Bullying/Harassment and Your  ESE Student October 2011 Presented by SEDNET 7B
<ul><li>What is Bullying?  </li></ul><ul><li>The behavior hurts or harms another person physically or  </li></ul><ul><li>e...
<ul><li>Race </li></ul><ul><li>Color </li></ul><ul><li>National 0rigin </li></ul><ul><li>Sex </li></ul><ul><li>Disability ...
<ul><li>Unwelcome conduct such as:  </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal abuse (name-calling, epithets, slurs) </li></ul><ul><li>Graph...
What Bullying is NOT: Mild teasing Conflict Fighting Rejection Random acts of violence
Think About…
Bully Proofing versus Victim Proofing Bully Proofing Victims rely on parents, school staff and student bystanders to prote...
Information on the Following Slides  Obtained From: <ul><li>ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, Technical Assistance </li></ul><u...
Types of Victims <ul><li>Passive (perceived as weak) </li></ul><ul><li>Special needs  </li></ul><ul><li>Provocative: Evoke...
<ul><li>Did the child hurt you on purpose? </li></ul><ul><li>Was it done more than once? </li></ul><ul><li>Did it make you...
<ul><li>Did the child know you were being hurt? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the other child more powerful (i.e. bigger,  scarier)...
<ul><li>How was the bus ride today? </li></ul><ul><li>Who did you sit by at lunch? </li></ul><ul><li>I notice that you see...
<ul><li>Read stories with your child about </li></ul><ul><li>bullying situations. </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about recent even...
3 Steps to Take if your Child is Targeted by Bullying Behaviors at School <ul><li>Work with your child </li></ul><ul><li>W...
<ul><li>Who is doing the behavior that is causing you the  problem? </li></ul><ul><li>What happened?  </li></ul><ul><li>Ve...
<ul><li>What day and time did it happen? </li></ul><ul><li>Where did it take place? </li></ul><ul><li>How did you respond ...
<ul><li>Practice possible ways for your child to  </li></ul><ul><li>respond to bullying. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell school sta...
<ul><li>Discuss what is happening to your child </li></ul><ul><li>using information from step one. </li></ul><ul><li>Menti...
<ul><li>Set clear expectations. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on desired positive behaviors. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not waste time...
<ul><ul><li>Develop goals, benchmarks, short-term  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>objectives. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ident...
Include the child in the decision-making to improve the likelihood of the child meeting his or her IEP goals.
<ul><li>Improve social skills such as sharing, </li></ul><ul><li>taking turns, or thinking before acting. </li></ul><ul><l...
<ul><li>Participate in a friendship group to  practice social skills with peer under  direction of school staff. </li></ul...
<ul><li>Improve speech intelligibility so child  can  interact with peers. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and practice direct ...
<ul><li>Provide hallway or playground monitoring  by school staff. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow child to leave class early to a...
<ul><li>In-service school staff to understand child’s  </li></ul><ul><li>disability and vulnerability. </li></ul><ul><li>I...
<ul><li>Educate peers about school district policies </li></ul><ul><li>on bullying behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Set up “no-...
<ul><li>A meeting request  </li></ul><ul><li>Your child’s name, age, grade, school </li></ul><ul><li>Your address and phon...
<ul><li>Background information on the bullying  situation. </li></ul><ul><li>How you have tried to resolve the problem. </...
<ul><li>Be brief and factual. </li></ul><ul><li>Send copies of this letter to the principal  and the Office of Exception E...
<ul><li>Organize your information. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down questions you want to ask. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember to a...
<ul><li>Decide if you want to take someone with you. </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify their role (e.g., take notes, provide  </li...
In Summary… : <ul><li>Is the behavior misbehavior, bullying or  harassment? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you bully proofing or vi...
<ul><li>Is there a need to approach the teacher? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you going to ask for a meeting to review  the IEP a...
Document! Document! Document!
