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    A design and implementation guide for tivoli decision support sg245499 A design and implementation guide for tivoli decision support sg245499 Document Transcript

    • A Design and Implementation Guidefor Tivoli Decision SupportEdson Manoel, Fernando Bergamo, Dave Hulse, Rakesh Parshotam International Technical Support Organization www.redbooks.ibm.com SG24-5499-00
    • SG24-5499-00International Technical Support OrganizationA Design and Implementation Guidefor Tivoli Decision SupportOctober 1999
    • Take Note! Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general information in Appendix D, “Special notices” on page 191.First Edition (October 1999)This edition applies to Tivoli Framework Version 3.6.1, Tivoli Enterprise Console Version 3.6.1, TivoliDistributed Monitoring Version 3.6.1, Tivoli Service Desk Version 5.02, Tivoli Decision Support Version2.0 for use with the AIX Version 4.3 and Windows NT 4.0 Operating SystemsComments may be addressed to:IBM Corporation, International Technical Support OrganizationDept. OSJB Building 003 Internal Zip 283411400 Burnet RoadAustin, Texas 78758-3493When you send information to IBM, you grant IBM a non-exclusive right to use or distribute theinformation in any way it believes appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1999. All rights reserved.Note to U.S Government Users – Documentation related to restricted rights – Use, duplication or disclosure issubject to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
    • Contents Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xi Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii The team that wrote this redbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Comments welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Chapter 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1.1 From fire fighting to business intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1.2 The desired solution for business information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 1.3 Decision Support Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 1.4 Positioning Tivoli Decision Support in the decision making process . . .5 1.5 Our approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Chapter 2. Tivoli Decision Support general overview . .. . . . . .. . . . . .9 2.1 Overview of Tivoli Decision Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .9 2.2 Tivoli Decision Support product components . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 10 2.2.1 Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Administrator . .. . . . . .. . . . . 11 2.2.2 Tivoli Decision Support Server component . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 12 2.2.3 Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Interface . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 12 2.2.4 Cognos PowerPlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 12 2.2.5 Crystal Reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 12 2.2.6 Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 12 2.3 Tivoli Decision Support implementation modes . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 14 2.4 Supported platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 15 2.5 Concepts and terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 16 2.6 How Tivoli Decision Support works. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 19 2.7 Who is making use of Tivoli Decision Support? . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 21 Chapter 3. Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 23 3.1 Tivoli Implementation Methodology . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 23 3.2 Implementing Tivoli Decision Support. . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 25 3.2.1 Requirements gathering phase . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 25 3.2.2 Systems analysis phase . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 30 3.2.3 Project planning phase . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 40 3.2.4 Deployment phase . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 47 3.2.5 Testing phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 52 3.2.6 Documentation phase . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 54 Chapter 4. TDS architecture and design considerations . . . . . . . . . . . 59 4.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 iii
    • 4.2 Integrating Decision Support with Tivoli Enterprise applications . . . . . 60 4.3 Tivoli Decision Support components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 4.4 Integrating Tivoli Decision Support components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 4.4.1 The cube-building process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 4.4.2 The Discovery Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 4.5 Stand-alone vs. network architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 4.6 Suggested architecture and design solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 4.6.1 Tivoli Service Desk environment - Case study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 4.6.2 Single TMR environment - Case study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 4.6.3 Multiple TMR environment - Case study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 4.7 Troubleshooting tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 4.7.1 ODBC source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 4.7.2 Cube building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 4.7.3 Discovery interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Chapter 5. Case study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 5.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 5.2 Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 5.2.1 Requirements gathering phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 5.2.2 Systems analysis and design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 5.2.3 Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 5.3 The existing Tivoli environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 5.3.1 Tivoli general architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 5.3.2 TMR servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 5.3.3 Endpoint gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 5.3.4 TEC server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 5.3.5 RDBMS and RIM hosts configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 5.3.6 Tivoli DM and monitors for performance and capacity trend data 90 5.4 Identifying the reports requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 5.4.1 Customer reporting requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 5.4.2 The SDC actual solution for reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 5.4.3 The Reports of the NCO account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 5.5 Customer objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 5.6 Mapping Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 5.6.1 Detailed reports mapping workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 5.7 Tivoli Decision Support reports and business information . . . . . . . . . 116 5.7.1 Server Performance Prediction Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 5.7.2 Event Management Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 5.7.3 Domino Management Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 5.7.4 Network Element Performance Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5.8 Suggested architecture and solution design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 5.9 Tivoli Decision Support deployment process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 5.9.1 Hardware and Software prerequisites installation . . . . . . . . . . . 145iv A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 5.9.2 Installation of the Tivoli Decision Support server components. . 145 5.9.3 Installation of the Tivoli Decision Support Administrator . . . . . . 153 5.9.4 Installation of the Tivoli Decision Support client components . . 154 5.9.5 Deploying TDS for server performance prediction . . . . . . . . . . . 154 5.9.6 Deploying the Event Management Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1615.10 Future reporting requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 5.10.1 Additional reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 5.10.2 Additional recommended TDS Discovery Guides . . . . . . . . . . 163Chapter 6. Reports and decision information usage . . .. . . . . .. . . . 1676.1 The scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 1686.2 The roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 168 6.2.1 The systems analyst role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 168 6.2.2 The IT manager role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 169 6.2.3 The Chief Executive Officer role . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 1696.3 The discovery process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 169 6.3.1 The system analyst discovery process . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 169 6.3.2 IT manager discovery process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 177 6.3.3 CEO’s discovery process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 1816.4 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . 183Appendix A. Tivoli Implementation Methodology (TIM) 3.6. . . . . . . . . 185A.1 Target market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185A.2 Customer profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185A.3 The top three things to remember. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185A.4 What is new with TIM? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186A.5 What is unique? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186A.6 Where can I find information on TIM? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186Appendix B. Tivoli Decision Support customer support . . . . . . . . . . . 187B.1 The support process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187Appendix C. Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides availability . 189Appendix D. Special notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191Appendix E. Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . 195E.1 International Technical Support Organization publications. . . . ...... . 195E.2 Redbooks on CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . 196E.3 Other publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . 196How to get ITSO redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197IBM Redbook fax order form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 v
    • List of abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 ITSO redbook evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209vi A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figures 1. The evolution to business intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2. The challenge of a better solution for business information. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3. TDS in the decision making process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4. Tivoli Decision Support components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 5. Tivoli Decision Support in stand alone implementation mode . . . . . . . . . . 14 6. Tivoli Decision Support network implementation mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 7. The operation of Tivoli Decision Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 8. TIM schematic overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 9. Requirements gathering process flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 10. Systems Analysis process flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 11. Typical architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 12. File server information example form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 13. TDS administrator PC information example form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 14. TDS client PC information example form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 15. Database server information example form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 16. Network information example form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 17. Project planning process flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 18. Sample project plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 19. Deployment process flow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 20. Testing process flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 21. Documentation process flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 22. Tivoli Decision Support functionality diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 23. Decision Support components integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 24. Cube-building process - Step 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 25. Cube-building process - Step 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 26. Cube-building process - Step 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 27. Cube-building process - Step 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 28. Viewing the multidimensional reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 29. Viewing Crystal Reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 30. TDS in stand-alone mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 31. Network installation architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 32. Tivoli Service Desk environment case study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 33. Single TMR environment case study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 34. Single TMR environment with Tivoli Decision Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 35. Multiple TMR environment case study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 36. Multiple TMR environment with Tivoli Decision Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 37. Service Delivery Center - West architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 38. Tivoli Distributed Monitoring object relationships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 39. The Problem for reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 40. The in-house process for reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 vii
