Learn to Use and Use to Learn: Designers as a Tool for Innovative Collaboration

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Presented at the 2012 AECT International Convention, Naimah Wade and Kecia Waddell discuss the study that also served as a model of technology application by providing a practical demonstration of how to utilize innovative social tools for learning and virtual collaboration. The benefit of this model is that it can be used inform instructional design decisions and guide the successful integration of technology into the learning strategy. Additional analysis of the data from this original study uncovered to emergent themes: the designer as a tool for innovative collaboration and strategies for navigating the technology learning curve.

*NOTE: SLIDE #3 is a video presentation of the integrative collaborative functions of Google Applications (To view visit - http://youtube.googleapis.com/v/kcOUWjkGBUY)

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  • Description of the StudyPurpose DataWhat HappenedFindingsKey Themes“Our” Discoveries. 2 messages that kept surfacing in so many words. Learn to Use (managing the learning curve) Use to Learn (use of designer’s style and expertise as a driver of innovative strategies in online environments) Our recommendations
  • http://youtube.googleapis.com/v/kcOUWjkGBUY
  • USE to LEARN – The Human Instrument (Professor) is more important than the toolTo what degree does the quality of the learning strategies that are implemented by the designer impact student collaboration in Google Applications?1. How should instructional designer approach and solve problems confronted by learners using online productivity tools for collaboration? Use principles of design thinkingAccording to Nigel Cross, design thinking is the notion of adopting a broad ‘systems view’ of a problematic situation with solution-focused mindsetthat starts with the goal or what is meant to be achieved instead of starting with a certain problem. Such a mindset opens a designer to the opportunities the problem might present for innovation2. What is the role of the instructional designer with increased use of online productivity tools for collaboration? CoachNational Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for Coaching (NETS-C) benchmark what coaches should know and be able to do to effectively help ID develop their confidence and effectiveness in designing and supporting technology-rich environments that maximize learning. Each iteration of our study required the ID as Instructor to apply her understanding of cognitive learning theory. She accomplished this by designing authentic problem-solving and goal-oriented activities using Google Apps that were constructive, reflective and collaborative. Innovation is an inherently social activity. Developing instructional materials, systems, and guidelines for learning to flourish formally, informally, and even socially was keyto learning advanced instructional design techniques and simultaneously observing strategies for course delivery and group collaboration. The ID Instructor designed coursework that exposed students to concepts and knowledge to prepare them for practice in the field:1. Course content2. Accessible technology tools3. Strategies for designing and teaching in an online environment through observation of instructor design3. How does the instructional designer as the human instrument impact productivity tool use to learn? Disposition & Competency of the ID The ID as Instructor NEED NOT be a TRANSFORMATIVE USER of various technologies as much as DEMONSTRATE COMPETENCY IN ways to use that technology to sequence learning experiences appropriate for successful task outcomes– i.e., problem solving and understanding and application of cognitivelearning theory within the online setting. The ID as Instructor would need to be able to engage in active course design, development and implementation as required by a learner-centered focusin order to develop a savvy and competitive workforce able to maximize learning with technology.
  • Poll the group to determine the degree of familiarity with Google Docs. If the group is mostly experts proceed to 5 ideas in 5 minutes. If the group is mostly novices, proceed to demo?Presenter needs to visit https://docs.google.com/demo/ FIRST THEN share the shortened URL with the audience(these demos are only good for 24 hours…so DON’T create the link for the audience until the day of the presentation.) http://goo.gl/ujeXu
  • Learn to Use and Use to Learn: Designers as a Tool for Innovative Collaboration

