TO HIRE ADJUNCT PROFESSORS The process for hiring adjunct professors is now vastly improved, thanks to a new electronic delivery system for employment paperwork. What once took two weeks to accomplish can now be done in three days. The electronic system reduces the time for receipt, signing and return of employment documents, and enables the university to be more nimble in attaining qualified professors for the various degree programs. ADMISSIONS ACTIVITIES ARE NOW BETTER MANAGED ON A MASTER RECRUITMENT CALENDAR WAU is better able to attract new students and increase enrollment with a master recruitment calendar that was created in 2014.
  • 43. THE ONLY ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY IN CIC’S LIST OF NINE MISSION DRIVEN CAMPUSES Just this Spring, WAU was listed in The Council of Independent Colleges Strategic Change and Innovation in Independent Colleges report as one of the Nine Mission-Driven Campuses. According to the report, the nine institutions show substantial variation in the challenges they faced, in the ways they organized to address those challenges, and in their eventual substantive choices. All the colleges studied exhibited: 1. A Bias for Action. 2. A Drive to Connect Locally, Regionally, and Beyond. 3. Realistic Self-Assessment and Adaptation. 4. Structuring for Innovation. 5. Assertive Leadership within Shared Governance Traditions. 6. Alignment of Mission and Innovation. To read the full report visit http://cic.edu/Programs-and-Services/Programs/ Documents/CIC-Hearn-Report-2016.pdf. Reclassified as a Private Not-for-profit Master’s University We have always been acknowledged as a teaching, service, and learning institution that is now reclassified as a private not-for-profit Master’s University by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. We are moving forward with a single shared vision – Vision 2020 – that will bring recognition to the institution by accrediting agencies, the academic community and the general public as a premier university of quality and distinction. ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 42WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 44. Growing with Excellence PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS COMPLETED PROJECTS A new $6.3 million music building; a $1.8 million artificial turf ball field with new lights, scoreboard and bleachers; a $1.2 million dining hall renovation; a $1.1 million student activity center, and a host of smaller renovation projects, ranging from 135 new security cameras to a new parking lot with solar lighting off Greenwood Avenue, are included in the campus improvements. Alumni, students, faculty, staff, and local elected officials joined to celebrate the opening of the new ball field on September 9, 2014. 43 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 45. IN THE WORKS Renovations to the women’s residence hall have begun, and 50 rooms and 15 restrooms will be renovated in time for the 2016 Fall Semester. That project will include new flooring, window dressing and wall paint, new showers, along with improved heating and air-conditioning. WAU President Spence and Athletic Director Patrick Crarey view the ballfield from the sideline. ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 44WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 46. BREAKING GROUND FOR A NEW HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND WELLNESS CENTER The new $9.7 million Gail S. and Bruce E. Boyer Health Professions and Wellness Center is breaking ground this month and expected to be completed in the fall of 2017. The 20,794-square-foot Center is being built as a renovation and addition to the existing Health Professions Building on campus. When completed, the Center will accommodate Washington Adventist University’s health