Model 940 PositionServo Overview TRAINING
What is the Model 940? <ul><li>The Model 940 is a fully programmable high performance Torque, Velocity and Position brushl...
Model 940: Features, Benefits, & Specifications <ul><li>A Fully Programmable Digital AC Brushless Servo Drive with: </li><...
What is the “940” PositionServo? <ul><li>Torque, Velocity, Electronic Gearing and Programmable Motion Control </li></ul><u...
Model 940: Power Ranges <ul><li>120/240VAC </li></ul>* Note: Input of 120V will result in reduced performance based upon m...
Model 940: Power Ranges Voltage Doubler Units E94P020S1NEM E94x040S1NEM Cont Current 2 Amps 4 Amps Peak Current 6 Amps 12 ...
Model 940: Power Ranges <ul><li>480 VAC </li></ul>
Model 940: Part Number  94 Series  <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amp...
Model 940: Part Number 94 Series  <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps...
E94P vs. E94R <ul><li>E94P / 940 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Encoder Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>15 pin D Shell Connecto...
Model 940: Part Number 94 Series  <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps...
Model 940: Part Number 94 Series  <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps...
Model 940: Part Number 94 Series  <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps...
Model 940: Part Number 94 Series  <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps...
Model 940: EMC Filters <ul><li>E94PxxxS2FEx = Single-phase input with integral line filter (VDE class A) </li></ul><ul><li...
Model 940: Part Number 94 Series  <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps...
Model 940: Part Number 94 Series  <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps...
Model 940: Communication Options <ul><li>Ethernet (Standard) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MotionView Communications </li></ul></u...
Model 940: Communication Options <ul><li>CANbus  (optional) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Up to 1 Mbps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Model 940: Communication Options <ul><li>DeviceNet  (optional) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>500 kbps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>U...
Model 940: Additional Features <ul><li>24-volt “Keep-Alive” circuit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apply optional external voltage ...
Model 940: Additional Features <ul><li>Braking & DC Bus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internal regen circuitry – external braking ...
Model 940: What makes us better? <ul><li>Electronic Programmable Module (EPM) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy to program drives...
Model 940: What makes us better? <ul><li>Keypad & Display </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring and diagnostics </li></ul></ul>...
Model 940: What makes us better?
Keypad & Display
New for Hardware Version 2
8oot 0=Autoboot Disabled 1=Autoboot Enabled
Fault Code Display
High density  50 pin SCSI Connector Field Wiring Pin Name Function 1 MA+ Master Encoder A+ / Step+ input  (2) 2 MA- Master...
Model 940: Digital I/O <ul><li>Digital Inputs (5…24vdc): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>12 Digital Inputs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><l...
Model 940: Analog I/O <ul><li>Analog Inputs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2 Analog Inputs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessible v...
Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>Terminal Block I/O Module: E94ZATB02 </li></ul>
Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>:SCSI cable assembly (EWLN002SF1NA) </li></ul>Two Meter
Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>:940 Test Board (E94ZATST1) </li></ul><ul><li>5 Status Led’s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>+5V...
Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>Panel Saver SCSI I/O Module: </li></ul>
Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>Motor Brake Terminal Block Module: (E94ZAHBK2) </li></ul>
Model 940: Standard Feedback <ul><li>Encoder Feedback   (standard) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2.5 MHz </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><l...
Motor Offerings <ul><li>Compatible Lenze Servo Motors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MCS Series </li></ul></ul>
Motor Offerings <ul><li>MCS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Synchronous AC brushless servo motors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>250W to...
Motor Offerings MCS Series Motors Rated Pwr Rated Speed Max Speed Rated Torque MCS06 / 240V 0.25 - 0.75 Kw 4050 - 6000 rpm...
Model 940: Additional Servo Motors <ul><li>You can use third-party motors </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback accepted: </li></ul><...
Model 940 Wiring the Drive TRAINING
Model 940: Digital I/O (A1, A2, A3, A4, Acom) } (B1, B2, B3, B4, Bcom) } (C1, C2, C3, C4, Ccom) } The inputs on the 940 ar...
Customer Connections PNP?? NPN?? Sinking?? Sourcing?? Positive Logic?? Negative Logic?? Active Hi?? Active Low??
Model 940: Digital Inputs +24V Gnd PNP PNP, Sourcing, Active High, Pos Logic
Model 940: Digital Inputs PNP + - Power  Supply  Drive PLC
Model 940: Digital Inputs NPN +24V Gnd NPN, Sinking, Active Low, Neg Logic
Model 940: Digital Inputs NPN - + Power  Supply  PLC Drive
Model 940: Digital I/O Ready Output } Output #1 } } There are 5 outputs on the 940. One is dedicated as a Ready Output. Al...
Model 940: Digital Outputs Digital outputs electrical characteristics Circuit type - Isolated Open Collector Digital outpu...
Model 940: Digital Outputs Digital outputs electrical characteristics Circuit type - Isolated Open Collector Digital outpu...
Model 940: Analog I/O The 940 has two Analog Inputs and one Analog Output Analog Input #2 is 12 bit and can be wired eithe...
Model 940: Analog I/O EXTERNAL REFERENCE  (DIFFERENTIAL   CONFIGURATION) Analog Command Output ACOM Analog Command Return ...
Model 940: Analog I/O SINGLE-ENDED CONFIGURATION As the dancer arm goes up and down a 0 – 10 volt signal is transmitted to...
Software & Drive Setup   TRAINING
Software and Drive Setup  Free Programming and Configuration Software Residing in the drive MVOB
Software and Drive Setup <ul><li>MVOB – MotionView On Board </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MotionView is the universal programming ...
Software and Drive Setup How do you connect and communicate to the PositionServo? First you need to create a small network...
What is a Network and how does the user set up their computer? Individual Work Stations Company Network
Work Station Local Area Network X
From “ Control Panel ” select “ Network Connections ”
Select your New “ Local Area Connections ”
Now Select “ Properties”
Select “ Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) ” and click “ Properties ”
Click “Use the following IP address Enter in the following address and click OK.
To launch the software you need to launch your web browser.  MVOB Software and Drive Setup
<ul><li>MVOB – MotionView On Board </li></ul>192.168.124.120 Just type the drive’s IP address into your web browser
<ul><li>MVOB – MotionView On Board </li></ul>The browser will connect to the drive to upload the software
<ul><li>MVOB – MotionView On Board </li></ul>You are now ready to configure and program you drive
Once MotionView has been launched from the browser a MotionView Java Icon will be loaded to the desktop.
Running MVOB on Windows 7 In the “ Control Panel ”, select “ Network and Internet ”
Then select “ Network and Sharing Center ”
From here you want to select “Change Adapter Settings”
Right-click on your “Local Area Connection” or Adapter and pick “Properties”
Now choose “ Internet Protocol Version 4 ” and click “ Properties ”
From here you can enter your desired IP settings and Subnet mask
Just as before, open your browser and enter the PositionServo’s IP address
MVOB – MotionView On Board <ul><li>Who else offers this? </li></ul><ul><li>NO CD’s needed! </li></ul><ul><li>No Rev’s to w...
Once MotionView is open select the “ Connect ” button from the Tool Bar
From the Connection screen, select the “ Discover ” button to ping the network and detect all PositionServo drives on the ...
Select “Save Connection” “ Save Connection ” allows the user to save the connection to a drive or multiple drives under on...
The next time you need to connect to a drive or group of drives you can click on the “ Load Connection ” button to connect...
We can now Program and Configure the drive. Click on the drive folder
Parameter View Window Message Window Parameter Tree Window The programming environment is segmented into three windows
Select the “ Motor ” file from the Parameter Tree The Motor’s Parameter will be displayed in the “ Parameter View Window ”
When you select the drive node   drive information is displayed in the  Parameter View Window This is also where the drive...
To select a motor from the Motor data base, click here
Click here to choose a Vendor Click here to select motor model
If the users motor isn’t in the database then a Custom Motor File can be created.
Model 940: Auto Tuning Feedback Command Output Lab
These settings are used for Autotuning
Deselect  “ Disable High Performance Mode” for best Autotuning results Select “Autotuning” Select “ Position Tuning ” to t...
Advanced AutoTuning Options Feedback Filter to compensate for noise in motor feedback Two available filters for tuning res...
Select the “ Parameter ” file from the Node tree to view & edit the drive’s parameters The following are some of the more ...
Drive Mode: can be set to Torque, Velocity or Position Reference: can be set to Internal or External
Servo Torque Control <ul><li>Up to 1.5 kHz bandwidth in Torque (Current) mode </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>65 μs current loop...
Servo Torque Control <ul><li>Controls current to motor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adjusts (torque) out of the motor </li></ul><...
Torque Control Speed-Torque Characteristics
Torque Control <ul><li>Torque Control Applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nut Runners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Web Tensio...
Torque Control Nut Runner
Servo Velocity Control <ul><li>Up to 200 Hz bandwidth in Velocity mode </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>512 μs velocity loop </li...
Servo Velocity Control <ul><li>Monitors and regulates speed </li></ul><ul><li>Also monitors current to motor </li></ul><ul...
Servo Velocity Control
Servo Velocity Control <ul><li>Velocity Control Applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conveyors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sp...
Servo Velocity Control Wafer Spinner
Servo Position Control <ul><li>Up to 200 Hz bandwidth in Position mode </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>512 μs position loop </li...
Servo Position Control <ul><li>Controls motor for correct position at correct time  </li></ul><ul><li>Also monitors torque...
Servo Position Control
Servo Position Control <ul><li>Position Control Applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Case Packer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Servo Position Control Case Packer
Drive Mode, can be set to Torque, Velocity or Position. Reference, Can be set to Internal or external Drive Frequency can ...
High Efficiency <ul><li>High Carrier Frequency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Selectable 8, 16 kHz switching frequency </li></ul></...
Master Encoder Input type can be set to Master Encoder or Step and Direction Set ratio to follow a Master Encoder User uni...
There are 4 selections under Communications - Ethernet - RS485 - Can - Profibus Ethernet tab allows you to view and change...
Select the “ Digital IO ” file from the Node tree to view/edit and program the drives IO Outputs can be set to come on at ...
Select the “ Analog IO ” file from the Node tree to view/edit and program the drives IO The Analog output can be configure...
When an output is preprogrammed to come on these parameters are used Select the “ Velocity Limits ” folder
These parameters are used in conjunction with the drives Position Error Select the “ Position Limits ” folder
Select the “ Compensation ” folder These parameters are used in conjunction with the tuning of the drive
Select the “ Indexer program ” folder This is where the user can write there own User program for there application
Select Oscilloscope to-do motor and drive diagnostics  Select the “ Tools ” folder
Select “Parameter & IO View” to monitor IO and read / write to drive parameters. Select the “Tools” folder. Select “Add” t...
Select the “ Monitor ” folder
Select “ Load Faults ” to display the fault history  Select the “ Faults ” folder Select “ Clear Faults ” to clear the fau...
“ Print ” prints a file containing all of the drives settings as well as the user program “ Save Configuration ” Allows th...
<ul><li>External Reference Labs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Torque, Velocity & Position </li></ul></ul>TRAINING
Model 940: Reference Input <ul><li>The 940’s Reference Input can be sourced in multiple ways </li></ul><ul><li>From an ext...
External Reference Input  Reference Input Pass Through Feedback “ External” Motion Controller Command Output  Feedback Cen...
Enable Input (IN_A3) 940 Test Board (E94ZATST01) Input (IN_A1) Inputs (IN_A4 – IN_B4) Status LED’s (+5V, Rdy, Out1 – Out4)...
Select “ Parameters”  from the node tree Open the Drive Mode pull down window and select “ Torque”  Mode
Set the drive up for External Reference Select “ Parameters”  from the node tree
Set the “ Enable switch function”  to  Run Select “ Digital IO”  from the node tree
Turn on the “ Enable ” Input Use the pot on the test board to simulate an analog input from a Motion Controller
Torque Control Speed-Torque Characteristics
Adjusting the Analog input (current scale) will determine how much torque is put out per analog voltage coming in Select “...
External Reference Input  (Centralized Control System): Reference Input Pass Through Feedback “ Centralized” Control Comma...
Select “ Parameters”  from the node tree Open the Drive Mode pull down window and select “ Velocity”  Mode Reference remai...
Turn on the “ Enable ” Input Use the pot on the test board to simulate an analog input from a Motion Controller
Change the value for Analog Input (velocity scale) and note how the speed of the motor changes Select “ Analog IO”  from t...
Select “ Parameters”  from the node tree Change the Velocity Mode Acceleration setting from Enabled to Disabled
Adjust the Pot to about half speed and click   on the “ << “ button next to “ Analog Input Offset ”. Turn the pot and noti...
Lower the Pot all the way to Zero volts. If the motor still rotates click on the “ << “ button next to “ Analog Input Offs...
Select “Oscilloscope” from the Tools folder Set channel 1 to “Motor velocity” and channel 2 to “Analog Input 1”, select th...
Model 940: Reference Input <ul><li>The 940’s Reference Input can be sourced in multiple ways </li></ul><ul><li>From an ext...
Model 940: Electronic Gearing Feedback Output can follow master encoder, ratio set by user Master Encoder Or Step and Dire...
Pin Name Function 1 MA+ Master Encoder A+ / Step+ input  (2) 2 MA- Master Encoder A- / Step- input  (2) 3 MB+ Master Encod...
First we need to wire the Enable Input (In_A3) Run a jump wire from +5V (pin 6) to input A3 (pin 29) Run a jump wire from ...
Now we need to wire up the Master Encoder Pin Name Function 1 MA+ Master Encoder A+ / Step+ input  (2) 2 MA- Master Encode...
Select “ Parameters”  from the node tree Open the Drive Mode pull down window and select “ Position”  Mode Reference remai...
Select “ Parameters”  from the node tree Open the “ Master Encoder Input Type ”   pull down window and select “ Master Enc...
Change the Master and System ratio as you spin the encoder Lab
Model 940 <ul><li>Internal Reference (Indexer Program)  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Programming Overview and Command str...
Model 940: Reference Input <ul><li>The 940’s Reference Input can be sourced in multiple ways </li></ul><ul><li>From an ext...
Internal Reference Input: Feedback Command Output Motion is derived internally from the drive’s user program
Programming Language <ul><li>Definitions and Assignments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DEFINE any constant or variable </li></ul><...
Programming Language <ul><li>Program Control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HALT, RESET </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EVENT <name>; EN...
Programming Language <ul><li>Motion Control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MOVE UNTIL, MOVE BACK UNTIL, MOVE WHILE, MOVE BACK WHILE...
System Variables <ul><ul><li>UNITS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>APOS, TPOS, RPOS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MAXV, VEL </li><...
System Operators <ul><li>Arithmetic Operators: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Add </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Subtract </li></ul></u...
System Operators <ul><li>Comparative Operators: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Greater-Than </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less-Than </...
System Operators <ul><li>Boolean Operators: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AND </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
System Flags <ul><ul><li>IN_A1-4, IN_B1-4, IN_C1-4 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OUT1-4 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>F_IN_POSIT...
Select the “ Indexer Program ” file from the Node Tree
The User’s Program will be displayed in the “ Parameter View Window ” Select the “ Indexer Program ” file from the Node Tree
The “ User Program Area ”, has it’s own set of control buttons Select the “ Indexer Program ” file from the Node Tree
Compile Program Compile and download Program Start Program Reset Program Stop Program Step through Program Save Pgm to fil...
Program Structure <ul><li>Header, I/O List, Define Variables: </li></ul><ul><li>Contains: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Commented ...