    1. 1. Learn to Use and Use to Learn: Designers as a Tool for Innovative Collaboration Kecia J. Waddell Naimah N. Wade Wayne State University 2012 AECT International Convention - Louisville, Kentucky Learning in the Age of Globalization October 30- November 3, 2012
    2. 2. Agenda• How We Got Here • Description of the Study • What Happened • Key Themes• Learn to Use Implication• Use to Learn Implications• Summary of Recommendations
    3. 3. How We Got HerePURPOSE : The purpose of the original Google Applications Study was to develop an innovative intervention incorporating Google Applications in a graduate instructional design course to model effective use of technology integration to support individual and peer learning. • Documenting the process of creating a higher education course utilizing Google Applications • Student perceptions of the function of Google Applications and its impact on learning 2 year study
    4. 4. Findings Google Apps Impact on Peer Learning• Google Apps improved peer learning by: • Timely/relevant feedback • Ease of use • Effective activity design • Reduced frustration with DB threads • Useful Conversation Tracking features• Google Apps hindered peer learning: • Didn’t like constant editing to docs by other group members when graded individually within group • Groups Documents being edited without permission or discussion. • Word processing features not as functional as Word • Group document got too large
    5. 5. Findings (Con’t) Google Apps Impact on Learning• Google Apps helped learning by: • Reducing frustration with Discussion Board threads • Allowing for rich/meaningful responses teacher-to-student • Providing a useful conversation tracking feature • Real-time collaboration features• Google Apps hindered learning by: • Generating frustration due to unfamiliarity with Google Apps
    6. 6. Key ThemesMETHOD• Reflective journals that captured learner perceptions were analyzed using constant-comparison (Ruona, 2005)• Discourse Analysis (Wordle.com)RESEARCH QUESTIONS THAT EMERGED• How might failing to overcome challenges that accompany learning new and emerging tools for learning and collaborative outweigh the benefits of their use?• To what degree does the quality of the learning strategies implemented by the designer impact student collaboration in Google Applications?
    7. 7. Reflective Journals
    8. 8. Learn to Use What does it mean?• How can designers best utilize innovative social tools for learning and virtual collaboration? By proactively learning to use them.• How can designers ensure that students excel in online learning environments built on new/unique platforms? By helping them gain required proficiency (learn to use ).• What can designers and those who train designers do to help students to gain this required proficiency and excel innovative learning platforms? Manage the technology learning curve
    9. 9. Learn to Use Implications Strategies for Managing the Learning Curve• Understand the phases of the innovation learning curve as it relates to designing online instruction. o Diffusion of Innovation (Rogers, 1995) o Technology Acceptance Model (Bagozzi, Davis & Warshaw, 1992)• Anticipate Learning Barriers o Technological anxiety and frustration Image Courtesy of Wikipedia (Saade & Kira, 2006)• Accelerate acceptance of the selected technology by proactively orienting students to the tools and providing opportunities for them to practice
    10. 10. Use to Learn What does it mean?• How should instructional designer approach and solve challenges confronted by learners using online productivity tools for collaboration? Use principles of design thinking• What is the role of the instructional designer with increased use of online productivity tools for collaboration? Coach• How does the instructional designer as the human instrument impact productivity tool use to learn? Disposition & Competency of the ID
    11. 11. Use to Learn ImplicationsInstructional designers are the human instrument inthe successful creation and support of effectivedigital-age learning environments DISPOSITIONS • Tolerance for ambiguity • Creativity and flexibility • Deep commitment to student learning • Perseverance • Optimism and enthusiasm (Danielson, 2006)Essential Strategies for Online Collaboration• Cognitive Apprenticeship (McLellan, 1994; Weigel, 2002)• Collaborative Learning
    12. 12. Interact with the Tool http://goo.gl/ujeXuUses and Benefits: 5 Ideas in 5 Minutes:
    13. 13. Interact with the Tool VISIThttp://goo.gl/ujeXu
    14. 14. ReferencesCross, N. (2011). Design thinking : understanding how designers think and work. Oxford; New York: Berg.Danielson, C. (2006). Teacher leadership that strengthens professional practice. Alexandria, VA: ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum DevelopmentMcLellan, H. (1994). Situated learning: Continuing the conversation. Educational Technology 34, 7- 8.Saade, R.G., & Kira, D. (2006). The Emotional State of Technology Acceptance. Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology Volume 3.Surry, D.W., & Ely, D.P. (2001). Adoption, Diffusion, Implementation and Institutionalization of Educational Technology. In R. Reiser & V.L. Dempsey (Eds.), Trends & Issues in Instructional Design and Technology, 183-193, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Unger, K. L. (2012). Examining the factors of a technology professional development intervention. Wayne State University).ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, 258. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.proxy.lib.wayne.edu/docview/1010417547?accountid=14925. (1010417547).Weigel, V. (2002). Deep learning for a digital age: Technology’s untapped potential to enrich higher education. New York: Jossey-Bass.
    15. 15. Contact Us Kecia J. Waddell - keciajw@gmail.comNaimah N. Wade - naimah.wade@wayne.edu

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