Email etiquette

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  • Have had the opportunity to be a guest; happy to repay
  • Spare you some of the basics--keep sentences short, because you’re professional communicators. As such, you’ll want to know about spelling. Didn’t want you distracted by wondering where the hyphen was.
  • Standard: http://winblogger.typepad.com/winblogger/2006/09/email_best_prac_2.html Poster: “e- anything makes you sound old-fashioned: http://www.marketingprofs.com/ea/qst_question.asp?qstID=4399
  • Kathy Towner, “5 Key Elements of an E-mail” http://www.wincommunications.com/BusinessBuilderJuly06.html
  • You Send Me: Getting It Right When You Write Online (Harcourt)
  • The above cartoon by Peter Steiner has been reproduced from page 61 of July 5, 1993 issue of The New Yorker, (Vol.69 (LXIX) no. 20) under license 21513e from The Cartoon Bank ( Format: PowerPoint; Use: Professional Conference/Seminar; Topic: Email Etiquette)
  • “ No one is quite sure how much of our communication is nonverbal. The statistics of anthropologist Ray Birdwhistell suggest it's around 65 percent, but other scientists put it as high as 93 percent.” Louise Dobson, “Avoiding Email Catastrophes,” http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20060405-000001.html
  • http://www.cnn.com/2004/BUSINESS/09/15/email.sins/index.html
  • http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20060405-000001.html
  • Reading aloud idea from Louise Dobson, “Avoiding Email Catasrophes,” http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20060405-000001.html
  • Samantha Miller, E-Mail Etiquette (Warner, 2001) “ Would a smiley face have saved Gates from Glaser’s damaging testimony? We’ll never know.” Glaser, a former MS employee, was CEO of RealNetworks.
  • Survey of 1,000 workers was done by the Department of Trade and Industries (DTI). “Other findings from the poll indicate that men are less adept at surviving in the 'communications jungle' than women, with 28 percent of men admitting their jokes have backfired (compared to 19 per cent of women), and 26 per cent misjudging their timing compared to just 13 per cent of their female counterparts.” From http://www.vnunet.com/vnunet/news/2125708/email-jokes-backfire-uk-workers
  • Louise Dobson, “Avoiding Email Catasrophes,” http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20060405-000001.html
  • Louise Dobson, “Avoiding Email Catasrophes,” http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20060405-000001.html
  • Chevron, for example, was forced to pay $2.2 million to settle a harassment case based in part on emails with such titles as “Why beer is better than women.” If in doubt, don’t send it. “ Halcrow and Rosner http://www.workpositive.com/pdf/Email.pdf
  • Welcome Message http://www.hoflin.com/Lists/WelcomeMessage
  • Abrams, R. (2006, July 3). Avoid these gaffes to land the client who works best. Des Moines Register : 4D.
  • Shapiro and Anderson (1985), Towards an Ethics and Etiquette for Electronic Mail , R-3283-NSF/RC
  • Shapiro and Anderson (1985), Towards an Ethics and Etiquette for Electronic Mail , R-3283-NSF/RC
  • Abrams, R. (2006, July 3). Avoid these gaffes to land the client who works best. Des Moines Register : 4D.