    • 41. The SRM method for reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 42. In-house performance and capacity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 43. Detailed report - CPU utilization by server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 44. Detailed report - process memory and paging utilization by server . . . . . 100 45. Detailed report - network I/O utilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 46. Detailed report - DASD usage by server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 47. Percentage availability by server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 48. Detailed alert summary by server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 49. Lotus Notes - Monthly mail server statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 50. Lotus Notes - Monthly database server report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 51. Lotus Notes - Daily mail hub report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 52. Lotus Notes - Daily MTA server report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 53. Lotus Notes - Hourly response time report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 54. Lotus Notes - Hourly concurrent users report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 55. Lotus Notes - Hourly sessions-per-minute report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 56. Lotus Notes - Hourly mail box size report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 57. Lotus Notes - Hourly SMTP transferred messages report . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 58. AIX servers - CPU utilization reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 59. AIX servers - Hard disk and file systems utilization report . . . . . . . . . . . 111 60. AIX servers - Account summary report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 61. NT servers - CPU, memory, and disk utilization report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 62. NT servers - Account Summary Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 63. All System Metrics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 64. CPU utilization by server report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 65. Memory utilization report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 66. Network I/O utilization report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 67. CPU utilization memory page rates by operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 68. Summary report by operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 69. CPU average forecast by system purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 70. Under-provisioned/Over-provisioned servers report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 71. SLA statistics by event class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 72. Which events take the longest to fix? report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 73. Event source volume by hour report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 74. Domino network traffic report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 75. Domino server statistics - Mail routed by server report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 76. Domino statistics - Total KB transferred report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 77. Domino statistics - Number of users report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 78. Domino statistics - Mail average delivery time report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 79. Domino statistics - Replication statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 80. Domino statistics - Server average delivery time by hour report . . . . . . . 136 81. Domino statistics - Mail box file size by server report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 82. Network Element Performance Guide - Cisco CPU utilization report . . . 138 83. Network Element Performance Guide - Name server speed by hour . . . 139viii A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 84. Network Element Performance Guide-Top ten nodes by transition count 14085. Recommended architecture in network mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14186. The update procedure first script - transfer.cmd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14787. The update procedure second script - copycubes.cmd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14888. The Transfer_Cubes task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14989. Defining the Transfer_Cubes task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14990. The Transfer_Cubes job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15091. Defining the Transfer_Cubes job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15092. The Copy_Cubes task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15193. Defining the Transfer_Cubes task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15194. The Copy_Cubes job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15295. Defining the Transfer_Cubes job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15296. Scheduling the jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15397. Scheduled jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15398. Lotus Notes mail servers by CPU utilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17199. Lotus Notes Mail Servers daily average run length cue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172100.Lotus Notes mail servers by memory utilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173101.Lotus Notes mail servers that need more memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174102.Lotus Notes mail servers by network utilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175103.Lotus Notes mail server - forecasted average mail delivery time . . . . . . 176104.Under-provisioned and over-provisioned Notes servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178105.Performance anomalies by server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179106.Lotus Notes server approaching critical thresholds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180107.Lotus Notes server daily average performance trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 ix
    • x A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Tables 1. Requirements gathering phase items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2. Systems analysis phase items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 3. Minimum configuration table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 4. Project planning phase items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 5. TDS workshop summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 6. Deployment phase items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 7. TDS deployment guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 8. Testing phase items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 9. Documentation phase items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 10. The TDS Discovery Guides mapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 11. Detailed mapping reference table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 12. Macro procedure for deploying TDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 13. Minimum hardware requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 14. TDS file server deployment steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 15. SPP Discovery Guide installation steps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 16. DM Roll-up installation steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 17. Event Management Discovery Guide installation steps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 18. Future requirements reference table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 19. TDS Discovery Guides general availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 xi
    • xii A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Preface Deploying a Tivoli Decision Support solution requires careful planning and includes numerous activities. The primary objective of this redbook is to describe the methodology used to deploy and migrate from the current reporting tools to Tivoli Decision Support by using an IBM service delivery center as a case study. In addition, we will describe how decision makers with different roles and responsibilities can benefit from Tivoli Decision Support and make better decisions by simulating typical problems in IT business. This redbook is targeted at the technical professional responsible for migrating from the current reporting tools used in his or her organization to Tivoli Decision Support and will be available as a reference book upon the deployment of Tivoli Decision Support. This redbook is a valuable addition to existing product documentation and is aimed at both architects and implementors of enterprise systems management solutions. This redbook should be read in conjunction with the product documentation, which complements some of the concepts explained in this book.The team that wrote this redbook This redbook was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center. Edson Manoel is an Advisory ITSO representative working as a project leader at the International Technical Support Organization, Tivoli Group, Austin Center. He applies his extensive field experience as an I/T Tivoli Specialist to his work at the ITSO where he writes extensively on all areas of systems management. Prior to joining the ITSO, Edson worked in IBM Brazil’s Professional Services Organization as an I/T Architect where he was involved in numerous projects designing and implementing systems and network management solutions for major IBM Brazil customers. Fernando Bergamo is an I/T Specialist working in the Technology and Automation Group at the IBM Technology Center, Brazil. He holds a Computer Engineering degree from the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP). His areas of expertise include system management, networking, database administration, data warehousing, and all Tivoli core applications.© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 xiii
    • He is currently working on deploying Tivoli enterprise solutions for several IBM customers in Brazil. Dave Hulse is an Advisory IT Specialist working at IBM Global Services Johannesburg, South Africa. He has over 20 years of experience in the IT industry. He has been with IBM for 18 months and, during that time, was project leader responsible for the design and deployment of the largest Tivoli implementation in Southern Africa. His areas of expertise include designing customer IT solutions, and he has extensive experience in the field of systems management. Rakesh Parshotam is an Advisory IT Specialist working as a Tivoli Architect at IBM Global Services in South Africa. He holds a degree in Computer Science and is a Certified Tivoli Consultant and Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer. He has been working with Tivoli for the past three years and has held various positions including Technical Team Leader for major Tivoli systems management deployment projects in South Africa. The team would like to express special thanks to Ling Tai, Senior Software Engineer working for Tivoli in Raleigh, for her major contribution to this book. Thanks also go to the following people for their invaluable contributions to this project: Kim Querner Tivoli Systems, Austin Bill Meloling Tivoli Systems, Raleigh Lisa Chaves, Axel Elfner IBM, Tucson Shawn Eldridge, Douglas Fuzie Tivoli Systems, Indianapolis Temi Rose International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center Milos Radosavljevic International Technical Support Organization, Austin Centerxiv A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Comments welcome Your comments are important to us! We want our redbooks to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments about this or other redbooks in one of the following ways: • Fax the evaluation form found in “ITSO redbook evaluation” on page 209 to the fax number shown on the form. • Use the online evaluation form found at http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/ • Send your comments in an internet note to redbook@us.ibm.com xv
    • xvi A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Chapter 1. Introduction This redbook was written with the input and experience of many people, and the result is a suggested approach that may apply directly to your situation or can be a guide to anyone involved in implementing Tivoli Decision Support in a large-scale environment. Enterprises usually have some reporting tools that assist in the performance of daily tasks. Very often, these tools are neither well-integrated with the business of the enterprise nor are they able, for example, to provide predictable information about growth or change. In addition, these tools generally do not provide a good and easy way of interpreting information that helps to make better decisions because they are normally designed for and used by technical people (who often make the interpretation of information as easy as reading and understanding hieroglyphics). Decision making often requires the analysis of large amounts of data, complex relationships, and abstract correlations. Decision support systems usually help in the evaluation of consequences (the what if) of given decisions and may advise which decisions are best for achieving particular goals. We will move towards a real scenario explaining the methodology used, the architecture and design considerations, and all phases of deployment of the Tivoli solution for the decision-making process. Furthermore, we will simulate a typical problem showing how decision makers with different roles and responsibilities can benefit from the business information provided by Tivoli Decision Support in order to make more efficient decisions. We do not explain the product details of Tivoli applications in this book, but we assume that the reader is reasonably familiar with Tivoli architecture and Tivoli applications. We have dedicated Chapter 2, “Tivoli Decision Support general overview” on page 9 to providing the reader with a brief introduction to Tivoli Decision Support.1.1 From fire fighting to business intelligence The Information Technology (IT) business is changing. An evolution is in progress, a paradigm shift that is changing the way we do business. Customers are demanding end-to-end solutions tied to Service Level Agreements (SLAs). The challenge for technology is to manage and deliver these services, such as availability, performance, and capacity management© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 1
