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Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB
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Roofing Operations & Aerial Lifts Training by NAHB

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  • Introduce Section 4, Roofing Operations.
  • Introduce what roofing operations entail. Also, introduce fall hazards when working on roofs and swing-fall hazards.
  • Explain the components of a PFAS.
  • Describe the anchorage of a rope grab system used at the peak of a roof.
  • Discuss whether this is attached to the roof truss or not? And whether it would meet the 5,000lb load.
    Note: OSHA requires that anchor points be capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds per employee attached, or shall be designed, installed and used as follows:
    As part of a complete personal fall arrest system which maintains a safety factor of at least two and;
    Under the supervision of a qualified person
  • Discuss possible roof anchor locations and requirements.
  • Discuss how to limit swing fall hazards when working on roofs.
    It is widely recommended that swing fall hazards be prevented by not working greater than 30 degrees from the anchor point. This data comes directly from roof anchor manufacturers and is even recognized by CAL/OSHA.
    DBI-SALA (leading manufacturer) http://www.fallprotectionusa.com/DBI/Anchors/Instructions/2103670.pdf
  • Discuss that workers should not work beyond 30 degrees of the anchor point in order to reduce swing fall hazards.
    It is widely recommended that swing fall hazards be prevented by not working greater than 30 degrees from the anchor point. This data comes directly from roof anchor manufacturers and is even recognized by CAL/OSHA.
    DBI-SALA (leading manufacturer) http://www.fallprotectionusa.com/DBI/Anchors/Instructions/2103670.pdf
  • Discuss the use of multiple anchor points to reduce swing fall hazards.
  • Explain the picture showing a swing fall hazard.
  • Use of a self-retracting lifeline (SRL) at the proper angle.
    Discuss, the D ring is too low on the workers back.
  • Never walk backwards to the roof edge, and also wear a personal fall arrest system when no guardrails are present.
  • No fall protection.
  • Use of a PFAS with a rope grab.
  • Introduce what roofing operations entail. Also, introduce fall hazards when working on roofs and swing-fall hazards.
  • The ACRO Roof bracket with guardrail holder
    Installs quickly and easily & Slotted for easy removal
    Positions for various roof pitches from 6/12 to 16/12
    One worker plus 40 lbs. of material per bracket
    Maximum spacing 8' apart (used with construction grade lumber)
    Can be used for fall protection & slide guard
    Complies with OSHA regulations
    http://www.acrobuildingsystems.com/guardrail_systems.asp#12070
  • Residential roofing guardrail system which allows roofing activities to be performed.
    The Guardian Fall Protection Ultra-Adjust Roof Bracket is designed for five different positions from 6/12 to 16/12.  
    Used in conjunction with 2" X 4" and  2" X 6"  toe boards.
    Can be used as a slide guard.
    www.guardianfall.com 
  • Hugs Guardrail systems provide a fall prevention solution because it provides workers with complete 360 degree roof top protection while requiring no active participation on their behalf after the installation process. 
    Description: This is the re-usable, core component of the HUGS passive fall prevention safety system. Its sleek steel construction and durable powder coated finish in safety orange makes it as safe as it is eye-catching.
    Application: Flat or pitched roofs, decking, highway and railroad overpass and bridge work, stairwells, access openings, multi-story work, new construction, remodeling, historical restorations, etc.
    http://www.hugsafety.com/
  • Introduce Section 5, Ladders and Scaffolding.
  • Discuss the learning objectives for section 5, and allow the participants to thoroughly understand what they are expected to learn. Allow time to answer any questions.
  • Discuss the training requirements when using ladders.
  • Discuss the unsafe work practice that is utilized here.
  • Explain how to pick the right ladder for the task being performed.
  • Discuss the proper duty rating capacity of ladders.
  • Explain the table showing duty ratings for a variety of ladder types.
  • Discuss all the variables that go into selecting a proper ladder for the task.