  • http://www.cnn.com/2004/BUSINESS/09/15/email.sins/index.html
  • You Send Me: Getting It Right When You Write Online (Harcourt)
  • You Send Me: Getting It Right When You Write Online (Harcourt)
  • http://www.youthxchange.net/main/ff4b280_e-etiquette-v.asp # 10% of the women surveyed had dumped a boyfriend via email,
  • Angell and Heslop. The Elements of E-Mail Style (Addison-Wesley, 1994)
  • 65 percent of Monster employers expect a thank-you note of some kind (36 percent indicated that they actually prefer thank you notes sent by email, surpassing the 29 percent who would rather receive the traditional letter variety). Workplace Technology Brings Changes to Job Seeker Etiquette, Polls Find; Monster Poll Finds Employers Prefer Email Thank-You Notes to Traditional Letters. Business Wire September t, 2002 (retrieved through HighBeam)
  • Miller, E-Mail Etiquette
  • --when Head of the Information Processing Techniques Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency -- Shapiro and Anderson. 1985. Towards an Ethics and Etiquette of Email. Available online email.eth Published byThe Rand Corporation, 1700 Main Street, P.O. Box 2138 Santa Monica, CA 90406-2138
  • Tunstall, Joan. Better, Faster Email: Getting the most out of emai l. Allen Unwin: 1999. Case: Michael A Smyth v The Pillsbury Company
  • The Boss’s Survival Guide , McGraw-Hill, July, 2001. As cited in Halcrow and Rosner, http://www.workpositive.com/pdf/Email.pdf
  • Daily Mail survey: Seventy-nine percent of survey repondents said they resented having to chase up e-mail responses. A quarter said they did so for more than half the e-mails they send. Nearly two-thirds felt business decisions were delayed due to a lack of e-mail response. http://www.cnn.com/2004/BUSINESS/09/15/email.sins/index.html
  • Flynn, Nancy & Tom Flynn. Writing Effective E-Mail: Improving Electronic Communications . Crisp: 1998 Brounstein, Marty. Communicating Effectively for Dummies . Hungry Minds: 2001
  • http://www.albion.com/catNetiquette.html
  • http://www.marketingprofs.com/ea/qst_question.asp?qstID=4399 Biggest contribution--emphasis on audience; “Core Rules” and advice on controlling tone still solid
  • http://www.albion.com/netiquette/netiquiz Few score over 70% on the first try.
  • http://www.albion.com/netiquette/netiquiz Few score over 70% on the first try.
  • http://www.amazon.com/gp/blog/id/A2PMHGM3991PCD Practical tips: e.g.; how do you wind down an email exchange? "I sent it out last Tuesday." /"Good. I'm hoping they make a decision before I leave for vacation next week.” /"Yes, me too.”/"Please copy me on any further correspondence with their proposal team." /"Will do. Sure thing.”/"Thank you.”/"Welcome."Progressively shorter replies 1. If the message is positive, assume all is well. If the message context is negative, spend the extra few seconds to reply and spare an offense. 2. Reduce the length of your response. A single word or phrase response implies "So long, I'm signing off now." 3. Repeat the action—yours or theirs. You're implying that either of you should "jump right on it" and have no further time to email.
  • In 1995, after ditching the corporate world where I had been an engineer for one of the top Japanese Electronic companies, I started my own innovative Technology Fusion, Marketing & Coaching Firm, The IStudio®. Publications include Everything you ever wanted to know about business e-mail etiquette-Don’t let your e-mail habits be a deal-breakers and free tutorial Netiquette 101.
  • http://www.wincommunications.com/BusinessBuilderOctober05.html
  • Towner recommends including your company and/or brand in your from line, your email address, and your subject line, if possible http://www.wincommunications.com/BusinessBuilderOctober05.html
  • D. Dumain. Write to the Top: Writing for Corporate Success (rev. ed.) New York: Random House, 2004.
  • http://www.tamingemail.com/subjects_are_everything.html
  • Angell and Heslop. The Elements of E-Mail Style (Addison-Wesley, 1994) http://www.tamingemail.com/subjects_are_everything.htm e.g. of threads--LIC# 234 ADB car lights on-- People replied with everything from requests to meet for lunch to questions about upcoming seminarl
  • Halcrow and Bosner (2001) http://www.workpositive.com/pdf/Email.pdf
  • (2005) http://www.43folders.com/2005/09/19/writing-sensible-email-messages/
  • Dianna Booher’s http://www.onlineac.com/main/articles/download.aspx?sfilename=Never_put_email.pdf Comments--forwarded Criticism--harsh Bonuses--if they don’t come through, employee can use to claim they were deserved Product or liability issues--see you in court Gossip--you’re clearly identifiable as the source Humor--often misinterpreted
  • Angell and Heslop. The Elements of E-Mail Style (Addison-Wesley, 1994) http://www.tamingemail.com/subjects_are_everything.html
  • D. Dumain. Write to the Top: Writing for Corporate Success (rev. ed.) New York: Random House, 2004.