professions and science programs, along with community health programs and activities. The building will also provide opportunities for the university to partner with the city and county in offering wellness activities. Funding for the new Gail S. and Bruce E. Boyer Health Professions and Wellness Center comes from the University’s annual Visionaries Gala fundraising event, the Boyers and other contributors, along with support from the Maryland Governor’s Office through a $3.2 million matching grant. The architect for the project is Hord Coplan and Macht. Growing with Excellence An artist's rendering of the new Gail S. and Bruce E. Boyer Health Professions and Wellness Center. 45 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 47. 08 CLASSROOMS 5 NURSING 1 RESPIRATORY 1 HWPE 1 SEMINAR 03 WELLNESS 1 EXISTING FITNESS CENTER 1 NEW FITNESS CENTER 1 MULTIPURPOSE ROOM 05 LABS 1 ICU SIMULATION 3 NURSING SKILLS 1 COMPUTER 11 COLLABORATION 3 INFORMAL STUDY AREAS WITH SOFT SEATING 4 STUDY NOOKS 4 GROUP STUDY ROOMS OF VARIOUS SIZES 31 OFFICE 23 PRIVATE OFFICES 2 RECEPTIONS 2 WORK ROOMS 2 CONFERENCE ROOMS 1 STUDENT LOUNGE 1 FACULTY LOUNGE Leroy and Lois Peters Music Center completed in 2011 Student Activity Center completed in 2013 Dining Hall completed in 2012 ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 46WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 48. Growing with Excellence SPIRITUAL GAINS “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Corinthians 12:9 THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE BAPTIZED DURING MISSION TRIPS IS NEARLY EQUIVALENT TO THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO REGULARLY ATTEND SLIGO SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH ON SABBATH. MORE THAN 60 YOUNG ADULTS HAVE BEEN BAPTIZED DURING CAMPUS REVIVALS Since 2013, Washington Adventist University has hosted an annual Campus Revival, a week of worship each evening under a large white tent. Hundreds of students, faculty and staff, and visitors from nearby churches have attended. A total of 53 students were baptized during the 2nd Annual Campus Revival, which featured the theme “I’m Weak,” based on 2 Corinthians 12:9; and 11 more answered the call to baptism this year at the most recent revival held March 28-April 1. 47 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 49. MISSION TRIPS, BOTH AT HOME AND ABROAD During the past five years, 170 students, faculty and staff have participated in mission trips organized by the Office of Ministry, and the resulting baptisms number 1,469. Trips to 19 countries have included destinations in the Philippines; Brazil; Jamaica; St. Kitts; Kenya, Mauritius, India, Haiti, Indonesia, Tanzania, Russia, Zambia and Costa Rica. In addition, local missions have included a trip to Flint, Michigan this year to deliver 560 cases of clean drinking water; and four vacation Bible schools in the last five years that ministered to 3,300 children – enough to fill all grade levels at a public elementary school. MISSION TRIP PARTICIPANTS 2011 35 2012 20 2013 64 2014 26 2015 25 Total 170 MISSION TRIP VBS 2011 2012 Tanzania 1 2013 India/Haiti 2 2014 2015 Kenya 1 Total 4 NUMBER OF CHILDREN MINISTERED IN VBS 2011 2012 200 2013 2900 2014 2015 200 Total 3300 NUMBER OF BAPTISMS MISSION TRIPS 2011 331 2012 900 2013 66 2014 141 2015 31 Total 1469 BAPTISMS – BY MISSION TRIPS Zambia 331 Tanzania 900 Mauritius 30 India 30 Indonesia 2 Philippines 141 Kenya 30 Haiti 4 Jamaica 1 Total 1469 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 BRAZIL NEW JERSEY BALTIMORE, MD FLINT, MICHIGAN MAP KEY: Total Mission Trips/Countries MAURITIUS TANZANIA KENYA ZAMBIA INDIA PHILIPPINES INDONESIA RUSSIA 19 COSTA RICA JAMAICA HAITI ST. KITTS DOMINICAN REPUBLIC PUERTO RICO ST. THOMAS ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 48WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 50. Growing with Excellence THE RUSSIAN BIBLE TRANSLATION WAS COMPLETED AND PUBLISHED, AND IT IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR THE FIRST TIME TO MORE THAN 140 MILLION RUSSIANS. A team of Washington Adventist University scholars, administrators and Seventh-day Adventist church leaders travelled to Russia last year to celebrate the completion of a five-year project to translate an inter-denominational Bible into Modern Russian. The Bible is now available in bookstores and elsewhere throughout the country, offering new access to 143.4 million residents. The effort — spearheaded by Washington Adventist University professor of theology, history and philosophy Michael Kulakov Jr., D.Phil. — involved an unprecedented collaboration between the United States, Russia, and multiple organizations and scholars. 49 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 51. Washington Adventist University’s WGTS 91.9 radio station is bringing people in the Washington, D.C. area and beyond closer to Jesus and each other. The station features Christian music, uplifting messages and personal stories of hope. WGTS BUILDS PERSONAL CONNECTIONS The number of people who listen to the station each week now number, on average, more than 498,700 people - a 9.4 percent increase from five years ago. WGTS HAS INCREASED CORE LISTENERS BY NEARLY TEN PERCENT IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS PrayerWorks! on the WGTS website has quickly grown to more than 280,000 prayer interactions in the past year. More than 246,000 people have prayed for the more than 31,600 requests shared on the website, and 734 stories of answered prayer have been shared with WGTS staff and volunteers. In addition, staff and volunteers have prayed for thousands of requests in person at events, over the phone, online and via email and text messaging. HOSTING ONE OF THE LARGEST VIRTUAL PRAYER COMMUNITIES IN THE NATION The radio station’s average quarter share (which is the percentage of total listening to stations in the Washington, D.C. area), increased from 2.5 percent in 2010 to 3.1 percent in 2015. GAINING A GREATER SHARE OF THE WASHINGTON, D.C. LISTENING AUDIENCE ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 50WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 52. Growing with Excellence Columbia Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Rob Vandeman, Executive Secretary Dave Weigley, President Seth Bardu, Treasurer
  • 53. SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS Over the last five years we have been blessed to experience an increase in support. Without these individuals we would not have been able to accomplish nearly as much. Thank you for your generosity and commitment to the future of Washington Adventist University. • Farid Srour • Leroy and Lois Peters • Gale and Bruce Boyer • Evelyn Bata • Vijayan Charles • Dean Bouland • Patrick Farley • Columbia Union • Terry Forde • Bill Roberson • Adventist Healthcare • Richard Raj • Ronald and Beverly Anderson • Commonweal Foundation • Friedenwald Memorial Fund, Inc • Lynn E. Thetus Gair Trust • Gemini Foundation • Medical Group Foundation, Inc • Milton and Merrillie Morris • Peters Education Foundation, Inc • The Herbert N. Gundersheimer Foundation, Inc ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 52WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 54. Growing with Excellence REPORT OF GIFTS FUND NAME AMOUNT Misc. $38,511.22 Departments $96,898.35 Capital Projects $504,986.03 Scholarships Endowments $332,390.98 Annual Fund $24,647.44 FUNDSDONATEDTO2014-2015W/OPLEDGESOR GIFTSINKIND YEAR AMOUNT 2014-2015 $972,461.58 2013-2014 $780,697.50 2012-2013 $629,057.38 2011-2012 $684,284.18 2010-2011 $387,745.15 5YRCOMPARISONW/OPLEDGESOR