• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Mentoring on the Network
 

Mentoring on the Network

on

  • 9,160 views

How to find and connect with mentors and mentees through the Net (IBM-focused, but may be generally useful)

How to find and connect with mentors and mentees through the Net (IBM-focused, but may be generally useful)

Statistics

Views

Total Views
9,160
Views on SlideShare
6,746
Embed Views
2,414

Actions

Likes
12
Downloads
185
Comments
0

15 Embeds 2,414

http://sachachua.com 2270
http://www.gseta.org 57
http://vincenthor.blogspot.com 33
http://wazi.mirqah.net 20
url_unknown 14
http://author.uthm.edu.my 9
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 3
http://www.google.com&_=1392099649680 HTTP 1
http://moyster.com 1
http://dev.sachachua.com 1
http://www.mongodb.org 1
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com 1
http://www.hanrss.com 1
http://twitter.com 1
http://www.google.com&_=1392099678520 HTTP 1
More...

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Mentoring on the Network Mentoring on the Network Presentation Transcript

    • Notes at http://sachachua.com/blog/p/22245
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • In IBM: You can ask your manager or other mentors for a referral. You can search Bluepages, the corporate directory . You can contact people whose presentations you like. You can read people’s blogs or profile updates. You can share what you know and ask people to help you with what you want to learn.
    •  
    • I find it really difficult to start by asking someone to be my mentor. If you’re shy like me, you might find it useful to start by asking someone for a small piece of advice. Apply that advice and share your results. Ask another question, get more advice, share more results. This way, you can gradually build a relationship.
    • I often find it intimidating to have one-on-one conversations with mentors. It’s surprisingly easier to learn from people if you have many mentors instead of just one or two. That’s because you can ask a lot of people questions, get insights from whoever’s available, and share what you’re learning with everyone. It’s like the saying, “It takes a village to raise a child.” Build your village of mentors.
    • You already know the importance of thanking your mentors for the time and effort they share – but don’t stop there. Show your return on investment. Show what you’re doing with their advice, and they’re more likely to help you in the future. Take notes and share them with your mentors so that they can save time by sharing those notes with other people. Ask questions and learn about other topics. Share what you’re learning with other people.
    • And don’t wait until you consider yourself a mentor before you find mentees. Share what you’re learning right away, so that you can learn more effectively and build more relationships. How can you find mentees? Tell people which topics you can help people with, and ask if they know anyone who might be interested. Put together presentations – they’re a great way to reach many people. Write your thoughts down in notes, articles, e-mail messages, or blog posts. You don’t have to wait for someone to formally ask you to be a mentor, either. Look for people you can help, and help them. As you help people, you’ll find that you’ll learn a lot along the way.
    •  
    •