Program Header PGM I/O List Initialize & Set Variables
Program Structure <ul><li>Events </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contains: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul></ul></...
Program Structure <ul><li>Events </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Event Scan time 512 µs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Independent of M...
Program Events
Program Structure <ul><li>Main Program </li></ul><ul><li>Contains: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Main Body of Program Code </li></...
Control Structures Wait Statement <ul><li>Used to Suspend Program Execution Until or While a condition is true. Includes s...
Control Structures Goto / Label Statement <ul><li>Used to Transfer Program execution to a new point in the program marked ...
Motion Commands <ul><li>Motion Statements: </li></ul><ul><li>(How to get from point A to point B) </li></ul>A B MoveD Move...
Motion Commands <ul><li>MoveD Command: </li></ul><ul><li>Move Distance </li></ul><ul><li>Performs Incremental Move to the ...
Motion Commands <ul><li>MoveP Command: </li></ul><ul><li>(Move to Position) </li></ul><ul><li>Performs Positional Move to ...
Program Events Main Program
Program Structures <ul><li>Subroutines: </li></ul><ul><li>Subroutine Stack </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Subroutine Stack is 16 Le...
Program Structure <ul><li>Subroutines: </li></ul><ul><li>Contains: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Routines Separate from the Main P...
Program Events Main Program Sub Routines
Model 940: Simple Motion Program Feedback Command Output Lab
Pick and Place Application
Move to Home (MoveP 0)
Extend arm (Out1 = 1)
Turn on Gripper (Out2 = 1)
Retract arm (Out1 = 0)
Move to Place Position (MoveP 100)
Extend arm (Out1 = 1)
Release Gripper (Out2 = 0)
Retract Pick Arm (Out1 = 0)
Move back to Pick Position (MoveP 0)
Select “ Parameters”  from the node tree Open the Drive Mode pull down window and select “ Position”  Mode Set the drive u...
Set the  Enable switch function  to  Inhibit Select “ Digital IO”  from the node tree
Select the “ Indexer Program ” file from the Node Tree. Click on the “ Import ” Control Button Navigate to the “ Programmi...
Select “ Load W Source ” to compile the program and load it to the drive.
Use the “ Step ” button to step through the  program. The “ >> ” keys point to the line of code next to be executed.
UNITS = 1 ACCEL = 75 DECEL =75 MAXV = 10 APOS = 0 ;************************************************ Events ***************...
Pick and Place Application with Homing
Move to Home –  Where is Home? Home Prox Switch
UNITS = 1 ACCEL = 75 DECEL =75 MAXV = 10 VAR_HOME_FAST_VEL = 10 ;Sets speed in rps for 1 st  move towards home sensor VAR_...
Program Structure Fault   Routines <ul><li>Contains: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Specific Routine that handles any fault occurri...
Program Structure Fault Routines <ul><li>When a fault is detected Motion will be suspended and drive will be disabled. </l...
Program Structure Fault Routines <ul><li>Fault code is written to the DFAULTS Register </li></ul><ul><li>Event Scanning is...
Program Events Main Program Sub Routines Fault Handling
Model 940: Fault Handling ! Start the program and drive While the motor is running turn off the Enable Switch diS rUn F_36...
OUT1 = 0 ;Retract Pick arm GOTO PROGRAM_START END ;******************************************* Sub-Routines **************...
OUT1 = 0 ;Retract Pick arm GOTO PROGRAM_START END ;******************************************* Sub-Routines **************...
Model 940: Adding I/O Feedback Command Output Lab
Extend arm Prox Sensors
;******************************************* Main Program ****************************************** RESET_DRIVE: WAIT UNT...
Model 940: Events Feedback Command Output Lab
Move to Home
Extend Arm
Turn on Gripper
Retract Arm
Move to Place Position
Extend Arm
Release Gripper
Retract Pick Arm
Move Back to Pick Position
EVENT SPRAY_GUNS_START APOS>25 OUT3=1 ENDEVENT EVENT SPRAY_GUNS_STOP APOS>75 OUT3=0 ENDEVENT ;****************************...
Model 940: Continue command Feedback Command Output
WAIT UNTIL IN_A4==0  ;Make sure Arm is retracted before starting the program MOVEP 0 ;Move to position 0 to pick part OUT1...
Model 940 Thank You TRAINING
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  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Hello and thank you for your interest. This presentation will outline the Lenze’s PositionServo product offering, discuss its capabilities and features, and provide training in its basic configuration and programming.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The PositionServo is a fully programmable high performance servo drive with low cost of ownership, low opportunity cost and extremely high value. The drive can function in three fundamental operating modes: torque, velocity, and positioning.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The PositionServo is a high performance servo drive which provides sinusoidal commutation. The drive is fully programmable giving it the ability to be used in either a centralized or decentralized control architecture. Models are available for either encoder or resolver feedback for a wide range of power options. The PositionServo offers popular industrial communication options so you are not limited to any particular controls vendor.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The drive can be used in torque control, velocity control , electronic gearing and programmable motion control applications. The drive is capable of registration and features 11 programmable digital inputs, 4 programmable digital outputs 2 analog inputs and 1 analog output. The drive is programmed in a basic like language which supports fault monitoring and deterministic event handling. These features allow the PositionServo to be the best value solution for a wide variety of applications.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Power ranges for the 230V models are from 2 to 18 Amps.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Two “Voltage Doubler” models are also offered (2Amp and 4Amp). These units can be fed with single phase 115VAC and will internally double their supply voltage so that they can be used with 230V AC standard servo motors without loss of their rated speed. While the standard 230V units can be supplied with 115VAC, 230V motors utilized with those models will lose speed capacity per the motor’s Ke factor rating.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS 400/480 VAC models are also offered from 2 to 9 Amps. All PositionServo drive models feature a 300% peak current capacity at a 50% duty cycle for a 2 second bandwidth. This means the drive is capable of providing 300% peak current for 2 out of every 4 seconds of time enabled.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS These next few slides will discuss the PositionServo model numbering code. All PositionServo drive models begin with a E94 prefix.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The 4’th character in the model number is either a ”P” for the Encoder based 940 or an “R” for the resolver based 941.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The 940 and 941 are both PositionServo drives. The difference is only that the 940 (E94P) uses encoder feedback from the servo motor (with a DB-15 connector) whereas the 941 (E94R) uses resolver feedback (from a DB-9 connector). An explanation of these terms and their features will be discussed in detail in the following slides.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The 5’th 6’th and 7’th characters in the drive model number are the continuous amperage rating of the drive in tenths of an amp. For example 020 would indicate 2.0 Amps continuous current rating.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The eighth character in the part number string describes the drive’s Input phase requirement. An “S” indicates the drive can only operate on single phase input power. A “Y” indicates that the drive can operate on either singe or three phase input power. A “T” indicates that three phase input power is required to operate the drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The ninth character in the part string indicates the nominal drive input power rating. A “1” denotes the drive is a 120VAC doubler model. A “2” indicates the drive is a 200/240VAC model. A “4” indicates the drive’s input voltage rating is 400/480VAC.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The PositionServo product line offers most 200/240VAC models in two variants. Those with an integrated line filter and those without an integrate line filter. The 10’th character in the character string is a “N” for all PositionServo models that do not have an integral line filter, and is a “F” for the models having an integrated line filter.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS It is important to note : the 200/240VAC PositionServo drives with the integrated line filters only support single phase input power. Users requiring three phase input power and EMC filters will need to use the standard drive offering and purchase an optional 3 phase line filter.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The 11’th character is either an “E” for the encoder based 940 drive, or an “R” for the resolver based 941 drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The final character in the PositionServo part number string indicates if the drive is a standard MVOB equipped drive (denoted by an “M”) or a MVOB equipped drive with the ISO13849-1 safety circuit (denoted by an “S”).
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS All current PostionServo drives are equipped with an Ethernet port for programming and monitoring purposes. The Ethernet port also natively supports both Modbus TCPIP and Ethernet IP protocols as a slave. Support of these two industrial protocols allows many popular controls to interface to the PositionServo.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The PositionServo has two expansion bays. The top expansion bay is used for communication option modules. There are four communication modules available. The CANOpen option module allows users to tie the drive into a CANOpen network allowing for DS301 functionality using either PDO or SDO messaging. The RS-485 option module can support drive to drive communication (as can the embedded Ethernet port) using the PositionServo’s proprietary PPP protocol, or it can support Modbus RTU as a Modbus slave device.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS A Devicenet slave communication option module and a Profibus DP-V0 slave communication module are also available. The lower option bay on the drive is currently not used and is reserved for future option modules.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The drive can be supplied with 24VDC power (500mA) to keep the logic alive during a loss of mains power. This 24V keep alive circuit allows the drive to respond to both I/O and communications, in addition to retaining position through a loss of mains power. As the PositionServo does not support absolute encoders, the drive must be re-homed after a power interruption if 24VDC keep alive power is not supplied to the drive. The drive also has a PTC input to monitor resistance of a motor’s integral temperature sensor (if the motor is so equipped) to prevent thermal overload of the motor.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Easy access is provided to the DC bus to allow drives to be wired for load sharing or to power the drives from a DC source. The drive also features an integral dynamic brake chopper circuit. Usage of the dynamic brake requires external brake resistors to be wired to the drive. The feedback connector is either a DB15 connector for the 940 encoder based models or a DB-9 connector for the 941 resolver based models. The encoder input can support frequencies up to 2MHz. The 940 drive requires a 5VDC full differential TTL incremental encoder with hall effect sensors. The 941 drive provides 12 bit resolution on its resolver input. The 941 drive is compatible with 10V peak to peak resolvers having a 0.5 transformation ratio at 5 kHz.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The PositionServo features Lenze’s EPM technology. The Electronic Programmable Module (EPM) is a removable memory module containing the drive’s program and all drive parameters. This feature allows easy field replacement. Lenze also offers an optional EPM programmer which can copy EPM modules. This optional programmer makes OEM programming of large numbers of drives quick and easy.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The PositionServo also features an integrated three button keypad and four digit 7 segment display providing access to key diagnostic data
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The display also has five LEDs. The “Enable” LED indicates the drive is enabled (producing current to control the motor). The “Regen” LED indicates that the drive is regenerating power and the regen chopper circuit is active. The “Data Entry” LED will flash yellow when the user is accessing a parameter on the front panel display that may be edited by the drive’s three button keypad (for example the fourth octet of the drive’s IP address). The “COM Fault” LED indicates a communications fault on a CANOpen network (This indication only functions when the optional CANOpen communication module is installed). The “Comm Activity” LED flashes to indicate communications activity on the drive’s Ethernet port. If the communications activity is fast enough- the blinking may appear to become a solid “on” LED.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Usage of the Keypad and display is simple and intuitive. Pushing the enter key (the rightmost button) gives the user access to the menu. Here the user can use the up and down arrow keys to navigate to the item of interest (i.e. IP_4 for the fourth octet of the drive’s IP address). Once at the item desired, simply press the enter key again to view the setting or data. If this is an editable parameter, the yellow C LED will flash at the top center of the display. Use the up/down arrow keys to edit the setting, and then hit the enter key again to save the change and return to the menu. One note. Some parameter changes (such as IP address changes) only take affect after the drive is rebooted or power cycled.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The main menu headings include drive status, hardware revision, firmware revision, baud rate and serial address (for drives equipped with a RS-485 communication option card), Fault history..
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Heatsink temperature, Encoder raw counts, Hall effect sensor status, DC bus voltage, RMS motor phase current, Motor PTc resistance, Analog input 1 Voltage, Analog input 2 voltage….
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS CAN communication parameters (for drives equipped with the CANOpen communication option module) DHCP enabled/disabled, the drive’s IP address and Autoboot Enable/Disable.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Common drive Fault codes are listed on this slide. For a complete list of drive faults, please refer to the PositionServo user’s manual available in the technical library on www.actech.com
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS All I/O wiring for the drive is landed to the 50 pin SCSI. This includes wiring points for a master encoder (for electronic gearing or step and direction command) as well as a buffered encoder output which can be wired back to a motion controller or to the master encoder input of another drive to synchronize or gear movement.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Drive has 12 digital inputs which are grouped into three groups of four. (Each group having a common return). All inputs are accessible to the user program, although certain function are reserved for certain inputs (i.e. inhibit/enable must be used and must be IN_A3, the registration input if used is always IN_C3). The drive also has 5 digital outputs. 1 is dedicated to indicate the drive is READY/ENABLED. The remaining four can be either be used as free outputs in the user program, or can be assigned special functions in the drive, for example the brake function may be assigned to an output.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Two analog inputs are present. Both are 12 bit resolution (11 bit + sign) and have a range of +/- 10V. Both may be used in the user program. Analog input 1 can also be used as an external reference for either velocity or torque modes. A 10 bit resolution 0-10VDC analog output is also present. It can be either used as a free output in the user program or it can be assigned a special function (i.e to indicate output phase current).
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS An optional Terminal block is available to facilitate field wiring. The part number is E94ZATBO2. It adapts the 50 pin SCSI connector over to a screw terminal block.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Lenze also offers a 2 meter long SCSI to flying lead cable to facilitate wiring the drive to third party terminal blocks. The part number of this optional cable is EWLN002SF1NA.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS For sales demo units and program development purposes a “Test Board” is available. This board incorporates 8 switches, LED indicators for all of the digital outputs and two 5V potentiometers for the analog inputs. The part number of the test board is E94ZATST1.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS For users concerned with cabinet depth, Lenze offers Panel Saver modules (one for the 940 and one for the 941). These modules are straight pass through connectors which mount to the front of the drive. By using these modules the user connections for the feedback cable and the 50 pin SCSI I/O are transferred off the left side of the drive facing into the cabinet. An important note: The Panel Saver modules cannot be used in conjunction with any other SCSI field wiring option module.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Lenze also offers the E94ZAHBK2 “Motor Brake Terminal Block Option Module”. This module is a SCSI to SCSI adapter module with easy provision for the user to wire a 24VDC power supply to and also the two motor brake leads. This option module uses digital output 2 for the brake function.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The buffered encoder output has a minimal electrical delay. Delay time for encoder based drives is approximately 100 nanoseconds. Resolver drives internally convert the resolver signal to a user selectable scaled encoder output. This is done by setting the parameter “Resolver Tracks” in the drive’s main parameters. The delay time for the buffered encoder when using the 941 drive is 62 micro seconds.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Lenze’s Servo motor offering includes the MCS series. These high quality, high performance servo motors are manufactured by Lenze in Germany.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The MCS series are synchronous AC brushless servo motors in power ranges from 250watts to 10 kilowatts. 240VAC and 480VAC models are offered in IEC metric frame sizes with 60mm, 90mm, and 120mm flanges. The motors are offered with either resolver of incremental encoder feedback (the encoder feedback is 4096 Pulses per revolution). These servo motors bare UL and CE marks and are IP54 rated and feature MIL spec M23 connectors. IP65 seals are optionally offered if required for the application.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This chart outlines the basic MCS servo motor offering.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS PositionServo can also support third party Synchronous Servo motors. To be compatible, the motor needs to be rated for the same voltage as the drive and must have either a 5V full differential TTL incremental encoder with hall effect sensors or a 10V peak to peak Resolver with a transformation ratio of 0.5 at 5 kHz carrier frequency.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS In this section we will discuss field wiring for Lenze’s PositionServo drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The 12 digital inputs of the PositionServo are grouped into 3 groups of 4 , each group with its own common. The I/O can accept 5-24VDC signals; however obviously all I/O within a given group must be of the same voltage.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS It can often be difficult selecting components for True High/ True Low Sourcing/Sinking to wire the system. The PositionServo allows users to wire the digital I/O for either sinking or sourcing. This gives the user the greatest flexibility in choosing components for their system.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here we see the drive wired for PNP, note the power flow.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This wiring is still PNP and is also valid for PositionServo.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here we show the drive wired for NPN. Note the current flow.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This configuration is also NPN and is valid for the PositionServo
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The digital outputs of the PositionServo are open collector/ Emitter. They can also be wired as either PNP or NPN.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here we show the wiring for PNP
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here we show the wiring for NPN.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Analog input 1 is the command from your Motion Controller. This will be either a torque command or a velocity command. The PositionServo analog inputs can be wired for either single ended or differential signals. You can program your Analog output to pass through information back to the controller – Speed, RMS current….