GIFTSINKIND FIVEYEARCOMPARISON 2014/15 $0.00 2013/14 2012/13 2011/12 2010/11 $200,000.00 $400,000.00 $600,000.00 $800,000.00 $1,000,000.00 $1,200,000.00 $972,461.58 $780,697.50 $629,057.38 $684,284.18 $387,745.15 The following represents those who contributed cash gifts or gifts-in-kind to Washington Adventist University from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015. Thank you for selecting Washington Adventist University as the recipient of your donation. We are also thankful for the organizations in the community that share our mission, values and vision. If we have inadvertently left your name off the list, please accept our apology and contact the Office of Advancement at 301-891-4133. Gifts given by Seventh-day Adventist Conferences under the direction of the president are listed by conference name. 53 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 55. Board member Bruce E. Boyer contributed $1 million for the new health professions and wellness center. From left, WAU Provost Cheryl Kisunzu, Board member Seth Bardu, Boyer, Vice-President of Finance Patrick Farley, President Weymouth Spence, Board Chair Dave Weigley, and Board Vice-Chair Rob Vandeman. ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 54WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 56. Growing with Excellence FRIENDS/DONORS 0.00+($3,743.28) NAME CLASS OF James Y. Albertson 1966 America’s Charitites-Distribution Account Eduardo Gonzalez Margaret Anderson Gonzalez 2005 2006 Esau Arrue Juliana C. Baioni 2012 Catherine V. Baker 1990 Howard F. Bankes 1953 Bert Beach Elmo Benjamin Harry J. Bennett 1942 Sophia O. Boswell 2013 Charles F. Brown 1990 Laurel A. Bryant 2014 Carol M. Byrkit 1953 Ricardo R. Cala 2015 Elmer Carreno Vera E. Chandler 1972 Frantz Dreane Charles Betty C. Chung 2014 Judith E. Coe 1965 Wanda Colon-Canales Marshall E. Conner Claudio Pamela Consuegra 1982 Raysa Creque Nancie Crespi Lu Ann Crews 1947 Alice N. Cunningham-Spindler 1953 Dupont Park Seventh-day Adventist Church Albert M. Ellis 1960 N. David Oleta Emerson Jamesa Everett Sandra E. Farwell-Williams 1985 Herbert Mabel Fevec 1954 1950 Raenelle J. Finney 2002 Shawn L. Fordham 2014 Virgil T. Fryling 1955 David Eileen Fuller 1979 1974 George B. Gainer 1974 Lisa A. Garrison James D. George Esther K. Ghazi 1990 Marthanne L. Glenn 1976 Lana L. Greaves-Benjamin 2014 Ray Hartwell Hiramoto Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, PA Irolsay Hosten-Peraza Beverley M. Hyatt-Allen IGive Welton L. Ingram Roland F. John 1952 Ruth Jorge Robin M. Kinard 2001 Pierre Jacqueline Laguere Steven Lapham Victoria K. Lawrence 1960 Mervyn Lilibeth Lee Grant Leitma 1978 Jered C. Lyons Pauline Maxwell 1951 Akosoa McFadgion Dorrett McFarlane Raquel A. McKenzie 1994 John H. Meier 1992 Doris J. Melendez-Warren 1994 Albert Florence Miller Sanders Mompremier 1995 Enoh Nkana Quiana N. Oates 2004 Jane Ogora 2014 Carol Onuska 1964 Nicholas Karen Palmer Rosalee R. Pedapudi-Jesudas 2002 Bruce Peifer Herma Percy Margaret Persand Jonathan Peter 2010 Rich Pfannenstiel 55 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 57. NAME CLASS OF Julie A. Barnard 2011 Paula Barnes Edward L. Barnette 1971 Lee D. Beers 1958 Steven Brinda Blackburn 1984 Larry Boggess John F. Bohner 1952 James E. Butler Krista Byrd 2013 Clara L. Cobb 1977 Elaine R. Congdon 1967 William Cox Dorothy L. Creveling 1953 Llewelyn Crooks Lori A. Dean Samuel Roneily Devai Desiree R. Dixon 2012 William D. Dorch 1988 Rabaut Dorval 1997 Deanna B. Echols 1988 Katharine Eldridge Lahna Farver C. Evelyn Gaskill 1987 Ruth O. Gelford Ryle 1953 Betty Giang Charles J. Goodacre Harrodine Greene Devie L. Phipps 2014 Grace B. Pitcher 1944 Christopher G. Priano 1993 Timothy Prue Boston L. Raith 1946 Becky A. Ratana 1989 Ellis Rich Marilyn F. Riley 2011 Betty C. Rivera