Countable and uncountable nouns

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Countable and uncountable nouns

  1. 1. COUNTABLE AND UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS (count and mass nouns) By Inma Domínguez Images in http://hcmc.uvic.ca/clipart/
  2. 2. COUNTABLE AND UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS <ul><li>COUNTABLE NOUNS </li></ul><ul><li>They refer to things that can be counted: </li></ul><ul><li>UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS </li></ul><ul><li>They refer to immaterial concepts: life, love ,... </li></ul><ul><li>They refer to stuff or liquid that cannot be counted: water, sugar, salt, ... </li></ul>A banana A cherry A Christmas tree bread jam icecream
  3. 3. COUNTABLE AND UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS <ul><li>COUNTABLE </li></ul><ul><li>They can be singular or plural </li></ul><ul><li>an apple </li></ul><ul><li>some apples </li></ul><ul><li>UNCOUNTABLE </li></ul><ul><li>They are always singular </li></ul><ul><li>coffee </li></ul><ul><li>milk </li></ul><ul><li>money </li></ul><ul><li>pasta </li></ul>
  4. 4. COUNTABLE AND UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS <ul><li>COUNTABLE </li></ul><ul><li>Before them you can use: </li></ul><ul><li>A /an a house </li></ul><ul><li>The the table </li></ul><ul><li>Numbers two children </li></ul><ul><li>Some /any (when they are plural only) </li></ul><ul><li>There are some apples on the table </li></ul><ul><li>UNCOUNTABLE </li></ul><ul><li>Before them you can use: </li></ul><ul><li>Some/any </li></ul><ul><li>There is some water in the glass </li></ul><ul><li>There isn't any cheese on the table </li></ul><ul><li>But you can't use: a /an or numbers before them. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Quantifiers <ul><li>COUNTABLE </li></ul><ul><li>Many </li></ul><ul><li>There are many children in the park </li></ul><ul><li>Few /a few </li></ul><ul><li>There are few apples (not enough). </li></ul><ul><li>There are a few apples (enough). </li></ul><ul><li>How many </li></ul><ul><li>How many apples do you want? </li></ul><ul><li>UNCOUNTABLE </li></ul><ul><li>Much </li></ul><ul><li>There isn't much sugar in my coffee. </li></ul><ul><li>Little / a little </li></ul><ul><li>They know little English (not enough to manage) </li></ul><ul><li>They know a little English (enough to manage) </li></ul><ul><li>How much </li></ul><ul><li>How much money do you need? </li></ul>
  6. 6. How to “count” uncountable nouns: the use of partitives <ul><li>Uncountable nouns can be quantified using some expressions called partitives. We use partitives when we refer to a part of a whole. There are many different partitives. Here are some examples: </li></ul><ul><li>A glass of water </li></ul><ul><li>A bottle of whisky </li></ul><ul><li>A tin of soup </li></ul><ul><li>A piece of cheese </li></ul><ul><li>A cup of coffee </li></ul><ul><li>A carton of milk </li></ul><ul><li>A jar of jam </li></ul><ul><li>A tube of toothpaste </li></ul><ul><li>A bag of crisps </li></ul><ul><li>An item of news </li></ul><ul><li>A loaf of bread </li></ul><ul><li>A can of coke </li></ul><ul><li>A bar of soap </li></ul><ul><li>We can use numbers before the partitives: two cups of coffee, ten bottles of whisky, ... </li></ul>

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