Google launches Google+, a quasi-Facebook competitor http://qa.us/aaabcG

233 views

Published on

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Google on Tuesday unveiled Google+, yet another attempt by the search giant to overcome its past miscues in the social networking space. More people visit Google's network of websites than Facebook each month, but Facebook is killing the search company in categories that advertisers care most about: Time spent and pages viewed. Users spent 62% more time on Facebook than on Google last month, and viewed more than twice the number of pages on Facebook as they did on Google, according to comScore. Google's (GOOG, Fortune 500) latest solution to this growing trend is Google+, a new social network that tries to out-Facebook Facebook. On Facebook, people are either "friends" or not. Google+ makes that distinction more fluid, letting users group their contacts into smaller categories, such as relatives, co-workers, or members of a yoga class. Information can be shared selectively with each group. "The subtlety and substance of real-world interactions are lost in the rigidness of our online tools," said Vic Gundotra, Google's senior vice president of social, in a blog post. "In this basic, human way, online sharing is awkward. Even broken. And we aim to fix it." Though Google often denies that Facebook is the company's primary competitor, sources with knowledge of the project say that Google+ was known internally as "Googbook." Google devoted 300 people to the team. Unlike Google's previous social attempts, such Orkut and Buzz -- which had big, bold launches and are largely considered failures -- Google is moving slowly and cautiously with Google+. It has only been launched for a small group of users, and others need to be invited to the service to use it. Google's social puzzle pieces The company is also trying to be extra careful about ensuring users' privacy, which ultimately killed any chance Buzz had of succeeding. Buzz was built on top of Gmail, Google's e-mail client, and a confusing one-two punch in Buzz's default settings automatically followed Gmail users' most e-mailed contacts. Initially, those contacts were revealed publicly after a user "buzzed" about something. Google's first attempt at a social network, Orkut, has also been plagued by privacy concerns, especially when it was hit with a virus in 2010 that collected users' personal information. After Buzz and Orkut never took off in the way the company had hoped, former CEO Eric Schmidt announced that Google would no longer consider launching a full-on Facebook competitor. Instead, he said, Google would incorporate "social elements" in all of its products. Then-President Larry Page disagreed with Schmidt. After Page took over as CEO in April, the company began to focus more intently on doing battle with Facebook, including reportedly linking employees' bonuses to Google's success in social networking. At the All Things D conference last month, Schmidt said Google's social failings were his fault. "I clearly knew that I had to do something, and I failed to do it," he said. "A CEO should take responsibility. I screwed up." 

Published in: Technology, Art & Photos
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
233
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Google launches Google+, a quasi-Facebook competitor http://qa.us/aaabcG

  1. 1. Making PowerPoint Slides Avoiding the Pitfalls of Bad Slides
  2. 2. Tips to be Covered <ul><li>Outlines </li></ul><ul><li>Slide Structure </li></ul><ul><li>Fonts </li></ul><ul><li>Colour </li></ul><ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Graphs </li></ul><ul><li>Spelling and Grammar </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>Questions </li></ul>
  3. 3. Outline <ul><li>Make your 1 st or 2 nd slide an outline of your presentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: previous slide </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Follow the order of your outline for the rest of the presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Only place main points on the outline slide </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: Use the titles of each slide as main points </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Slide Structure – Good <ul><li>Use 1-2 slides per minute of your presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Write in point form, not complete sentences </li></ul><ul><li>Include 4-5 points per slide </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid wordiness: use key words and phrases only </li></ul>
  5. 5. Slide Structure - Bad <ul><li>This page contains too many words for a presentation slide. It is not written in point form, making it difficult both for your audience to read and for you to present each point. Although there are exactly the same number of points on this slide as the previous slide, it looks much more complicated. In short, your audience will spend too much time trying to read this paragraph instead of listening to you. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Slide Structure – Good <ul><li>Show one point at a time: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Will help audience concentrate on what you are saying </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Will prevent audience from reading ahead </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Will help you keep your presentation focused </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Slide Structure - Bad <ul><li>Do not use distracting animation </li></ul><ul><li>Do not go overboard with the animation </li></ul><ul><li>Be consistent with the animation that you use </li></ul>
  8. 8. Fonts - Good <ul><li>Use at least an 18-point font </li></ul><ul><li>Use different size fonts for main points and secondary points </li></ul><ul><ul><li>this font is 24-point, the main point font is 28-point, and the title font is 36-point </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use a standard font like Times New Roman or Arial </li></ul>
  9. 9. Fonts - Bad <ul><li>If you use a small font, your audience won’t be able to read what you have written </li></ul><ul><li>CAPITALIZE ONLY WHEN NECESSARY. IT IS DIFFICULT TO READ </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use a complicated font </li></ul>
  10. 10. Colour - Good <ul><li>Use a colour of font that contrasts sharply with the background </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: blue font on white background </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use colour to reinforce the logic of your structure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: light blue title and dark blue text </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use colour to emphasize a point </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But only use this occasionally </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Colour - Bad <ul><li>Using a font colour that does not contrast with the background colour is hard to read </li></ul><ul><li>Using colour for decoration is distracting and annoying . </li></ul><ul><li>Using a different colour for each point is unnecessary </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Using a different colour for secondary points is also unnecessary </li></ul></ul><ul><li>T r y i n g t o b e c r e a t i v e c a n a l s o b e b a d </li></ul>
  12. 12. Background - Good <ul><li>Use backgrounds such as this one that are attractive but simple </li></ul><ul><li>Use backgrounds which are light </li></ul><ul><li>Use the same background consistently throughout your presentation </li></ul>
  13. 13. Background – Bad <ul><li>Avoid backgrounds that are distracting or difficult to read from </li></ul><ul><li>Always be consistent with the background that you use </li></ul>
  14. 14. Graphs - Good <ul><li>Use graphs rather than just charts and words </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Data in graphs is easier to comprehend & retain than is raw data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trends are easier to visualize in graph form </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Always title your graphs </li></ul>
  15. 15. Graphs - Bad
  16. 16. Graphs - Good
  17. 17. Graphs - Bad
  18. 18. Graphs - Bad <ul><li>Minor gridlines are unnecessary </li></ul><ul><li>Font is too small </li></ul><ul><li>Colours are illogical </li></ul><ul><li>Title is missing </li></ul><ul><li>Shading is distracting </li></ul>
  19. 19. Spelling and Grammar <ul><li>Proof your slides for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>speling mistakes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the use of of repeated words </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>grammatical errors you might have make </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If English is not your first language, please have someone else check your presentation! </li></ul>
  20. 20. Conclusion <ul><li>Use an effective and strong closing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your audience is likely to remember your last words </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use a conclusion slide to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Summarize the main points of your presentation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Suggest future avenues of research </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Questions?? <ul><li>End your presentation with a simple question slide to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Invite your audience to ask questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide a visual aid during question period </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid ending a presentation abruptly </li></ul></ul>

×