Ivybelle M. Roye Selena P. Simons Brian Claudia Smith 1979 1987 David C. Smith Melissa C. Smith Boyd 2014 Loren Stone Loraine F. Sweetland 1968 Joseph P. Tobing 1987 Verizon of Tulsa, OK Terri J. Vincentich 1981 Mary L. Weigle 1958 Nan Whalen 1958 Annie P. Wilkins 1988 Kathy L. Williams 1975 Tyronea Williams 2014 Aaron Wilson 2012 Lee M. Wisel Peet 1974 Debra W. Wood 1982 VISIONARY’S SOCIETY $10,000.00+($761,496.93) NAME CLASS OF Ronald Beverly Anderson 1964 Ronald Glen H. Bennett 1970 Bruce Gail Boyer Bruce attend- ed Columbia Union Conference Commonweal Foundation Friedenwald Memorial Fund, Inc Lynn E. Thetis Gair Trust 1940 Gemini Foundation Medical Group Foundation, Inc. Milton Merrillie Morris 1964/1966 Leroy Lois Peters 2014 Lois Peters Education Foundation, Inc. Farid Srour 1949 The Herbert N. Gundersheimer Foundation, Inc. PIONEER SOCIETY $100.00+($12,539.47) ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 56WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 58. Cephas Daphne Greenidge 1956 1964 Cheryl A. Haag-Schaeffer 1973 Ronald B. Halvorsen Patricia Hare Swensen 1989 Peggy L. Harris 1997 Nancy J. Heine 1977 Alfred E. Hess 1952 Steven M. Hipps Alverton Holness Daisy Hosten-Holness Faith D. Housen 1984 William E. Jackson 1974 Andre Cecilia Johnson 1998 1996 Regina N. Johnson 2014 Sandra L. Juarez 1964 Josephine Y. Loh 1970 Sandra M. Loughlin 2002 Linda J. Lundberg 1970 Melvin Makey Lorena Martinez Elizabeth E. Matthews 1958 Joel A. Mercado 2013 Edwin Monge Rebekah S. Moore 1973 Brian Tiffany Morgan Douglas Morgan Jeremias Maria Natividad Delores L. Nichols 1987 Jean B. Oliphant Babajide Dorothy Oluyemi Lester Jennifer Ortiz Alana Pabon Oliver S. Palmer 1964 Joyce Passer 1945 Jean A. Patterson 1949 Penny E. Perry 1979 Leslie H. Pitton 1967 Viola R. Poey 2014 Potomac Conference of Seventh-Day Adventists 1994 Wilma J. Raub 1969 Glenn S. Rea Richard M. Reinhardt 2002 Growing with Excellence Rick Remmers Ruby A. Rice 1956 Alice F. Rich 1991 Ruth M. Rivera 1965 Jean Robert Brice Lee M. Roberts Vicki S. Rosette 1986 Celeste P. Ryan Blyden 1993 Dean Sadat-Aalaee Anne V. Saggurthi 1996 Nikolaus Ruth Satelmajer William G. Seth 1956 Shake Shennar 1962 Phyllis Y. Simons 1962 Myschelle W. Spears 1970 Linda L. Steinberg Ruth I. Swan 1969 The Word of God Baptist Church Deborah A. Thurlow 1986 Karen Titus 1971 Carol J. Wallington 1965 Amy L. Wallish 2012 Paul Weir Ouida E. Westney 1959 Daniella S. Williams 2013 Hattie J. Williams 1970 Ted N. C. Nancy Wilson 1971/Ted Leona A. Woodrupp 1990 Joseph Wright Ruth E. Wright 1962 Angeli Yutuc 2010 Lynn Zabaleta GATEWAY SOCIETY $250.00+($13,541.28) NAME CLASS OF William Bernie Albright Rebecca J. Alignay 1999 Becky Barker Ellie R. Barker 2011 57 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 59. Karen Benn Marshall Janet Brode 2011 Jeanette Bryson Gaspar Colon Angie Crews 2007 Nicole Currier Charles Rosie Davis Sonia Donaldson Phyllis Edmonds Max Faulkner Dorothy M. Gardner 1964 Stanley M. Grube 1961 Gladstone Gurubatham Joseph Juanita Gurubatham 1966 1974 Kathy E. Hecht 1984 Erytheia Lambert-Jones Benin A. Lee 1991 Edna Maye M. Loveless Beulah Manuel Martec Facilities Adrienne Matthews Lincoln R. McKenzie New Jersey Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Molly S. Peters 1980 Madge Quesenberry 2011 Howard M. Schwartz Michael K. Shelton 2005 Windolyn Spence-Graham Spencerville Adventist Academy Sanjay S. Thomas Umoja Central Seventh-day Adventist Church United Stationers Supply Company Clarline V. Wallace Kaneil D. Williams 2007 Lauren M. Wilson Mildred E. Wright 1978 Mark A. Young 1995 Charlotte C. Zane 1960 NAME CLASS OF Donald L. Albright Harry L. Banks 1967 Seth Bardu Roy P. Benson 1969 Charles Betsey Margaret Simms Hamlet Canosa Rajan Elizabeth Charles City of Takoma Park William Ellis Fifth Estate