  • Emphasize this important rule, requiring the ladder to expend at least 3 feet above the landing.
  • Picture showing extended ladder above the landing.
  • Discuss the proper height extension ladders.
  • Discuss the proper selection of stepladders.
  • Discuss the proper care and instructions of ladders.
  • The 2x4 used to repair the siderail is not permitted. Ladders that are damaged must be tagged and removed from service. Also, notice the lumber used to support the bottom step.
  • Discuss what information is displayed on ladders.
  • Introduce proper ladder set-up.
  • Explain the proper ladder placement tips.
  • Discussion: A good rule of thumb to determine if the ladder is at the proper pitch is to stand at the base of the ladder and extend your arms. If you can touch the ladder while standing straight up the pitch is approximately 4:1.
  • Discuss the unsafe work practices utilized in this photo.
  • Is this ladder at the proper 4:1 angle.
  • Discuss how stepladders are designed to be used properly and improperly.
  • Never stand on the top two rungs of a stepladder.
  • Job made ladder over an unprotected stair opening. Never use ladders over unprotected openings.
  • Discuss steps taken to secure and stabilize ladders.
  • Secure ladders at the top.
  • Secure ladders at their base.
  • Discuss ways to secure ladders on slippery surfaces.
  • On loose soil or a soft base, dig feet into the ground.
  • On a firm base, set feet level and on the rubber pads.
  • Only use manufacturers approved stabilizers. Never modify a ladder to stabilize it yourself.
  • Only use manufacturer approved ladder stabilizers.
  • Discuss the safe practices used to safely work from ladders.
  • Picture shows a worker properly climbing a ladder.
  • Discuss these additional tips to safely work on ladders.
  • Introduce the scaffolding section.
  • Fabricated frame scaffold.
  • Pump jack scaffolding.
  • Discuss the hazards associated with improperly constructed job-built scaffolds, and the types of interior and exterior scaffolding that is commercially available.
  • Fabricated frame scaffold must have mud-sills as supports and masonry blocks are never acceptable.
  • Discuss the requirements for scaffolding.
  • Discuss the many hazards associated with this scaffold.
  • Discuss the requirements for guardrails on scaffolding.
    OSHA states that the top edge height of toprails or equivalent member on supported scaffolds manufactured or placed in service after January 1, 2000 shall be installed between 38 inches (0.97 m) and 45 inches (1.2 m) above the platform surface. The top edge height on supported scaffolds manufactured and placed in service before January 1, 2000, and on all suspended scaffolds where both a guardrail and a personal fall arrest system are required shall be between 36 inches (0.9 m) and 45 inches (1.2 m).
    Midrails, screens, mesh, intermediate vertical members, solid panels, and equivalent structural members of a guardrail system shall be capable of withstanding, without failure, a force applied in any downward or horizontal direction at any point along the midrail or other member of at least 75 pounds (333 n) for guardrail systems with a minimum 100 pound toprail capacity, and at least 150 pounds (666 n) for guardrail systems with a minimum 200 pound toprail capacity.
  • Overall, a pretty well built stucco scaffold with proper guardrails.
    Braces are used as top rails with midrails installed approximately half way
    Discuss the requirements for guardrails on scaffolding.
    OSHA states that the top edge height of toprails or equivalent member on supported scaffolds manufactured or placed in service after January 1, 2000 shall be installed between 38 inches (0.97 m) and 45 inches (1.2 m) above the platform surface. The top edge height on supported scaffolds manufactured and placed in service before January 1, 2000, and on all suspended scaffolds where both a guardrail and a personal fall arrest system are required shall be between 36 inches (0.9 m) and 45 inches (1.2 m).
    Midrails, screens, mesh, intermediate vertical members, solid panels, and equivalent structural members of a guardrail system shall be capable of withstanding, without failure, a force applied in any downward or horizontal direction at any point along the midrail or other member of at least 75 pounds (333 n) for guardrail systems with a minimum 100 pound toprail capacity, and at least 150 pounds (666 n) for guardrail systems with a minimum 200 pound toprail capacity.
