A New Breed of Communications Company
“ You Never Get a Second Chance to Make a First Impression.”  —Unknown Take pride in all aspects of your business, whether...
Take a LOOK at YOURSELF
93% •  93% of how you are judged is based on NON-VERBAL data: your appearance and body language. Only 7% is based on the W...
Are you having a POSITIVE or NEGATIVE impact on customers? •  Everyone that comes in contact with your business is a poten...
ASSESS your SPACE Whether you have a retail store, reception area, corporate or home-based office—make sure: •  Your space...
Is this the image you want to portray to customers? Can you be productive in a space like this?  Your staff also shapes th...
VALUE your CUSTOMERS Consider the negative customer-service experiences you’ve had.  What impressions have they left on th...
Treat your customers as precious JEWELS. Especially in this economy, take extra measures to show you care about their need...
Stimulate Your DIGITAL IMAGE The good and bad news about technology is that we have greater access to everything.
= <ul><li>KEEP IT SHORT. If your email goes beyond the length of what can be seen on the screen of a tablet, smart phone, ...
A few points on SOCIAL MEDIA:  Embrace It!  Build your social media presence ONLY IF you are going to be active on it. •  ...
EVALUATE your BUSINESS TOOLS Look at the signals your professional materials are sending.
Before After Never leave your office without your business cards. How does it make you feel when someone you are meeting w...
Before After •  The American Advertising Federation recently polled members and found websites ranked first as the most va...
What does the Apple brand say to you? (emotions, lifestyle, community, passion, imagination, design, simplicity, customer ...
Your brand is reflected in all forms of communication.  •  Top businesses use their brands effectively and include a brand...
Avoid the BAND AID approach to BRANDING. •  If you can’t afford to rebrand all of your communication tools at once, we rec...
? What does your brand say about you? Take a minute to think about your various messages and materials and how that reflec...
Before After Think of a brand as a THREAD that is woven throughout your communications. The next few slides show some exam...
“ HATCH was able to turn around a temporary website design in less than   three weeks. We are already seeing increased inq...
Entegrion wins Navy contract extension Navy Awards Entegrion $9.84 Million to Investigate  Life-Saving Resuscitation Thera...
Before After Here is an example of a Chapel Hill, NC nonprofit: The PTA Thrift Shop. •  We first redesigned their basic br...
“ WE HAVE FOUND our relationship with Hatch to be valuable both professionally and personally. We appreciate their profess...
•  The PTA Thrift Shop has given over $5M to local schools over the past 15 years. •  They turn trash into cash through re...
PTA Thrift Shop Launches Campaign to Build New Carrboro Facilities PTA Thrift Shop to Build $5.1 M Plaza in Carrboro Carrb...
We branded this client from inception. They provide consulting services to government and private firms in the very compet...
We also branded this client from inception. It is a nonprofit in DC that specializes in advocacy evaluation for nonprofits...
Your company is a REFLECTION  of WHO YOU ARE.  All of your marketing and communication materials, across all platforms sho...
 
Tamara Baker Message Maestro [email_address] 919.933.7650  O 919.951.9282  C Lynne Smyers Design Diva [email_address] 919....
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Hatch: First Impressions in Business

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First impressions count. Whether you have a retail space or a lobby; are dealing with customers or clients, your phone etiquette, emails, and meeting style are all factors that can make or break a sale or business relationship.

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  • First Impressions count. Pride in all aspects of your business. Retail space or lobby, clients or customers, phone etiquette, emails, meetings, all factors can make or break a sale or business relationship.
  • Let’s start with our physical selves.
  • 93% of how you are judged is based on non-verbal data: your appearance and body language. Only 7% is based on the words you speak. People will notice your hair and face first. People will look from your face to your feet. So ladies and gentlemen, shoes DO matter! 
  • Everyone that comes in contact with your business as a potential customer. You can create a POSITIVE or NEGATIVE impact. You are in direct control of what may seem like small things but help determine your success.
  • Let’s focus on your business space. Whether you have a retail store, a reception area, a corporate office, or a home-based office—make sure: Your space sends the professional signal you want to send. Employees uphold those same standards you want reflected to customers or clients.
