InfeudalJapanSamuraiexistedinordertoprotectandservetheShogunandbushido
wasthecodeofmoralprinciplesfollowedbythesamurai,ane...
Usually a Samurai would begin their training at ages 5-7. The father and male relatives would
provide the early combat tra...
Gi - Rectitude
Rei - Respect Makoto - Honesty Chuugi - LoyaltyMeiyo- Honor
Yu-Courage
Jin - Benevolence
"It is the parent who has borne me.”
‘it is the teacher who makes me man."
It might easily have been turned into a nest of cowardice,
if Bushido had not a keen and correct sense of Courage
Rectitude is the bone that gives firmness and stature.
Without bones the head cannot rest on the top of the spine, nor han...
"it is true courage to live when it is right to live, and to die only when it is right to die"
Courage does not mean being...
Courage to act must be tempered with the fortitude of judgment. However, when the cause is
worthy and the path is clear, a...
In the menacing presence of danger or death, retains his self possession; can compose a
poem under impending peril or hum ...
They help their fellow man at every opportunity.
Though they may wound your feelings,
A man invested with the power to command & the power to kill,
was expected to demonstrate equally
Extraordinary powers of ...
Weep with those who weep, rejoice with those that rejoice.
Warriors are courteous even to their enemies.
"if there is anything to do, there is certainly a best way to do it, and the best way is both the most
economical and the ...
Politeness should be expression of a benevolent regard for the feelings of others and it’s not
motivated only by a fear of...
Nothing will stop them from completing what they say they will do.
They do not have to “give their words”. They do not have to “promise”.
Decisions they made and how this decisions are carried out is a reflection of whom they truly are
Dishonor is like scar on a tree, which time, instead of healing only helps to enhance.
We must recognize in each virtue its own positive, excellence and follow
its positive ideal, and the ideal of self-restrai...
Calmness of behavior,
composure of mind,
should not be disturbed by passion of any kind.
The discipline of fortitude,
a sa...
"The Way of the Warrior does not include other Ways...but if you know the
Way broadly, you will see it in everything." - M...
Training the Bushido way of Samurai in daily life will give you a guide to how to live
a life of character, honor and inte...
Pictures are taken from film:
“Harakiri” – “Seppuku” 1962
Directed by Masaki Kobayasi
Presentation by Dodong Budijanto P
2...
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
Samurai way of bushido
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Samurai way of bushido

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Leadership is a vital quality to develop for anyone who wants to be active in the creation of their future - personal, familial, social, organizational, societal, political and global. Leadership is a being function: you are a leader, not based on specific actions but based on the quality of your presence and being.
And through the 7 virtues code of samurai we can learn more how a Japanese warrior Samurai is trained for both skill of war and skill of philosophy (The Pen and the sword). Now we can also implement this way of Samurai in modern time for business man character building.