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here we show the wiring for a differential analog signal to the drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here we show the wiring for a single ended analog signal to the drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS In this section we will discuss the Motionview On Board (MVOB) programming software and the basic PositionServo drive configuration.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS PositionServo drives feature MotionView On Board (MVOB) software. The MVOB software is a java based software package imbedded within the drive. The user simply uploads the programming software out of the drive onto their PC using a standard web browser. With MVOB there is never any concern of either a service technician or a customer ever being without access to the programming software for the drive or having the correct version of software to be compatible with an installed drive. The software they need is ready to access at any time from the drive itself.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS To access the MVOB software from the drive. Connect the PC’s Ethernet port to the drive’s Ethernet port, set the PC’s IP address to be on the same subnet as the drive’s IP address and then simply type the drive’s IP address into the destination field in your standard web browser. That’s it! We will go over this process in detail over the next few slides.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Use an Ethernet cross over cable to connect the PC’s Ethernet port directly to the PositionServo. If a hub or switch is used, a patch cable should be used to connect the drive to the switch.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will need to set the PC’s IP address to be on the same subnet as the PositionServo drive. Most corporate and home networks assign the IP address to the PC automatically. In this case; however we want to manually set that IP address.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS When we set the PC’s IP address, it will no longer be able to communicate to your local network. The IP address however is unique for the Ethernet adapter- so if your PC has more than one Ethernet adapter- each has it’s own configured IP address. If you have a wireless connection as your main network connection there will be no issue. If you use a hardwired connection you may find it easier to purchase a third party USB/Ethernet adapter for your PC so that you do not have to disrupt your connection to your corporate network. USB/Ethernet adapters are readily available and quite inexpensive. They certainly are not necessary; however they are very convenient allowing for you not to have to adjust your settings when you want to program a drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS In WIN XP, to access your TCPIP settings first enter your control panel then double click “Network Connections”
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Double click on the “Local Area Connections” that you have the drive connected to. Quick tip: if you disconnect the cable from the PC that you will be using you will be able to see the correct icon change adding a red “x” over it. Reconnecting the cable will make the icon change again (the red “x” will disappear).
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Now click on the “Properties” Button.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Scroll through the list and first left click on “Internet Protocol”, then left click on the “Properties” button to access the IP address window.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Select “Use the following IP address” then enter the address you want he PC to assume. The default IP address of the PositionServo is 192.168.124.120. You will want to set the PC to 192.168.124.xxx (xxx= any number between 1-254 not used by another device already- the default value of Position servo’s last octet of its IP address is 120- so any address other than 120 will work if the only two devices on the network are the PC and the the drive. (i.e.xxx=1). Enter 255.255.255.0 for the subnet mask then click “OK”.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS To load the MVOB software from the drive onto your PC you will now need to launch your web browser.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Type the drive’s IP address into the web browser (again the default IP address is 192.168.124.120). If you are unsure of your drive’s IP address you can check it using the front panel display on the drive as discussed in the last section.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS After you type the IP address into the destination address of the webbrowser and hit enter the MVOB software will load onto the PC. Depending on your security settings you may be prompted to allow download of the file and you may also then get a popup asking you to confirm you want the software to run. Allow the software to open and allow the software to run in order start MVOB.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Once MVOB launches you will be ready to start configuring your drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS After launching Motionview for the first time, a Motionview Java icon will be placed on your desktop.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The process of setting the PC’s IP address under WIN7 is a bit different from using WIN XP. Again, start by going to the control panel, then double click on Network and Internet.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Next you will need to double click on “Network and Sharing Center”
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS From this point you need to click on “Change adapter settings”.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Right click on the “Local Area Connection” that you are using to connect to the drive. Quick tip: Just like in WIN XP, if you disconnect the cable from the PC that you will be using you will be able to see the correct icon change adding a red “x” over it. Reconnecting the cable will make the icon change again (the red “x” will disappear). You can use this technique to determine the correct icon to double click on this screen.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Now choose “Internet Protocol Version 4” and click “Properties”
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This step is identical to using WIN XP: Select “Use the following IP address” then enter the address you want he PC to assume. The default IP address of the PositionServo is 192.168.124.120. You will want to set the PC to 192.168.124.xxx (xxx= any number between 1-254 not used by another device already- the default value of Position servo’s last octet of its IP address is 120- so any address other than 120 will work if the only two devices on the network are the PC and the drive. (i.e.xxx=1). Enter 255.255.255.0 for the subnet mask then click “OK”.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Type the IP address of the drive into the destination address of your webbrowser. Open the MVOB software file and then allow it to run.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS With PositionServo MVOB the user always has the software they need for the drive whenever they need it without question.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Once MVOB is launched, you will want to connect to your drive. To do so- click on the “Connect” button on the left hand side of your tool bar.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Clicking the “Discover” button will cause the list of IP addresses of available PositionServo drives to be populated under “Connect to drive:”. You can click on the IP address of the drive you want to connect to and then click on the “Connect” button. Note: if your PC has more than one Ethernet adapter the “Discover” button may not be able to detect any drives available. You can still connect to your PositionServo drive in this case by simply typing in the IP address of the drive in question manually in the “IP Address” field and then clicking on the “Connect” button.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The “Save Connection” button, saves the communication path to the drive you are currently programming, not the drive’s program. This is useful during development of multi axis systems.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The “Load Connection” button loads a saved connection path. This is useful in the development of multiaxis systems.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Once you have connected to a drive, you are ready to configure and program. Click on the drive folder. The Drive folder is set up as basic tree navigation for ease of use.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The MVOB programming screen is broken into three basic windows. The Parameter Tree Window is used to navigate through the drive’s navigation tree. The Parameter View Window is used to access the individual parameters for the drive features contained in the navigation tree selection. The message window gives individual program status indicators: such as connected to drive, disconnected from drive: progress of loading, or program errors.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS For example: If you select the Motor file in the navigation tree you will be able to access the motor parameters. We will now begin exploring the navigation tree and discuss the configuration features of the drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Click on the drive node (the drive’s top line in the navigation tree). This will show the drive’s basic information including its firmware and hardware revisions. This screen also allows you to assign a name or alias to the drive. In this example, the drive is named “X-axis”. You can also set the Group ID number of the drive. This is an advanced field used only in drive to drive messaging using the “SEND TO” logic command. For further information on the “SEND TO” logic command please refer to the PositionServo programming manual.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Next, let’s explore the motor selection of the navigation tree. To change the currently selected motor click the “Change Motor” button.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Motor database contains over 600 motors from a wide array of vendors. Simply select the manufacturer and then the motor model number for the motor you will be using. Once you have selected your motor, click the “Update Drive” button to load the motor selection and motor data to the drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS If the motor is not in the database, the user can create a custom motor file. Simply select “Custom Motor”, and then fill in the prompted motor information. Once entered the user can save the custom motor file and then select “Update Drive” to save the motor parameter settings to the drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS After configuring the motor, the drive needs to be tuned. The PositionServo incorporates an advanced auto-tuning feature to make setup of the system both quick and easy. We will walk through this process in this follow along lab.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The tuning parameters and functions are located on the Compensation selection of the drive’s navigation tree.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS With the Indexer code stopped Select “Compensation:” from the navigation tree. Then deselect “Disable High Performance Mode”. (Disable High Performance Mode” is selected by default to facilitate users replacing a first hardware generation Position Servo with the current product offering). Next turn on IN_A3 and click the Autotuning button. To tune both the Position and the velocity loops, select both the “Position Tuning” and “Velocity Tuning” check boxes. When it is safe to move the motor click the “Start” button. Finally once autotuning is complete select “Yes” to save the gain settings.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS For advanced applications the drive incorporates a feedback filter with a programmable time constant (to counteract noise from the motor feedback signal) as well as two advanced loop filters which can be configured. A generic low pass filter may be selected, a Resonator filter may be selected (to counteract mechanical resonance), and a Notch filter is also available. A notch filter is useful in dealing with a non-uniform mass distribution on the load (eccentric loading) and also on tuning vertical applications. Autotuning must be rerun after enabling filters for proper response.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The “Parameter” screen accesses the drive’s basic configuration parameters. The next few slides will discuss the commonly used parameters and their settings.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Fundamentally the drive has three modes of operation: torque, velocity, and Position. Use the “Drive Mode” setting to select the mode of operation for the application. **Note the drive mode can be altered logically by the user program whenever the drive is disabled. This field sets the mode first used when the drive boots.** Reference refers to the source of the drive mode’s command. In other words, what does the drive look at to determine what it should be doing for the drive mode being used. In the case of Torque Mode this indicates where the output current level command initiates from. In velocity mode , reference identifies the source of the velocity command. For Position mode it identifies where the reference for relative position originates from. The drive can has two possible references: either “Internal” or “External”. Internal reference is taken by the drive’s internal variables. An external reference is analog input 1 for torque or velocity modes. External reference for position mode is either a master encoder or a step and direction signal.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The servo loop solves in 62.5 micro seconds. Torque regulation is specified for a 100:1 range with a 1% accuracy of maximum current rating for the drive model.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Servo torque control regulates current to the motor to control the motor’s torque. Motor torque is proportional to the Kt (torque constant) of the motor in question. A torque command can be from an analog signal from a device such as a motion controller, or can be logically manipulated by the drive’s user program.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS In torque mode the motor will produce the commanded amount of torque. If load is not present, the motor speed will runaway.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Examples of torque control applications include: Nut runners, web tensioners, and labelers. Motion controllers will often use the drive in torque mode, giving the drive an analog torque command and referencing the drive’s buffered encoder output to solve the position loop.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This slide shows the action of a typical nut runner. The axis turns at a given amount of torque to ensure the bottle is sealed properly.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The velocity loop update rate of the PositionServo is 512 micro seconds. Speed regulation is +/-1 RPM over a 5000:1 velocity range. Analog control is however limited to 11 bits + sign (so 2048 divisions are possible from a 0-10VDC command signal).
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Velocity mode regulates the speed of the motor; however the drive will not allow it’s peak current limit to be exceeded. Analog input 1 can be used as a velocity command or the drive’s internal variable “IREF” can also be used for this purpose.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS While in velocity mode there is no position error checking. As such if the torque required to rotate the motor at the commanded speed is in excess of the torque limit (peak current limit setting of the drive) the axis will loose velocity without fault or error. This can be useful in certain torque applications where the possibility of a runaway could exist. Application example AE8 in the technical library of the actech.com website covers this concept in detail.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Basic examples of velocity control applications include: Conveyors and Wafer spinners. Some motion controllers will give the drive an analog signal for the speed reference and use the buffered encoder output to solve their position loop.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This is an example of a Wafer Spinner.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Position loop update rate is every 512 microseconds. When used with an external reference master encoder signal, the drive can follow position signal frequencies up to 2 MHz. During execution of motion, deterministic program events can be run by the user logic program. This provides application flexibility.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS During Position mode, velocity and torque are monitored so as to provide correction to the axis, keeping it in the proper position at the proper time. If the torque required to move the axis exceeds the torque setting (peak current limit setting) the drive will be unable to keep the axis in proper position and will fault with a Position error once the error exceeds user programmed limits for both time and magnitude.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This graph shows the correction a drive will attempt due to a torque disturbance. If the torque required is below the torque limit, the correction will be possible.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Examples of position control applications include case packers, indexing tables, pick and place machines, and flying shears.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here you can see typical action of a case packer traversing back and forth from programmed positions.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Position Servo can be programmed to use either 8 kHz or 16 kHz carrier frequency. 16kHz provides quieter operation at the expense of being less efficient. This loss of efficiency results in the peak current rating of the drive being de-rated by 17% when the drive is used at 16kHz carrier.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Both 8 and 16 kHz are out of the audible range for human beings. The drive uses space vector modulation for greater DC-bus utilization
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The external reference type for position mode is set by the “Master Encoder Input Type” parameter. Either a Step/Direction or a master encoder can be configured. In either case the drive can also be set for an electronic gearing ratio off of that external reference. The ratio is expressed as two integers: Counts of the Master (set under “Master”) to desired resulting counts from the PositionServo system (set under “System”). Again as these are in counts both fields are entered as integer values. The “User Units” field is used to internally scale motor revolutions into actual user units. For example: If half of a motor revolution resulted in 1 inch of displacement on your axis and you want to work in inches: set the User units to 0.5. If 2 revolutions of the motor resulted in 1 inch of displacement and again you wanted to work in inches- set User Units = 2.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Under the communication main heading there are four 4 pages that can have parameter settings: Ethernet (to configure the drive’s resident Ethernet Port, RS-485 – to configure a E94ZARS41 RS485 communication option module, CAN to configure either a E94ZACAN1 CanOpen communication option module or a E94ZADVN1 Devicenet Communication option module, and Profibus –DP to configure a E94ZAPFB1 Profibus DP communications option module. Selecting the Ethernet tab will allow you to view and change the drive’s IP address.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The “Digital I/O” selection in the navigation tree provides access to the programmable aspects of the Drive’s digital I/O. The Drive’s outputs can be configured to turn on and off for given conditions, such as when the drive is at 0 speed, to control the brake function, or when the drive is at current limit. If you want the drive to manipulate the I/O by user programmed logic, set the output to “not assigned”. You can program a debounce time for each digital input to minimize the effects of noise. Inputs A1 and A2 can be set for Normally open limit switch functionality. To do this set the “Hard limit switch function to “Stop and Fault”. Input A3 (IN_A3) must always be activated for the drive to be enabled. If you will be using an external reference to command the drive without user logic, set the Enable Switch Function to RUN. This causes IN_A3 to enable or disable the drive directly. If you want user logic to command the drive to enable and disable, set IN_A3 to inhibit. IN_A3 will still need to be asserted in order to enable; however simply asserting IN_A3 does not command the actual enable function. It prevents the enable function from executing if IN_A3 is not asserted.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Select “Analog I/O” from the navigation tree to access the configuration parameters for the drive’s analog I/O. The Analog output can be configured to indicate several different possible data selections. These include Phase current and Motor Velocity. If the analog output will be used to indicate drive output current, you will need to program the “Analog Output Current Scale”. If the analog output will be programmed to indicate the motor velocity you will need to program the “Analog Output Velocity Scale”. If you would like to command the Analog output logically set the Analog Output parameter to “Not Assigned”. If the drive is in Torque mode with an external reference, the Analog input current scale defines the conversion between the +/- 10VDC analog input signal to the drive’s output amperage command. If the drive is in velocity mode with an external reference, the Analog Input Velocity scale parameter defines the scale of the analog input signal to the motor RPMs.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Velocity Limit parameters are used to define conditions. “Zero Speed” defines a bandwidth around “0” RPM’s as 0 speed. The “Speed Window” defines a bandwidth around the “At Speed” value to define the condition “in speed window”.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The position limit parameters are only used while the drive is in positioning mode. “Position Error” defines a maximum allowable position error for the application. “Max error time” defines a maximum allowable time for the drive to be outside of its maximum allowable “Position error limit” for the application. If the drive’s position error is larger than the setting of the “Position Error” parameter for more time than the value of the “Max Error Time” parameter, the drive will fault with a Position Error Fault (F_PE). The “In Position” limit defines a bandwidth around the target position at the completion of a move for the drive to determine it is “in position”.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The tuning parameters and commands for the drive are accessed by clicking on the “compensation” heading in the navigation tree.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The indexer program selection accesses the user program of the drive. We will cover programming concepts and usage of the control buttons for the compiler later in this presentation.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The drive features a built in oscilloscope to monitor basic drive functions. The Oscilloscope and the Parameter and I/O view watch window are both located in the Tools section of the navigation tree.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Parameter and I/O View window allows the user to monitor any user readable variable during the drive’s operation. By clicking the “Add Button” the user can select any accessible drive variable and then view it in the window. The status of the digital I/O is also shown here with the I/O point showing green when On.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The PositionServo also features a “Monitor” window accessible from the navigation tree. This Monitor window displays the status of all commonly accessed drive parameters and the drive status flags.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The “Faults Screen” always displays the drive’s most recent fault code. To view the last 16 fault codes click the “Load Fault History” button. To Clear the drive’s fault history click the “Clear Fault History” button. Executing the clear fault history command can cause an interruption in motion. It is recommended to stop the application prior to executing this command.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The main toolbar in MVOB also has selections for the user to print a hardcopy of their program, save or load a configuration file to the drive (this is the actual drive’s program) and also features a “STOP/Reset” button so that the user can stop the running drive indexer program from any screen. This button is useful during initial program development and debugging of applications.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS In these follow along labs we will set up the PositionServo for external reference in torque, velocity, and position modes. Before attempting to perform any of these labs ensure the motor is free to spin in any direction with no load attached and without restrictions. These labs build upon each other so it is recommended to perform them in sequence.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Reference can be set to either External or Internal. An External reference can originate commonly from a PLC, a Motion Controller , or a master encoder. An Internal reference originates from the drive’s internal variables. These typically are manipulated by the internal User Program, but can also be written to from a master device over a communications network.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS There are two basic control architectures for systems: Centralized Control and Decentralized Control. Decentralized Control, put simply, relies on devices performing logical actions on their own and exchanging data amongst each other to perform as a system. Centralized control relies on a centralized controller to make all logical decisions and issue commands to the individual devices. One such system is a external motion controller. These systems will read the buffered encoder output of the drive to solve a position loop and command the drive giving it an analog torque reference. This lab will cover setting the drive to Torque mode with an external reference.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This is the E94ZATST01 940 Test Board. If you have a sales demo unit from Lenze this board should be included in the setup. For this lab we will be using IN_A3 (which is the top switch on the board, and Analog Input 1, which is the bottom analog potentiometer. If you do not have a Lenze sales demo unit, you can also duplicate this lab wiring in a digital signal to IN_A3 and a 0-10VDC signal into Analog Input 1. Wiring diagrams are provided in the PositionServo User manual.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS First connect to the Drive with MVOB. Select the Parameter section on the navigation tree and then set the Drive Mode to “Torque”.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Next set the Reference to “External”.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS On the Digital I/O section: Set the Enable Switch function to “Run”.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Now turn on the enable input , IN_A3 (Again this is the top switch on the test board). The drive is now enabled and producing torque. Use Analog input 1 (the lower pot on the test board) to change the torque command to the drive and note the motor response.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Note that when the torque commanded exceeds the friction, the motor will accelerate and runaway until the drive faults with an over speed (F_OS) fault. Clear the fault by disabling and then re-enabling the drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS You can adjust the commanded torque scale (Amps per volt) using the “Analog Input Current Scale” parameter on the analog I/O selection of the navigation tree.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS In Velocity mode an External reference commands a motor speed in RPM. We will now walk through configuring the drive for this basic function.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Under the Parameter selection in the Navigation tree: change the drive mode to “Velocity”. You will leave the reference set to “External” as used in the previous lab.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Turn on the enable input (IN_A3) and use the lower pot to change the Analog Input 1 signal. Note the motor&apos;s reaction
