HDR Basics

1,252 views
1,202 views

Published on

David Lawrence's presentation to the Photography Guild of the Lexington Arts & Crafts Society

Published in: Art & Photos
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,252
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
186
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
58
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • This is an example of a High Dynamic Range photo.
  • This is an example of a High Dynamic Range photo.
  • HDR Basics

    1. 1. HDR Photography Basics What is it… how do you shoot for it… and how do you process it.
    2. 2. What is “Dynamic Range”  The Dynamic Range of an image is the “ratio between the brightest and darkest parts of the scene.” An example of a low dynamic range.
    3. 3. Photos by Trey Ratcliff (http://www.stuckincustoms.com)
    4. 4. What is HDR Photography?  “HDR is an acronym for High Dynamic Range. It is a post-processing task of taking either one image or a series of images, combining them, and adjusting the contrast ratios to do things that are virtually impossible with a single aperture and shutter speed.” (from Trey Ratcliff, http://www.stuckincustoms.com/hdr/)
    5. 5. What is HDR Photography?  Humans eyes can see a much wider dynamic range than a single DSLR image can capture. HDR photography combines the “highs” and “lows” of multiple exposures into a single image.  For me, it is a way to create a photograph that better captures the highlights (bright whites) and shadows (the dark blacks) that might get lost when taking a photo.
    6. 6. How to shoot for it… 1. Mount your camera on a tripod 2. Use manual or Aperture Priority mode. Take at least three exposures: good exposure, under-exposed, and over-exposed. Number of exposures varies based on how wide the dynamic range of your scene is. “I recommend using a camera that has autobracketing. Autobracketing is the ability for your camera to take at least 3 pictures right after one another, each at different exposures. Sometimes it’s called “Exposure Bracketing”. If you have a DSLR camera, then you probably already have this ability.” (www.stuckincustoms.com)
    7. 7. How to process it… Use “HDR” software such as: • Photomatix Pro • Nik HDR Efex Pro • Photoshop 5 A GREAT tutorial can be found at: http://www.stuckincustoms.com/hdr-tutorial/
    8. 8. David’s example  Now I will demonstrate how to use Photomatix Pro with three exposures…

    ×