  • Often contractors use whatever way available to access a scaffold, including the cross-braces.
    When scaffold platforms are more than 2 feet above or below a point of access, a safe means of access shall be provided
    Do Not Climb Cross-bracing As a Means of Access
  • Never climb the cross bracing to access the working level of a fabricated frame scaffold.
  • Discuss the many unsafe work practices used in this picture.
  • Often contractors use whatever way available to access a scaffold, including the cross-braces.
    When scaffold platforms are more than 2 feet above or below a point of access, a safe means of access shall be provided
    Do Not Climb Cross-bracing As a Means of Access
  • SPIB - Southern Pine Inspection Bureau
    WCLB - West Coast Lumber Inspection Bureau
    Solid sawn wood used as scaffold planks shall be selected for such use following the grading rules established by a recognized lumber grading association or by an independent lumber grading inspection agency.
    Such planks shall be identified by the grade stamp of such association or agency. The association or agency and the grading rules under which the wood is graded shall be certified by the Board of Review, American Lumber Standard Committee, as set forth in the American Softwood Lumber Standard of the U.S. Department of Commerce.
  • Planks with visible defects, such as bowing and cracks (as shown in this slide) must not be used.
  • Planks with visible defects, such as bowing and cracks (as shown in this slide) must not be used.
  • Discuss: This picture shows a scaffold that is not fully planked on any level.
    Referenced below are the OSHA Subpart L – Scaffold requirements:
    1926.451(b)(1)
    Each platform on all working levels of scaffolds shall be fully planked or decked between the front uprights and the guardrail supports as follows:
    1926.451(b)(1)(i)
    Each platform unit (e.g., scaffold plank, fabricated plank, fabricated deck, or fabricated platform) shall be installed so that the space between adjacent units and the space between the platform and the uprights is no more than 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide, except where the employer can demonstrate that a wider space is necessary (for example, to fit around uprights when side brackets are used to extend the width of the platform).
  • This picture shows a fully planked scaffold.
  • Scaffolding must be fully planked, and loads distributed evenly. Look at the bow in the planks. Also, depending on the height, which is not clear in this photo, guardrails must be installed.
    Planking on this platform should be six planks wide, instead of only two.
    Overlap supports by 12”.
    Planks are bowing because the bricks are loaded at one point on the platform, instead of evenly distributed.
    Fall protection if over 10 feet!
  • This is not an acceptable use of a scaffold system.
    Discuss the numerous safety hazards present in the picture.
  • Properly used pump jack scaffold.
  • Ladder jack scaffolds can not exceed 20ft and workers must use a PFAS if they are working higher than 10ft.
  • Discuss the many unsafe work practices and procedures used in this picture.
  • Discuss the improper use and erection of a job-made scaffold.
  • Discuss the hazards present from this job-made scaffold.
  • Discuss the hazards present from this job-made scaffold.
  • Discuss the hazards present from this job-made scaffold.
  • Introduce the use of aerial lifts and their many applications.
  • Picture of an aerial lift on a residential construction jobsite.
  • Picture showing a personnel basket attached to a forklift (left) and the use of a PFAS attached to an anchor point on an aerial lift (on the right).
  • Discuss the competent person requirements.
    Discuss how homemade boxes are unacceptable to transport workers to a working level.
  • Explain safe work practices when using an aerial lift.
  • Picture showing the use of an aerial lift on a multi-family townhome.
  • Close-up picture of a worker using an aerial lift (using a PFAS).
  • Discuss safe work practices when working in the lift.
  • Discuss safe work practices when using aerial lifts.