    • across the entire enterprise as e-Business spawns more and more devices that are connected to it. A few years ago, it was sufficient for service providers (IT Departments) to manage and plan business operations using monthly batch reports. Changes in the organizations took a long time to be implemented. After that, with the implementation of some management tools, we were able to execute queries from the historical operational data in order to get reports or charts that only allowed us to be reactive to problems. Today, enterprises need to provide decision makers with fast and easy access to information that reflects the constant changes in the environment. Decision makers and customers need to have access to tools that provide them with the ability to identify trends and model relationships in the data to find behavioral anomalies in the business environments. Exception and Predictive Management Based on SLA IT Investments o n Proactive cti Inter t i sfa Management Sa Platform er m sto Cu Managed Environment Monitoring & Defined Process Reactive Few Defined Process Fire Fighting No Tools No Process Business Drivers Figure 1. The evolution to business intelligence Large amounts of data are stored in your enterprise. This data contains precious information about the way the enterprise does business, its process, and customers. In these competitive days, using the knowledge provided by2 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • this data in order to make strategic business decisions can often move the enterprise ahead of the competition. Business intelligence is what we are describing in this section; It is the ability to be proactive to problems, leverage the assets in our business to gain profit from available data, and provide the know-how needed to make well-informed decisions for our business. As e-business drives the need for more network devices, we will need technologies that enable us to manage resources across the entire enterprise, end-to-end, not only by exception but by predictive analysis as well. One such technology is Tivoli Decision Support, soon people will ask: How did we manage without it?1.2 The desired solution for business information Historically, both Network and Systems Management tools have focused on the state and function of individually managed elements or groups of similar devices. However, these tools, with their incompatible and independent data, do little to help those who must manage based on a broader vision of the business and its supporting services, a capability that is now essential in enterprise distributed systems management. The challenge is to view systems and network management from the perspective of the business as a whole. End-to-end service delivery and reporting has become the model for distributed management. This model is commonly called service management or service level agreement management. The question facing IT managers is whether there are tools and products that are up to the challenge. The greatest obstacle to full end-to-end service level agreement management is not the lack of but the abundance of management tools. If you think of your own organization, there are probably numerous tools for managing the enterprise. Some are vendor-specific, and others are produced in-house, each defining its own standard for data formats and reporting. Every tool has been optimized to address a specific or limited set of management functions. Introduction 3
    • Multiple Management Functions Monitor A Monitor B Transforming the Data ...... . . ... into Business Information . Standard Format . Monitor Z Figure 2. The challenge of a better solution for business information. As shown in Figure 2, the challenge is to find a complete solution that provides an integrated framework or platform offering multiple management functions across multiple vendor applications, services, or devices across the entire enterprise collecting the data and storing it in a standard format that can be processed and transformed into meaningful business information. Attempts to provide this capability are not new. One such solution is Tivoli, which offers centralized policy-based functions, such as user management, software distribution, and services accessible to third party vendors.1.3 Decision Support Systems The concept of a Decision Support System (DSS) is widely used in both research and in many different applications, but it has not yet been uniquely defined. In order to avoid possible misunderstandings, it is necessary to present the basic characteristics of the class of DSS we will define. Let us start with a brief discussion of the environment in which a DSS will be used. The key person in this consideration is an individual who uses a DSS in real life situations. By convention, such a person is called a Decision Maker (DM). By this term, we mean both a person who makes real decisions (depending on4 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • an application, this person may be a manager, engineer, or operator) and an expert who may that person’s supervisor. Decisions are made within a Decision Making Process (DMP), which, in situations that justify the use of a DSS, is a complex sequence of tasks. We assume that a final decision is to be made by the Decision Maker, and a Decision Support System does not serve as a replacement or control of a DM. In other words, a DSS is not aimed at the automatic selection of decisions. The following are characteristics of a DSS: • Systems that facilitate/extend knowledge management capabilities. • Systems that coordinate distributed decision making. • Systems that offer advice, expectations, facts, analyses, and so on. • The user interface of a DSS is designed in such a way that a DM may obtain, from the DSS, information and answers for questions that she or he considers to be important for a DMP. • DSS are interactive by nature. • Even though a DSS might be unable to solve a problem facing DM, it can be used to stimulate the DM’s thoughts about the problems. The following DSS definition is the one that can better explain the class of DSS we will work with: DSS DSS is a supportive tool for the management and processing of large amounts of information and logical relations that helps a DM extend his or her habitual domain and, thus, helps him or her reach a better decision. In other words, a DSS can be considered a tool that, when under the full control of a DM, performs the difficult tasks of data processing and provides relevant information that enables a DM to concentrate on this part of the DMP.1.4 Positioning Tivoli Decision Support in the decision making process Tivoli Decision Support (TDS) is designed to provide the best possible environment for facilitating the Decision Making Process and helps you to be pro-active, planning future changes and determining their impact on the organization. The better the measurements and feedback regarding business processes, the better a decision maker can adjust for changes and maximize the results in the decision making process. In addition, when decisions are not made in a Introduction 5
    • timely manner, windows of opportunity can close, and business is usually not done. Tivoli Decision Support as a technology is best known for dynamically providing the decision maker with interactive business indicators and then allowing the user to look at those indicators from many different perspectives. For example, let us suppose that a product manager wants to know how well the product is being supported in South America this month and compare the rates with the same month the previous year. Once she or he views the high-level report, she or he may drill into the region to only look at how Brazil is doing. Moreover, she or he may drill into the southeast region and look at how a particular city is doing. This technology is called On-line Analytical Processing (OLAP) or multidimensional analysis. In addition, Tivoli Decision Support allows us to benefit from information collected by the customer’s Tivoli solution. For example, the support centers collect a large quantity of transactional data from their customers, which contains valuable information about the way they interact with the business. With Tivoli Decision Support, Decision Makers have a way to manage this data and convert it into useful information providing a way to evaluate and identify trends, to gain insight into the way customers do business, and to make better decisions. Tivoli Applications Decision RDBMS Data processing and Management of logical relationship Tivoli Decision Support Decision Maker Accessing business relevant information Figure 3. TDS in the decision making process6 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • As shown in Figure 3 on page 6, Tivoli Management Applications, such as Enterprise Console, Service Desk, Inventory, Distributed Monitoring, and so on collect the data and store it in databases. Tivoli Decision Support selects management data from these databases, performs calculations, and adds value to the data by managing the natural relationship in the data. At this point, only business relevant information is offered to the Decision Maker who is in charge of the decision. With Tivoli Decision Support, Tivoli Enterprise solution has moved a step forward to reach the desired solution for Business Decision Information providing the ability to: • Measure the effectiveness of your operation • Gain insight into the potential satisfaction level of customers • Gain insight into the value of your customer relationships • Further leverage your investment in technology and automation • Identify areas of weakness to convert from reactive activities to proactive planning • Discover patterns that influence your decision making and future planning • Become more efficient and effective • Gain control over your business faster1.5 Our approach The remaining sections of this redbook are divided into the following chapters: • Chapter 2, “Tivoli Decision Support general overview” on page 9 This chapter provides information about the product describing the concepts and terminology used by Tivoli Decision Support. In addition, we provide basic information about the Tivoli Decision Support components. • Chapter 3, “Methodology” on page 23 In a generic form, this chapter is intended to provide the reader with basic information about the methodology used to plan, deploy, and migrate to Tivoli Decision Support: • Requirement Gathering phase • Systems Analysis phase • Project Planning phase Introduction 7
    • • Deployment phase • Testing phase • Documentation phase Chapter 4, “TDS architecture and design considerations” on page 59 In this chapter, we will describe some considerations for the Tivoli Decision Support architecture/topology/design solution, such as: • How Tivoli Decision Support integrates with the Tivoli architecture • How the Tivoli Decision Support components integration works • Tivoli Decision Support architectures based on case studies environments • Troubleshooting tips Chapter 5, “Case study” on page 85 This chapter exercises the knowledge acquired from the previous chapters performing an example by exploring one of the IBM Service Delivery Centers as a customer presenting a structured Tivoli Decision Support deployment solution. Chapter 6, “Reports and decision information usage” on page 167 This chapter demonstrates how Tivoli Decision Support can support the decision making process by describing a simple scenario and outlining the steps used to find and analyze critical data in order to make a well-informed decision.8 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Chapter 2. Tivoli Decision Support general overview In the context of delivering services in a complex IT environment, to accomplish a high level of customer satisfaction requires the IT function of an organization to have a full understanding of and insight into the different aspects of its operation and performance in terms of efficiency and effectiveness. For example, for the network analyst of an organization to conduct network performance tuning, he or she may need to find out not only which portion of the corporate network has the most traffic, but also why, when, and which systems cause the most traffic. Similarly, for the IT manager, the network analyst may need to know how well his help desk operation performs not only in terms of, for example, how many problems were resolved within the SLA, but also in terms of what problems were resolved, by whom, and over a series of time intervals. Despite the high volume of data being collected by the different systems in an organization, without a suitable tool, it is increasingly difficult for technical analysts and IT managers alike to obtain answers to business-relevant questions, such as those discussed above. As a result, resolutions and decision making are frequently conducted using only a subset of the information stored in the organization. It is the goal of Tivoli Decision Support to maximize the value of the Tivoli data being collected across the various systems in organizations by making them available to aid analysis and decision making.2.1 Overview of Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Support provides a powerful mechanism to aid its users to dive into complex database structures and explore them in different scopes, levels of detail, and from different perspectives. It also allows its users to analyze data in multiple dimensions. Collectively, these features enable the user to gain a deeper understanding of and insight into the relationship between the data stored in different systems that affect the business operation and performance of an organization. Because of its flexibility in handling data in different scopes, levels of details, perspectives, and dimensions, Tivoli Decision Support addresses the information need of different users for conducting analyses and decision making - from technical analysts, through line managers, to executives. Finally, Tivoli Decision Support handles the delivery of and access to the data. It facilitates knowledge discovery and user access to information. Data© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 9