  • Is this the image you’d want to portray to customers? Can you really be productive in this space? If your space is messy because you are busy, do you need to set aside a time each day to clean it up? Your staff or co-workers also shape the company’s image and represent you when you are not around. Walk the walk, talk the talk. What we say even in casual conversations is a reflection of our business. Have you ever heard an employee use a word or seen wording in an email that sends a red flag? If you noticed, others likely will too. Do you need a company handbook with a dress code and behavior standards? Make sure professional behavior expectations are clear and followed.
  • Now for some role-play: Imagine you enter a local hair salon that only takes walk in customers, and you see 2 employees and NO other customers. You wait at the front desk for 2 mins. before the employees acknowledge you because they are talking to each other. Just as you are seated for your cut, a potential customer calls the salon. In this scenario: I am the salon employee who takes the call, leaving you waiting in the chair, and Lynne is the potential customer on the phone. Tamara: [RING, RING] Hello. Lynne: Hi, is this XYZ Hair Salon? Tamara: Yes. Lynne: I was wondering if you’re busy and how long I’d have to wait if I come now for a cut. Tamara: Well, you know, I can’t really say what it will be like when you get here. We take customers as they come in. Lynne: Are you real busy? I don’t have much time. Tamara: [Frustrated] Like I said, I can’t really tell you. You just have to take your chances. Lynne: Well, I’m not sure if I should come or not… Tamara: That’s up to you. Good bye. What went wrong? This is a true story that happened to me recently. Does anyone else have a quick customer-service-gone-bad story you want to share? We have time for one example now, or we may have time at the end.
  • Treat your customers as precious jewels. Especially in this economy, take extra measures to show customers you care about their needs and appreciate their business. And your competitors will appreciate it. When you meet a client, express some form of thank you when you meet them. Clients appreciate you when you appreciate them.
  • The good and bad news about advances in technology are that we have greater access to everything.
  • Be courteous of your client’s time. We’ll start with email. Here are 10 simple rules of email etiquette: These will help make positive first impressions and endear you to those you email. Keep it short. If your emails go beyond what can be seen on the screen when you type them on a tablet, laptop or smart phone, you’ll lose your reader. Be courteous. Include a call to action upfront. What is your goal? What do you need from the recipient? Keep the subject line current. We’ve all tried to track down emails that were contained within a totally irrelevant heading. Watch your language. Keep it professional. Check the trail when forwarding emails. It can be embarrassing and regrettable otherwise. Edit your email. Don’t hit send until you re-read what you’ve written – and cut wherever possible. Flag and separate. Include sub-heads, bullets, numbered lists, and underlined words or bold to help draw attention to your key points and flag when you’ve changed topics. Avoid text code in emails. Watch the size of attachments, legalese at the bottom, or long signatures. Don’t send HUGE files that may slow down a server. Resize photos.
  • A few points on Social Media: Embrace it. It can grow your brand and do great things for you professionally. Todd’s recruiting story on LinkedIn. Use judgment. Business contacts on Personal Facebook pages. Those photos your niece posts (and then tags you) of you living it up at a party, never go away. Corporate recruiters routinely request a social audit of prospective employees? Tell that to your child who is in high school or college, and you hope will someday get a job. Put your photo up! It takes a few seconds to add a head shot to either Facebook or LinkedIn. Get help if you don’t know how. 3. Build your Social Media presence ONLY if you are going to be active on it.
  • Let’s look at the signals your professional materials are sending.
  • Never leave your office without your business cards. How do you feel when someone in a business setting or networking event tells you they don’t have any cards with them? Possibly that this person isn’t prepared or doesn’t think very highly of you, right?   Your card is your company’s first visual introduction when meeting people face-to-face. It leaves a lasting impression of you and your company. The image it portrays speaks volumes about your substance and style: DO NOT print your cards out on your home copier. DO NOT use Vista Print that requires you to print their name on the back to get a discount. DO NOT use perforated sheets from Staples or Office Depot. These are all tell-tail signs that you do not have value in your own business.