    ***Please note that the clearance distances from overhead power lines may change.
  • Picture showing a worker that has fallen out of lift basket and is restrained by his harness attached to the anchor point of the lift.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Rev: 8-2011 Section 4 Roofing Operations
    • 2. Rev: 8-2011 Roofing OperationsRoofing Operations • When installing shingles and other roofing material, use a PFAS. • Check manufacturer instructions to determine exactly how and where to install anchor points. • On most homes, multiple anchor points will be required to manage swing-fall hazards. • It is also important to locate anchor points at a height that prevents striking a lower level should a fall occur.
    • 3. Rev: 8-2011 1. Anchor Point 2. Life Line 3. Rope Grab 4. Shock Absorbing Lanyard 5. Full Body Harness Personal Fall Arrest System (PFAS) ComponentsPersonal Fall Arrest System (PFAS) Components
    • 4. Rev: 8-2011
    • 5. Rev: 8-2011
    • 6. Rev: 8-2011
    • 7. Rev: 8-2011 Swing Fall HazardSwing Fall Hazard Minimize swing falls: • Work directly below the anchor. • Do not extend your work zone more than 30o from the anchor. • Manage the slack in the rope.
    • 8. Rev: 8-2011 Swing Fall Hazard, cont.Swing Fall Hazard, cont.
    • 9. Rev: 8-2011 Swing Fall Hazard, cont.Swing Fall Hazard, cont. • On most homes, multiple anchor points will be required to manage swing-fall hazards. • It is also important to locate anchor points at a height that prevents striking a lower level should a fall occur.
    • 10. Rev: 8-2011 Swing Fall HazardSwing Fall Hazard
    • 11. Rev: 8-2011
    • 12. Rev: 8-2011
    • 13. Rev: 8-2011
    • 14. Rev: 8-2011 
    • 15. Rev: 8-2011 Roofing Operations,Roofing Operations, cont.cont. • When installing shingles and other roofing material, you can also use guardrails. • Check manufacturer instructions to determine exactly how and where to install guardrails. • Guardrails must meet OSHA specifications.
    • 16. Rev: 8-2011 Guardrail SystemsGuardrail Systems Source: ACRO Building Systems
    • 17. Rev: 8-2011 Guardrail Systems,Guardrail Systems, cont.cont. Source: Guardian Fall Protection
    • 18. Rev: 8-2011 Guardrail Systems,Guardrail Systems, cont.cont. Source: Hugs, One, LLC (Hugs Safety)
    • 19. Rev: 8-2011 Section 5 Ladders and Scaffolding
    • 20. Rev: 8-2011 Learning Objectives: Section 5Learning Objectives: Section 5 • Determine the proper ladder to use based on weight capacity and height. • Calculate the proper pitch of extension ladders for proper set-up, and identify how to secure and stabilize ladders. • Identify how to maintain a safe position when using a ladder. • Identify safety requirements and practices for scaffolding, including aerial lifts.
    • 21. Rev: 8-2011 Ladder Training RequirementsLadder Training Requirements • Each employee using ladders should be trained to recognize hazards related to their use. This includes: • Nature of the fall hazards in the work area • Correct procedures for placement, use, and maintenance • Maximum intended load-carrying capacities
    • 22. Rev: 8-2011 Ladder or Scaffold?Ladder or Scaffold?
    • 23. Rev: 8-2011 Pick the Right LadderPick the Right Ladder Before stepping onto a ladder, think about these things: • Duty rating of the ladder—what capacity can it hold? • Height of the ladder—too short or too tall? • Condition of the ladder and instructions unique to the ladder selected. We’ll look at each of these in detail.
    • 24. Rev: 8-2011 Proper Duty Rating/CapacityProper Duty Rating/Capacity OSHA Requirement Ladders shall not be loaded beyond the maximum intended load for which they were built nor beyond their manufacturer's rated capacity.