    • collected can be shared with others in the organization using delivery mechanisms including hard copy printouts, files, and push content. In the latter case, content that has been collected by one user can be sent to a central repository on a company’s intranet from which other users can gain access to the content.2.2 Tivoli Decision Support product components Tivoli Decision Support can be categorized into two main parts: • Tivoli Decision Support Base Product • Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides The base product provides functions that are necessary to configure, administer, and operate Tivoli Decision Support and is the prerequisite for using the TDS Discovery Guides. The base product is composed of the following components: • Discovery Administrator • TDS Server component • Discovery Interface • Cognos PowerPlay • Crystal Reports The TDS Discovery Guides are software add-on modules that put the application of TDS in context. For example, the Call Center Management Guide deals with issues related to the decision making process associated with support requests, resolution rates, and so on. Figure 4 on page 11 shows the relationship between the Tivoli Decision Support Base Product and Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides.10 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides: Ready-to-use Solutions Figure 4. Tivoli Decision Support components The following sections are dedicated to explaining each of the Tivoli Decision Support components. For further information, refer to the product documentation.2.2.1 Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Administrator The Discovery Administrator helps you ensure that Tivoli Decision Support functions correctly within your organization and information is kept up to date. The Discovery Administrator performs the following tasks: • The Discovery Administrator has access to the database in order to gather and maintain all data used by Tivoli Decision Support. The Discovery Administrator can be customized to automatically gather the data, which is stored in special files (it populates these special files with current data from your organization’s databases) at pre defined intervals or it can enable you to perform such operations manually. • It provides specific parameters you can set when building or customizing cubes. These parameters affect the operation of specific cubes and enable you to customize the behavior of views in the Discovery Interface. Tivoli Decision Support general overview 11
    • • It enables you to set parameters that are specific to your enterprise’s operation. These parameters, such as severity level thresholds and business hours, determine how Tivoli Decision Support interprets data and makes calculations when generating views.2.2.2 Tivoli Decision Support Server component The TDS Server component, best known as TDS File Server, acts as a repository for TDS. This component contains TDS related models, queries, templates, and other information required to generate views for the Discovery Interface.2.2.3 Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Interface The Discovery Interface is the client component of TDS. This is the interface to Decision Support. It provides all the tools needed to open and work with views of data from your organization’s enterprise databases.2.2.4 Cognos PowerPlay Cognos PowerPlay is a third-party application from Cognos Inc. It is a multi-dimensional analysis and reporting tool that is included in Tivoli Decision Support. Cognos PowerPlay can generate customized views based on queries to the databases in your enterprise. It can also display views in a variety of graphical styles including bar, line, and pie charts. Using the tools provided by Tivoli Discovery Interface and PowerPlay, you can turn low-level detailed data into useful business knowledge. After a view is opened in PowerPlay format, you can analyze many dimensions of the data to determine relationships, trends, effects, and so on. PowerPlay also gives you the option of further accessing view details so that you can break out and analyze the data behind it.2.2.5 Crystal Reports Crystal Reports is a third-party reporting application from Seagate Software Inc. This application generates text-based views from standard database queries. Tivoli Decision Support uses many views in Crystal Reports format in the TDS Discovery Guides.2.2.6 Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides A Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guide is a TDS module that groups enterprise data into specialized categories. Each category contains a series of topics that correspond to the different aspects of that category. Each topic12 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • contains a number of views that are associated with the data elements beingexamined.Tivoli Decision Support uses the Discovery Guides to aid in discovering keyinformation. With this information, Tivoli Decision Support becomes apowerful end-user solution. This solution provides users with acomprehensive set of views into their enterprise’s data. Along with the viewsare methods (including algorithms, queries, and reports) for abstracting keybusiness indicators from the business data. Managers can use theseindicators as key business information to improve efficiency, performance,and profitability.TDS includes several Discovery Guides. Other Guides are available asadditional options. Appendix C, “Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guidesavailability” on page 189, offers a complete list of the Tivoli Decision SupportDiscovery Guides including those that are shipped with TDS Version 2.0.TDS Discovery Guides contain algorithms, queries, reports, views, andbusiness models that best represent a business concept. Guides can be veryrobust and contain several hundred views and multiple business models.Along with the views, guides have embedded contextual informationassociated with views. The context helps users identify, discover, andunderstand what the view has to offer. For example, as the user views andinterprets data in Tivoli Decision Support, the Tivoli Discovery Interfaceprovides several features to facilitate the user. These features include hints,related views, and keyword searches.No customization, analysis, or programming is required to use Tivoli DecisionSupport guides. By selecting guides in the Discovery Interface, managers candefine the scope of their data searches to yield the most relevant results fortheir needs. A call center manager, for instance, may want to see only datathat pertains to his or her area of the business. He or she may not need toreview data that another department manager needs to review. It is onlynecessary to activate all relevant TDS Discovery Guides and turn off all otherguides. The views shown in the Tivoli Discovery Interface topic map are onlythose associated with the Call Center Management Discovery Guide.Managers can select as many Guides as they want to expand the scope oftheir data search, for instance, if the call center manager wants to review notonly relevant call center data, but also data collected about the health of hisor her business’ contacts. The call center manager selects the Call CenterManagement Discovery guide as well as the Relationship ManagementDiscovery Guide. Now, the views available to the call center manager in the Tivoli Decision Support general overview 13
    • topic map are a combination of the two guides he or she selected. The call center manager’s scope has changed to encompass more views.2.3 Tivoli Decision Support implementation modes Tivoli Decision Support can be implemented in either Stand-alone or Network mode. • Stand-alone mode All the TDS components are installed and run on one machine. The stand alone machine also requires the installation of the database client software and the ODBC driver in order to have access to the databases from which one or more cubes are built. This database connection also allows report generation by running database queries against the individual databases. Figure 5 shows an example of a Tivoli Decision Support implementation in stand alone mode: INVENTORY ODBC Connection DM TEC Machine running TDS DATABASES in stand alone mode Figure 5. Tivoli Decision Support in stand alone implementation mode • Network mode Only TDS Discovery Interface and Cognos PowerPlay are installed on the client machine. In addition, the client requires the installation of both the Client Database and the ODBC Driver, in order to have access to the data stored in the database server, when generating Crystal reports. The TDS Version 2.0 installation CD contains the Intersolv 3.01 32-bit ODBC Driver for Oracle and Sybase. The TDS Server component is installed on a file server which the client machines have access to a shared drive that will contain all the cubes generated. A separate machine is used as the administrator system where the Discovery Administrator module is installed along with PowerPlay. The14 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Administrator system should access the shared drive in the TDS File Server. In addition, it also requires the database client and the ODBC driver in order to have a connection to the database from which the cubes are built. The cube files created by the Discovery Administrator are stored on the TDS File server. The diagram in Figure 6 on page 15 shows an example of a Tivoli Decision Support in the network mode: stores the Cubes access access TDS File Server the Cubes the Cubes builds the Cubes TDS Discovery TDS Discovery Interface Interface TDS Discovery Administrator ODBC connection Crystal Reports Crystal Reports Database Server Figure 6. Tivoli Decision Support network implementation mode2.4 Supported platforms The following software platforms are supported by Tivoli Decision Support Version 2.0: Operating Systems: • Windows NT 4.0 • Windows 95 Tivoli Decision Support general overview 15
    • Database Management Systems: • Oracle • Sybase • SQL Server • Informix • DB22.5 Concepts and terminology This section provides some important Tivoli Decision Support concepts and terminology. Category A Category is a major division of data in the Tivoli Decision Support topic map. The enterprise data is grouped according to concepts, such as productivity or interaction trends. Within a Category, the user can find more specifically-related types of data. See also Topic and View. Cubes A cube is a data container used by PowerPlay. PowerPlay is a multi-dimensional reporting and analysis tool packaged with Tivoli Decision Support. As opposed to a flat two-dimensional table of rows and columns, a multi-dimensional array can be visualized as a cube with many sides, with each dimension forming a side. The cube is arranged so that every data item is located and accessed based on the intersection of the dimension members that define it. Cubes are built by the TDS Discovery Administrator, which runs a query against the database and executes the Cognos Transformer. Cognos Transformer is a component of Cognos PowerPlay. The function of the Cognos transformer is to input the queries and summarize the data (by counting, averaging, calculating percentage, and so on) and pack this information into a compressed cube file (*.MDC). The TDS Discovery Interface executes PowerPlay reports that look at these cube files for historical data rather than live data.16 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • DimensionsA dimension refers to a broad grouping of descriptive data about an aspect ofa business, such as software products and dates. Each dimension includescategories in one or more drill-down paths and an optional set of specialcategories. See also drill-up and drill-down.Dimension lineThe dimension line shows the dimensions in the cube and the categorieswithin each dimension currently being examined.Drill-up and Drill-downDrill-up refers to looking at data in a progressively more general way whereasdrill-down refers to looking at data in a progressively more detailed way.Drill-throughDrill-through is more detailed than drill-down. While drill-down stops at thelower level of consolidated data, drill-through goes one step further by lookingat the actual data records themselves. For example, if the breakup of thetypes of problems resolved by a particular analyst is the lowest level ofconsolidation, drill-through looks at the actual records that correspond to theproblem descriptions themselves.FilterA filter is a means of ensuring that a data search yields the most relevantresults. In Tivoli Decision Support, the user can specify data selectioncriteria, such as data ranges or severity levels, that restrict the data searchand result in only relevant data.LayerLayer is the third set of dimension categories, along with rows and columns,that you can add to the views in TDS. Layers offer details for anotherdimension to provide a new perspective on your views. A view can containseveral layers, but you can look at only one at a time.MeasuresMeasures refer to indicators you use to gauge the performance of yourorganization. For example, measures can be the number of problem requestsreceived and the average time taken to resolve a problem. Tivoli Decision Support general overview 17