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Presentation ese bully_6_revised

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  • There should someone to be blame due to this bullying issue, others get off to school because of being afraid about this growing issue. I could say that the impact of bullying is definitely not a joke and must be stop. I would like to inform everyone that I have found a safety service which can be use and beneficial to all. It is called SafeKidZone, it has an application called panic button. By simply pressing it the alert will simultaneously go to a group of safety network and can access to the nearest 911 in the area. For more information about their service check out: http://bit.ly/ZjYchC
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  • At first glance, many people might think this behavior is easy to define. Their first image of bullying might be of a physically intimidating boy beating up a smaller classmate. While that can still be considered bullying today, parents need to know that bullying behaviors can be much more complex and varied than that typical stereotype. For example, harmful bullying can also occur quietly and covertly, through gossip or on the Internet, causing emotional damage. Bullying can be circumstantial or chronic. It might be the result of a situation, such as being the new student at school, or it might be behavior that has been directed at the individual for a long period of time.
  • Defining “Harassment” Including Harassment based on Disability The OCR (Office for Civil Rights) and DOJ (Department of Justice) has made the distinction between bullying and harassment in that when the behaviors listed below are directed at a protected class; including:
  • Students have protection under federal laws.
  • Unless it meets RIP- repeated. Intentional and power over,
  • A true bully is a person that has little or no empathy and is most likely a sociopath. Bully behaviors are something that most likely we are all guilty of performing at some time in our life.
  • Characteristic of victims: Provocative: Passive Can provoke attack Generally do not invite attack Continually irritate their peers Are often isolated ( alone) Can be ADD or ADHD May use money or brides for protection Tend to perpetuate the conflict, but never win Anxious, low self-esteem and lacking social skills May be clumsy and few social skills May have a disability- mental or physical . LD May be mislabeled as bullies Usually lack humor May carry a weapon to protect themselves Are social outcasts, such as being last picked for activities
  • Who, What When and Where
  • What to do if you are being bullied: Tell them to stop. Walk away, tell them to stop, telling adult you trust, find a safe place, stick together, find opportunities to make new friends
  • Does not want to come to school o Is fearful he or she will be hurt Complains of stomach aches, headaches, etc. Has other new behavior as a result of bullying The 2008-2009 Annual Safe and Drug Free Schools (SDFS) Report of 7 th and 8 th graders: 41.8% in 8 Brevard schools self reported being verbally bullied. 38.4% of those reporting being bullied in the classroom. The 2009-2010 Annual SDFS Report of 7 th and 8 th graders in 8 Brevard schools found that 57% of students self reported being verbally bullied. 40% of those reporting being bullied in the classroom. Reported in both FYS and the SDFS survey, a majority of bullying occurred in the classroom with a teacher present. (While this finding might be surprising it is note worthy to speculate that this occurs not due to teachers choosing to ignore but due to the nature of bullying as a covert behavior).
  • Focus on the bulling behaviors..not the bully. The 2008-2009 Annual Safe and Drug Free Schools (SDFS) Report of 7 th and 8 th graders: 41.8% in 8 Brevard schools self reported being verbally bullied. 38.4% of those reporting being bullied in the classroom. The 2009-2010 Annual SDFS Report of 7 th and 8 th graders in 8 Brevard schools found that 57% of students self reported being verbally bullied. 40% of those reporting being bullied in the classroom. Reported in both FYS and the SDFS survey, a majority of bullying occurred in the classroom with a teacher present. (While this finding might be surprising it is note worthy to speculate that this occurs not due to teachers choosing to ignore but due to the nature of bullying as a covert behavior).
