Strategic Issues of Renewable PowerPublished:November 2011No.Of Pages:185Price:US $ 2875INTRODUCTIONSo much is now widely ...
YOUR KEY QUESTIONS ANSWERED* What are the key influences affecting the growth of renewable power market?* How have renewab...
Influences and actions for governmentDynamic influences on governmentActions available to governmentInfluences and actions...
BrazilKey influences on industrySummaryIntroductionPolitical InfluencesPredictabilityUncertain tax liabilitiesEconomic inf...
Recommendation 1: invest early/spread the riskRecommendation 2: invest strategically: buy into key sectorsRisk managementA...
Table: Top Ten world wood pellet manufacturers, 2011Table: Key players in world hydropower market, 2011Table: The top 10 w...
Contact:Mr.Priyank7557 Rambler road,Suite727,Dallas,TX75231Tel: + 1 888 391 5441E-mail: sales@reportsandreports.comhttp://...
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Strategic issues of renewable power

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The renewables sector is highly differentiated and investors need to understand this: within the sector are established, mature technologies such as hydro, as well as cutting edge technologies, more likely to be found in wind and solar areas.

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Strategic issues of renewable power

  1. 1. Strategic Issues of Renewable PowerPublished:November 2011No.Of Pages:185Price:US $ 2875INTRODUCTIONSo much is now widely recognised: and the detail of renewables growth is increasinglydocumented by business and investment analysts. This is the mark of a maturing sector,and also a sign that business now needs to progress beyond simply regarding renewables as“blue skies” and part of an unpredictable future – and move on to treating them as part ofthe everyday mix.FEATURES AND BENEFITS* Achieve a comprehensive understanding of the pressures acting on government andindustry in the renewables sector.* Focus on strategies designed to guide business towards responding commercially tocurrent political, economic, social and technological trends.* Analyze trends and initiatives in renewables development, both worldwide and by leadingdeveloped and developing nations.* Examine trends and initiatives in renewables development by key suppliers to theindustry.* Utilize definitive source work, including the most recent data on renewables use bycountry.Browse All Energy and Power Market Research ReportsHIGHLIGHTS* The renewables sector is highly differentiated and investors need to understand this:within the sector are established, mature technologies such as hydro, as well as cuttingedge technologies, more likely to be found in wind and solar areas.* The lead across many areas of renewable growth is now being taken by China, with theEU also being a major player: the US continues to be a significant player – but there aresome signs that the current hands-off model may mean the US is starting to be left behind.* Governments, particularly in Europe, are becoming more sophisticated in their use offinancial instruments to encourage renewables: where incentives are seen as too generous,they are now rapidly being dismantled, with targeting of help going to areas more likely tobenefit.
  2. 2. YOUR KEY QUESTIONS ANSWERED* What are the key influences affecting the growth of renewable power market?* How have renewables been performing over recent years?* How are renewables forecast to perform in the next two decades?* What are the main policy instruments employed by governments in promotiong andmanaging the growth of renewables?* What are the strategies that businesses need now to be considering in respect ofdeveloping their renewables porrtfolio?Table Of ContentsAbout the authorsProfessor Merlin StoneJane Fae OzimekDisclaimerEXECUTIVE SUMMARYPreface and key themesRenewables overviewPlayers and interactions: a theoretical frameworkKey influences on governmentActions available to governmentStrategic approaches by state: the US and the EUStrategic approaches by state: Asia/Pacific and the rest of the worldKey influences on industryIndustry: influences and actionsDiscussion and recommendationsPreface and key themesSummaryKey themesRenewables overviewSummaryIntroductionWorld energy demandDemand: scale and growthGlobal forecasts: primary energy by sourceFigures for total final consumption and electricity generationFactors influencing renewable growth(Untitled sub-section)The drivers towards renewable energyEconomic enablersUnreliability of renewablesRegional and national variationGrowth in renewables: historyRenewables potentialStrong growth forecastPlayers and interactions: a theoretical frameworkSummaryIntroductionTheoretical framework
  3. 3. Influences and actions for governmentDynamic influences on governmentActions available to governmentInfluences and actions for industryThe role of large stand-alone initiativesSuppliers to the power industryStatic influences on industryDynamic influences on industryActions available to industryInfluences and actions for consumersActions available to consumersKey influences on governmentSummaryIntroductionPolitical InfluencesEconomic influencesSocial influencesTechnological influencesActions available to governmentSummaryIntroductionNational levers(Untitled sub-section)Investment/pump-priming: reforming the financial infrastructureThe “Naming and Shaming” approachStrategic approaches by state: the US and the EUSummaryIntroductionGlobal approachesUNManaging geographic issuesNorth America(Untitled sub-section)State highlightsTexasCanadaEuropeUKSpainGermanyFranceItalyStrategic approaches by state: Asia/Pacific and the rest of the worldSummaryIntroductionChinaJapanSouth KoreaAustraliaIndiaRest of the world
  4. 4. BrazilKey influences on industrySummaryIntroductionPolitical InfluencesPredictabilityUncertain tax liabilitiesEconomic influencesRenewable costsThe smart grid and improved storageInvestment availabilityRecessionSocial influencesMediaNGO’sTechnological influencesIndustry: influences and actionsSummaryIntroductionPower companiesPower producersElectricity generatorsPower usersRenewable specialistsBiomassHydropowerWindSolarRenewable market forecastsActionsInvestmentDifferent strategies by fuel sourceRenewable Energy Attractiveness IndexPartner, ally, takeover, supportRisk managementPositioningDiscussion and recommendationsSummaryIntroductionAnalyze before actionRecommendations for industryRecommendations for StatesInvestmentAnalyze and understand the value chainRecommendation: match investment to value chain stageFocus on managing and winning fundsRecommendation: appoint a CCOPartnerships and alliancesRecommendation 1: grow through partnershipRecommendation 2: explore (full) service solutionsMarket strategies