Communication, LLC Henry Sharon Fordham Jose A. Fuentes TiJuana G. Griffin 1977 Olive Hemmings Heritage Homes Development Corp. Marilyn Herrmann 1965 Karl Donna Janetzko 1971 1975 Ruth F. Jenkins 1937 Ralph Johnson Mikhail Kulakov Ralph Lee Maria Lee-Johnson Martha Lopez Sharlin Lowry William George Jo Ann K. MacKey Medical Health Center of Frederick, LLC Justin D. Mezetin 2006 Timothy L. Nelson 2011 Densil Janette Neufville 1992 Densil North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists Johnny D. Nwankwo 2015 Kathryn S. Pearson 1984 Pepco Christina Rosette Greta Russell-Greene Bogdan Scur Sligo Seventh-day Adventist Church State Farm Companies Foundation Carol H. Stewart HMS RICHARDS SOCIETY $500.00+($27,324.07) ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS 58WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 60. Deborah J. Szasz 1975 Fitzroy Jennifer Thomas 1976 2009 Rob Vandeman Vanguard Charitable Lisa M. Walls Wheaton Spanish Seventh-day Adventist Church Melissa L. Whitmill 1995 Dave Wigley Lloyd Yutuc Growing with Excellence JAMES LAWHEARD SOCIETY $1,000.00+($68,527.77) NAME CLASS OF Nirmala R. Abraham 1994 Adventist Health Care-Community Partnership Fund Anonymous Russell Nancy Arnold 1959 1955 James Bingham Mike Bletzacker Khadene Campbell-Taffe Judith Cichosz Dennis Linda Currier Frank Anna Damazo Frank Dolly DeHaan Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Daisy J. Flores-Orion Terry Forde Brett Gamma Grillmarx, LLC M. Leroy Janet Haas Hamburg Seventh-day Adventist Church Paul S. Heipp Hord Coplan Macht, Inc Cynthia L. Isensee-Boyle 1982 Burton Martha Johnson 1955 Martha Cheryl H. Kisunzu John L. Matthews McCottry Industries Inc. Angus W. McDonald 1974 Donald E. Melnick 1971 Merrill Lynch Donald G. Morgan 1963 Baraka Muganda Joyce P. Newmyer Henry H. Pittman E. Albert Reece Alex Melissa Romain Genevieve Singh Skanska USA Building Inc. Ruben Smith Janet F. Stoehr 1969 Patrick A. Williams FOUNDER’S SOCIETY $5,000.00+($85,888.78) NAME CLASS OF Adventist HealthCare Aladdin Food Management Services, LLC Evelyn Bata H. Dean Bouland 1975 LeRoy G. Cain Vijayan Jill Charles Patrick K. Farley 1981 International Education Management Resources, LLC Michael Lee Maryland Independent Colleges and Universities Association Office Care, Inc. Osborne Parchment Weymouth P. Spence The MT Charitable Foundation WGTS 91.9 59 STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 61. ACADEMIC ENHANCEMENTS / FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS / ADVANTAGES / ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS / COMMUNITY SERVICE ADVANCEMENTS / FINANCIAL STRENGTH / INCREASED ENGAGEMENT / INNOVATIONS AND ADVANCEMENTS / PHYSICAL CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS / SPIRITUAL GAINS / SIGNIFICANT SUPPORTERS / REPORT OF GIFTS
  • 62. EXECUTIVE EDITOR Angie Crews PHOTOGRAPHER John Keith Ross Patterson Randolph Robin PRINTER ITP - Innovative Technologies in Print STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY DESIGNER Marshall Moya Design EDITOR AND WRITER Donna Bigler, Kinetics Marketing and Communications
  • 63. The State of the University was produced for the quinquennial constituency meeting held on May 20, 2016. It is an illustrative report intended to give an overview of the university’s achievements since 2011. Washington Adventist University is sponsored and governed by the Columbia Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists as an integral part of the system of educational institutions established throughout the world by the Seventh-day Adventist Church. 62WASHINGTON ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY
  • 65. Growing with Excellence reflects our transformative journey from a good university to a great one.
  • 67. OUR VISION THANK YOU For your continued support!