  • This is a local nonprofit in Durham The American Advertising Federation recently polled members and found websites ranked first as the most valuable self-promotion tool. That trend that is expected to continue for the next 3-5 years. (Networking events ranked 2 nd ; social media profiles ranked 3 rd .) Make sure your site portrays your company’s mission and core values. Make sure it’s timely and current. Styles change quickly with technology. If you haven’t updated your look of your homepage in a year or two, it’s probably time for a make-over. Make sure your website speaks to your core audiences and is easy to navigate. Less is more. Research shows that a webpage has at the most, 7 seconds to engage the visitor.
  • Emotions, Lifestyle, Passion, Imagination, Dreams, Community, Customer Experience, Personality. The mark say a lot. The design philosophy: Less is More. Over 1 million 3G iPhones were sold in just 3 days. Much excitement over the iPad2. [I love mine.] Lots of anticipation for even the slightest hint of the next product. Steve Jobs was just on the lastest Newsweek cover: How he changed the world
  • These are all of the ways a brand reaches customers and why your brand needs to be consistent across all types of communications. The top companies in the world use their brands effectively. Branding is written into their business plan; marketing is a fundamental requirement. There is absolutely an emotional attachment associated with a brand. • Brand loyalty is as important as the product or service itself (refer back to Apple) • This all begins with the messages you create about your company: mission statement and core values.
  • To raise your business to the next level, it’s important to avoid the band aid approach to branding. We’re all pinched in this economy. Few clients have the budget to implement an entire rebranding campaign when they have a new product or want to demonstrate a new strategic direction. If you can’t afford to re-brand all of your communications tools at once, we recommend a phased approach over a set timeframe. One thing that’s worse than an outdated brand you’re not proud of is inconsistency. The key is to have a set timeframe to implement the changes cohesively. Otherwise, the message to customers is confusing.
  • What does your brand say about your business? Take a minute to think about your various messages and materials and how that reflects who you are as a business.
  • Think of a brand as a thread that is woven throughout your communications. The next few slides show some examples of the branding thread for some of our clients. Here, a life sciences/biotech company in RTP needed to re-shape its communications direction for a new strategic priority: to generate investor interest. We first consulted with the client on adapting their business plan to reflect the new priorities. We then began the process of applying the new direction, first to their website. Since their old content was no longer relevant and they had a limited budget, they chose to have us create an interim website—a single page with updated content and design.
  • The response to their website and new priorities has been very positive. Six months later, we were just given the go-ahead to create a robust website for them that reflects their significant new business opportunities.
  • And the thread continues… We incorporated the client’s new messaging into a press release we issued for them 2 weeks ago. The media coverage exceeded THEIR expectations
  • Here’s an example you all should recognize—the PTA Thrift Shop. We began working together earlier this year to help tell their impressive story. Did you know they will celebrate their 60 th anniversary next year?
  • Did you know their mission is to support the schools, and they have given almost $5 million in the last 15 years to our local schools? Did you know they turn trash to cash and through their creative recycling programs keep over 300 tons of waste out of the landfill each year?
  • Did you know they’ve started a major re-building campaign? Did you hear they plan to replace their Carrboro location with a new plaza and building complex next year? Though the Carrboro store will close during construction process, their Chapel Hill store will remain open during the construction process, so continue to donate your goods and shop there. Even greater potential on the horizon -- schools can expect a 20 percent increase in donations from the PTA Thrift Shop after the new store opens. If you’ve not already pledged your support, take a look at their donor options that include nice perks for corporate support and an affordable $12 x 12 (or $12 for 12 months) individual giving plan. We brought information kits with lots of goodies for you to take with you. Do you see the branding thread that shows a consistent but fresh look and feel?
  • How many of you have heard about their news of expansion? The news has spread fast based on the building campaign launch press release we did for them. Here are a few of those headlines. Please help us spread the good news about them and their campaign. Friend them on Facebook. Email your friends. Find an excuse to work them into your conversation. And we love word-of-mouth referrals.
  • These are design examples for a company we branded from inception. The company provides consulting services to government and private companies in the 911 emergency response industry. It found itself pitted against a highly competitive drove of large corporations that were entrenched in the industry. It had to be distinctive. It started with a logo DESIGN then a concept that grew into a messaging strategy. Here are ads, a new website and trade show exhibit we did for them. Repeated design elements, images, and colors. Consistent wording.