    • 25. Rev: 8-2011 Proper Duty Rating/Capacity,Proper Duty Rating/Capacity, cont.cont. Select a ladder with the proper duty rating for your weight and the materials you are handling. TYPE DUTY RATING USE LOAD 1AA Special Heavy Duty Rugged 375 Lbs. 1A Extra Heavy Duty Industrial 300 Lbs. 1 Heavy Duty Industrial 250 Lbs. II Medium Duty Commercial 225 Lbs. III Light Duty Household 200 Lbs.
    • 26. Rev: 8-2011 Think About ItThink About It What do these materials weigh: •A sheet of plywood •A tool box with tools •A bundle of shingles •A 3 x 4 window Remember: Select a ladder with the proper duty rating for your weight AND the materials you are handling. ?
    • 27. Rev: 8-2011 Proper Height Extension LaddersProper Height Extension Ladders When using an extension ladder for access to another level, the ladder must extend at least 3 ft. (.9 m) above the landing to provide a hand hold for getting on and off the ladder. When using an extension ladder for access to another level, the ladder must extend at least 3 ft. (.9 m) above the landing to provide a hand hold for getting on and off the ladder.
    • 28. Rev: 8-2011 Ladder Height ExtensionLadder Height Extension 3 feet
    • 29. Rev: 8-2011 Proper Height Extension LaddersProper Height Extension Ladders,, cont.cont. 40'28' to 31' 36'25' to 28' 32'21' to 25' 28'17' to 21' 24'13' to 17' 20'9' to 13' 16'9' max. Extension Ladder Height Height to Gutter or Top Support 40'28' to 31' 36'25' to 28' 32'21' to 25' 28'17' to 21' 24'13' to 17' 20'9' to 13' 16'9' max. Extension Ladder Height Height to Gutter or Top Support Ladder heights are 9-11 ft. longer than the height to be reach to allow for the height/length lost when the ladder is positioned at an angle.
    • 30. Rev: 8-2011 Proper Height StepladdersProper Height Stepladders Maximum Height You Need to Reach Stepladder Height 7 3 8 4 9 5 10 6 12 8 14 10 15 11 16 12 18 14 20 16 Choose a stepladder that is no more than 4 ft. shorter than the height you want to reach.
    • 31. Rev: 8-2011 Proper Condition andProper Condition and InstructionsInstructions • Inspect the ladder for visible defects. – Never use a ladder that is broken or otherwise damaged. – Remove damaged ladders from service and tag them as damaged. • Review the safety labels on the ladder. – Always comply with the warnings and instructions.
    • 32. Rev: 8-2011
    • 33. Rev: 8-2011 Ladder LabelsLadder Labels • What type of information can be found on ladder labels? – Warnings – Capacity – Set-up
    • 34. Rev: 8-2011 Determine Proper Ladder Set-upDetermine Proper Ladder Set-up • Consider placement and pitch of the ladder • Secure and stabilize the ladder We’ll look at each of these in detail.
    • 35. Rev: 8-2011 Placement TipsPlacement Tips • Avoid setting up a ladder in high traffic areas or barricaded areas. • Do not use metal or aluminum ladders near electrical lines. • Place ladders on stable and level surfaces.
    • 36. Rev: 8-2011 Extension LaddersExtension Ladders • Extension ladders should be used at a 4 to 1 pitch (1.2 to .3 m). • For every 4 ft. (1.2 m) in height, the bottom of the ladder should be 1 ft. (.3 m) away from the structure. • Extension ladders should be used at a 4 to 1 pitch (1.2 to .3 m). • For every 4 ft. (1.2 m) in height, the bottom of the ladder should be 1 ft. (.3 m) away from the structure. Example: 20 ft. (height) ÷ 4 ft. = 5 ft. pitch
    • 37. Rev: 8-2011 Correct Pitch?Correct Pitch?
    • 38. Rev: 8-2011 Any Hazards?Any Hazards?