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The “Analog Input Velocity Scale” Parameter on the analog I/O selection of the navigation tree is used to change the scaling of the command signal.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Go back to the Parameters selection in the Navigation tree. Here you can find the Velocity Mode Acceleration and Deceleration Limits. You need to select “Enable” for “Enable Accel/ Decel Limits” for these limits to function. These settings only apply to the drive while it is in Velocity Mode.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The “Analog Input Offset” command (the button with the arrows on it) changes the analog command 0 value to whatever the current analog input value is. To illustrate this set the pot for Analog input 1 halfway and then click the Analog Input Offsett Button. You will notice now turning the pot down will now cause the drive to change directions. This feature is usefull in analog control applications where the drive needs to run in both directions, but the analog input control can only run 0-10VDC. Set the command to 5 VDC and select click the Analog Input Offset button. The change is stored to the drive’s nonvolatile memory.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Some systems suffer from residual voltage on the analog signal wiring. Set the command signal to 0 Volts and select the “analog Input Offset” to resolve this issue. To simulate this turn the pot all the way down on your unit and again click the analog Input Offset button.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS External reference for the drive in Position mode is either a master encoder or a step and direction signal. We will configure a master encoder as the external reference in our next lab.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Electronic gearing is easily configurable off of the position mode external reference. We will also configure this during this lab. A master encoder must be a 5VDC encoder.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This is the E94ZATBO2 terminal block option module, which is commonly used in most applications. Pins 1-4 can be used to wire either the master encoder or a step and direction signals to the drive. Differential signals are preferred for either a master encoder or step and direction reference. Single ended wiring can be used but is not recommended.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This diagram illustrates wiring the enable input (IN_A3) through a switch using the drive’s built in 5VDC 100 mA convenience power supply.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS For a Master Encoder signal Connect A+ to pin 1, A- to pin 2, B+ to pin 3, B- to pin 4, the encoder’s common to pin 5 and the encoder 5VDC power input wire to pin 6. The Lenze sales demos have a master encoder already wired to the test board.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Select the Parameters” from the node tree, leave the reference set to External and set the Drive mode to “Position”
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS As we are using a Master encoder input in this lab set the “Master Encoder Input Type” parameter to “Master encoder”. (The “S/D” setting would be used for a Step and Direction signal).
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Now change the master to system ratio. Remember this is raw counts from the master to desired raw encoder counts out of the drive (system). Remember the master encoder may not be the same PPR (pulse per revolution) count as the encoder on your motor, so you will want to check this to understand the operation of the drive from this lab exercise.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The following will cover basic user programming of the drive’s internal indexer program. Follow along labs will be presented to familiarize the user with SML programming. These labs build upon each other. It is recommended to perform these labs in sequence.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The drive uses its internal variables as its internal reference. The “Internal” setting for “Reference” on the Parameter section of the navigation tree is used when the drive will either be commanded by user logic using its indexer program, or by messaging from a master communicating over a network.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The indexer program allows the PositionServo to make logical decisions and execute motion commands.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Indexer program is written in a basic like language called Simple Motion Language (SML). As with most basic – like languages, the User can DEFINE any constant or variable. They can assign names to any constant, variable, input, output or event (this is commonly called aliasing). Labels can also be added to any section of code to facilitate program development and program execution (i.e. the GOTO command).
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The commands shown on this slide are used for basic logic decisions.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The commands on this this slide are the basic motion commands in SML.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS These are the basic system variables in the drive
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The drive is also capable of basic mathematics
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS And also basic comparison logic..
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Boolean Logic instructions are also available. These are often used in conjunction with drive system flags
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS On this slide we see the drive system flags.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Indexer program is accessed in the Navigation tree as shown
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS When viewing the indexer the indexer program is displayed in the “Parameter View Window” of MVOB.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The indexer program has its own set of control buttons. These control the actions of MVOB’s compiler.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Compiler control buttons are: “Compile”, which compiles a program to check for syntax errors (this button does not actually load the program or program changes to the drive. Load W Source. This button compiles the code and then loads the program to the drive. Load W/O source compiles the code, loads the program to the drive, but it does not load a source code copy to the drive. As a result users logging into a drive that has had its indexer program loaded without source cannot see or edit the program. This feature is particularly useful for OEMs wanting to protect their intellectual property. Reload uploads the indexer program from the drive to the screen. This feature is useful if a user changes his mind in the process of editing an existing indexer program. The “Export” button exports the indexer code to an .txt file. The “Import” button imports a indexer program .txt file to the editor. “Run” starts the indexer Program execution. “Reset” resets the indexer wherever it is in solve to the top line of the program. “Pause” stops the indexer program execution. “Step” allows the user to step through the program execution one line at a time for debugging/ troubleshooting purposes. The “Clear” button clears the indexer program from the screen.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Lenze recommends users follow good programming structure and provides example templates in the technical support library of the www.actech.com website. Programs should first contain a header listing the title of the program and the author as well as a commented revision number and date, an I/O listing for the machine, definitions of user variables and then a definition of all constants used.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here you will see a basic header, I/O list and initialization and setting of variables.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS After initializing and setting variables, the next element to the program structure is to define all events. Events are a deterministic task that solves independently of the main program.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Events are scanned every 512 microseconds to see if they are true. While they cannot be used to trigger a “GOTO” statement, an equivalent command which can be used within EVENTS is JUMP.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here we see programming structure of where events are defined, immediately before the main body of the program. The main program is followed by subroutine definitions and then a fault handler routine.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Main Program is the main body of code. This can include any Motion Commands, logic statemetns, math statements, labels, or subroutine calls. The main body of code must be finished by an END statement.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The SML language includes very easy to use and understand logical statement (i.e. IF/ ELSE/ ENDIF, DO/ UNTIL, WHILE, ENDWHILE). Of these the most commonly used statement is the WAIT command. This is used either to WAIT until a condition occurs. WAIT while a condition is present or WAIT for a time period (always in milliseconds).
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Another commonly used element appearing in virtually all user programs is the GOTO instruction and labels. Uses of this include allowing program loops to be written.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The Motion Commands, simply put command the axis to move. We will now discuss each type of move individually.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS MOVED is a displacement move. MOVED 3 would be move forward 3 user units. MOVED -5 would be move 5 user units in the reverse direction. MOVED BACK 5 would also move the drive in the reverse direction 5 user units. These are all incremental moves and just move the programmed distance from the current location when executed.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The MOVEP command is Move to Absolute Position. Absolute Position should first be established by homing the drive at the beginning of program. The PositionServo also features registration moves (MOVEDR and MOVEPR), MOVE UNTIL, MOVE WHIILE, Segmented moves (MDV) and also can perform S ramp for any move type using the “S” modifier after the command (i.e. MOVED 5, S)
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here you can see a very basic indexing program. Note that even though the GOTO statement is used to loop the program endlessly, the main program still is finished with an END statement.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Subroutines are programmed after the main program body. Subroutines can nest 16 levels deep. The command GOSUB is used to trigger the execution of a subroutine. Subroutines use the RETURN statement to note their end an to send the program execution back to the main body of code at the line immediately after the subroutine was triggered
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Subroutines are very useful when a section of code must be repeated multiple times within the execution of a loop of the main program.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS As you can see from this slide: Subroutines are coded after the main body of code in the indexer program.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will now begin building a PositionServo indexer program with these follow along labs. These build upon each other. It is recommended you do these labs in sequence.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will examine a typical, basic Pick and Place application. The following slides will list the individual actions the sample program performs.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS First the Axis will be homed to determine the absolute 0 position
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS An output (output 1) will then be turned on to simulate actuating a pneumatic valve to extend the gripper arm.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS After the gripper arm is fully extended another output (output 2) will turn on to simulate triggering of a pneumatic gripper
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The first output will then be turned off to retract the pneumatic arm to pick up the part.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The axis will then move to the place location.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Once at the place location, the first output will turn on again to extend the pneumatic arm…
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The second output will then be turned off to release the gripper…
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Having placed the part, the first output will turn off to retract the pneumatic arm…
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS And then finally the axis will return to the pick location, completing the cycle.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS First we need to select “Parameters” from the navigation tree, set the drive mode to “Position”, and set the reference to “Internal”
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Next, select “Digital I/O“ from the navigation tree and set the Enable switch function to “Inhibit” as the indexer program will be using logic to enable and disable the drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will now import the “Pick and Place” demo program from the MVOB documentation CD. If you have not yet done so. Please install the MVOB documentation CD to the default install location on your PC. Once done, select “Indexer Program” from MVOB’s navigation tree, click the Import button as shown, then browse to the C:\\Lenze-ACtech/MVOB/Programming_Examples folder. And finally double click on the “Pick and Place” program.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Now click the “Load W(ith) Source” button to compile the program and load it to your drive.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Click the “Step” button to step through a line of the indexer program code. Notice as you click the button the “&gt;&gt;” will transition down the program in the green column to indicate what line of code will solve next. Note that lines with a semi colon are comments and are not solved.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS When you step through a “Wait” statement the “&gt;&gt;” line marker will disappear until the code is satisfied. For example when WAIT UNIT IN_A3 is stepped through the “&gt;&gt;” line marker will disappear and will not reappear until Input A3 is turned on. When WAIT TIME 1000 is stepped through the “&gt;&gt;” line marker will disappear until the time period specified (1000 milliseconds- this is always milliseconds) is complete. After 1000 milliseconds passes, the “&gt;&gt;” will then reappear on the next line of code to denote that line will be solved next. So stepping through this program we will see that the drive first waits for IN_A3 to turn on (the top switch of the E94ZATST1 test board in the Lenze sales demo is IN_A3), the drive then enables, moves to absolute position 0 (MOVEP 0).. NOTE if your move is quite long it is due to the drive having traveled far from Absolute Position 0. You can see the current position at all times by viewing the monitor window (Monitor is the bottom selection of the navigation tree). APOS = 0 when the drive is powered up or reset logically (i.e. by re-homing the drive). Back to the program execution: you will see that Output 1 is then turned on (OUT 1 =1), The drive then waits 1000 milliseconds before turning on Output 2 (OUT2 =1). The drive then waits another 1000 milliseconds , turns off output 1 (OUT1 = 0) and immediately moves to absolute position 100 (MOVEP 100). Once there, output 1 is turned on, the drive waits 1000 milliseconds, output 2 turns off, the drive turns output 1 off and the cycle repeats.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The long initial move is imprecise and will not work on actual machine. The axis requires homing. We will now add a homing routine to the indexer code.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This shows the homing operation we want to perform. We want to home to a switch to establish accurately and repeatably what the actual home position (APOS = 0) is as we will need to do this every time the axis is power cycled.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Edit your indexer code to include the new lines shown here: VAR_HOME_FAST_VEL = 10 ;Sets speed in rps for 1st move towards home sensor VAR_HOME_SLOW_VEL = 1 ;Sets speed in rps for 2nd move towards home sensor VAR_HOME_ACCEL = 100 ;Sets all accel values for homing routine in rps^2 VAR_HOME_OFFSET = 0 ;Sets distance to move from home sensor for zero position VAR_HOME_SWITCH_INPUT = 0 ;Select which input to use for home input(0-A1,1-A2…11-C4)- VAR_HOME_METHOD = 21 ;Select which homing routine to use HOME ; Start the Homing Procedure This will define a fast home velocity, a slow home velocity, a homing method and will add the command to home after the drive enables, but before the program loop. This will cause the drive to home whenever the indexer code is first started. Input A1 is the home switch used in this example. Input A1 is the top white pushbutton on the E94ZATST test board for those with a Lenze sales demo unit. All homing methods are defined in the PositionServo programming manual in detail. Please note, the drive will only start solving the indexer program on power up IF the ”Autoboot” parameter is set to Enable. To get to the Autoboot parameter select the Parameters selection on the navigation tree and scroll down the window to the bottom. “Autoboot” is the last parameter listed on the bottom of the parameters screen.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The last part of a program’s structure is the Fault handling routine. When a fault occurs the operator will need a process to acknowledge and clear the fault, and then restart the machine.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS When a fault occurs any motion being executed will be suspended and the drive will be disabled, regardless of the type of fault that has occurred. If there is no Fault handling routine programmed the program execution will end. By programming a fault handler you can set up a specific operation to occur to recover from the fault, and then use the RESUME statement within the Fault routine to restart the indexer at a specific point of the program that you denote with a label.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS It is important to note that you cannot execute any motion related statement from within the fault handler and that the only command allowed to exit the fault handler to return to a point in the main program body is the RESUME statement.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Here you can see in the program structure the Fault handling routine is after any programmed subroutines.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS In this follow along lab a fault handling routine will be added to the pick and place indexer code. First start the application and turn off the enable input (IN_A3) while the axis is in motion. Note that the drive faults, the axis is disabled and the indexer program execution has ceased.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will now add a fault routine that will turn off both output 1 and output 2 and then wait for a input signal transition to reset the drive
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Add the lines of code in yellow to your indexer program and then click the “Load W Source” button. Click the “Run” button and note the drive behavior. Now when the drive faults the fault is reset, outputs 1 and 2 are turned off and input A1 must be turned on and off again to reset the drive. IN_A1 is the top white pushbutton on the E94ZATST1 test board.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Up until this point the indexer program we have been working with has used time base wait statements to give the actuators enough time to operate. Machine cycle time can be decreased if we instead use proximity switches to determine when the axis is ready to move exactly. In this follow along lab we will add I/O to the program for use by proximity sensors.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will use Input A4 for the proximity sensor to detect when the actuator arm is in the extended position. Input A4 is the second switch from the top on the E94ZATST1 test board.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Replace the lines WAIT TIME 1000 with Wait until IN_A4 and Wait until !IN_A4 as shown above. NOTE that the “!” mark shown indicates a “not” condition. So WAIT UNTIL IN_A4 would indicate wait until Input A4 turns on, whereas WAIT UNTIL !IN_A4 would mean wait until Input A4 turns off. Once complete click the “Load W Source” button and then the “Run Button”. Try your application and note the usage of the new proximity sensor logic just added.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS Through this point the Indexer program has not incorporated any events. Events are Useful bits of code that solve as a separate determinist task from the main indexer code program body. This final follow along lab will incorporate an event into the indexer program.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS In this example we will add an event to operate spray guns to paint the part as it passes through the pick and place operation.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will extend the actuator arm as we have been (remember we have incorporated a proximity switch in the last lab which will still be used to get the fastest cycle time possible from the operation).