  5. 5. Recommendation 1: invest early/spread the riskRecommendation 2: invest strategically: buy into key sectorsRisk managementAppendixScopeMethodologySecondary researchGlossary/AbbreviationsBibliography/ReferencesLIST OF TABLESTable: World primary energy consumption (quadrillion BTU), 1990-2035Table: World primary energy consumption (quadrillion BTU) by fuel, 1980-2035Table: World energy consumption (%) by fuel, 1980-2035Table: Shares of global final energy consumption and electricity by fuel type (%), 2011Table: Breakdown of global final energy consumption (%) by renewable fuel type, 2009Table: Key drivers towards reduced reliance on fossil fuels, 2011Table: Typical average estimated capital costs for new power plants (US$bn), 2008Table: Existing renewables capacity, 2011Table: Share of wind and solar in total electricity generation (%) by selected countries,2009Table: Projected share of energy use of world renewables and of overall use (%) by region,2030Table: Average annual growth rates of renewable energy capacity (%), 2005-2010Table: Potential for renewable energy by energy type (EJ and TWh), 2009Table: Rates of green job growth (%), 2003-2010Table: Funding for the NREL (US$), 2002-2010Table: Changes to global primary consumption (%), 2009 to 2010: highlightsTable: Highlights of US primary energy consumption by overall share and change (%),2009-2010Table: US energy consumption by energy source of power supplied (renewables %), 2009Table: National renewables shares mandated by the EU Renewables Directive (%) 2009Table: Changes in key factors relating to UK energy production and consumption (%),2009-2010Table: Complete listing of all generation tariff levels up to March 2012Table: Primary energy use in Spain and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Table: Renewable energy sources in Germany – key indicators, 2009/2010Table: Breakdown of German renewable energy by source (%), 2010Table: Primary energy use in France and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Table: Primary energy use in Italy and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Table: Primary energy use in China and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Table: Primary energy use in South Korea and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Table: Breakdown of electricity generation from renewable sources in Australia (%), 2010Table: Primary energy use in India and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Table: Primary energy use in Brazil and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Table: Status of renewables technologies, characteristics and costs, 2011Table: Top Ten energy producers, 2010Table: Top Ten electricity generators, 2010Table: Top five biomass equipment manufacturers, 2011
  6. 6. Table: Top Ten world wood pellet manufacturers, 2011Table: Key players in world hydropower market, 2011Table: The top 10 wind power companies in the world by market share and powergenerated (% and MW), 2009 and 2007Table: The global top 10 wind power equipment manufacturers, 2009Table: Top 10 solar power companies by market capitalisation, July 2011Table: Key milestones in renewables investment, 2010Table: Country Attractiveness Indices, August 2011LIST OF FIGURESFigure: World primary energy consumption (quadrillion BTU), 1990-2035Figure: World primary energy consumption (quadrillion BTU) by fuel, 1980-2035Figure: Shares of global final energy consumption and electricity by fuel type (%), 2011Figure: Renewable Energy Cost Trends (levelized cents/kWh in constant 2000US$), 2011Figure: Typical average estimated capital costs for new power plants (US$bn), 2008Figure: Share of wind in total electricity generation (%) by selected countries, 2009Figure: Average annual growth rates of renewable energy capacity (%), 2005-2010Figure: Potential for renewable energy by energy type (EJ), 2009Figure: Key factors acting as influence upon government, 2011Figure: Role of government as influencer, 2011Figure: Theoretical framework: Triangle of influence, 2011Figure: Rates of green job growth (%), 2003-2010Figure: Pathways for renewable integration, 2011Figure: Funding for the NREL (US$), 2002-2010Figure: Highlights of US primary energy consumption by overall share and change (%),2009-2010Figure: US energy consumption by energy source (renewables %), 2009Figure: National renewables shares for leading EU states mandated by the EU RenewablesDirective (%) 2009Figure: Changes in key factors relating to UK energy production and consumption (%),2009-2010Figure: Breakdown of German renewable energy by source (%), 2010Figure: Primary energy use in China and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Figure: Breakdown of Japanese total energy consumption (%), 2008Figure: Primary energy use in South Korea and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Figure: Breakdown of electricity generation from renewable sources in Australia (%), 2010Figure: Primary energy use in India and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Figure: Primary energy use in Brazil and change (Mtoe and %), 2009-2010Figure: Wind (onshore and offshore) value chains, 2010Figure: Solar PV value chains, 2011Figure: Clean Tech generic value chain, 2010About Us:ReportsnReports is an online library of over 100,000+ market research reports and in-depthmarket research studies & analysis of over 5000 micro markets. We provide 24/7 online andoffline support to our customers. Get in touch with us for your needs of market researchreports.Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/marketsreportsOur Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/ReportsnReports/191441427571689
  7. 7. Contact:Mr.Priyank7557 Rambler road,Suite727,Dallas,TX75231Tel: + 1 888 391 5441E-mail: sales@reportsandreports.comhttp://www.reportsnreports.comVisit our Market Research Blog

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