  • Presentation ese bully_6_revised

    1. 1. Bullying/Harassment and Your ESE Student October 2011 Presented by SEDNET 7B
    2. 2. <ul><li>What is Bullying? </li></ul><ul><li>The behavior hurts or harms another person physically or </li></ul><ul><li>emotionally over a period of time. ( R = Repeated) </li></ul><ul><li>It is intentional. ( I = Intentional) </li></ul><ul><li>The targets have difficulty stopping the behavior </li></ul><ul><li>directed at them and struggle to defend themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>( P = Power over) </li></ul>RIP
    3. 3. <ul><li>Race </li></ul><ul><li>Color </li></ul><ul><li>National 0rigin </li></ul><ul><li>Sex </li></ul><ul><li>Disability </li></ul><ul><li>Religion </li></ul>It Becomes Harassment if the RIP Behavior Targets:
    4. 4. <ul><li>Unwelcome conduct such as: </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal abuse (name-calling, epithets, slurs) </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic or written statements </li></ul><ul><li>Threats </li></ul><ul><li>Physical assault </li></ul><ul><li>Other conduct that may be physically </li></ul><ul><li>threatening, harmful, or humiliating </li></ul>Harassment Behaviors
    5. 5. What Bullying is NOT: Mild teasing Conflict Fighting Rejection Random acts of violence
    6. 6. Think About…
    7. 7. Bully Proofing versus Victim Proofing Bully Proofing Victims rely on parents, school staff and student bystanders to protect them. Parent/staff creates a victim mentality. Punishing the bullies only makes them more angry or vengeful. Victim Proofing Victims learn to solve problems on their own. Gets rid of victim mentality Defuses bullying so there is no retaliation
    8. 8. Information on the Following Slides Obtained From: <ul><li>ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, Technical Assistance </li></ul><ul><li>ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, a Project of PACER </li></ul><ul><li>Center, Inc. PACER Center, Inc. Copyright 2003 PACER Center, Inc. 8161 Normandale Blvd., </li></ul><ul><li>Bloomington, MN 55437. www.pacerteensagainstbullying.org </li></ul>
    9. 9. Types of Victims <ul><li>Passive (perceived as weak) </li></ul><ul><li>Special needs </li></ul><ul><li>Provocative: Evokes negative feelings in everyone, lacks social sense, has irritating or nasty habits, blurts out </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>Did the child hurt you on purpose? </li></ul><ul><li>Was it done more than once? </li></ul><ul><li>Did it make you feel (think) bad or angry? </li></ul><ul><li>or How do you feel (think) about the behavior? </li></ul>Parents Can Help their Child Recognize Bullying/Non-Bullying Behavior The following questions may be helpful:
    11. 11. <ul><li>Did the child know you were being hurt? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the other child more powerful (i.e. bigger, scarier) than you in some way? </li></ul><ul><li>(Adapted from Our Child: Bully or Victim, </li></ul><ul><li>Peter Sheras, Ph.D., 2002) </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>How was the bus ride today? </li></ul><ul><li>Who did you sit by at lunch? </li></ul><ul><li>I notice that you seem to be feeling sick a lot and </li></ul><ul><li>wanting to stay home. Please tell me about that. </li></ul><ul><li>Are kids making fun of you? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there a lot of cliques at school? What do you think about them? </li></ul><ul><li>Has anyone touched you in a way that did not feel right? </li></ul>Variations of These Questions for the Child who is Reluctant to Talk
    13. 13. <ul><li>Read stories with your child about </li></ul><ul><li>bullying situations. </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about recent events in the news. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss bullying incidents on TV or </li></ul><ul><li>in a movie. </li></ul>Other Options for Helping your Child Discuss Bullying/Non-Bullying
    14. 14. 3 Steps to Take if your Child is Targeted by Bullying Behaviors at School <ul><li>Work with your child </li></ul><ul><li>Work with the school </li></ul><ul><li>Work with the administration </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Who is doing the behavior that is causing you the problem? </li></ul><ul><li>What happened? </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal </li></ul><ul><li>Physical </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional </li></ul><ul><li>Cyber-bullying (Meet directly with the principal.) </li></ul>Work With Your Child Talk with your child about the specifics of the situation:
    16. 16. <ul><li>What day and time did it happen? </li></ul><ul><li>Where did it take place? </li></ul><ul><li>How did you respond to this behavior? </li></ul><ul><li>Did other children or adults observe the </li></ul><ul><ul><li>situation? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Do you know the names of these people? </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>Practice possible ways for your child to </li></ul><ul><li>respond to bullying. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell school staff (teacher, principal, other staff). </li></ul><ul><li>Keep a written record of this information. </li></ul><ul><li>If it is bullying, make and turn in a written report. </li></ul><ul><li>If needed, go to step two. </li></ul>Other Ideas:
    18. 18. <ul><li>Discuss what is happening to your child </li></ul><ul><li>using information from step one. </li></ul><ul><li>Mention how the situation is impacting your child. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask what can be done so your child feels safe. </li></ul>Work With The School Meet with Your Child’s Teacher
    19. 19. <ul><li>Set clear expectations. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on desired positive behaviors. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not waste time identifying the underlying causes of the bullying behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>If needed, request a meeting to review the IEP and/or behavior plan. </li></ul>Take a Problem-Solving Approach
    20. 20. <ul><ul><li>Develop goals, benchmarks, short-term </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>objectives. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify supplementary services, program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>modifications or supports to help prevent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and intervene against bullying and to victim proof your child. </li></ul></ul>The IEP Team can Work Together to:
    21. 21. Include the child in the decision-making to improve the likelihood of the child meeting his or her IEP goals.