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  • The kanji of the seven virtues and their spiritThe kanji you find here may differ from the characters seen in other websites.I present the bushido code as discussed by InazoNitobe, and have found the following kanji the most appropriate to represent its spirit. The seven virtues follow each other in a very specific sequence, as each complements the other.1. GI – Right Action, DutyGi has two parts: the upper part represents a sheep, which was the symbol of beauty in ancient China and the lower part is the character for I, with a strong slanting stroke on the left which represents a halberd. The character could be explained as understanding (sheep) after conflict (halberd).Gi is to do the right thing.2. YUUKI – CourageYuuki has two kanji. The first is yuu, which means courageous, with the important component of chikara, the symbol for strength.The second kanji is ki or energy.Yuuki means brave, courageous energy.3. JIN – BenevolenceJin has two parts: on the left side stands the character for human, and on the right there are two horizontal strokes which represent the number two. Jin is one of the most fundamental virtues of Confucianism, which could be defined as to treat each other with tenderness, to love each other.Jin is the benevolence that unites each human being to the other.4. REI – Politeness or MoralityThe kanji for rei is a modern abbreviated form, which does not reveal very much of the ancient character. The ancient symbol shows a sacrificing vessel that evokes the rites and ceremonies conducted for worshipping and offerings. The character actually means rite or ceremony but in a broader sense it means respect.Rei too is essential to Confucianism: In society rei governs your actions towards others, a fundamental politeness, very much related to jin.It is often translated with morality, but as morality has other connotations I suggest politeness.Rei is politeness, respect shown in social behavior.5. MAKOTO – TruthfulnessThe kanji for makoto is composed of two parts: at the left stands the character for to speak, a mouth that produces words. At the right stands the character sei, which means to accomplish, to succeed.Makoto means truth in word and action, to follow truly the Law of the Universe.6. MEIYO – HonorMeiyo has two kanji. The first is mei, which means reputation, with the symbol of mouth below. The second kanji is yo, which means to praise or to admire, which has the component of to say.Meiyo is to enjoy a good reputation, honor.7. CHUUGI – LoyaltyChuugi has two characters. The first one is chuu which means to be sincere or loyal. This character expresses very well the true meaning of loyalty. We see a heart and on top of it the symbol for middle. Chuu could be understood as no conflict in the heart, faithful to what is felt in the heart.The second kanji is gi, which means right action or duty.Chuugi is to act faithfully, to be loyal.
  • The reason why Integrity is the number one virtue is because it’s who you are and what you represent. Everyone you meet judges you on your integrity. Sadly, this is the number one virtue that is the most compromised in today’s society. Has anyone ever made a promise to you, but never fulfilled the promise? I’ve had people say they’ll call me back yet they never follow-up. Others have shown up 30 minutes late for an appointment without even calling–if they show up at all. How many New Year’s resolutions are distant memories by January 31st? What kind of impression do you hold of those individuals? You probably don’t respect them at all. What is Integrity? Integrity, in it’s simplest and purest form, is about living up to your commitments. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy defines commitment as: “‘Commitment’ is used as a broad umbrella term covering many different kinds of intentions, promises, convictions and relationships of trust and expectation.” In other words, your personal integrity is defined by following through with what you tell people you’ll do. I know that this sounds simple enough, but this can actually be difficult in today’s society for many reasons.
  • The reason why Integrity is the number one virtue is because it’s who you are and what you represent. Everyone you meet judges you on your integrity. Sadly, this is the number one virtue that is the most compromised in today’s society. Has anyone ever made a promise to you, but never fulfilled the promise? I’ve had people say they’ll call me back yet they never follow-up. Others have shown up 30 minutes late for an appointment without even calling–if they show up at all. How many New Year’s resolutions are distant memories by January 31st? What kind of impression do you hold of those individuals? You probably don’t respect them at all. What is Integrity? Integrity, in it’s simplest and purest form, is about living up to your commitments. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy defines commitment as: “‘Commitment’ is used as a broad umbrella term covering many different kinds of intentions, promises, convictions and relationships of trust and expectation.” In other words, your personal integrity is defined by following through with what you tell people you’ll do. I know that this sounds simple enough, but this can actually be difficult in today’s society for many reasons.
  • The reason why Integrity is the number one virtue is because it’s who you are and what you represent. Everyone you meet judges you on your integrity. Sadly, this is the number one virtue that is the most compromised in today’s society. Has anyone ever made a promise to you, but never fulfilled the promise? I’ve had people say they’ll call me back yet they never follow-up. Others have shown up 30 minutes late for an appointment without even calling–if they show up at all. How many New Year’s resolutions are distant memories by January 31st? What kind of impression do you hold of those individuals? You probably don’t respect them at all. What is Integrity? Integrity, in it’s simplest and purest form, is about living up to your commitments. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy defines commitment as: “‘Commitment’ is used as a broad umbrella term covering many different kinds of intentions, promises, convictions and relationships of trust and expectation.” In other words, your personal integrity is defined by following through with what you tell people you’ll do. I know that this sounds simple enough, but this can actually be difficult in today’s society for many reasons.