  • Five Tips for E-mail Excellence http://www.patronsaintpr.com/samples/Booher/21C.htm
  • Five Tips for E-mail Excellence http://www.patronsaintpr.com/samples/Booher/21C.htm
  • Five Tips for E-mail Excellence http://www.patronsaintpr.com/samples/Booher/21C.htm As cited by Kathy Towner in “A Review of Email Etiquette,: Judith Kallos of NetM@anners.com says, “Never assume a position of informality in your business e-mail…. For commercial business reasons, one should commuicate as if e-mail is on their company letterhead at all times. This is your business’s image you are branding.”
  • Five Tips for E-mail Excellence http://www.patronsaintpr.com/samples/Booher/21C.htm
  • Cunningham and Greene, The Business Style Handbook (McGraw-Hill, 2002).
  • Cunningham and Greene, The Business Style Handbook (McGraw-Hill, 2002).
  • 65 percent of Monster employers expect a thank-you note of some kind (36 percent indicated that they actually prefer thank you notes sent by email, surpassing the 29 percent who would rather receive the traditional letter variety). Workplace Technology Brings Changes to Job Seeker Etiquette, Polls Find; Monster Poll Finds Employers Prefer Email Thank-You Notes to Traditional Letters. Business Wire September t, 2002 (retrieved through HighBeam)
  • Email etiquette

    1. 1. Email Etiquette:Keeping Your Foot Outof Your Virtual Mouth
    2. 2. How is it spelled? email Email eMail EMail e-mail E-mail e-Mail E-Mail
    3. 3. How is it spelled? Gregg, Microsoft, and AP: e-mail Wired: email Email Experience Council: email is standard
    4. 4. Email etiquette is evolving too E-mail has quickly become a communication standard and the Internet’s most popular application. Both the number of e-mail users and the usage rates are continuing to grow exponentially. Mischelle Davis, V.P. of marketing communications at NewWorldIQ
    5. 5. Where are we now? Right now online writing is pretty much in its Wild West stage, a free- for-all with everybody shooting from the hip and no sheriff in sight. O’Conner & Kellerman (2002)
    6. 6. If you were sheriff… What would be your rules? Madlantern Arts
    7. 7. What makes email different?
    8. 8. Difference: No nonverbal cues No nonverbal cues, which account for ___________ percent of message
    9. 9. Nonverbal cues No nonverbal cues, which account for 65 - 93percent of message Only words and :-)
    10. 10. Difference: Tone No nonverbal cues Tone becomes crucial
    11. 11. Difference: Tone No nonverbal cues Tone becomes crucial  In Germany and Britain, 23 percent and 14 percent respectively [of respondents to a Daily Mail survey] admitted confrontations with colleagues because of e-mail misunderstandings.
