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Bromo

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  • 1. 35Bromo – BromineMass:79.904 uElectron configuration: [Ar] 4s23d104p5Melting point: 265.8 K, -7.2 °C, 19 °FBoiling point: 332.0 K, 58.8 °C, 137.8    °FDensity: (Br2, liquid) 3.1028 g·cm−3Discovery: antiquity.Bromine (from Greek: βρῶμος, brómos, meaning "strong-smelling" or "stench") is achemical element with the symbol Br, and atomic number of 35. It is in the halogengroup (17). The element was isolated independently by two chemists, Carl JacobLöwig and Antoine Jerome Balard, in 1825–1826. Elemental bromine is a fuming red-brown liquid at room temperature, corrosive and toxic, with properties betweenthose of chlorine and iodine. Free bromine does not occur in nature, but occurs ascolorless soluble crystalline mineral halide salts, analogous to table salt.Bromine is rarer than about three-quarters of elements in the Earths crust;however, the high solubility of bromide ion has caused its accumulation in the oceans,and commercially the element is easily extracted from brine pools, mostly in theUnited States, Israel and China. About 556,000 tonnes were produced in 2007, anamount similar to the far more abundant element magnesium.

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