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Parenting U: Toddler Behavior Tips
 

Parenting U: Toddler Behavior Tips

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Providence Parenting University: Toddler Behavior Tips by Rick Brandt-Kreutz, LICSW of St. Peter Family Medicine. Presented May 31, 2011 in Olympia, WA.

Providence Parenting University: Toddler Behavior Tips by Rick Brandt-Kreutz, LICSW of St. Peter Family Medicine. Presented May 31, 2011 in Olympia, WA.

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    Parenting U: Toddler Behavior Tips Parenting U: Toddler Behavior Tips Document Transcript

    • Toddler Tips Rick Brandt-Kreutz, LICSW St. Peter Family Medicine 360.493.7230www.provmedicalgroup.org
    • Can’t stop Gets “lockedNot persistent in” persistent
    • Discipline with firmness and kindness High kindness (respect for child) Permissive Rigid Authoritative (democratic)Low firmness High firmness (respect for self) Neglect Authoritarian/Abuse Low kindness (mean)
    • BRIGHT FUTURES TOOL FOR FAMILIES Guidelines for Special Time Special time is priceless because it symbolizes the parent’s unconditional love for the child. Special time works best when it is � Called a certain name that the child understands, such as “special time” � Given every day, whether the child has behaved well or badly � Never taken away as a punish- ment � Kept a consistent, short amount of time (e.g., 10–15 minutes) � Given at a time convenient for the parent, although a con- sistent time is desirable � Given separately by each parent to each child in the family each day � Used for a joint activity that the child chooses (within activ- ities acceptable to the adult, e.g., coloring, reading a book, playing catch) � Not used for watching television or other passive activities � Not interrupted by taking telephone calls or turning atten- tion away to something else � Ended on time to prevent begging � Not saved up and done at greater length another day � Separated from other play time that day by a break, which indicates that the rules are different � Shortened by any time out required for misbehavior that occurs during special time � Carried out by repeatedly trying to engage a child who refuses special time, in order to convey the parent’s sincere interestCite as: Howard BJ. 2002. Guidelines for special time. In Jellinek M, Patel BP, Froehle MC, eds., Bright Futures in Practice:Mental Health—Volume II. Tool Kit. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. www.brightfutures.org 82