    • 39. Rev: 8-2011 StepladdersStepladders • Stepladders are designed for use in an opened-and- locked position. • Do not use a stepladder that is folded or in a leaning position
    • 40. Rev: 8-2011 Higher Ceilings Require TallerHigher Ceilings Require Taller LaddersLadders
    • 41. Rev: 8-2011 Job built ladder over a stair openingJob built ladder over a stair opening
    • 42. Rev: 8-2011 Secure and Stabilize LaddersSecure and Stabilize Ladders • Extension ladders should be secured at the top or bottom to prevent movement. • The base of an extension ladder must be secured in place by using the safety feet on the ladder or other effective means.
    • 43. Rev: 8-2011 Secured at the TopSecured at the Top
    • 44. Rev: 8-2011 Secured at the BottomSecured at the Bottom
    • 45. Rev: 8-2011 Secure and Stabilize LaddersSecure and Stabilize Ladders,, cont.cont. Slippery Surfaces Never use a ladder on a slippery surface, unless it is secured to prevent movement. – Wet or slippery surfaces may require a cleat. – Ladder feet should dig into the ground, and the ladder should be secured at the bottom to prevent movement/slipping.
    • 46. Rev: 8-2011 Loose SoilLoose Soil
    • 47. Rev: 8-2011 Firm BaseFirm Base
    • 48. Rev: 8-2011 Unstable BaseUnstable Base
    • 49. Rev: 8-2011 Secure and Stabilize Ladders,Secure and Stabilize Ladders, cont.cont. Uneven Surface When the surface is not level, use a ladder leveler (accessory) to provide even contact points.
    • 50. Rev: 8-2011 Maintain a Safe Position onMaintain a Safe Position on LaddersLadders • Face the ladder when ascending or descending and maintain three points of contact at all times. • Keep your body centered on the ladder. • Never let your belt buckle pass either ladder siderail.
    • 51. Rev: 8-2011 Maintain a Safe Position on Ladders,Maintain a Safe Position on Ladders, cont.cont.
    • 52. Rev: 8-2011 Maintain a Safe Position on Ladders,Maintain a Safe Position on Ladders, cont.cont. • Do not overreach when working from the ladder. • Do not stand on the top two rungs of a stepladder. • Do not allow another person on a ladder at any given time, unless you are using a double-cleated ladder that is intended for two-way traffic.
    • 53. Rev: 8-2011 ScaffoldingScaffolding A safe alternative to using ladders is to use: • Interior and Exterior Scaffolding • Aerial Lifts ...if OSHA requirements and safety practices are followed. We’ll look at each of these in detail.
    • 54. Rev: 8-2011
    • 55. Rev: 8-2011 Pump Jack ScaffoldPump Jack Scaffold
    • 56. Rev: 8-2011 Interior and Exterior ScaffoldingInterior and Exterior Scaffolding • Job-built scaffolding that is improperly constructed is extremely hazardous. • Various types and brands of interior and exterior scaffolding are commercially available. – Always, follow the manufacturer’s safety instructions.
    • 57. Rev: 8-2011 Masonry Blocks Are Not AcceptableMasonry Blocks Are Not Acceptable
    • 58. Rev: 8-2011 Interior and Exterior Scaffolding,Interior and Exterior Scaffolding, cont.cont. • Scaffolding that is 10 ft. or higher must be equipped with guardrails. • A competent person must supervise the set-up and take down of all scaffolding. • Walls that support exterior scaffold must be capable of supporting, without failure, the weight of the scaffold and four times the maximum intended load on the scaffolding. • Scaffolding must be fully planked, and planks must be secured so they cannot move.
    • 59. Rev: 8-2011 Will This Scaffold hold 4 times theWill This Scaffold hold 4 times the Intended Load?Intended Load?