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will then grab the part..
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will pick up the part…
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will then move the part to the place location. Along the way we will turn on spray guns to paint the part when the part is above them.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS One the part has passed by the Spray guns we will turn them off to stop painting and then upon reaching the place position the actuator arm will again extend
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The grabber will then release the painted part..
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS And the actuator arm will again retract.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The axis will then return to the pick location. As the axis is not carrying a part during the return part of the cycle, we will not reactivate the spray guns during this move.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS We will use output 3 for the spray guns. Note the two events defined in this logic. We define a “Spray GUNS_Start” event which becomes true when APOS (The absolute position) is greater than 25. This event turns on the spray guns (OUT3 = 1). We also define a second event, “SPRAY_GUNS_STOP) to turn off the spray guns (OUT 3 = 0) when APOS is greater than 75. Events execute only once upon them becoming true. They must become false and then true again to execute another time. Because of this the spray guns will remain off during the return cycle. Note that each event begins with a declaration statement of its name and trigger condition. Each event statement also ends with ENDEVENT. You will also notice lines turning on those events must be added to the main program body. This is required in order for them to solve. Add the shown lines of code to your program, click the “Load W/ Source” button, and then click the “Run” program to run the program. Observe Output 3’s operation turning on and off the spray guns as the part is passed over the spray gun location.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS In the previous labs you can see that the indexer code waits for a MOVE to complete prior to solving the next line of code. Usage of the CONTINUE command allows the indexer code to continue on and execute code while a move is in progress without using events.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS The above indexer code performs the same control of the Spray guns from our previous lab with the events; except that no events are used. Note the MOVEP 100,C command. The “,C” is the continue command. Note also the WAIT UNTIL F_MCOMPLETE line of code (this code is Wait until the Motion Complete Flag). This statement stops the indexer program from executing further lines of code until the movement is complete.
  • L-force System Präsentation Dezember 2004 Lorch / Funk / LDS This concludes the online PositionServo training course. If you have any questions on the PositionServo contact your local Lenze sales or Lenze’s technical support line. Thank you!
  • Camtasia 940

    1. 1. Model 940 PositionServo Overview TRAINING
    2. 2. What is the Model 940? <ul><li>The Model 940 is a fully programmable high performance Torque, Velocity and Position brushless servo drive with powerful performance & innovative features! </li></ul>
    3. 3. Model 940: Features, Benefits, & Specifications <ul><li>A Fully Programmable Digital AC Brushless Servo Drive with: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sinusoidal Commutation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Digital Signal Processing (DSP) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Field-oriented Control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encoder & Resolver Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple power levels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple input voltages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple communication options </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And much more! </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. What is the “940” PositionServo? <ul><li>Torque, Velocity, Electronic Gearing and Programmable Motion Control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Serves similar markets to 93xx-EP’s, 93xx-ES’s </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Registration reaction (3μS/encoder) (7 μS/resolver) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>17 Programmable I/O </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5 separate and independent program threads: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Deterministic “EVENT” handling </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Motion Control </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Program Control </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fault Monitor </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Model 940: Power Ranges <ul><li>120/240VAC </li></ul>* Note: Input of 120V will result in reduced performance based upon motor Ke factor E94P020.. E94P040.. E94P080.. E94P100.. E94P120.. E94P180.. Continuous Current 2 AMP 4 AMP 8 AMP 10 AMP 12 AMP 18 AMP Peak Current 6 AMP 12 AMP 24 AMP 30 AMP 36 AMP 54 AMP Input Voltage 80 - 264 VAC 1 OR 3 - phase
    6. 6. Model 940: Power Ranges Voltage Doubler Units E94P020S1NEM E94x040S1NEM Cont Current 2 Amps 4 Amps Peak Current 6 Amps 12 Amps Input Voltage 120 VAC or 240 VAC
    7. 7. Model 940: Power Ranges <ul><li>480 VAC </li></ul>
    8. 8. Model 940: Part Number 94 Series <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>060 = 6 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>080 = 8 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>090 = 9 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>100 = 10 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>120 = 12 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>180 = 18 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>Input Phase </li></ul><ul><li>S = 1-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Y = 1- or 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>T = 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Input Voltage </li></ul><ul><li>1 = 120VAC (voltage doubler) </li></ul><ul><li>2 = 120/200/240 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>4 = 400/480 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>Line Filter </li></ul><ul><li>N = No line filter </li></ul><ul><li>F = Integrated line filter </li></ul>E94 P020S1NEM <ul><li>Feedback Type </li></ul><ul><li>E = Encoder </li></ul><ul><li>R = Resolver </li></ul><ul><li>ISO 13849-1 Safety Circuit </li></ul><ul><li>M = MVOB no STO </li></ul><ul><li>S = MVOB and STO </li></ul>P = PositionServo 940 (Encoder Based) R = PositionServo 941 (Resolver Based)
    9. 9. Model 940: Part Number 94 Series <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>060 = 6 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>080 = 8 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>090 = 9 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>100 = 10 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>120 = 12 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>180 = 18 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>Input Phase </li></ul><ul><li>S = 1-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Y = 1- or 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>T = 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Input Voltage </li></ul><ul><li>1 = 120VAC (voltage doubler) </li></ul><ul><li>2 = 120/200/240 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>4 = 400/480 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>Line Filter </li></ul><ul><li>N = No line filter </li></ul><ul><li>F = Integrated line filter </li></ul>E94 P 020S1NEM <ul><li>Feedback Type </li></ul><ul><li>E = Encoder </li></ul><ul><li>R = Resolver </li></ul>P = PositionServo 940 (Encoder Based) R = PositionServo 941 (Resolver Based) <ul><li>ISO 13849-1 Safety Circuit </li></ul><ul><li>M = MVOB no STO </li></ul><ul><li>S = MVOB and STO </li></ul>
    10. 10. E94P vs. E94R <ul><li>E94P / 940 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Encoder Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>15 pin D Shell Connector </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E94P_ _ _ _ _ _ E_ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>E94R / 941 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolver Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>9 pin D Shell Connector </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E94R _ _ _ _ _ _R_ </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Model 940: Part Number 94 Series <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>060 = 6 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>080 = 8 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>090 = 9 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>100 = 10 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>120 = 12 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>180 = 18 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>Input Phase </li></ul><ul><li>S = 1-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Y = 1- or 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>T = 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Input Voltage </li></ul><ul><li>1 = 120VAC (voltage doubler) </li></ul><ul><li>2 = 120/200/240 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>4 = 400/480 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>Line Filter </li></ul><ul><li>N = No line filter </li></ul><ul><li>F = Integrated line filter </li></ul>E94P 020 S1NEM <ul><li>Feedback Type </li></ul><ul><li>E = Encoder </li></ul><ul><li>R = Resolver </li></ul>P = PositionServo 940 (Encoder Based) R = PositionServo 941 (Resolver Based) <ul><li>ISO 13849-1 Safety Circuit </li></ul><ul><li>M = MVOB no STO </li></ul><ul><li>S = MVOB and STO </li></ul>
    12. 12. Model 940: Part Number 94 Series <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>060 = 6 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>080 = 8 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>090 = 9 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>100 = 10 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>120 = 12 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>180 = 18 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>Input Phase </li></ul><ul><li>S = 1-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Y = 1- or 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>T = 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Input Voltage </li></ul><ul><li>1 = 120VAC (voltage doubler) </li></ul><ul><li>2 = 120/200/240 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>4 = 400/480 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>Line Filter </li></ul><ul><li>N = No line filter </li></ul><ul><li>F = Integrated line filter </li></ul>E94P020 S 1NEM <ul><li>Feedback Type </li></ul><ul><li>E = Encoder </li></ul><ul><li>R = Resolver </li></ul>P = PositionServo 940 (Encoder Based) R = PositionServo 941 (Resolver Based) <ul><li>ISO 13849-1 Safety Circuit </li></ul><ul><li>M = MVOB no STO </li></ul><ul><li>S = MVOB and STO </li></ul>
    13. 13. Model 940: Part Number 94 Series <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>060 = 6 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>080 = 8 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>090 = 9 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>100 = 10 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>120 = 12 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>180 = 18 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>Input Phase </li></ul><ul><li>S = 1-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Y = 1- or 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>T = 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Input Voltage </li></ul><ul><li>1 = 120VAC (voltage doubler) </li></ul><ul><li>2 = 120/200/240 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>4 = 400/480 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>Line Filter </li></ul><ul><li>N = No line filter </li></ul><ul><li>F = Integrated line filter </li></ul>E94P020S 1 NEM <ul><li>Feedback Type </li></ul><ul><li>E = Encoder </li></ul><ul><li>R = Resolver </li></ul>P = PositionServo 940 (Encoder Based) R = PositionServo 941 (Resolver Based) <ul><li>ISO 13849-1 Safety Circuit </li></ul><ul><li>M = MVOB no STO </li></ul><ul><li>S = MVOB and STO </li></ul>
    14. 14. Model 940: Part Number 94 Series <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>060 = 6 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>080 = 8 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>090 = 9 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>100 = 10 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>120 = 12 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>180 = 18 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>Input Phase </li></ul><ul><li>S = 1-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Y = 1- or 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>T = 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Input Voltage </li></ul><ul><li>1 = 120VAC (voltage doubler) </li></ul><ul><li>2 = 120/200/240 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>4 = 400/480 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>Line Filter </li></ul><ul><li>N = No line filter </li></ul><ul><li>F = Integrated line filter </li></ul>E94P020S1 N EM <ul><li>Feedback Type </li></ul><ul><li>E = Encoder </li></ul><ul><li>R = Resolver </li></ul>P = PositionServo 940 (Encoder Based) R = PositionServo 941 (Resolver Based) <ul><li>ISO 13849-1 Safety Circuit </li></ul><ul><li>M = MVOB no STO </li></ul><ul><li>S = MVOB and STO </li></ul>
    15. 15. Model 940: EMC Filters <ul><li>E94PxxxS2FEx = Single-phase input with integral line filter (VDE class A) </li></ul><ul><li>Filters are required for CE (EMC). User can order the 1-phase Model 94 with or without the integrated EMC filters. </li></ul><ul><li>3-phase units must purchase external filter for EMC compliance </li></ul>
    16. 16. Model 940: Part Number 94 Series <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>060 = 6 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>080 = 8 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>090 = 9 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>100 = 10 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>120 = 12 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>180 = 18 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>Input Phase </li></ul><ul><li>S = 1-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Y = 1- or 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>T = 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Input Voltage </li></ul><ul><li>1 = 120VAC (voltage doubler) </li></ul><ul><li>2 = 120/200/240 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>4 = 400/480 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>Line Filter </li></ul><ul><li>N = No line filter </li></ul><ul><li>F = Integrated line filter </li></ul>E94P020S1N E M <ul><li>Feedback Type </li></ul><ul><li>E = Encoder </li></ul><ul><li>R = Resolver </li></ul>P = PositionServo 940 (Encoder Based) R = PositionServo 941 (Resolver Based) <ul><li>ISO 13849-1 Safety Circuit </li></ul><ul><li>M = MVOB no STO </li></ul><ul><li>S = MVOB and STO </li></ul>
    17. 17. Model 940: Part Number 94 Series <ul><li>Continuous Current </li></ul><ul><li>020 = 2 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>040 = 4 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>060 = 6 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>080 = 8 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>090 = 9 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>100 = 10 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>120 = 12 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>180 = 18 Amps </li></ul><ul><li>Input Phase </li></ul><ul><li>S = 1-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Y = 1- or 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>T = 3-Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Input Voltage </li></ul><ul><li>1 = 120VAC (voltage doubler) </li></ul><ul><li>2 = 120/200/240 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>4 = 400/480 VAC </li></ul><ul><li>Line Filter </li></ul><ul><li>N = No line filter </li></ul><ul><li>F = Integrated line filter </li></ul>E94P020S1NE M <ul><li>Feedback Type </li></ul><ul><li>E = Encoder </li></ul><ul><li>R = Resolver </li></ul>P = PositionServo 940 (Encoder Based) R = PositionServo 941 (Resolver Based) <ul><li>ISO 13849-1 Safety Circuit </li></ul><ul><li>M = MVOB no STO </li></ul><ul><li>S = MVOB and STO </li></ul>
    18. 18. Model 940: Communication Options <ul><li>Ethernet (Standard) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MotionView Communications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drive to Drive Communications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Modbus TCP </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet IP </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Model 940: Communication Options <ul><li>CANbus (optional) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Up to 1 Mbps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Up to 64 axis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CANopen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DS301 COM profile </li></ul></ul><ul><li>RS 485 (optional) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>38.4 kbps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Up to 32 axis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MODBUS RTU </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Model 940: Communication Options <ul><li>DeviceNet (optional) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>500 kbps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Up to 63 axis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Group 2 Server </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Profibus DP (optional) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>12 Mbps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Up to 125 axis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>RS485 ½ Duplex </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DP V0 </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Model 940: Additional Features <ul><li>24-volt “Keep-Alive” circuit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apply optional external voltage to keep logic alive even without mains power applied to the drive </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Thermocouple input </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PTC input at motor-power terminal block </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Model 940: Additional Features <ul><li>Braking & DC Bus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internal regen circuitry – external braking resistors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>± Bus for DC input or load sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Standard feed back </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Encoder </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Quadrature Incremental Encoder (2MHz) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolver </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>12 Bit Resolution </li></ul></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Model 940: What makes us better? <ul><li>Electronic Programmable Module (EPM) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy to program drives in high-volume OEM production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ultra-easy to swap in the field </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easier and more reliable than analog drives </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Model 940: What makes us better? <ul><li>Keypad & Display </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring and diagnostics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4-Digit 7-Segment Display </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3-Button “Keypad” </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. Model 940: What makes us better?