    • Models A model contains definitions of queries, dimensions, and measures as well as objects for one or more cubes that Cognos Transformer creates via the TDS Discovery Administrator for viewing and reporting in PowerPlay. Profile A profile is a feature in the Discovery Interface that enables each user to configure settings and views that pertain only to him or her. The Discovery Interface can contain several profiles. Related view A related view is a view that is different from the current view but may contain additional relevant data. Tivoli Decision Support automatically suggests views that are related to the current view. These additional views are listed in the Related Views tab in the hint pane. Role A role is a user-selected description that describes the user’s position in all areas of the business. A user can select one or more roles based on the scope of his or her position. By specifying one or more roles, the user establishes the scope of the information contained on the topic map. The more roles are specified, the greater the scope of the data searches displayed on the topic map. Selection criteria Selection criteria are the parameters specified by the user when conducting a data search. Selection criteria act as filters ensuring that only relevant data is yielded by a data search. See also Filter. Slicing and Dicing Slicing and Dicing refers to the process of extracting information for viewing from the cube file by selecting different dimensions. This process can be thought of as constructing a multi-dimensional space by using the selected dimensions for its constituent axes or as looking at the same data from a variety of angles. Topic A topic is a subcategory of data in the Tivoli Decision Support topic map. Within each category of enterprise data, data is subdivided into related18 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • topics. Within each topic, the user can choose an individual type of data for viewing. See also Category and View. Topic Map Topic map is the user’s primary means of navigating Tivoli Decision Support. In the topic map, the user can choose specific categories, topics, and views. When a view is selected, a specially-configured view appears in the view pane. See also View. View A view is the most detailed type of question in the topic map. A view provides the user with an outlook of the data stored in the cube file or the data retrieved from a special database query.2.6 How Tivoli Decision Support works The Tivoli Discovery Administrator module, which is installed on your system if you run in stand-alone mode or on the system administrator’s system if you run in network mode, connects to your enterprise’s databases. When you issue a request for information in the Tivoli Discovery Interface, Tivoli Decision Support either reads the information from the database directly (if the report requested is a Crystal report) or reads the cube file created by the Tivoli Discovery Administrator (if the report requested is a multi-dimensional report). The cube is summarized data that is read from the database when the cube is built by the Tivoli Discovery Administrator. The information is then returned to the Discovery Interface and presented to you. Tivoli Decision Support general overview 19
    • TDS Discovery Administrator Cubes Multi-dimensional Reports Enterprise Databases TDS Discovery Interface Crystal Reports Figure 7. The operation of Tivoli Decision Support Because of its integration with PowerPlay and Crystal Reports, Tivoli Decision Support provides snapshot-style views of data that are displayed in the Discovery Interface. The data can be viewed in one of several formats: as text, a bar chart, a line chart, or some other graphical format. The default format depends on the type of data you are viewing, but you can select different formats for some types of views. These views allow you to: • Analyze data from different perspectives • Compare current activities to historical records • Spot trends • Troubleshoot • Evaluate resource allocation • Make projections and forecasts • Perform other management tasks The Discovery Interface also provides features that can automate your search for data. For example, you can use bookmarks to collect your favorite views; so, they are instantly available. Instead of manually browsing for data, you can use the Search tool to find information based on keywords. The20 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Discovery Interface’s History feature tracks your most recently used views; so, you can quickly return to them.2.7 Who is making use of Tivoli Decision Support? Tivoli has identified three distinct groups of users for Tivoli Decision Support: Explorers, Tourists, and One-minute managers. Each group defines a set of needs unique to the group: • Explorers use existing Tivoli Decision Support metrics and reports as a stepping stone to discover additional trends and views. After they notice a trend in the data, they investigate why the trends occur. Most organizations have a limited number of employees devoted to the task of exploring, but they are typically required to continually research the effectiveness of their organization. The information they gather is funneled to other employees in the organization. • Tourists want to explore, but they do not want to go into areas that are dead ends or areas that do not quickly meet their needs. Typically, tourists want as much freedom as possible to follow their touring needs as long as each step meets their needs. They spend time looking for data, but they want a high success rate in finding what they want when they want it. There are usually more tourists in an organization than there are explorers. • One-minute managers do not want to spend their time exploring. They want to continually review a set of views that allow them to know what they need to know. One-minute managers need a fixed set of views they can reference, and they want views customized to their specific needs. For example, analysts may only want to look at their open calls. This view can be set in the Discovery Interface; so, it is readily accessible to the One-minute manager. Tivoli Decision Support satisfies the needs of different types of users with an environment that is highly-customizable. The customizable nature of Tivoli Decision Support lends itself well to explorers who are continually viewing the enterprise’s data sources to discover trends and views. Tourists also benefit from the customizable features of Tivoli Decision Support, which enable them to expand or limit the number of pre-packaged views. Finally, One-minute managers appreciate the user-friendly Discovery Interface, which assists them in locating the view or sets of views they want to reference. Also, Tivoli Decision Support’s Tivoli Decision Support general overview 21
    • push-delivery feature enables all users to receive updated views but is particularly helpful to the One-minute manager.22 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Chapter 3. Methodology This chapter provides the reader with the recommended methodology that they should conform to in order to successfully plan, install, and configure the Tivoli Decision Support product. This chapter kicks off with an overview of the Tivoli Implementation Methodology (TIM), which has been branded as Tivoli’s best practice for identifying, designing, planning, installing, testing, and documenting a Tivoli Enterprise solution. Following the introduction to TIM, a recommended Tivoli Decision Support deployment process incorporating the structured procedure driven by the implementation methodology that TIM is based on will be presented to the reader.3.1 Tivoli Implementation Methodology The Tivoli Implementation Methodology (TIM) constitutes the methodology for successful deployments of Tivoli management software solutions. TIM uses structured, predictable, and repeatable processes, which result in efficient and effective deployments. Through the use of a set of documentation, guidelines, templates, and tools used to plan, develop, test, implement, and maintain Tivoli solutions, TIM is Tivoli’s best practice standard to: • Understand a customers system-management needs • Select Tivoli management software that best addresses those needs • Enable the sales team to use the consultant organizations experience to obtain accurate estimates of the effort required to implement the solution • Assist Tivoli Certified Consultants and project managers in planning, designing, and implementing Tivoli solutions that meet customer needs • Test Tivoli Solutions • Document Tivoli Solutions, thus, enabling customers to independently manage their systems • Assist the customer support team in supporting the deployed Tivoli Solutions. TIM is used by sales teams, project managers, architects, consultants, and account managers from both Tivoli Systems and approved Tivoli Business Partner consultant organizations. TIM was developed by Tivoli consultants, architects, project managers, support staff, and developers. It captures the best practices framework-wide deployments of Tivoli Management Software. TIM provides standard deployment processes and offers best-of-breed procedures continuously© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 23
    • refined by Tivoli Professional Services and selected Business Partners. TIM is organized according to the Software Engineering Life Cycle model. This model addresses each element that is critical to the implementation of any software development activity. In Figure 8, a schematic overview of TIM is given. Figure 8. TIM schematic overview TIM provides standard verified methods for use by project managers and Tivoli-certified consultants to execute each phase of a Tivoli implementation. With this common deployment strategy, Tivoli and Tivoli’s business partners can provide: • Accurate and complete requirements definitions for Tivoli solutions24 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • Efficient requirements analysis to generate an architecture and design for a solution • Complete project planning and detailed design for a solution • Accelerated deployment of Tivoli solutions • Detailed solution verification that lends itself to customer regression test activities • Completed solution documentation that can be used by the customer, consultants, Tivoli support staff, and Tivoli development to ensure the long-term success of that solution To find information on TIM, refer to the instructions in Appendix A, “Tivoli Implementation Methodology (TIM) 3.6” on page 185.3.2 Implementing Tivoli Decision Support In order to ensure that the process of deploying Tivoli Decision Support is in line with TIM, we will follow the process flow defined in the TIM methodology to detail each phase of the TDS implementation. Since our main focus in this chapter is the implementation, the methodology detailed below will only highlight those procedures that are significant to TDS. It is assumed that TDS has already been identified as the solution that the customer requires; so, we will not go into detail about the pre-sales and best-fit Tivoli product analysis exercises, which are part of the Sales Engagement phase.3.2.1 Requirements gathering phase Requirements gathering, as it relates to Tivoli Decision Support, is a systematic process of identifying a customers reporting requirements in order for us to deliver a well-thought-out implementation of Tivoli’s decision-making software. With the aid of detailed questionnaires, the consultant services organization works with the customer to identify complete and accurate requirements for their reporting solution. This activity also helps the customer establish the proper expectations of the breadth and scope of the TDS solution. In order to deliver a definitive TDS requirements document, we will tailor this requirements gathering phase to provide only the information necessary to define the scope, architecture, and estimated hours that will be required to implement the customer’s TDS solution. The objective of this segment is, therefore, to gather requirements that enable the following: Methodology 25
    • • A system architect to analyze the information and successfully create a System Architecture and Design document • The consultant, business operations, project management, sales team, and the deployment team to work together, led by business operations, to develop a technical proposal • A deployment project team to create a detailed project plan Table 1 shows the input and output items, which highlight the components of the requirements-gathering phase: Table 1. Requirements gathering phase items Requirements gathering phase Input Initial customer requirements questionnaire Output Tivoli decision support requirements questionnaires Figure 9 outlines the process flow of the requirements-gathering phase: Requirements Gathering Flow Customer TDS Requirements Requirements INPUT Questionaire Questionaire OUTPUT Figure 9. Requirements gathering process flow We will now take a look at the questionnaires shown in Figure 9. 3.2.1.1 Questionnaires Questionnaires serve as the main tool for gathering a detailed description and logical picture of the customer’s environment. It is a tool that portrays the customer’s environment and high-level goals for reporting on his or her IT environment. Gathering the customer-specific TDS requirements is the focal point of this exercise and will be investigated shortly. First, however, we must take a look at the systems management requirements of the customer in the form of the Customer Requirements Questionnaire.26 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 3.2.1.2 Initial customer requirements questionnaireThe information gathered in this report serves as the single input element ofthe implementation solution. Our aim is to process this information andproduce other questionnaires and reports that will serve as inputs to thesubsequent phases of the implementation cycle.In this questionnaire, many business-specific questions are answered. Themost important and valuable pieces of information gathered would be thecustomer reporting goals and issues. For example, the answers to thefollowing types of questions will be available to us: • What are the immediate Tivoli-specific goals of the customer? • What are the long-term Tivoli-specific goals of the customer? • What are the customers general immediate goals with TDS? • What are the customers general long-term goals with TDS?From this information, the TDS consultant will be able to identify the reportingsolution components that are significant to the customer’s business. He orshe can now focus on the implementation of the product functions of TivoliDecision Support and gather all the necessary TDS requirements.3.2.1.3 Tivoli Decision Support requirements questionnaireHaving manipulated the information received above, we are now ready todraw up a questionnaire to extract the TDS product-specific information. TheTDS provider will set up an interview with the customer requesting therelevant business leaders as well as the IT technical leader to be present.This interview is broken up into four steps, which are shown in the list below.The purpose, requirements, and process of each step will be clearlydistinguished; furthermore, a set of suggested questions for the questionnairewill be proposed.1. Decision-making/reporting requirements overview: • Purpose It is during this step that Tivoli personnel acquire their initial information on the customer’s reporting requirements. It is assumed that the customer has an amateur solution in place and intends to migrate to Tivoli Decision Support. The customer will be questioned on his or her current reporting activities, and a document detailing his or her requirements will be drawn up. • Required information Details of what the customer expects from the Tivoli Decision Support solution, current process, procedure, service levels, reports, and any Methodology 27