  • This is for a nonprofit client in DC that specializes in advocacy evaluation for nonprofit clients across the country. The logo was just chosen for inclusion in a new book on strong design examples. I started with the logo, website, flyer, poster, newsletter, and brief series. The work on the newsletters and brief series that are posted online is ongoing.
  • All of your marketing and communications materials, across all platforms should be cohesive. Guiding you through the process is what Hatch does through messaging, branding, design and public relations.
  • We try to practice what we preach. So…we THANK YOU for coming today.
  • Please contact us with any questions or ideas or to explore how we might work together.
  • Hatch: First Impressions in Business

    1. 1. A New Breed of Communications Company
    2. 2. “ You Never Get a Second Chance to Make a First Impression.” —Unknown Take pride in all aspects of your business, whether you have a retail space or lobby or virtual office. Your phone etiquette, emails, and level of engagement during meetings—all of these factors can make or break a sales or business relationship.
    3. 3. Take a LOOK at YOURSELF
    4. 4. 93% • 93% of how you are judged is based on NON-VERBAL data: your appearance and body language. Only 7% is based on the WORDS you speak. • People notice your HAIR and FACE first. Then, move to your feet. So shoes do matter!
    5. 5. Are you having a POSITIVE or NEGATIVE impact on customers? • Everyone that comes in contact with your business is a potential customer or can refer your business. • You can create a POSITIVE or NEGATIVE impact and be in direct control of that contact outcome success.
    6. 6. ASSESS your SPACE Whether you have a retail store, reception area, corporate or home-based office—make sure: • Your space matches the professional core messages you want to send to clients • Employees uphold those same standards you want reflected to customers or clients
    7. 7. Is this the image you want to portray to customers? Can you be productive in a space like this? Your staff also shapes the company’s image and represents you in your absence.
    8. 8. VALUE your CUSTOMERS Consider the negative customer-service experiences you’ve had. What impressions have they left on those businesses?
    9. 9. Treat your customers as precious JEWELS. Especially in this economy, take extra measures to show you care about their needs and appreciate their business. When you meet a client, express some form of thank you. Clients appreciate YOU when you appreciate THEM.
    10. 10. Stimulate Your DIGITAL IMAGE The good and bad news about technology is that we have greater access to everything.
    11. 11. = <ul><li>KEEP IT SHORT. If your email goes beyond the length of what can be seen on the screen of a tablet, smart phone, or laptop, you WILL lose your reader. </li></ul><ul><li>2. BE COURTEOUS. </li></ul><ul><li>3. INCLUDE A CALL-TO-ACTION UPFRONT. What is your goal? What do you need from the recipient? </li></ul><ul><li>4. KEEP THE SUBJECT LINE CURRENT. We’ve all tried to track down emails that had a totally irrelevant heading. </li></ul><ul><li>WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE. Keep it professional. </li></ul><ul><li>CHECK CC’s AND TRAIL WHEN FORWARDING. It can be embarrassing and regrettable otherwise. </li></ul>Be Courteous of Your Client’s TIME. <ul><li>EDIT YOUR EMAIL. Don’t hit ‘send’ until you’ve re-read what you’ve written—and cut wherever possible. </li></ul><ul><li>AVOIDE TEXT SPEAK. Email is a form of business communication. No short cuts. </li></ul><ul><li>9. FLAG AND SEPARATE. Include sub-heads, bullets, and numbered lists. Bold words to draw attention to key points. Flag when you’ve changed topics by highlighting or underlining. </li></ul><ul><li>10. DON’T SEND LARGE ATTACHMENTS. Huge files slow down servers. Resize photos and limit legalese or long signatures at the bottom of emails. </li></ul>Ten Simple Rules for EMAIL —F or First and Ongoing Positive Impressions:
    12. 12. A few points on SOCIAL MEDIA: Embrace It! Build your social media presence ONLY IF you are going to be active on it. • Use good judgment. Separate business and personal Facebook pages. • Corporate recruiters routinely request social audits of prospective employees, so post carefully online. • Social media profiles are the new resume. Be creative with them.
    13. 13. EVALUATE your BUSINESS TOOLS Look at the signals your professional materials are sending.
    14. 14. Before After Never leave your office without your business cards. How does it make you feel when someone you are meeting with doesn’t have a card? That this person isn’t prepared or doesn’t think very highly of you? It leaves a first impression, and so does their card.