    26. 26. Keypad & Display
    27. 27.
    28. 28. New for Hardware Version 2
    29. 29. 8oot 0=Autoboot Disabled 1=Autoboot Enabled
    30. 30. Fault Code Display
    31. 31. High density 50 pin SCSI Connector Field Wiring Pin Name Function 1 MA+ Master Encoder A+ / Step+ input (2) 2 MA- Master Encoder A- / Step- input (2) 3 MB+ Master Encoder B+ / Direction+ input (2) 4 MB- Master Encoder B- / Direction- input (2) 5 GND Drive Logic Common 6 +5V +5v output 7 BA+ Buffered Encoder Output: Channel A+ (1) 8 BA- Buffered Encoder Output: Channel A- (1) 9 BB+ Buffered Encoder Output: Channel B+ (1) 10 BB- Buffered Encoder Output: Channel B- (1) 11 BZ+ Buffered Encoder Output: Channel Z+ (1) 12 BZ- Buffered Encoder Output: Channel Z- (1) 13-19 Empty 20 AIN2+ Positive (+) of Analog signal input 21 AIN2- Negative (-) of Analog signal input 22 ACOM Analog common 23 AO1 Analog output 24 AIN1+ Positive (+) of Analog signal input 25 AIN1 - Negative (-) of Analog signal input 26 IN_A_COM Digital input group A COM terminal 27 IN_A1 Digital input A1 28 IN_A2 Digital input A2 29 IN_A3 Digital input A3 30 IN_A4 Digital input A4 31 IN_B_COM Digital input group B COM terminal 32 IN_B1 Digital input B1 33 IN_B2 Digital input B2 34 IN_B3 Digital input B3 35 IN_B4 Digital input B4 36 IN_C_COM Digital input group C COM terminal 37 IN_C1 Digital input C1 38 IN_C2 Digital input C2 39 IN_C3 Digital input C3 40 IN_C4 Digital input C4 41 RDY+ Ready output Collector 42 RDY- Ready output Emitter 43 OUT1-C Programmable output #1 Collector 44 OUT1-E Programmable output #1 Emitter 45 OUT2-C Programmable output #2 Collector 46 OUT2-E Programmable output #2 Emitter 47 OUT3-C Programmable output #3 Collector 48 OUT3-E Programmable output #3 Emitter 49 OUT4-C Programmable output #4 Collector 50 OUT4-E Programmable output #4 Emitter
    32. 32. Model 940: Digital I/O <ul><li>Digital Inputs (5…24vdc): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>12 Digital Inputs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User Program accessible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Special Purpose programmable </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Digital Outputs (open-collector): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>5 Digital Outputs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 Dedicated (Ready/Enabled) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4 Programmable and/or User Program accessible </li></ul></ul>
    33. 33. Model 940: Analog I/O <ul><li>Analog Inputs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2 Analog Inputs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessible via the User Program: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(±10V, 12-bit A1, 12-bit A2) (differential) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Analog Outputs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 Programmable or User Program assessable: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(0-10V, 10-bit, single-ended) </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>Terminal Block I/O Module: E94ZATB02 </li></ul>
    35. 35. Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>:SCSI cable assembly (EWLN002SF1NA) </li></ul>Two Meter
    36. 36. Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>:940 Test Board (E94ZATST1) </li></ul><ul><li>5 Status Led’s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>+5V </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ready </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outputs 1 – 4 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>8 Input Switches </li></ul><ul><li>2 Analog Inputs </li></ul><ul><li>Field Wiring </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Master Encoder / Step & Direction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5 Volt Ref </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Output 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>External Inputs </li></ul></ul>
    37. 37. Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>Panel Saver SCSI I/O Module: </li></ul>
    38. 38. Model 940: Breakout Modules <ul><li>Motor Brake Terminal Block Module: (E94ZAHBK2) </li></ul>
    39. 39. Model 940: Standard Feedback <ul><li>Encoder Feedback (standard) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2.5 MHz </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Buffered Encoder Pass-Through </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Direct pass through – virtually no delays </li></ul></ul></ul>To Motion Controller Encoder Feedback to Controller
    40. 40. Motor Offerings <ul><li>Compatible Lenze Servo Motors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MCS Series </li></ul></ul>
    41. 41. Motor Offerings <ul><li>MCS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Synchronous AC brushless servo motors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>250W to 10kW </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>240/480 VAC </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IEC Metric-mounting flange </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>60mm, 90mm, 120mm </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolver feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Encoder optional (4096 PPR) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>UL, CE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IP54 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>IP65 optional </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mil-Spec connectors </li></ul></ul>
    42. 42. Motor Offerings MCS Series Motors Rated Pwr Rated Speed Max Speed Rated Torque MCS06 / 240V 0.25 - 0.75 Kw 4050 - 6000 rpm 6500 - 8500 rpm 0.5 - 1.5 Nm MCS09 / 240V 1.2 - 1.9 Kw 3750 - 6000 rpm 6500 - 8500 rpm 2.4 - 3.8 Nm MCS12 / 240V 1.6 - 2.8 Kw 1500 - 3000 rpm 4000 - 6000 rpm 8 - 13.5 Nm MCS06 / 480V 0.25 - 0.75 Kw 4050 - 6000 rpm 8000 rpm 0.5 - 1.5 Nm MCS09 / 480V 1.2 - 1.9 Kw 3750 - 6000 rpm 7000 rpm 2.4 - 3.8 Nm MCS12 / 480V 1.1 - 4.7 Kw 1500 - 4050 rpm 6000 rpm 4.3 - 13.5 Nm MCS14 / 480V 1.45 - 2.8 Kw 1500 - 3600 rpm 6000 rpm 7.5 - 16 Nm MCS19 / 480V 4 Kw 1425 rpm 4000 rpm 27 Nm
    43. 43. Model 940: Additional Servo Motors <ul><li>You can use third-party motors </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback accepted: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>5-volt Incremental Encoders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hall-effect feedback for commutation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A, B, and Z channels with differential pairs (A-not, B-not and Z-not) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Line-driven (not open-collector) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>10 V peak to peak Resolvers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>0.5 Transformation Ratio </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>5 kHz carrier frequency </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Cannot accept </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Absolute encoders </li></ul></ul>Motor Offerings
    44. 44. Model 940 Wiring the Drive TRAINING
    45. 45. Model 940: Digital I/O (A1, A2, A3, A4, Acom) } (B1, B2, B3, B4, Bcom) } (C1, C2, C3, C4, Ccom) } The inputs on the 940 are grouped into three sets of four, each with its own common Pin Name Function 26 IN_A_COM Digital Input group A COM terminal 27 IN_A1 Digital Input A1 28 IN_A2 Digital Input A2 29 IN_A3 Digital Input A3 30 IN_A4 Digital Input A4 31 IN_B_COM Digital Input group B COM terminal 32 IN_B1 Digital Input B1 33 IN_B2 Digital Input B2 34 IN_B3 Digital Input B3 35 IN_B4 Digital Input B4 36 IN_C_COM Digital Input group C COM terminal 37 IN_B1 Digital Input C1 38 IN_B2 Digital Input C2 39 IN_B3 Digital Input C3 40 IN_B4 Digital Input C4
    46. 46. Customer Connections PNP?? NPN?? Sinking?? Sourcing?? Positive Logic?? Negative Logic?? Active Hi?? Active Low??
    47. 47. Model 940: Digital Inputs +24V Gnd PNP PNP, Sourcing, Active High, Pos Logic
    48. 48. Model 940: Digital Inputs PNP + - Power Supply Drive PLC
    49. 49. Model 940: Digital Inputs NPN +24V Gnd NPN, Sinking, Active Low, Neg Logic
    50. 50. Model 940: Digital Inputs NPN - + Power Supply PLC Drive
    51. 51. Model 940: Digital I/O Ready Output } Output #1 } } There are 5 outputs on the 940. One is dedicated as a Ready Output. All the outputs Open Collector / Emitter } } Output #2 Output #3 Output #4 Pin Name Function 41 RDY+ Ready output Collector 42 RDY- Ready output Emitter 43 OUT1-C Programmable output #1 Collector 44 OUT1-E Programmable output #1 Emitter 45 OUT2-C Programmable output #2 Collector 46 OUT2-E Programmable output #2 Emitter 47 OUT3-C Programmable output #3 Collector 48 OUT3-E Programmable output #3 Emitter 49 OUT4-C Programmable output #4 Collector 50 OUT4-E Programmable output #4 Emitter
    52. 52. Model 940: Digital Outputs Digital outputs electrical characteristics Circuit type - Isolated Open Collector Digital output load capability - 15 mA (100 mA for Rev 2) Digital outputs Collector-Emitter max voltage - 30V PNP +24V Gnd 43 44 45 46 OUT1-C OUT1-E OUT2-C OUT2-E
    53. 53. Model 940: Digital Outputs Digital outputs electrical characteristics Circuit type - Isolated Open Collector Digital output load capability - 15 mA (100mA for Rev 2) Digital outputs Collector-Emitter max voltage - 30V NPN +24V Gnd 43 44 45 46 OUT1-C OUT1-E OUT2-C OUT2-E
    54. 54. Model 940: Analog I/O The 940 has two Analog Inputs and one Analog Output Analog Input #2 is 12 bit and can be wired either as single ended or differential } The Analog Output is a 10 bit single ended, (0-10V) signal. It can be programmed to emulate parameters like motor velocity, Phase Current, and others } Analog Input #1 is used as the main external reference. It is 12 bit and can be wired either as single ended or differential } Pin Name Function 20 AIN2+ Analog Input #2 [Positive (+)] 21 AIN2- Analog Input #2 [Negative (-)] 22 ACOM Analog Common 23 AO1 Analog Output 24 AIN1+ Analog Input #1 [Positive (+)] 25 AIN1- Analog Input #1 [Negative (-)]
    55. 55. Model 940: Analog I/O EXTERNAL REFERENCE (DIFFERENTIAL CONFIGURATION) Analog Command Output ACOM Analog Command Return Motion Controller 940 Servo Drive AIN+ AIN- ACOM P3.25 P3.22 + - 940 P3.24 Analog Device Analog Input Analog input + Analog input -
    56. 56. Model 940: Analog I/O SINGLE-ENDED CONFIGURATION As the dancer arm goes up and down a 0 – 10 volt signal is transmitted to the 940 drive AOut ACOM AIN2+ AIN2- ACOM P3.21 P3.22 + - 940 P3.20
    57. 57. Software & Drive Setup TRAINING
    58. 58. Software and Drive Setup Free Programming and Configuration Software Residing in the drive MVOB
    59. 59. Software and Drive Setup <ul><li>MVOB – MotionView On Board </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MotionView is the universal programming software used to communicate to and configure the PositionServo drive. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This software package is not only free but resides in the drive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All that is needed is a web browser to program and configure the drive. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Simply type in the drives IP address into the web browser and MotionView will be up loaded from the drive. </li></ul></ul>
    60. 60. Software and Drive Setup How do you connect and communicate to the PositionServo? First you need to create a small network between the drive and the PC. To do this connect a Ethernet Cross Over cable between your computer and the Ethernet port on the PositionServo Drive.
    61. 61. What is a Network and how does the user set up their computer? Individual Work Stations Company Network
    62. 62. Work Station Local Area Network X
    63. 63. From “ Control Panel ” select “ Network Connections ”
    64. 64. Select your New “ Local Area Connections ”
    65. 65. Now Select “ Properties”
    66. 66. Select “ Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) ” and click “ Properties ”
    67. 67. Click “Use the following IP address Enter in the following address and click OK.
    68. 68. To launch the software you need to launch your web browser. MVOB Software and Drive Setup
    69. 69. <ul><li>MVOB – MotionView On Board </li></ul>192.168.124.120 Just type the drive’s IP address into your web browser
    70. 70. <ul><li>MVOB – MotionView On Board </li></ul>The browser will connect to the drive to upload the software
    71. 71. <ul><li>MVOB – MotionView On Board </li></ul>You are now ready to configure and program you drive
    72. 72. Once MotionView has been launched from the browser a MotionView Java Icon will be loaded to the desktop.
    73. 73. Running MVOB on Windows 7 In the “ Control Panel ”, select “ Network and Internet ”
    74. 74. Then select “ Network and Sharing Center ”
    75. 75. From here you want to select “Change Adapter Settings”
    76. 76. Right-click on your “Local Area Connection” or Adapter and pick “Properties”
    77. 77. Now choose “ Internet Protocol Version 4 ” and click “ Properties ”
    78. 78. From here you can enter your desired IP settings and Subnet mask
    79. 79. Just as before, open your browser and enter the PositionServo’s IP address
    80. 80. MVOB – MotionView On Board <ul><li>Who else offers this? </li></ul><ul><li>NO CD’s needed! </li></ul><ul><li>No Rev’s to worry about! </li></ul>
    81. 81. Once MotionView is open select the “ Connect ” button from the Tool Bar
    82. 82. From the Connection screen, select the “ Discover ” button to ping the network and detect all PositionServo drives on the network Select the drives you wish to connect to and select the “Connect” button If the no drives where discovered then type the IP address in for the desired drive and select “Connect” 192.168.124.120
    83. 83. Select “Save Connection” “ Save Connection ” allows the user to save the connection to a drive or multiple drives under one name, for example (XAxis) XAxis
    84. 84. The next time you need to connect to a drive or group of drives you can click on the “ Load Connection ” button to connect to all the saved connections.
    85. 85. We can now Program and Configure the drive. Click on the drive folder
    86. 86. Parameter View Window Message Window Parameter Tree Window The programming environment is segmented into three windows
    87. 87. Select the “ Motor ” file from the Parameter Tree The Motor’s Parameter will be displayed in the “ Parameter View Window ”
    88. 88. When you select the drive node drive information is displayed in the Parameter View Window This is also where the drive can be assigned a name “ XAxis ”
    89. 89. To select a motor from the Motor data base, click here
    90. 90. Click here to choose a Vendor Click here to select motor model
    91. 91. If the users motor isn’t in the database then a Custom Motor File can be created.