  • 2. YUUKI – CourageYuuki has two kanji. The first is yuu, which means courageous, with the important component of chikara, the symbol for strength.The second kanji is ki or energy.Yuuki means brave, courageous energy.
  • The spiritual aspect of valor is evidenced by composure -- calm presence of mind. Tranquillity is courage in repose. It is a statical manifestation of valor, as daring deeds are a dynamical. A truly brave man is ever serene; he is never taken by surprise; nothing ruffles the equanimity of his spirit. In the heat of battle he remains cool; in the midst of catastrophes he keeps level his mind.
  • 3. Benevolence - The Tenderness of a Warrior"Though they may wound your feelings, these three you have only to forgive; the breeze that scatters your flowers, the cloud that hides your moon, and the person who picks a quarrel with you."Forgiving those who wrong you, or team members who fail you as a manager, is not a sign of weakness. There are times when someone fails or falls short of a goal, but the person legitimately did the absolute best he could. The easiest thing for a manager is to blame the employee for the overall failure and reprimand or fire him. The manager who constantly takes such an inflexible stand against failure will someday be found lacking himself by the team. When that happens, what action can the manager take without being a hypocrite?The smart manager shows benevolence in as public a manner as possible. She acknowledges the team's shortcomings without minimizing a disdain for failure. The manager may even point out the person or department responsible, but there's an important difference. She takes part of the responsibility for the failure. The manager might say, "Everyone did their absolute best, and I thank you all for your effort, yet we somehow failed to meet our goal. As your leader, I must have missed something or failed to anticipate all the contingencies. Whatever the cause, we will do better the next time."
  • 3. Benevolence - The Tenderness of a Warrior"Though they may wound your feelings, these three you have only to forgive; the breeze that scatters your flowers, the cloud that hides your moon, and the person who picks a quarrel with you."Forgiving those who wrong you, or team members who fail you as a manager, is not a sign of weakness. There are times when someone fails or falls short of a goal, but the person legitimately did the absolute best he could. The easiest thing for a manager is to blame the employee for the overall failure and reprimand or fire him. The manager who constantly takes such an inflexible stand against failure will someday be found lacking himself by the team. When that happens, what action can the manager take without being a hypocrite?The smart manager shows benevolence in as public a manner as possible. She acknowledges the team's shortcomings without minimizing a disdain for failure. The manager may even point out the person or department responsible, but there's an important difference. She takes part of the responsibility for the failure. The manager might say, "Everyone did their absolute best, and I thank you all for your effort, yet we somehow failed to meet our goal. As your leader, I must have missed something or failed to anticipate all the contingencies. Whatever the cause, we will do better the next time."
  • 4. REI – Politeness or MoralityThe kanji for rei is a modern abbreviated form, which does not reveal very much of the ancient character. The ancient symbol shows a sacrificing vessel that evokes the rites and ceremonies conducted for worshipping and offerings. The character actually means rite or ceremony but in a broader sense it means respect.Rei too is essential to Confucianism: In society rei governs your actions towards others, a fundamental politeness, very much related to jin.It is often translated with morality, but as morality has other connotations I suggest politeness.Rei is politeness, respect shown in social behavior.
  • Be true by the actions you show, and by the words you speak.  Follow the laws of the universe and you will become a honest person.
  • Be true by the actions you show, and by the words you speak.  Follow the laws of the universe and you will become a honest person.
  • Be true by the actions you show, and by the words you speak.  Follow the laws of the universe and you will become a honest person.
  • Samurai way of bushido

    1. 1. InfeudalJapanSamuraiexistedinordertoprotectandservetheShogunandbushido wasthecodeofmoralprinciplesfollowedbythesamurai,anethicalcodeofconduct thatpermeatedlife,fromchildhoodtoelderhood,oftennotevenwritten,butcarved intheheartofthesamurai. Samuraimustbehonest,fair,andtheyhadtobefearlessinthefaceofdeath.Theyhad tovalueloyaltyandpersonalhonorovertheirownlives.Inmanycasestheyhadtotake theirownlivesforfailingdutiesorbetrayingtheShogun.ThiswascalledSeppukuor ritualsuicide.