    • product(s) associated with accomplishing their current reporting task (if any) are required information. • Process Document all customer expectations and reporting goals. Gather all existing reporting policies and procedures implemented by the customer. Review the customers existing reporting policies and procedures to determine how data is collected and manipulated and what Tivoli Decision Support specifics need to be presented in order to migrate to this new reporting strategy. • Suggested questions: • What are the customer’s immediate report requirements? • What report requirements are forecast as future needs? • What is your current reporting strategy, and what are the shortfalls? • Are you able to publish content to the Web? • How often do you run your data mining and database interrogation procedures? • Are any Tivoli products used to gather data for the current reporting solution? Note It is in the analysis phase that we will investigate how these existing policies and procedures can be migrated to Tivoli Decision Support 2. Existing Tivoli systems management products installed: • Purpose Tivoli Decision Support is dependent on various Tivoli products to perform its reporting task. It is assumed that the customer has either an existing Tivoli Systems Management solution implemented, or it is in the process of implementation in their environment. • Required information Tivoli Servers, Tivoli Products (including patch levels), installed Plus modules, TMR architecture, and Operating System platforms are required. • Process28 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Gather all existing architecture and deployment documents (if available). Identify process flows, and systems management procedures that the business is running with. Identify if Tivoli Decision Support dependent Tivoli products are installed for example, Distributed Monitoring, Enterprise Console, Netview, Service Desk etc. • Suggested questions: • Which systems management disciplines does your Tivoli solution integrate with? Describe the details of that integration including the flow of data and desktop configurations. • Are there current architecture and deployment summary documents that describe the Tivoli deployment? • If using a Master-Spoke TMR, where are the Spoke TMR Servers located? (For example, central data center, different geographic locations, one per branch office).3. Determine hardware and operating system information For this step, we basically need to get an idea of the existing hardware that is deployed at the customer site. We will use this information in the Systems Analysis to decide if it is possible to share the roles of some of these machines with Tivoli Decision Support. • Purpose The purpose is to gather a hardware and operating system inventory of all dedicated Systems Management machines as well as machines that need to be monitored. • Required information System-specific information is required. • Process Review the Tivoli Decision Support hardware requirements with the customer. Processor, memory, monitor, and hard disk space of the existing hardware are some of the main issues that need to be covered.4. Determine network-specific information • Purpose The purpose is to gather the following information to describe the network communication mechanisms used between the various components that may be used for the TDS deployment. • Required information Methodology 29
    • The customer should provide a network topology diagram. If the following information is not on the diagram, annotate the diagram or provide details: • Line speed of each network connection. • Actual network bandwidth. If it varies by time of day, define the typical averages. • Each firewall between nodes. • Each firewalls configuration, monitoring, and policies. • Socks configuration description. • Protocols used within the current environment. • Frame Relay (Committed Information Rate (CIR) and Burst Rate). • Suggested questions: • Are all systems reachable via TCP/IP? • Describe the host and IP address naming conventions and scheme used to identify networking and computer system equipment. • Is the TCP/IP routing structure static or dynamic? • If DNS is used, provide a copy of the DNS map configuration. (Note that the integrity of these maps must be verified.) Describe how reverse lookups are performed. • If DHCP or WINS is in use, identify the server and describe how these utilities are configured.3.2.2 Systems analysis phase During the Systems analysis phase, the TDS requirements that were gathered in the previous stage are processed. The goal of this system analysis is to provide a total reporting solution using Tivoli Decision Support that meets or exceeds customer expectations. This solution includes the development and presentation of a proposal for TDS. Furthermore, the architecture and detailed design is completed, and the Statement of Work for the deployment of the solution is developed and presented to the customer. The results of the questionnaires are now needed, and they serve as the main ingredient for systems analysis.30 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • The input and output items shown in Table 2 highlight the components of the systems analysis phase: Table 2. Systems analysis phase items Systems Analysis Phase Tivoli Decision Support Requirements Questionnaires Input Tivoli Decision Support Installation Guide Technical Proposal Output System Architecture and Design Document Figure 10 outlines The process flow of the Systems Analysis phase:Systems Analysis Flow Systems Mapping TDS Technical Preparation Architecture & INPUT Guides Design Proposal OUTPUTFigure 10. Systems Analysis process flow 3.2.2.1 Preparing for systems analysis To create a TDS architecture, begin by translating the customer requirements and the proposals into a list of what functions and capabilities TDS must provide. Document this information so that it can be used to implement the technical solution. As requirements are reviewed, carefully evaluate each customer requirement to ensure they have provided sufficient information to enable the analyst to meet these requirements using Tivoli Decision Support. Also, if the customer accepted an action item to provide requirements information during the requirements gathering phase, ensure that the customer has supplied this information. Once all the preparations have been completed, we can now be certain that focusing on customer requirements to create an architecture and design will ensure that the architecture and design is concise, and, thus, the deployment of the TDS solution will be successful. Methodology 31
    • We will begin with an analysis of the information received and then go on to explain the documentation or results that must emerge as a consequence of this analysis phase. 3.2.2.2 Tivoli Decision Support Guides A Decision Support Guide is a TDS module that groups the enterprise data into specialized categories. Each category contains a series of topics that correspond to the different aspects of that category. Each topic contains a number of views that are associated with the data elements being examined. The following list provides some examples of Decision Support Guides that are available: • Tivoli Decision Support for Server Performance Prediction This provides capacity planning, forecasting, and trend analysis and identifies server performance issues using data from Tivoli Distributed Monitoring. • Tivoli Decision Support for Event Management This uses information from the Tivoli Enterprise Console to provide an understanding of event handling versus service level agreements. • Tivoli Decision Support for Network Event Analysis This leverages data captured by Tivoli NetView to indicate the performance of network devices, the state of network health, and the control of network event management. • Tivoli Decision Support for Software Deployment Analysis This helps identify issues that impact software deployment using Tivoli Software Distribution and Tivoli Inventory. • Tivoli Decision Support for Information Management This enables customers to analyze problem and change management information stored in Tivoli Service Desk for OS/390 host databases. 3.2.2.3 Working with Tivoli Decision Support Guides As soon as the questionnaires from the requirements gathering phase are ready, they will be used during this next phase to derive a TDS reporting solution that meets the customer’s requirements. A TDS analyst will study the reporting and decision information requirements from the questionnaires and he or she will then carry out an exercise to deliver a proposal to the customer on how we plan to meet their requirements with the use of TDS and TDS Discovery Guides. This exercise is a two-fold process and is outlined in the following list:32 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 1. Mapping TDS guides to customer requirements The analyst needs to evaluate the various TDS guides available. He or she will need to implement a one-to-one mapping between each required report and TDS view, which is made possible by one of many TDS guides. The analyst will need to have detailed information available about the TDS Guides. This information can be obtained from various sources: • Using Decision 2.0 Support Guides, GC32-0290 • Release Notes Shipped with the TDS Discovery Guides • Tivoli Website (Overview of Guides capabilities) In most situations, TDS, with the use of its Drill-Down capabilities, will be able to produce much more detailed information than is required by the customer. On the other hand, it is possible that some of the customer reporting requirements will not be provided by TDS. For this reason, there should be a second step where a solution for these unmatched reports is developed2. Determine customization requirements (if necessary) For this process, the analyst will compare the list of items required by the customer (or collected by the current reporting tools), to the list of items collected by the TDS Guides. Reports that are required by the customer and are not available to TDS are listed down. A sub-project for delivering these reports will now need to be kicked off. This project will investigate the extent of work required and will produce a customized solution for the outstanding reports. Customization can include but is not limited to: • Editing current guides • Writing custom scripts to populate the DM database • Creating Custom Crystal reports • Creating Custom PowerPlay reports For detailed information, refer to Using Decision 2.0 Support Guides, GC32-0290, which is shipped with the product.3.2.2.4 System architecture and design documentThe objectives of this process are to design and document the physical andlogical aspects of the customer’s TDS deployment.The following tasks need to be completed by this activity: • Design a high-level architecture for TDS layout (Physical Design). • Define logical architecture for the TDS implementation (Logical Design). Methodology 33
    • • Identify and acquire the servers required for implementing Decision Support (Resource requirements). • Document the system architecture and design. (Output Documentation). The TDS architecture Chapter 4, “TDS architecture and design considerations” on page 59 is dedicated to designing solutions and focuses a great deal on various architecture considerations. For this reason, we will not go into too much detail here on the TDS physical design. This architecture section will introduce some TDS architecture concerns and present to the reader a standard design on which the customer’s solution should be based. The foundation of the physical design depends on the customer requirements and the answers to the questionnaires presented to the customer in Section 3.2.1, “Requirements gathering phase” on page 25. The analysts will need to study the customer’s environment and business with the intention of identifying suitable TDS hardware components and personnel resources. They will then need to bring these two resources together and apply a process to deliver a suitable architecture. Insights into some of the thought processes that willcome into play are listed below: • Does my customer require a stand-alone or network installation? • How many TDS Servers does my customer need? • How many administrator machines will be required? • How many client interfaces will be required? • Does the customer require Crystal Reports to be installed? Below is a recommended network configuration diagram. The figure depicts a typical TDS implementation in Network Mode. In Network Mode, only Decision Support’s client component and PowerPlay are installed on the client machine. The other components are installed elsewhere. The user of the client system only has access to the Discovery Interface. You must administer Decision Support for all clients from the system administrator’s system.34 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • ODBC INVENTORY DM TEC DATABASES Service and support Client system Client system Client system database system running Discovery running Discovery running Discovery Interface Interface Interface ODBC Shared File Access File server running System running server components Administrator and client including guides, cubes and modelsFigure 11. Typical architectureAs mentioned before, Chapter 4, “TDS architecture and designconsiderations” on page 59, will go into the details of the physical and logicaldesign considerations of a TDS implementation.Resource availabilityEarly in the process of developing a system architecture and design, a roughdetermination as to what hardware might be required for deployment is made.It is important to generate this information as soon as possible so thathardware can be procured and made available as soon as hands-ondeployment work begins.The system requirements for Tivoli Decision Support may vary greatly andwill depend on many environmental factors. For the purpose of simplifyingthis exercise, we will assume that a networked topology of clients fed by a fileserver will be the standard workgroup configuration. With that in mind, cubebuild times and view run time will vary based on the following: • Number of datapoints included in the scope of the analysis • Performance of the database server • Demand on the database server • Throughput of the network • Performance of the Client Methodology 35