    92. 92. Model 940: Auto Tuning Feedback Command Output Lab
    93. 93. These settings are used for Autotuning
    94. 94. Deselect “ Disable High Performance Mode” for best Autotuning results Select “Autotuning” Select “ Position Tuning ” to tune both Velocity and Position loops at the same time Turn on IN_A3 and select “Start” to Autotune the drive Select “ Yes ” to accept the tuning gains and complete Autotuning
    95. 95. Advanced AutoTuning Options Feedback Filter to compensate for noise in motor feedback Two available filters for tuning response Low Pass for noncompliant transmission (i.e. belt drive) Resonator for Resonance Notch for non-uniform load distribution You need to run Autotune again after enabling a filter. For most applications these filters are not required
    96. 96. Select the “ Parameter ” file from the Node tree to view & edit the drive’s parameters The following are some of the more commonly used properties
    97. 97. Drive Mode: can be set to Torque, Velocity or Position Reference: can be set to Internal or External
    98. 98. Servo Torque Control <ul><li>Up to 1.5 kHz bandwidth in Torque (Current) mode </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>65 μs current loop </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>100:1 torque range </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Accuracy is 1% of Imax </li></ul></ul></ul>   LOAD Velocity Torque Position Computed Set point
    99. 99. Servo Torque Control <ul><li>Controls current to motor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adjusts (torque) out of the motor </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Accepts torque command from controller </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Analog or frequency signal </li></ul></ul>
    100. 100. Torque Control Speed-Torque Characteristics
    101. 101. Torque Control <ul><li>Torque Control Applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nut Runners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Web Tension </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Labelers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Velocity and Position loop are closed in controller (if applicable) </li></ul></ul>
    102. 102. Torque Control Nut Runner
    103. 103. Servo Velocity Control <ul><li>Up to 200 Hz bandwidth in Velocity mode </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>512 μs velocity loop </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>5000:1 velocity range* </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Regulation ±1 RPM </li></ul></ul></ul>*With 4096 PPR encoder    LOAD Velocity Torque Position Computed Set point
    104. 104. Servo Velocity Control <ul><li>Monitors and regulates speed </li></ul><ul><li>Also monitors current to motor </li></ul><ul><li>Accepts velocity command from controller </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Analog or frequency signal </li></ul></ul>
    105. 105. Servo Velocity Control
    106. 106. Servo Velocity Control <ul><li>Velocity Control Applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conveyors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spinning wafers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Position loop closed in master controller </li></ul></ul>
    107. 107. Servo Velocity Control Wafer Spinner
    108. 108. Servo Position Control <ul><li>Up to 200 Hz bandwidth in Position mode </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>512 μs position loop </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Follows frequencies up to 2 MHz </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>High-speed execution of motion program </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Trajectory calculations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Deterministic EVENTs </li></ul></ul></ul>   LOAD Velocity Torque Position Computed Set point
    109. 109. Servo Position Control <ul><li>Controls motor for correct position at correct time </li></ul><ul><li>Also monitors torque and velocity </li></ul>Time / Position Speed
    110. 110. Servo Position Control
    111. 111. Servo Position Control <ul><li>Position Control Applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Case Packer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Point to point motion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pick and Place machines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flying Shear </li></ul></ul>
    112. 112. Servo Position Control Case Packer
    113. 113. Drive Mode, can be set to Torque, Velocity or Position. Reference, Can be set to Internal or external Drive Frequency can be set to 8 KHZ or 16 KHZ
    114. 114. High Efficiency <ul><li>High Carrier Frequency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Selectable 8, 16 kHz switching frequency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Out of the audible range </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Space-Vector Modulated </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Greater DC-bus utilization </li></ul></ul>
    115. 115. Master Encoder Input type can be set to Master Encoder or Step and Direction Set ratio to follow a Master Encoder User units defined the move
    116. 116. There are 4 selections under Communications - Ethernet - RS485 - Can - Profibus Ethernet tab allows you to view and change the drives Ethernet IP address
    117. 117. Select the “ Digital IO ” file from the Node tree to view/edit and program the drives IO Outputs can be set to come on at preprogrammed times Input debounce time can be set for mechanical Inputs Inputs A1 and A2 can be preset to be used as end of travel limit switches Enable Switch Function can be set to Run for external reference or Inhibit for internal reference
    118. 118. Select the “ Analog IO ” file from the Node tree to view/edit and program the drives IO The Analog output can be configured to various values Analog Output (Current Scale) – Scale Analog output for Phase current Analog Output (Velocity Scale) – Scale Analog output Velocity Analog Input (Current Scale) – Scale Analog input for torque Analog Input (Velocity Scale) – Scale the motor RPM vs. analog input Analog Input Dead-Band configures where and when the analog input will take control Analog Input Offset cancels out noise on the line
    119. 119. When an output is preprogrammed to come on these parameters are used Select the “ Velocity Limits ” folder
    120. 120. These parameters are used in conjunction with the drives Position Error Select the “ Position Limits ” folder
    121. 121. Select the “ Compensation ” folder These parameters are used in conjunction with the tuning of the drive
    122. 122. Select the “ Indexer program ” folder This is where the user can write there own User program for there application
    123. 123. Select Oscilloscope to-do motor and drive diagnostics Select the “ Tools ” folder
    124. 124. Select “Parameter & IO View” to monitor IO and read / write to drive parameters. Select the “Tools” folder. Select “Add” to select variables. Expand to view selections. Select variables to read/write. Select “Add” to select variables.
    125. 125. Select the “ Monitor ” folder
    126. 126. Select “ Load Faults ” to display the fault history Select the “ Faults ” folder Select “ Clear Faults ” to clear the fault history
    127. 127. “ Print ” prints a file containing all of the drives settings as well as the user program “ Save Configuration ” Allows the user to save all the settings as a configuration file “ Load Configuration ” Allows the user to load the configuration saved file to a new drive “ Stop/Reset ” Stops the Indexer program and resets the drive
    128. 128. <ul><li>External Reference Labs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Torque, Velocity & Position </li></ul></ul>TRAINING
    129. 129. Model 940: Reference Input <ul><li>The 940’s Reference Input can be sourced in multiple ways </li></ul><ul><li>From an external devices (Centralized Control System) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PLC / Motion Controller </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Master Encoder </li></ul></ul><ul><li>From it’s internal User Program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Index Moves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Position Moves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gearing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Segment Moves </li></ul></ul>
    130. 130. External Reference Input Reference Input Pass Through Feedback “ External” Motion Controller Command Output Feedback Centralized Control Torque Reference Lab Motion Controller Computer w/PC Card
    131. 131. Enable Input (IN_A3) 940 Test Board (E94ZATST01) Input (IN_A1) Inputs (IN_A4 – IN_B4) Status LED’s (+5V, Rdy, Out1 – Out4) Field Inputs Master Enc / Step Dir Field Wiring Out1 5 Volt Ref Analog Output Field Wiring Inputs IN_A1, IN_C1- IN_C4 Analog Input 2 Analog Input 1 Input (IN_C3)
    132. 132. Select “ Parameters” from the node tree Open the Drive Mode pull down window and select “ Torque” Mode
    133. 133. Set the drive up for External Reference Select “ Parameters” from the node tree
    134. 134. Set the “ Enable switch function” to Run Select “ Digital IO” from the node tree
    135. 135. Turn on the “ Enable ” Input Use the pot on the test board to simulate an analog input from a Motion Controller
    136. 136. Torque Control Speed-Torque Characteristics
    137. 137. Adjusting the Analog input (current scale) will determine how much torque is put out per analog voltage coming in Select “ Analog IO” from the node tree
    138. 138. External Reference Input (Centralized Control System): Reference Input Pass Through Feedback “ Centralized” Control Command Output Feedback Analog Reference Lab Motion Controller Computer w/PC Card
    139. 139. Select “ Parameters” from the node tree Open the Drive Mode pull down window and select “ Velocity” Mode Reference remains as “ External ”
    140. 140. Turn on the “ Enable ” Input Use the pot on the test board to simulate an analog input from a Motion Controller
    141. 141. Change the value for Analog Input (velocity scale) and note how the speed of the motor changes Select “ Analog IO” from the node tree
    142. 142. Select “ Parameters” from the node tree Change the Velocity Mode Acceleration setting from Enabled to Disabled
    143. 143. Adjust the Pot to about half speed and click on the “ << “ button next to “ Analog Input Offset ”. Turn the pot and notice direction change Select “ Analog IO” from the node tree
    144. 144. Lower the Pot all the way to Zero volts. If the motor still rotates click on the “ << “ button next to “ Analog Input Offset ” to cancel out any noise. Select “ Analog IO” from the node tree
    145. 145. Select “Oscilloscope” from the Tools folder Set channel 1 to “Motor velocity” and channel 2 to “Analog Input 1”, select the “Run” button and turn the Pot to turn the motor. Select “ Tools” from the node tree
    146. 146. Model 940: Reference Input <ul><li>The 940’s Reference Input can be sourced in multiple ways </li></ul><ul><li>From an external devices (Centralized Control System) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PLC / Motion Controller </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Master Encoder </li></ul></ul><ul><li>From it’s internal User Program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Index Moves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Position Moves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gearing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Segment Moves </li></ul></ul>
    147. 147. Model 940: Electronic Gearing Feedback Output can follow master encoder, ratio set by user Master Encoder Or Step and Direction You can set your ratio from 1 to ± 32767 Up to 2MHz, 0-5VDC
    148. 148. Pin Name Function 1 MA+ Master Encoder A+ / Step+ input (2) 2 MA- Master Encoder A- / Step- input (2) 3 MB+ Master Encoder B+ / Direction+ input (2) 4 MB- Master Encoder B- / Direction- input (2) 5 GND Drive Logic Common 6 +5V +5v output 7 BA+ Buffered Encoder Output: Channel A+ (1) 8 BA- Buffered Encoder Output: Channel A- (1) 9 BB+ Buffered Encoder Output: Channel B+ (1) 10 BB- Buffered Encoder Output: Channel B- (1) 11 BZ+ Buffered Encoder Output: Channel Z+ (1) 12 BZ- Buffered Encoder Output: Channel Z- (1) 13-19 Empty 20 AIN2+ Positive (+) of Analog signal input 21 AIN2- Negative (-) of Analog signal input 22 ACOM Analog common 23 AO1 Analog output 24 AIN1+ Positive (+) of Analog signal input 25 AIN1 - Negative (-) of Analog signal input 26 IN_A_COM Digital input group A COM terminal 27 IN_A1 Digital input A1 28 IN_A2 Digital input A2 29 IN_A3 Digital input A3 30 IN_A4 Digital input A4 31 IN_B_COM Digital input group B COM terminal 32 IN_B1 Digital input B1 33 IN_B2 Digital input B2 34 IN_B3 Digital input B3 35 IN_B4 Digital input B4 36 IN_C_COM Digital input group C COM terminal 37 IN_C1 Digital input C1 38 IN_C2 Digital input C2 39 IN_C3 Digital input C3 40 IN_C4 Digital input C4 41 RDY+ Ready output Collector 42 RDY- Ready output Emitter 43 OUT1-C Programmable output #1 Collector 44 OUT1-E Programmable output #1 Emitter 45 OUT2-C Programmable output #2 Collector 46 OUT2-E Programmable output #2 Emitter 47 OUT3-C Programmable output #3 Collector 48 OUT3-E Programmable output #3 Emitter 49 OUT4-C Programmable output #4 Collector 50 OUT4-E Programmable output #4 Emitter
    149. 149. First we need to wire the Enable Input (In_A3) Run a jump wire from +5V (pin 6) to input A3 (pin 29) Run a jump wire from A COM (pin 26) to GND (pin 5) 5 GND Drive Logic Common 6 +5V +5v output 7 BA+ Buffered Encoder Output: 8 BA- Buffered Encoder Output: 9 BB+ Buffered Encoder Output: 10 BB- Buffered Encoder Output: 11 BZ+ Buffered Encoder Output: 12 BZ- Buffered Encoder Output: 13-19 Empty 20 AIN2+ Positive (+) of Analog input 21 AIN2- Negative (-) of Analog input 22 ACOM Analog common 23 AO1 Analog output 24 AIN1+ Positive (+) of Analog input 25 AIN1 - Negative (-) of Analog input 26 IN_A_COM Digital input group A COM 27 IN_A1 Digital input A1 28 IN_A2 Digital input A2 29 IN_A3 Digital input A3 30 IN_A4 Digital input A4
    150. 150. Now we need to wire up the Master Encoder Pin Name Function 1 MA+ Master Encoder A+ / Step+ input (2) 2 MA- Master Encoder A- / Step- input (2) 3 MB+ Master Encoder B+ / Direction+ input (2) 4 MB- Master Encoder B- / Direction- input (2) 5 GND Drive Logic Common 6 +5V +5v output
    151. 151. Select “ Parameters” from the node tree Open the Drive Mode pull down window and select “ Position” Mode Reference remains as “ External ”
    152. 152. Select “ Parameters” from the node tree Open the “ Master Encoder Input Type ” pull down window and select “ Master Encoder”
    153. 153. Change the Master and System ratio as you spin the encoder Lab
    154. 154. Model 940 <ul><li>Internal Reference (Indexer Program) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Programming Overview and Command structure </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>TRAINING
    155. 155. Model 940: Reference Input <ul><li>The 940’s Reference Input can be sourced in multiple ways </li></ul><ul><li>From an external devices (Centralized Control System) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PLC / Motion Controller </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Master Encoder </li></ul></ul><ul><li>From it’s internal User Program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Index Moves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Position Moves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gearing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Segment Moves </li></ul></ul>
    156. 156. Internal Reference Input: Feedback Command Output Motion is derived internally from the drive’s user program
    157. 157. Programming Language <ul><li>Definitions and Assignments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DEFINE any constant or variable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ASSIGN names to any constant, variable, input, output and EVENT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LABEL any section of code </li></ul></ul>
    158. 158. Programming Language <ul><li>Program Control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HALT, RESET </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EVENT <name>; END EVENT; EVENT ON; EVENT OFF </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ON FAULT, RESUME </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>WAIT UNTIL, WAIT WHILE, WAIT TIME </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>WAIT MOTION COMPLETE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>WHILE, END WHILE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DO WHILE, DO UNTIL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>GOTO; JUMP; GOSUB, RETURN </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IF ELSE ENDIF </li></ul></ul>
    159. 159. Programming Language <ul><li>Motion Control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MOVE UNTIL, MOVE BACK UNTIL, MOVE WHILE, MOVE BACK WHILE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MOVEP, MOVED, MOVEPR, MOVEDR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MDV </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MOTION SUSPEND, MOTION RESUME </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STOP MOTION [QUICK] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VELOCITY (ON/OFF) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ENABLE, DISABLE </li></ul></ul>
    160. 160. System Variables <ul><ul><li>UNITS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>APOS, TPOS, RPOS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MAXV, VEL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ACCEL, DECEL, QDECEL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PGAIN_P, PGAIN_I, PGAIN_D, PGAIN_VFF, PGAIN_ILIM </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VGAIN_P, VGAIN_I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>INPUTS, OUTPUTS, INDEX </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PHCUR, DSTATUS, DFAULTS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AIN, AOUT </li></ul></ul>
    161. 161. System Operators <ul><li>Arithmetic Operators: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Add </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Subtract </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiply </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Divide </li></ul></ul>
    162. 162. System Operators <ul><li>Comparative Operators: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Greater-Than </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less-Than </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Greater-Than-or-Equal-To </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less-Than-or-Equal-To </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Equal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not Equal </li></ul></ul>