    • 60. Rev: 8-2011 GuardrailGuardrail Requirements-Requirements- ScaffoldsScaffolds • Toprails Between 38” and 45” High • Guardrails to 200 Lbs/Midrails to min. 75 Lbs – 150 lbs depending on Toprail capacity. • Cross Bracing OK as Guardrail if Between 20” and 30” for Midrail 38” to 48” for Toprail • Protect from Falling Objects – All Workers on Scaffolds MUST Wear Hard Hats
    • 61. Rev: 8-2011 Midrail Toprail Cross Bracing OK as ToprailCross Bracing OK as Toprail 
    • 62. Rev: 8-2011 Scaffold AccessScaffold Access • Ladders Needed if Access More Than 2’ • Don’t Climb Cross Braces • Place Ladders Securely
    • 63. Rev: 8-2011
    • 64. Rev: 8-2011
    • 65. Rev: 8-2011 Scaffold Access,Scaffold Access, cont.cont.
    • 66. Rev: 8-2011 Scaffold Grade Plank StampsScaffold Grade Plank Stamps
    • 67. Rev: 8-2011
    • 68. Rev: 8-2011 Acceptable Planking?Acceptable Planking?
    • 69. Rev: 8-2011 Fully Planked?Fully Planked?
    • 70. Rev: 8-2011 Fully PlankedFully Planked
    • 71. Rev: 8-2011
    • 72. Rev: 8-2011
    • 73. Rev: 8-2011
    • 74. Rev: 8-2011 PFAS Used with Ladder JackPFAS Used with Ladder Jack ScaffoldScaffold
    • 75. Rev: 8-2011 Makeshift ScaffoldsMakeshift Scaffolds
    • 76. Rev: 8-2011
    • 77. Rev: 8-2011
    • 78. Rev: 8-2011
    • 79. Rev: 8-2011
    • 80. Rev: 8-2011 Aerial LiftsAerial Lifts • Aerial lifts (e.g., JLG boom lift) or approved personnel lift baskets on rough terrain forklifts is a safe alternative to working from: • Ladders, or • other types of scaffolding. • An aerial lift can be used for the installations of: • windows • soffit • fascia • gutters • siding
    • 81. Rev: 8-2011 Aerial Lifts,Aerial Lifts, contcont..
    • 82. Rev: 8-2011 Aerial Lifts,Aerial Lifts, contcont..
    • 83. Rev: 8-2011 Aerial Lifts,Aerial Lifts, cont.cont. The competent person should: • Restrict operation of aerial lifts or forklift vehicles to trained and authorized personnel. • Use only commercially built personnel baskets designed for lifting workers. – Follow the American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) standards for using personnel lift baskets. • Make certain that homemade boxes lifted by a forklift are not used—homemade boxes are unacceptable. The competent person should: • Restrict operation of aerial lifts or forklift vehicles to trained and authorized personnel. • Use only commercially built personnel baskets designed for lifting workers. – Follow the American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI) standards for using personnel lift baskets. • Make certain that homemade boxes lifted by a forklift are not used—homemade boxes are unacceptable.
    • 84. Rev: 8-2011 Aerial Lifts,Aerial Lifts, cont.cont. When in the lift: • Wear a full body harness. • Attach the lanyard to the boom or an approved anchor point inside the basket.
    • 85. Rev: 8-2011
    • 86. Rev: 8-2011 Aerial Lifts, cont.Aerial Lifts, cont.
    • 87. Rev: 8-2011 Aerial Lifts,Aerial Lifts, cont.cont. When in the lift: • Always stand on the floor of the basket. • Do not sit or climb on the edge of the basket, lean over the edge, or climb out of the basket. • Do not use a ladder or other objects to increase reach.
    • 88. Rev: 8-2011 Aerial Lifts,Aerial Lifts, cont.cont. When operating the lift: • Stay at the controls at all times. • Do not move the vehicle while a person is in the elevated basket. • Only use the equipment when it is on stable and level ground. • Maintain the required minimum clearance of 10 ft. (3 m) from power lines carrying 50 kilovolts or less.
    • 89. Rev: 8-2011 Saved By The HarnessSaved By The Harness

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