Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Disclosure
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Disclosure

485
views

Published on

This is powerpoint presentation I did recently for Eagle Academy, a local alternative high school, and it is for staff, about dealing with disclosure.

This is powerpoint presentation I did recently for Eagle Academy, a local alternative high school, and it is for staff, about dealing with disclosure.


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
485
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Dealing with Disclosure Atlantic County Women’s Center Monday, September 17, 2007
  • 2. Atlantic County Women’s Center Services
    • Child Care Network
    • Home to Work Program
    • WomenSource Training Institute
    • Violence Intervention Program
    • counseling
    • Referral
    • Groups psycho-educ
    • Prevention education
    • Life skills services
  • 3. What is disclosure?
    • When a child or an adult voluntarily tells you they have experienced or are experiencing sexual abuse/incest, sexual assault (rape), domestic violence or other crisis
        • Drug/alcohol
        • Transitional living/homelessness
        • Death/loss
  • 4. Who discloses?
    • Children/Teens
      • Sexual violence
      • Witnessing domestic violence
      • Experiencing dating violence
      • Child abuse
    • Adults
      • Past history of abuse
      • Domestic violence
      • Child abuse by partner
  • 5. How do they disclose?
    • Within counseling
    • At schools
    • Accidentally
      • Marks on body
      • Behavior red flags
      • Interrupted act of violence
    • Purposefully
      • During counseling
      • Out of fear for other children
      • After the abuse has stopped
  • 6. Red Flags for Abuse
    • Some Physical signs/symptoms
      • Welts or other skin injuries
      • Repeated injuries
      • Venereal disease
      • Unexplained injuries
      • Lack of medical care
      • Lack of self care
  • 7. Red Flags for Abuse
    • Some behavioral signs/symptoms
      • Extremes of behavior/mood swings
      • Addictions
      • Extreme fear of dark, small places, etc.
      • Depressed or withdrawn
      • Overly eager to please adults
      • Inappropriate sexual information
      • Habitually absent or late from school/care
      • Always tired
  • 8. Red Flags of Abusive/Abused Parents
    • Story doesn’t always “add” up
    • Overreacts/hostile when questioned
    • Rarely touches or looks at child
    • Has unrealistic expectations of child based on child’s age
    • Minimizes child’s needs
    • Focuses on self instead of child (may also be victim)
    • Acts competitively towards child
  • 9. Why is an appropriate response important?
    • Validation for the victim
    • Students can’t learn if they’re not safe
    • Less recanting of the victimization
    • Safety for all
    • Community responsibility
    • Ethical responsibility
  • 10. What is an appropriate response?
    • Creating a “safe space”
    • Listening, not investigating
    • Non-judgment – meet them where they are
    • Validating
    • Empowerment, empowerment, empowerment
    • Empathy/not sympathy
    • Confidentiality
    • Boundaries
    • Be mindful of language used
    • Your own triggers/experiences
    • Responsibility to report
    • Meta-communication
  • 11. Do not:
    • Minimize
    • Blame
    • Judge
    • Not respond out of fear
    • Make promises
    • React (body language, anger, cry)
    • Make it about you
    • Break confidentiality unless necessary
  • 12. Do:
    • Take the person to a confidential spot
    • Believe them!
    • Provide options whenever possible
    • Call for support/intervention
    • Check your personal values at the door
    • Create a safety plan
    • Advocate for the plan
    • Take care of self
  • 13. What to do next:
    • Consider safety first
    • Explore resources
    • Take action/Make contacts
    • Debrief staff
    • Stages of transition/loss
      • Denial
      • Anger
      • Bargaining
      • Hopelessness
      • acceptance
    • Review the results
      • What went well?
      • What could have gone better?
      • What lessons are there for next time?
  • 14. Additional Resources
    • DYFS 1-877-NJ-ABUSE
    • 911
    • Atlantic County Women’s Center
        • 1-800-286-4184 and www.acwc.org
    • Ipac.aclink.org and click “clubs and organizations”
    • 211
  • 15. Thank You.
    • Erin O’Hanlon,
    • Director of Community Initiatives
    • 609-601-9925, ext. 201
    • Michelle Duffy,
    • Supervisor of Children’s Services
    • 609-646-6767, ext. 661

×