    12. 12. Criticisms are harsher Messages meant to express mild displeasure can come across as tirades. Louise Dobson, Avoiding Email Catastrophes (2006)
    13. 13. Tone: Example OneTo: Female employeesFrom: H. HonchoRe: Dress codeDate: 1 July 2006Clients will be visitingnext week. Halter topsand jeans will not makethe right impression.It’s time you starteddressing for the officeinstead of the beach.Leave your flip-flops at
    14. 14. Tone: Example TwoTo: All staffFrom: H. HonchoRe: Reminder about what towear to workDate: 1 July 2006During the summer, our dress codeis business casual. We think“business casual” means clothesthat feel comfortable and lookprofessional. Men Women•khaki pants •casual pants andskirts
    15. 15. Tips: Tone Avoid terseness, which can be misinterpreted Use face-to-face communication if issue is sensitive Read your emails aloud, looking for ambiguity
    16. 16. For want of a smiley…? Rob Glaser asked to meet with Bill Gates Gates said no, in a “cold and flip email” Glazer denounced Microsoft at anti-trust hearings
    17. 17. Difference: Humor Humor is riskier
    18. 18. Humor: Riskier Nearly a quarter of employees have suffered problems with colleagues or clients because their use of humour in an email has not been understood or appreciated, according to a survey. Robert Jacques, “Email Jokes Backfire for UK Workers” (2004)
    19. 19. Humor: Often misinterpreted Participants [in recent studies] were able to accurately communicate humor and sarcasm in ________ percent of the emails they sent. Louise Dobson (2006)
    20. 20. Humor: Often misinterpreted  Participants [in recent studies] were able to accurately communicate humor and sarcasm in barely half -- 56 percent -- of the emails they sent. Louise Dobson (2006)
    21. 21. Tips: Humor If in doubt, don’t send it. Chevron was forced to pay $2.2 million to settle a harassment case based in part on emails with such subjects as “Why beer is better than women.” Reread for ambiguities. Signal the joke. One emoticon or <grin> per email is plenty.
    22. 22. Humor: Tips in action If you [ignore these rules], the great list guru will expel you into the gloomy dimension without email and your days will be long and lonely after you have made a permanent impression in print for many to keep and repeat forever <grin> (see how the use of email "emoticons" aids the assimilation of that last paragraph!). Bonnie Dalzell, Welcome Message
    23. 23. Difference: Levels of formality Most people view email as  more formal than a phone call  less formal than a letter
    24. 24. Meeting request: InformalFrom: Bob Anderson <anderson@rand-unix>Date: 21 Dec 84 11:40:12 PST (Fri)To: randvax!anderson, randvax!gillogly, randvax!normSubject: meeting ... we need to setup a meeting bet. jim you and i -- can you arange? im free next wed. thks.
    25. 25. Meeting agenda: Formal Subject: MEETING ON FY86 PLANNING, 2PM 12/28/84, CONFERENCE ROOM 1 There will be a meeting of the FY86 planning task force in Conference Room 1 on December 28, 1984 at 2pm. The Agenda for the meeting is: --------------------------------------- Topic Presenter Time --------------------------------------- Strategic Business Plan John Fowles 30 min. Budget Forecast for FY86 Sue Martin 15 " New Product Announcements Peter Wilson 20 " Action Items for 1st Qtr FY86 Jane Adamson 25 " -----------------------------------------------------------
    26. 26. Tip: Spelling still countsThis is an actual email.Purposal I can beat almost anyones price and almost promise you success and if I don’t reach it, we wont charge you after the time we say we can achieve it until we do.
    27. 27. Tip: Spelling still counts Sloppiness is one of “seven deadly e-mail sins” Bad grammar, misspelling and disconnected arguments gave 81 percent of the survey sample "negative feelings" towards the senders. 41 percent of senior managers said badly worded e-mails implied laziness and even disrespect. CNN.com
    28. 28. Tip: Level of Formality When in doubt, err on the side of formality.
    29. 29. Tip: Level of Formality When in doubt, err on the side of formality. Usually the problem is that we treat [e-mail] too much like a phone call and not enough like a letter. O’Conner and Kellerman (2002)
    30. 30. Tip: Level of Formality When in doubt, err on the side of formality. 16% [of email users under 25] sign every message with love and kisses, even when addressing their boss MSN survey
    31. 31. Tip: Level of Formality Be conversational. An overly formal e-mail message alienates the reader. Don’t adopt a cold, remote, or superior tone in an attempt to sound professional. Angell and Heslop (2002)
    32. 32. Difference: Level of FormalityQuestions to which answers are evolving:  Do I need a subject line?  Should I email a thank-you note after a job interview?  Should I communicate bad news via email?
    33. 33. Difference: Electronic Hit Send and it’s gone Hit Reply All and your career may be gone Deleted emails live on Messages can be forwarded without your knowledge or consent
    34. 34. Tip: What not to do One of the officers convicted of beating Rodney King sent this email: Oops. I haven’t beaten anyone so bad in a long time. A transcript of the message was used at his trial.