    163. 163. System Operators <ul><li>Boolean Operators: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AND </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NOT </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bit-Wise Operators: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AND </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>XOR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NOT </li></ul></ul>
    164. 164. System Flags <ul><ul><li>IN_A1-4, IN_B1-4, IN_C1-4 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OUT1-4 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>F_IN_POSITION </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>F_MCOMPLETE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>F_MQUEUE_FULL, F_MQUEUE_EMPTY </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>F_FAULT, F_ARITHMETIC_FLT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>F_REGISTRATION </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>F_MSUSPENDED </li></ul></ul>
    165. 165. Select the “ Indexer Program ” file from the Node Tree
    166. 166. The User’s Program will be displayed in the “ Parameter View Window ” Select the “ Indexer Program ” file from the Node Tree
    167. 167. The “ User Program Area ”, has it’s own set of control buttons Select the “ Indexer Program ” file from the Node Tree
    168. 168. Compile Program Compile and download Program Start Program Reset Program Stop Program Step through Program Save Pgm to file Download Program without Source code Upload Program from the drive Load Pgm from file
    169. 169. Program Structure <ul><li>Header, I/O List, Define Variables: </li></ul><ul><li>Contains: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Commented Header and Program Title </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Commented Software Revision Number / Date </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I/O listing for machine </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Definitions of User Variables </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Definitions of Constants </li></ul></ul>
    170. 170. Program Header PGM I/O List Initialize & Set Variables
    171. 171. Program Structure <ul><li>Events </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contains: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>; Events </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Event Check_swt IN_A4 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>End Event </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Event Input_Check Time 1 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>End Event </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>; Main Program </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Event Home ON </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Event Home OFF </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    172. 172. Program Structure <ul><li>Events </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Event Scan time 512 µs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Independent of Main Program Execution) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Code Prohibited in Events: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Goto </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Goto statements are prohibited in Events. However the ‘Jump’ statement can be used to exit the event. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    173. 173. Program Events
    174. 174. Program Structure <ul><li>Main Program </li></ul><ul><li>Contains: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Main Body of Program Code </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can Include any Motion Commands, Maths Statements, Labels, I/O Commands or Subroutines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Has to be Finished by an ‘End’ Statement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>; Main Program </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>End </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>; Main Program </li></ul></ul></ul>
    175. 175. Control Structures Wait Statement <ul><li>Used to Suspend Program Execution Until or While a condition is true. Includes statement for waiting a fixed time period, or waiting for a motion to be completed. </li></ul><ul><li>Simplified Syntax: </li></ul><ul><li>Wait Until <Condition> </li></ul><ul><li>Wait While <Condition> </li></ul><ul><li>Wait Time <Time> </li></ul><ul><li>Wait Motion Complete </li></ul>If / Else / EndIf Do / Until While / EndWhile Goto / Label Wait Halt / Reset
    176. 176. Control Structures Goto / Label Statement <ul><li>Used to Transfer Program execution to a new point in the program marked by a Label. The Label may be above or below the GOTO Statement. Labels are a maximum of 64 characters. Labels must end with a Colon ( : ) </li></ul><ul><li>There is no automatic record of the point at which the GOTO was initiated. </li></ul><ul><li>Simplified Syntax </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Goto <Label Name> </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… Statements </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li><Label Name>: </li></ul></ul>If / Else / EndIf Do / Until While / EndWhile Goto / Label Wait Halt / Reset
    177. 177. Motion Commands <ul><li>Motion Statements: </li></ul><ul><li>(How to get from point A to point B) </li></ul>A B MoveD MoveP Move Until MoveDR MovePR MDV Move Modifiers Move While
    178. 178. Motion Commands <ul><li>MoveD Command: </li></ul><ul><li>Move Distance </li></ul><ul><li>Performs Incremental Move to the distance specified (in User Units) </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MoveD 3 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MoveD –5 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MoveD Back 4 </li></ul></ul>Start Current End MoveD MoveD MoveP Move Until MoveDR MovePR MDV Move Modifiers Move While
    179. 179. Motion Commands <ul><li>MoveP Command: </li></ul><ul><li>(Move to Position) </li></ul><ul><li>Performs Positional Move to the Position specified (in User Units) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MoveP 3 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MoveP –5 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Absolute Position set to Zero at Enable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Absolute Position can be set with APOS Command </li></ul></ul>Start Current End MoveP MoveD MoveP Move Until MoveDR MovePR MDV Move Modifiers Move While
    180. 180. Program Events Main Program
    181. 181. Program Structures <ul><li>Subroutines: </li></ul><ul><li>Subroutine Stack </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Subroutine Stack is 16 Level </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(Subroutines can be nested 16 times) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only the Main Program may contain a GOSUB statement </li></ul></ul>
    182. 182. Program Structure <ul><li>Subroutines: </li></ul><ul><li>Contains: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Routines Separate from the Main Program that are ‘called’ when required </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Very useful for structuring programs and multiple calls of common code </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>; Main Program </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Gosub Button_Press </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>End </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>; Subroutines </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Button_press: </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Return </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    183. 183. Program Events Main Program Sub Routines
    184. 184. Model 940: Simple Motion Program Feedback Command Output Lab
    185. 185. Pick and Place Application
    186. 186. Move to Home (MoveP 0)
    187. 187. Extend arm (Out1 = 1)
    188. 188. Turn on Gripper (Out2 = 1)
    189. 189. Retract arm (Out1 = 0)
    190. 190. Move to Place Position (MoveP 100)
    191. 191. Extend arm (Out1 = 1)
    192. 192. Release Gripper (Out2 = 0)
    193. 193. Retract Pick Arm (Out1 = 0)
    194. 194. Move back to Pick Position (MoveP 0)
    195. 195. Select “ Parameters” from the node tree Open the Drive Mode pull down window and select “ Position” Mode Set the drive up for Internal Reference
    196. 196. Set the Enable switch function to Inhibit Select “ Digital IO” from the node tree
    197. 197. Select the “ Indexer Program ” file from the Node Tree. Click on the “ Import ” Control Button Navigate to the “ Programming Examples ” folder Open the “ Pick and Place ” program
    198. 198. Select “ Load W Source ” to compile the program and load it to the drive.
    199. 199. Use the “ Step ” button to step through the program. The “ >> ” keys point to the line of code next to be executed.
    200. 200. UNITS = 1 ACCEL = 75 DECEL =75 MAXV = 10 APOS = 0 ;************************************************ Events *********************************************** ;Set Events handling here ;******************************************* Main Program ******************************************** RESET_DRIVE: WAIT UNTIL IN_A3 ;Make sure that the Enable / Inhibit switch is made ENABLE PROGRAM_START: MOVEP 0 ;Move to Pick position OUT1 = 1 ;Turn on output 1 on to extend Pick arm WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to extend arm OUT2 = 1 ;Turn on output 2 to Engage gripper WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to Pick part OUT1 = 0 ;Turn off output 1 to Retract Pick arm MOVEP 100 ;Move to Place position OUT1 = 1 ;Turn on output 1 on to extend Pick arm WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to extend arm OUT2 = 0 ;Turn off output 1 to Disengage gripper WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to Place part OUT1 = 0 ;Retract Pick arm GOTO PROGRAM_START >> >> Use the “ Step ” buttons to step through the program. >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >>
    201. 201. Pick and Place Application with Homing
    202. 202. Move to Home – Where is Home? Home Prox Switch
    203. 203. UNITS = 1 ACCEL = 75 DECEL =75 MAXV = 10 VAR_HOME_FAST_VEL = 10 ;Sets speed in rps for 1 st move towards home sensor VAR_HOME_SLOW_VEL = 1 ;Sets speed in rps for 2 nd move towards home sensor VAR_HOME_ACCEL = 100 ;Sets all accel values for homing routine in rps^2 VAR_HOME_OFFSET = 0 ;Sets distance to move from home sensor for zero position VAR_HOME_SWITCH_INPUT = 0 ;Select which input to use for home input(0-A1,1-A2…11-C4) VAR_HOME_METHOD = 21 ;Select which homing routine to use ;************************************************ Events *********************************************** ;Set Events handling here ;******************************************* Main Program ******************************************** RESET_DRIVE: WAIT UNTIL IN_A3 ;Make sure that the Enable / Inhibit switch is made ENABLE HOME ; Start the Homing Procedure PROGRAM_START: MOVEP 0 ;Move to Pick position OUT1 = 1 ;Turn on output 1 on to extend Pick arm WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to extend arm OUT2 = 1 ;Turn on output 2 to Engage gripper WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to Pick part Add the following code to your program
    204. 204. Program Structure Fault Routines <ul><li>Contains: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Specific Routine that handles any fault occurring during normal program flow </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Several drive functions suspended until exit from Fault Handler </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>; Main Program </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>End </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>; Subroutines </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>; Fault Handler </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ON FAULT </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… statements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>END FAULT </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>Fault Occurs!
    205. 205. Program Structure Fault Routines <ul><li>When a fault is detected Motion will be suspended and drive will be disabled. </li></ul><ul><li>If no Fault Routine is Specified then program Execution will end as soon a fault is detected. </li></ul><ul><li>Exit of the Fault Handler and Return to Main Program Execution can be done with either a ‘Reset’ or ‘Resume’ statement. </li></ul><ul><li>Reset Statement: </li></ul><ul><li>Will re-commence Main Program Execution from the first Program Statement. </li></ul><ul><li>Resume Statement: </li></ul><ul><li>Will re-commence Main Program Execution from the point (label) specified in the resume statement. </li></ul>
    206. 206. Program Structure Fault Routines <ul><li>Fault code is written to the DFAULTS Register </li></ul><ul><li>Event Scanning is Terminated until Main Program execution is resumed. </li></ul><ul><li>Detection of further Faults is Suspended. </li></ul><ul><li>Code Prohibited in Fault Routine: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Move Statements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motion Suspend </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motion resume </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Goto </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gosub </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jump </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gear On/Off </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Velocity On/Off </li></ul></ul>
    207. 207. Program Events Main Program Sub Routines Fault Handling
    208. 208. Model 940: Fault Handling ! Start the program and drive While the motor is running turn off the Enable Switch diS rUn F_36 How do we recover from the fault? Lab
    209. 209. OUT1 = 0 ;Retract Pick arm GOTO PROGRAM_START END ;******************************************* Sub-Routines ****************************************** ; Enter Sub-Routine code here ;************************************ Fault Handler Routine **************************************** ON FAULT ;Statement starts fault handler routine, motion is ;stopped, drive is disabled, and events are no longer ;scanned. OUT2 = 0 ;Output 2 is turned off to disengage the gripper ;the releasing part. OUT1 = 0 ;Output 1 is turned off to retract Pick & Place arm RESUME FPROCESS ;Sends code execution to the FPROCESS routine. ENDFAULT FPROCESS: ;This is a place holder for the FAULT HANDLER WAIT UNTIL !IN_A3 ;Wait for enable switch to be turned off GOTO RESET_DRIVE
    210. 210. OUT1 = 0 ;Retract Pick arm GOTO PROGRAM_START END ;******************************************* Sub-Routines ****************************************** ; Enter Sub-Routine code here ;************************************ Fault Handler Routine **************************************** ON FAULT ;Statement starts fault handler routine, motion is ;stopped, drive is disabled, and events are no longer ;scanned. OUT2 = 0 ;Output 2 is turned off to disengage the gripper ;the releasing part. OUT1 = 0 ;Output 1 is turned off to retract Pick & Place arm RESUME FPROCESS ;Sends code execution to the FPROCESS routine. ENDFAULT FPROCESS: ;This is a place holder for the FAULT HANDLER WAIT UNTIL IN_A1 ;Wait for reset switch to be made WAIT UNTIL !IN_A1 ;Wait for reset switch to be released GOTO RESET_DRIVE ON FAULT :Statement starts fault handler routine, motion is OUT2 = 0 :Output 2 is turned off to disengage the gripper OUT1 = 0 :Output 1 is turned off to retract Pick & Place arm RESUME FPROCESS :Sends code execution to FPROCESS routine. WAIT UNTIL IN_A1 :Wait for reset switch to be made. WAIT UNTIL !IN_A1 :Wait for reset switch to be released. GOTO RESET_DRIVE
    211. 211. Model 940: Adding I/O Feedback Command Output Lab
    212. 212. Extend arm Prox Sensors
    213. 213. ;******************************************* Main Program ****************************************** RESET_DRIVE: WAIT UNTIL IN_A3 ;Make sure that the Enable / Inhibit switch is made ENABLE PROGRAM_START: MOVEP 0 ;Move to Pick position OUT1 = 1 ;Turn on output 1 on to extend Pick arm WAIT UNTIL IN_A4 ; Arm extend OUT2 = 1 ;Turn on output 2 to Engage gripper WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to Pick part OUT1 = 0 ;Turn off output 1 to Retract Pick arm WAIT UNTIL !IN_A4 ;Make sure Arm retracted MOVEP 100 ;Move to Place position OUT1 = 1 ;Turn on output 1 on to extend Pick arm WAIT UNTIL IN_A4 ; Arm is extend OUT2 = 0 ;Turn off output 2 to Disengage gripper WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to Place part OUT1 = 0 ;Retract Pick arm WAIT UNTIL !IN_A4 ;Arm retracted GOTO PROGRAM_START END Replace the “ Wait TIME 1000 ” with “ Wait Until In_A4 ” And “ Wait Until !In_A4 ”
    214. 214. Model 940: Events Feedback Command Output Lab
    215. 215. Move to Home
    216. 216. Extend Arm
    217. 217. Turn on Gripper
    218. 218. Retract Arm
    219. 219. Move to Place Position
    220. 220. Extend Arm
    221. 221. Release Gripper
    222. 222. Retract Pick Arm
    223. 223. Move Back to Pick Position
    224. 224. EVENT SPRAY_GUNS_START APOS>25 OUT3=1 ENDEVENT EVENT SPRAY_GUNS_STOP APOS>75 OUT3=0 ENDEVENT ;******************************************* Main Program ******************************************** RESET_DRIVE: ;Place holder for Fault Mon EVENT SPRAY_GUNS_START ON ;Activate Event EVENT SPRAY_GUNS_STOP ON ;Activate Event WAIT UNTIL IN_A3 ;Make sure that the Enable / Inhibit switch is made ENABLE PROGRAM_START: WAIT UNTIL IN_A4 == 1 ;Make sure Arm is retracted MOVEP 0 ;Move to Pick position OUT1 = 1 ;Turn on output 1 on to extend Pick arm WAIT UNTIL IN_A4 == 0 ; Arm extend OUT2 = 1 ;Turn on output 2 to Engage gripper WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to Pick part OUT1 = 0 ;Turn off output 1 to Retract Pick arm WAIT UNTIL IN_A4 ;Make sure Arm retracted MOVEP 100 ;Move to Place position MOVEP 100 ;Move to Place position
    225. 225. Model 940: Continue command Feedback Command Output
    226. 226. WAIT UNTIL IN_A4==0 ;Make sure Arm is retracted before starting the program MOVEP 0 ;Move to position 0 to pick part OUT1 = 1 ;Turn on output 1 to extend Pick arm WAIT UNTIL IN_A4 == 1 ;Check input to make sure Arm is extended OUT2 = 1 ;Turn on output 2 to Engage gripper WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to Pick part OUT1 = 0 ;Turn off output 1 to Retract Pick arm WAIT UNTIL IN_A4==0 ;Check input to make sure Arm is retracted MOVEP 100 , C ;Move to Place position and continue code execution WAIT UNTIL APOS >25 ;Wait until pos is greater than 25 OUT3 = 1 ;Turn on output 3 to spray part WAIT UNTIL APOS >=75 ;Wait until pos is greater than or equal to 75 OUT3 = 0 ;Turn off output 3 to shut off spray guns WAIT UNTIL F_MCOMPLETE ;Wait until move is done before extending arm OUT1 = 1 ;Turn on output 1 to extend Pick arm WAIT UNTIL IN_A4 == 1 ;Check input to make sure Arm is extended OUT2 =0 ;Turn off output 1 to Disengage gripper WAIT TIME 1000 ;Delay 1 sec to Place part OUT1 = 0 ;Retract Pick arm WAIT UNTIL IN_A4 == 0 ;Check input to make sure Arm is retracted
    227. 227. Model 940 Thank You TRAINING
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