    • • Performance of the File Server • Performance of the processor that builds the cubes The Tivoli Decision Support Installation Guide, GC32-0289, lists the operating system and suggested hardware requirements for each Decision Support component. It differentiates between two classes of machines: a low-end and a high-end machine for each component. Although this serves as a good base, it is often not easy to rank the type of environment that you are in, and it makes the choice very difficult. Table 3 details the minimum configuration for various business environments. The sizings are based on Tivoli’s experience with the Service Desk product line. This table provides you with an easier method of deciding on the configuration that you require. The business environments are divided into four ranks: Small, Medium, Large, and Mega. The variable that we are interested in is the number of contacts, which gives us an idea of how large the business is. Table 3. Minimum configuration table Size of Center Client PC Administrator PC File Server Requirements Requirements Requirements Small 40 MB disk space 500 MB disk space 200 MB disk space <10K contacts 100 MHz Pentium 200 MHz Pentium 133 MHz Pentium <50K calls/yr 32 MB RAM 64 MB RAM 64 MB RAM NT 4.0/Win 95 NT 4.0/Win95 NT 4.0/Win95 Medium 40 MB disk space 500 MB disk space 300 MB disk space 10-30K contacts 100 MHz Pentium 250 MHz Pentium 150 MHz Pentium 50-100K calls/yr 48 MB RAM 128 MB RAM 128 MB RAM NT 4.0/Win 95 NT 4.0 NT 4.0 Large 40 MB disk space 700 MB disk space 400 MB disk space 30-250K contacts 100 MHz Pentium 300 MHz Pentium 200 MHz Pentium 100-500K calls/yr 64 MB RAM 256 MB RAM 256 MB RAM NT 4.0/Win95 NT 4.0 NT 4.0 Mega 40 MB disk space 1 GB disk space 500 MB disk space >250K contacts 100 MHz Pentium 300 MHz Dual Pentium 300 MHz Pentium >500K calls/yr 64 MB RAM 512 MB RAM 256+ MB RAM NT 4.0/Win 95 NT 4.0 NT 4.0 The best way to gather the TDS resource mapping information is through a survey sheet that should be filled in by the customer with help from the systems analysts. The survey should be structured in such a way that36 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • emphasis is placed on every machine identified as playing a specific role inthe TDS architecture.What follows is a description of the machine roles and the accompanyingsurvey sheets.File server informationThis is the repository for TDS and contains the TDS models, templates,queries, and other information required to generate views for the DiscoveryInterface. It is necessary for this to be reasonably fast to service the files.Every client machine will connect to this server and, thus, the networkconnection must be reasonably fast. These factors need to be investigated atthis point. Figure 12 shows an example file server information form: Example Form Machine Type:________________________________________________ Operating System: _____________________ Version: _____________ Network protocol used between server and workstations (Novell, NT, etc.): _______________________________________________________ Is this file server dedicated to TDS file storage? Amount of disc space available for TDS files? ___(300+MB recommended) Do all TDS client and admin machines have READ and WRITE access to the TDS file service/directory?Figure 12. File server information example formTDS Administrator PC informationThis component provides functions for TDS configuration and administration,for example, setting system parameters that control the behavior of TDS. Thismachine requires a fast hard drive and fast network access to the databaseserver. Figure 13 on page 38 shows an example TDS administrator PCinformation form. Methodology 37
    • Example Form Is this PC dedicated to Tivoli Decision Support or is it used for other applications? If it is used for other applications, what are they? Machine Type: ________________________ Operating System: _____________________ Version: ___________ Has a drive letter to the server components been mapped on this machine? If yes, what is the drive letter? ______________ Figure 13. TDS administrator PC information example form TDS Client PC information ODBC connection to the database server, sufficient disk space, and shared access to the file server are some of the main criteria that need to be looked at in this step. Figure 14 shows an example TDS client PC information form: Example Form Machine Type: ___________________________________________ Operating System: _______________________ Version: _______ Free disk space: _________________________ RAM: __________ Number of client workstations for installation: __________________ Number of classroom workstations for installation: ______________ Figure 14. TDS client PC information example form Database server information Identify the machine that will host and the type of RDBMS that will retain the respective configuration repositories. The following information is required to set up Tivoli’s RDBMS Interface Module: • Database Vendor • Database ID • Database Home Directory • Database Server ID • User name38 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • Instance Home Directory (DB2 only)For database management purposes, identify what the customer wants to dowith the data collected in the configuration repositories; this information willassist in engineering the database by determining the following: • Structure of the Database • Size of the Database • Required Queries by users • Customized Database tasks, scripts, and reports • Database clean-up requirements (when and how often)Figure 15 shows an example database server information form: Example Form Is this a dedicated database server or is it used for other applications? If it is used for other applications, what are they? ___________________________________________________________ RDBMS: _____________________________ Version: ______________ Is your database backup hot or cold?__________________________ Day(s) and time(s) of database backup __________________________Figure 15. Database server information example form Note In the example form shown in Figure 15, Hot refers to a backup where the database remains in use while the data is backed up. Cold refers to logging off all users, stopping all database activity, and then backing up the data. A cube build will fail during a cold backup of the data source or if a Tivoli Decision Support multidimensional view is open. Cube builds should be done during business off-hours.Network informationSince TDS is comprised of three directly-related components functioning ondifferent machines on the network, it is important that all network shortfalls beidentified. Figure 16 on page 40 shows an example network information form. Methodology 39
    • Example Form Network protocol used between Database Server and Application Server, Workstations and Servers (i.e. TCP/IP, IPX-SPX, etc.): ________________ Do you use network Login scripts to set application path statements? Figure 16. Network information example form3.2.3 Project planning phase The consultant team uses data generated in previous TDS Methodology phases to develop the detailed project plan. The plan includes all project planning documents, identification of the specific tasks to meet customer requirements, identification of the consultant resources to perform each task, and a definition of how the consultant team will partner with the customer to finish the job. Project planning ensures that each engagement completes on time, stays within budget, and produces a TDS solution that satisfies the customer. Table 4 shows the input and output items, which highlight the components of the project planning phase: Table 4. Project planning phase items Project Planning Phase Initial customer requirements Tivoli Decision Support requirements questionnaires Input Technical proposal System architecture and design document Project analysis Output Detailed project plan40 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 17 outlines the process flow of the Project Planning phase:Project Planning Flow Project Drawing up Choosing a Training Plan INPUT Analysis the Plan Project Team OUTPUTFigure 17. Project planning process flow 3.2.3.1 Project analysis At this point in the process, the sales team and the deployment team have established a strong working relationship with the customer and have completed a number of tasks. Project analysis involves reviewing the results of these efforts. Data available for review includes: • Technical Proposal • Cost Proposal • Statement of Work • Results of all requirements gathering activities • System Architecture and Design Document For the details of the review and verification process, refer to the Tivoli Implementation Methodology. To find information on how to access TIM, refer to the instructions outlined in Appendix A, “Tivoli Implementation Methodology (TIM) 3.6” on page 185. 3.2.3.2 The TDS project plan After the analysis is complete, the project manager and the consultant services team consolidates the results of this activity and develops a detailed project plan for the customer engagement. The project plan is a collection of the following information: • TDS Solution Objectives • Project task plan • Project Team Phasing Plan • Project Change Control Plan • Risk Assessment and Mitigation Plan Methodology 41
    • • TDS Training Plan • Status Reporting Plan The deliverables in the preceding list represent a high-level listing of what is expected of this TDS project plan. The details of each deliverable are clearly explained in TIM and should be referenced directly from TIM. It is however, important that we discuss some of the Decision Support details surrounding some of these core deliverables, namely, the solution objectives, project task plan, staff phasing plan, and training. Decision support solution objectives A plainly-written document called the Solution Objectives is written by the project manager that used to establish the scope of the project. The TDS Solution Objectives document summarizes the results of the initial project review documented in the project analysis and is created to assist with project task plan development. Elements of the TDS Solution Objective include the following: • The TDS solution to be developed and the estimated completion date • The customer’s business and information technology goals for the project • The number of hours allocated to the consultant team to deliver this product • A description of the functionality and limitations of the solution • High-level tasks required to develop the TDS solution • Assignment of high-level tasks to the customer or consultant organization • Completion criteria established for each high-level task and for the project • Key assumptions and risks associated with the project. Decision Support project task plan The project manager and the services consultant team consolidate the results of the Analysis and develop a project task plan for the customer engagement. The goal of the project task plan is to identify all project tasks, the duration of each task, and the individual responsible for performing each task. The project task plan also presents this data graphically. This plan is used to set customer expectations for consultant services engagements and to track progress and control the scope of these engagements. In line with the above-mentioned goal, the project task plan is supposed to do the following: • Identify the TDS version and patches to be deployed42 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • List all prerequisite tasks that must be performed in preparation for each deployment task • Define the schedule for the customer to provide consultant services facility access and office materials at the customer location • Require that all outstanding requirements gathering or system analysis activities are complete or that tasks are documented in the project task plan to perform this work • Define the TDS environment configuration and administrative tasks • Define the date that the required hardware should be acquired • Detail the configuration process of TDS hardware • Identify work to be completed for each task in the project task plan • Address each reporting requirement identified by the customer • Identify each task required to implement the TDS architecture • Identify all configuration and customization tasks not defined by the TDS architecture • Identify each task necessary to perform system testing • Identify each task necessary to generate deployment documentation • Identify all management and administrative tasks essential to the success of the project • Assign each task to an individual • Specify the duration of each taskFor your reference, Figure 18 on page 44 shows a snapshot of a project taskplan. Methodology 43