    15. 15. Before After • The American Advertising Federation recently polled members and found websites ranked first as the most valued self-promotion tool. Networking events ranked second; social media profiles ranked third. • Your site must portray your company’s mission and core values; be timely and current; be easy to navigate; less is more. • If your site hasn’t been updated in a few years, it’s time for a redesign since technology and styles are constantly changing. • Research shows that a webpage has at most 7 SECONDS to engage the visitor.
    16. 16. What does the Apple brand say to you? (emotions, lifestyle, community, passion, imagination, design, simplicity, customer service) • Over 1 million 3G iPhones were sold in just three days. • Brand loyalty is highest among any product; anticipation explodes over the hint of a new product launch. • Steve Jobs’ death has been compared to the loss of inventors such as daVinci and Edison.
    17. 17. Your brand is reflected in all forms of communication. • Top businesses use their brands effectively and include a brand strategy in business and marketing plans. • There is absolutely an emotional attachment associated with a brand. This is how brand loyalty is developed. It becomes as important as the product or service itself. • It all begins with the messages you create about your company.
    18. 18. Avoid the BAND AID approach to BRANDING. • If you can’t afford to rebrand all of your communication tools at once, we recommend a phased approach over a specific timeline. • One thing that is worse than an outdated brand you’re not proud of is INCONSISTENCY. • The key is to have a set timeframe to implement the changes cohesively. Otherwise, the message to customers is confusing.
    19. 19. ? What does your brand say about you? Take a minute to think about your various messages and materials and how that reflects who you are as a business.
    20. 20. Before After Think of a brand as a THREAD that is woven throughout your communications. The next few slides show some examples of the branding thread for some of our clients. A life sciences/biotech company in Research Triangle Park, NC needed to generate new investor interest quickly. • We first consulted with them to adapt new messages to their business plan. • We then did an interim single-page website focusing on new products and updated content to attract their core audiences.
    21. 21. “ HATCH was able to turn around a temporary website design in less than three weeks. We are already seeing increased inquiries and web traffic.” — Mike Galiger, Director, Product Development, Entegrion
    22. 22. Entegrion wins Navy contract extension Navy Awards Entegrion $9.84 Million to Investigate Life-Saving Resuscitation Therapies Navy to study Entegrion’s blood technology as a life-saving fluid NC biotech Entegrion’s gets $9.84M contract extension from Navy
    23. 23. Before After Here is an example of a Chapel Hill, NC nonprofit: The PTA Thrift Shop. • We first redesigned their basic brochure and then their building campaign materials. Did you know they are celebrating their 60 th anniversary in 2012?
    24. 24. “ WE HAVE FOUND our relationship with Hatch to be valuable both professionally and personally. We appreciate their professionalism and their enthusiasm and are privileged to have them in our ‘arsenal.’ ” — Barbara Jessie-Black, Executive Director, PTA Thrift Shop
    25. 25. • The PTA Thrift Shop has given over $5M to local schools over the past 15 years. • They turn trash into cash through recycling programs and keep over 300 tons out of landfills each year. • Once their new facility opens, schools can expect a 20% increase in donations, so continue to donate and pledge your support! • Do you see the branding consistent ‘thread’ in the materials?
    26. 26. PTA Thrift Shop Launches Campaign to Build New Carrboro Facilities PTA Thrift Shop to Build $5.1 M Plaza in Carrboro Carrboro Thrift Shop Has $5 M Plan PTA Thrift Shop Expands
    27. 27. We branded this client from inception. They provide consulting services to government and private firms in the very competitive 9-1-1 emergency response industry.
    28. 28. We also branded this client from inception. It is a nonprofit in DC that specializes in advocacy evaluation for nonprofits across the country.
    29. 29. Your company is a REFLECTION of WHO YOU ARE. All of your marketing and communication materials, across all platforms should be cohesive. Hatch guides clients through the process through messaging, branding, design and public relations.
    30. 31. Tamara Baker Message Maestro [email_address] 919.933.7650 O 919.951.9282 C Lynne Smyers Design Diva [email_address] 919.968.7713 O 202.329.7038 C A New Breed of Communications Company www.hatch-consulting.com

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