    2. 2. Usually a Samurai would begin their training at ages 5-7. The father and male relatives would provide the early combat training. They were taught archery, military tactics, unarmed combat,riding,andhowtohandleaspear. They also trained using self control, mental training, and meditation. Samurai would train their body to be able to withstand the harshest of conditions, and always being prepared for anything, like attacks from enemies. Samurai trained their minds as well. They stayed aware of theirsurroundings. Samuraiwerealsotaughtliteratureandwriting.Theypracticedcalligraphyandwrotepoetry.They wrotehaiku’s.Theylearnedthisbecausetheywereexpectedtobestudentsofcultureandnotjust fiercewarriors.Writingandliteraturewasimportanttotheirculture. Whatcharacterizedthesesamuraiandsupportedtheiractionandknowledgeofright and wrong is what we now popularly call the bushido code or the seven virtues of bushido. Some of the virtues such as benevolence, politeness and truthfulness are inspiredbytheteachingsofConfuciusandMencius.
    3. 3. Gi - Rectitude Rei - Respect Makoto - Honesty Chuugi - LoyaltyMeiyo- Honor Yu-Courage Jin - Benevolence
    4. 4. "It is the parent who has borne me.”
    5. 5. ‘it is the teacher who makes me man."
    6. 6. It might easily have been turned into a nest of cowardice, if Bushido had not a keen and correct sense of Courage
    7. 7. Rectitude is the bone that gives firmness and stature. Without bones the head cannot rest on the top of the spine, nor hands move nor feet stand.
    8. 8. "it is true courage to live when it is right to live, and to die only when it is right to die" Courage does not mean being foolhardy, nor does it require you to fight a losing battle.
    9. 9. Courage to act must be tempered with the fortitude of judgment. However, when the cause is worthy and the path is clear, a samurai must have the courage to act
    10. 10. In the menacing presence of danger or death, retains his self possession; can compose a poem under impending peril or hum a strain in the face of death.
    11. 11. They help their fellow man at every opportunity. Though they may wound your feelings,
    12. 12. A man invested with the power to command & the power to kill, was expected to demonstrate equally Extraordinary powers of benevolence and mercy
    13. 13. Weep with those who weep, rejoice with those that rejoice. Warriors are courteous even to their enemies.
    14. 14. "if there is anything to do, there is certainly a best way to do it, and the best way is both the most economical and the most graceful.“ by Izano Nitobe
    15. 15. Politeness should be expression of a benevolent regard for the feelings of others and it’s not motivated only by a fear of offending good taste. In its highest form Politeness approaches love.
    16. 16. Nothing will stop them from completing what they say they will do.
    17. 17. They do not have to “give their words”. They do not have to “promise”.
    18. 18. Decisions they made and how this decisions are carried out is a reflection of whom they truly are
    19. 19. Dishonor is like scar on a tree, which time, instead of healing only helps to enhance.
    20. 20. We must recognize in each virtue its own positive, excellence and follow its positive ideal, and the ideal of self-restraint is to keep our mind
    21. 21. Calmness of behavior, composure of mind, should not be disturbed by passion of any kind. The discipline of fortitude, a samurai shows no emotions on his face. The most natural affections were kept under control.
    22. 22. "The Way of the Warrior does not include other Ways...but if you know the Way broadly, you will see it in everything." - Musashi Miyamoto Leadership is a being function: you are a leader, not based on specific actions but based on the quality of your presence and being. In terms of organizational leadership, this is not about developing leaders who know more, this is about developing leaders who are more. Leadership is a vital quality to develop for anyone who wants to be active in the creation of their future - personal, familial, social, organizational, societal, political and global
    23. 23. Training the Bushido way of Samurai in daily life will give you a guide to how to live a life of character, honor and integrity of a modern Samurai warrior mindset .
    24. 24. Pictures are taken from film: “Harakiri” – “Seppuku” 1962 Directed by Masaki Kobayasi Presentation by Dodong Budijanto P 27 July 2013

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