    35. 35. Tip: Electronic Colonel David Russell’s rule: Never say anything in an electronic message that you wouldnt want appearing, and attributed to you, in tomorrow morning’s front-page headline in the New York Times.
    36. 36. Tip: Email is never private Pillsbury assured employees that emails were private. Michael Smyth was fired after sending an email calling his bosses “backstabbing bastards.” A court held that he had no reasonable expectation of privacy.
    37. 37. Tip: Keep confidences To cope with many questions about vacation policy, an HR minion emailed a copy to all employees. Attached was salary information. Within weeks, 20% of the workforce was gone—including the hapless minion.
    38. 38. Tip: Electronic ≠ Instant Many expect a phone call to alert them to an email labeled Urgent. Allow a reasonable time (two days – week) for a response. Respond before senders have to follow up or business is delayed.
    39. 39. When would you use email? To send confidential salary information To address a personal hygiene issue To get an immediate reply To settle a conflict between two team members To request a manual for the new phone system To recap a conversation about a pending order To set up a meeting next month To keep people updated on a project’s status
    40. 40. When would you use email? To send confidential salary information To address a personal hygiene issue To get an immediate reply To settle a conflict between two team members To request a manual for the new phone system To recap a conversation about a pending order To set up a meeting next month To keep people updated on a project’s status
    41. 41. Difference: Where’s audience? People who wouldnt dream of burping at the end of dinner post offensive messages to international forums. Middle managers inadvertently send romantic email messages to the company-wide email alias. People at computer terminals forget that there are real live people on the other end of the wire. Virginia Shea, Netiquette (1994)
    42. 42. Three manners mavens: Shea Virginia Shea is “Miss Manners of the ’Net” Pioneered netiquette in 1994 Book available online at http://www.albion.com/ catNetiquette.html
    43. 43. Three manners mavens: Shea Typing in all capitals in electronic communications means(A) Nothing special--typing in all caps is normal.(B) You are shouting.(C) It’s OK to forward this message to others.(D) This message is very important.
    44. 44. Three manners mavens: Shea Typing in all capitals in electronic communications means(B) You are shouting. Typing in all capitals in online communications is the equivalent of SHOUTING! Only type in all caps if you really mean to shout.
    45. 45. Three mavens: Booher Communications consultant Dianna Booher is “Miss Manners of memos” Good tips for writers Blog available online at http://www.amazon.com/
    46. 46. Three mavens: Kallos Judith Kallos is “Miss eManners” Best source for specific advice on business email etiquette Site: NetManners.com
    47. 47. Style mavens: O’Conner Email’s “very structure … encourages curtness.” The blank subject line staring you in the face is a signal to state your business and get on with it…. The To and From fields seem to make salutations and signatures redundant or unnecessary. What we have here is the ideal breeding ground for rudeness.
    48. 48. Anatomy of email: ToTo: My Entire Address BookFrom: H. HonchoRe: Nothing importantDate: 1 July,2006
    49. 49. Anatomy of email: ToTo: You mad mustachio purple-hued maltwormBcc: Henry IV, part 1From: I. RateRe: So-called service at your crummy excuse for a store today
    50. 50. Tip: Use BCC wisely To keep addresses private, put your own address in the To: line and paste your mailing list in the cc: line BCCs within an organization can create distrust
    51. 51. Tip: Leave address blank If you’re furious and must answer an email right away, leave the address line blank. If you hit Send before you’ve had a chance to cool down, the email won’t go through.
    52. 52. Anatomy of email: From Would you open mail from  Vampyra@Goths_’R_Us.net  Boogers2007@hotmail.com  Dunno dunno@yahoo.com
    53. 53. Anatomy of email: FromE-mail recipients put more weighton who the e-mail is from thanany other item when choosing which e-mails to open which to delete which to complain about Chris Baggot, ExactTarget
    54. 54. Anatomy of email: From Be complete and be recognized. Kathy Towner, WIN Communications
    55. 55. Anatomy of an email: Subject Your subject can answer any of readers’ four key questions: 1. What’s this about? 2. Why should I read this? 3. What’s in this for me? 4. What am I being asked to do?