    22. 22. <ul><li>Improve social skills such as sharing, </li></ul><ul><li>taking turns, or thinking before acting. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop ability to carry on a 2-way </li></ul><ul><li>conversation. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify social norms for the child who </li></ul><ul><li>does not recognize them by him or herself. </li></ul>Possible IEP Goals and Objectives
    23. 23. <ul><li>Participate in a friendship group to practice social skills with peer under direction of school staff. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase self-advocacy skills so child </li></ul><ul><li>can say “no” or “stop that”. </li></ul>
    24. 24. <ul><li>Improve speech intelligibility so child can interact with peers. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and practice direct and indirect </li></ul><ul><li>ways to react to, handle, and avoid bullying behavior. </li></ul>
    25. 25. <ul><li>Provide hallway or playground monitoring by school staff. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow child to leave class early to avoid hallway incidents. </li></ul><ul><li>Use social stories to help child understand difficult situations when they occur. </li></ul>Examples of Supplementary Services, Program Modifications, or Supports
    26. 26. <ul><li>In-service school staff to understand child’s </li></ul><ul><li>disability and vulnerability. </li></ul><ul><li>In-service classroom peers to help them understand the child’s disability and/or child’s use of assistive technology, paraprofessional, or interpreter (i.e. things that are different) . </li></ul>
    27. 27. <ul><li>Educate peers about school district policies </li></ul><ul><li>on bullying behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Set up “no-questions-asked” procedure for child to remove him or herself from a situation where bullying behavior occurs. </li></ul><ul><li>If needed, go to step three. </li></ul>
    28. 28. <ul><li>A meeting request </li></ul><ul><li>Your child’s name, age, grade, school </li></ul><ul><li>Your address and phone number </li></ul>Work With District Administration Write a Letter or E-Mail to the Area Superintendent to Include:
    29. 29. <ul><li>Background information on the bullying situation. </li></ul><ul><li>How you have tried to resolve the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>Your times available for a meeting. </li></ul>
    30. 30. <ul><li>Be brief and factual. </li></ul><ul><li>Send copies of this letter to the principal and the Office of Exception Education Administrative Support Services. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep a copy for yourself. </li></ul>Other Important Tips:
    31. 31. <ul><li>Organize your information. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down questions you want to ask. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember to ask what can be done to </li></ul><ul><li>keep your child safe in school so </li></ul><ul><li>he/she can learn. </li></ul>Prepare for this Meeting
    32. 32. <ul><li>Decide if you want to take someone with you. </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify their role (e.g., take notes, provide </li></ul><ul><li>support, contribute information about your </li></ul><ul><li>child). </li></ul><ul><li>Keep a written record of this meeting, including </li></ul><ul><li>who was present, what was discussed, </li></ul><ul><li>and any decisions made. </li></ul>
    33. 33. In Summary… : <ul><li>Is the behavior misbehavior, bullying or harassment? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you bully proofing or victim proofing? </li></ul><ul><li>What are you doing to help your child? </li></ul>
    34. 34. <ul><li>Is there a need to approach the teacher? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you going to ask for a meeting to review the IEP and/or behavior plan? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you going to approach the school administration? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you going to approach the area superintendent? </li></ul>
    35. 35. Document! Document! Document!

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