    56. 56. Anatomy of email: SubjectTo: Girrrl friendsFrom: Ima DitzRe: Change of plans
    57. 57. Anatomy of email: SubjectTo: Sara BellumFrom: Gray MatterRe: Marketing meeting rescheduled for 12/15/06
    58. 58. Anatomy of email: SubjectTo: Sara BellumFrom: Gray MatterRe: Marketing meeting rescheduled for 12/15/06 (EOM) EOM = end of message
    59. 59. Tips: Subject Lead with the main idea Browsers may not display more than first 25-35 characters Create single-subject messages Keep track of threads Subject: New Year’s Party Plans (was: New Year-End Bonus Structure)
    60. 60. More Tips: SubjectDouble-check the address line before sending. Insulted by a general email from the boss, an employee sent an angry comment to a colleague (she thought): “Does she think we’re stupid?”  The reply (from her boss): “Yes, I do.”
    61. 61. Anatomy of an email: Body Before you type anything into a new message, have explicit answers for two questions: 1. Why am I writing this? 2. What exactly do I want the result of this message to be? 43 Folders (2005)
    62. 62. Anatomy of an email: Body Before you hit Send, review and delete  Negative comments about management  Criticisms of staff or performance issues  Bonuses or salary issues  Product or liability issues  Gossip  Humor or other ambiguities Booher
    63. 63. Anatomy of email: Body Write so emails are easy to read  Make paragraphs 7-8 lines  Insert a blank line between paragraphs  Use headlines, bullets, and numbers  AVOID ALL CAPS; THAT’S SHOUTING  If a message is longer than 3 screens, send an attachment
    64. 64. Anatomy of email: BodySubject: Noise level in the break roomsHow can we satisfy everyone?Many of you have told me about the growing tensionyou feel around using the break rooms. Some of youuse them to work and socialize; others need a quietplace to work.Your ideas are welcomeWhat do you think we can do about this? Should wedesignate one room as a lounge and another as a quietarea? D. Dumaine, Write to theTop
    65. 65. Tip: Balance formal/informal Like our work clothes, the preferred writing style has become business casual. Avoid extremes  Not too pompous  Not too passive  Not too careless or flip Diana Booher
    66. 66. Tip: Avoid brusqueness Brief is good. Blunt is not.  Question: Should I pursue an advanced degree?  Response 1: No.  Response 2: I don’t think an advanced degree would have any effect on your potential for promotion here. Diana Booher
    67. 67. Tip: Write business casual Strive for a style somewhere between stuffed-shirt and t-shirt. Diana Booher
    68. 68. Question: Do I need a greeting? Consensus: Yes. Otherwise, you can seem brusque or unfriendly.
    69. 69. Question: Which greeting? Opinion: Divided  Some say “Hi, Steve,” is too informal.  Some say “To whom it may concern” is stilted.  For external communication, use same greeting as in letter  For internal communication, some use Myra:
    70. 70. Question: Which closing? Consensus  Match greeting in tone  Formal: Sincerely, Best regards, Cordially  Informal: Thanks; All the best, Talk to you later  Use a sig line that gives your name, title, and contact information  Omit a P.S. (if the email is longer than a screen, a postscript could be missed)
    71. 71. Question: Email thank-you? 36 percent of employers on Monster prefer thank-you notes sent by email 29 percent prefer traditional letters
    72. 72. Why netiquette? The electronic equivalent of a set of fussy rules that tell you … which fork to use with the salad course? Netiquette does not consist of a set of rigid rules. It encourages you to adopt a certain attitude of thoughtfulness. Gregg Reference Manual, 10th ed.
    73. 73. Suggested resources Available at http://word-crafter.net/email.html  Articles  Best practices for email marketing  Grammar help  Test your netiquette

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