    • Figure 18. Sample project plan 3.2.3.3 Project team phasing plan The formation of the Implementation Project Team is critical to the success of any project. The roles of the essential team members required for Tivoli Decision Support implementation projects are detailed in the following sections. Keep in mind that one team member may fulfill multiple roles during the implementation project. Implementation project leader The Implementation project leader organizes the efforts of the team. His or her responsibilities include project management, direction setting, resource scheduling, and project acceptance. It is crucial that the customer provide an Implementation project leader. This role is typically filled by someone with authority to sign off and accept completion of contracted work. The project leader must be available to verify and accept any work completed by the44 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • implementation consultants. This person will be required to sign theacceptance document as the various project phases are completed.System administratorThe responsibilities of the Tivoli Decision Support system administratorinclude long-term model administration, parameter administration,configuration changes, usage policies, and so on. If the reports analystposition detailed below is not filled, the system administrator assumes thereports analyst’s responsibilities.Management teamThe Management team provides the sponsorship necessary to successfullyimplement the products within the business units of the company. Theirresponsibilities will be to aid the team in marketing the application to otherbusiness areas, to provide the resources and funding needed for theimplementation, and to remove organizational roadblocks. Participation isheaviest during the planning phase of the implementation but continuesthroughout the implementation process.Tivoli product system administratorsDue to the integral nature of Tivolis products, it may be important for theTivoli system administrators (for those products for which TDS DiscoveryGuides have been purchased) to be on the Tivoli Decision Supportdeployment team. Responsibilities include describing any customizations tothe product databases and determining the overall management objectivesfor the Tivoli Decision Support implementation. Participation is highest duringplanning and the first phase of implementation.Network administratorSomeone familiar with the corporate network configuration is the best choicefor this role. Responsibilities will be to aid the team in technology decisionsand in the installation of software and the setup of user permissions to thedirectory structures of the applications. Participation is heaviest during theplanning phase and first phase of the implementation.Database administratorThe Database Administrators participation is critical to the success of theimplementation. Responsibilities will include team participation in technologydecisions and in optimization of the database prior to deployment.Participation is heaviest during application setup, but will be ongoing as DBAissues arise. Methodology 45
    • Web administrator If your organization would like to take advantage of Tivoli Decision Supports ability to push views to a Web server, you will need a Web administrator. He or she will be responsible for the Web servers administration in your enterprise and will make sure that all the users have access to the reports stored on the Web servers. Reports analyst (optional) The best choice to fill this role is someone who has experience with a structured programming language and software development and who has experience with Crystal Reports. Responsibilities include completing cube customizations as defined during the implementation (This role can be filled by a customer resource if available, or by a Tivoli Systems resource). Trainer (optional) The TDS trainer will be responsible for attending all TDS Workshops and for training TDS administrators and users after the deployment. 3.2.3.4 Decision Support training plan During the services engagement, customer personnel working with Tivoli certified consultants will gain some informal knowledge of the Tivoli Decision Support software. Additional formal training, however, is necessary for all customer personnel involved with the development, implementation, testing, transition, administration, or operation of the TDS solution. The consultant project manager works with the customer project manager to identify the training needed by each customer staff member and helps develop a training plan based on the individuals responsibilities, the necessary skills, and available training courses. At the time this redbook was published, Tivoli developed a series of workshops to deliver this necessary training. The training covers the entire deployment process starting from Installation and Configuration to the use of the Discover Interface. Table 5 highlights the content and value of these workshops: Table 5. TDS workshop summary Workshops Description Application setup, Configuration, Installation and configuration of the TDS and Administration workshop components. TDS Administration options, cube builds, build schedules.46 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Workshops Description Advanced administration TDS usability, configuring profiles, publishing views, adding components to the topic map Customization workshop Modifying calculations, adding flex fields, creating new cube and report templates End-user workshop Use of the Discovery Interface including drill-through and adding dimensions Note Formal Tivoli training is offered by the Tivoli Worldwide Education department. Information about Tivoli Customer Education is available at http://www.tivoli.com/services/education/3.2.4 Deployment phase The objective of this segment is to bring together the best project management organizational practices and technical team deployment knowledge to successfully deploy the customer’s TDS solution. The deployment implements the design defined for the solution according to the System Architecture and Design Document. The deployment follows the sequence of tasks defined by the project task plan. The input and output items listed in Table 6 highlight the components of the Deployment phase: Table 6. Deployment phase items Deployment Phase Tivoli deployment guides Initial customer requirements questionnaire Tivoli Decision Support requirements questionnaires Input Technical proposal System Architecture and Design Document Detailed project task plan Output Tivoli TDS solution, ready for testing Figure 19 outlines the process flow of the Deployment phase: Methodology 47
    • Deployment Phase Flow TDS TDS TDS Preparation TDS Training INPUT Installation Configuration Customization OUTPUTFigure 19. Deployment process flow For most Tivoli product deployments, Tivoli management software deployment guides are provided to the technical consultant to assist with all installation, configuration, customization, automation, and maintenance tasks. These guides contain a wealth of information by providing in-line tips and hints and Web-based links to online documentation, technical papers, and useful Web sites. The important topics of a TDS deployment guide are shown in Table 7:Table 7. TDS deployment guide Reference Subject Information Pointer Type Product TDS Information Available on TDS CD Version, http://www.support.tivoli.com/Prodman/html/AB.html Shipped Manuals, Release Notes http://www.support.tivoli.com/Prodman/html/RN.html Installation Patch Number http://www.support.tivoli.com/patches/ /Patch Patches ftp://ftp.tivoli.com/support/ References Tivoli External http://www.tivoli.com/products/index/decision_support/ Web URL TDS Information Pointers White paper White Papers http://www.tivoli.com/products/documents/whitepapers/ References, Managed View Managed View http://www.wellesleyinfo.com/tmv/ Articles, URL magazine Pointers Press Release http://www.tivoli.com/teamtivoli/press/48 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Reference Subject Information Pointer Type Discovery Refer to TDS Administrator Guide, TOC AdministratorConfigurationand Discovery Refer to TDS User Guide, TOCCustomization Interface Server Refer to TDS Installation Guide, TOCMaintenance Troubleshooting Refer to TDS Administrator Guide, TOC & Optimization The phases of the Deployment Segment include: • Preparing for deployment • Installation and customization • Configuration • Advanced configuration and customization • Training 3.2.4.1 Preparing for deployment A few important steps need to be performed before deployment can commence. 1. Hardware prerequisites Prior to deployment, the customer should have all the necessary hardware in position and ready to be rolled out with the TDS applications. The consultant services team should have information on all the machine access passwords with appropriate permissions to make configuration changes. 2. Software prerequisites It is necessary to verify that all prerequisite software installations and network configurations have been completed prior to the deployment of TDS. Some of the items to be checked include: • 32-bit database client software is installed on every TDS client and the TDS Administrator PC. • 32-bit SQL database connectivity has been verified on each TDS client and the TDS Administrator PC. Methodology 49
    • • The shared source path (the file service where the cubes, reports, models, and administrative databases will reside) has been mapped to the TDS Administrator and client PCs. • Network connectivity between the TDS Administrator PC, client PCs, and the shared source path has been successfully tested. • The TDS Administrator PC and TDS Client PCs have READ and WRITE access to the shared source file server. • In order to optimize SQL processing time, database maintenance and backup has been recently performed, indices have been rebuilt, inactive records purged, and appropriate data archived. 3. Gathering documentation The deployment team should have all the necessary documentation on hand. This includes, but is not limited to, the input elements identified below: • Tivoli deployment guides • Initial customer requirements questionnaire • Tivoli Decision Support requirements questionnaires • Technical Proposal • System architecture and design document • Detailed project task plan 3.2.4.2 Product installation This section describes the method for an installation in Network Mode. The following tasks are accomplished in this phase: Tivoli Decision Support file server example macro-tasks • Installation of the Tivoli Decision Support Server Components on the Shared Source file server. • Install the TDS Discovery Guides required to meet customer requirements as established in the systems analysis Tivoli Decision Support administrator example macro-tasks • Installation of the following components on the TDS Administrator PC: • Tivoli Decision Support Administrator components • Cognos Administrator components - Transformer, On-line Books, and Help files • 32-bit Crystal Reports 6.050 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • 32-bit ODBC driver (if not already installed)Tivoli Decision Support client example macro-tasks • Installation of the following Tivoli Decision Support client components: • Tivoli Decision Support Client • Cognos Standard - PowerPlay, On-line Books, and Help • 32-bit ODBC driver (if not already installed)3.2.4.3 Product configurationThe Discovery Administrator needs some configuration in order to work withthe chosen guides and configured data source. The Discovery client needs tobe configured for each user to enable their job-specific data and views to beavailable to them. The following tasks are accomplished in this phase:TDS administrator • Importing the required guides • Adding the respective Data Sources for the cubes associated with the guides that have been imported • Configuration of TDS Administrator options including cube parameters and date ranges, as well as other guide-specific parameters for the cubes. • Review the cube build schedule and use the Tivoli Discovery Scheduler to automatically build the cubes after business hours as specified in the design document.TDS client • Selecting the Guides that the user will require • Setting up the appropriate user roles3.2.4.4 Advanced configuration and customizationThe customer requirements not fulfilled by TDS now need to be integratedinto the solution. This is a technically-intensive stage during which thefollowing customization tasks are accomplished: • TDS calculations are modified. • Flex fields are added as dimensions to cubes. • Flex fields are added as parameters to Crystal reports. • Terminology in PowerPlay or Crystal reports is changed. • Existing reports are integrated. • New Crystal and PowerPlay reports are created. Methodology 51
    • 3.2.4.5 Training Customer personnel involved with the development, implementation, testing, transition, administration, or operation of the TDS solution require training based on the individuals respective responsibilities. For details on the type of training available, refer to the workshops identified in Section 3.2.3.4, “Decision Support training plan” on page 46.3.2.5 Testing phase The intent of the test segment is twofold: • To verify the operability of the customers TDS solution • To verify the service organizations methodology of deployment and integration of the TDS solution within the customers environment The input and output items shown in Table 8 highlight the components of the Testing phase: Table 8. Testing phase items Testing Phase Tivoli TDS solution, ready for testing Input System architecture and design document Detailed project task plan System test plan Output Verified TDS deployment Figure 20 outlines the process flow of the testing phase:Testing Phase Flow Intergration System Production Preperation INPUT Testing Testing Testing OUTPUTFigure 20. Testing process flow 3.2.5.1 Preparing to test The customer should be involved with the testing of the TDS solution. This enables and encourages the customer to take an active role in the52 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • deployment, thus, becoming familiar with the Tivoli solution and more easilyassuming ownership of the solution.Time and resources should have been allocated to test the TDS solution inthe project task plan throughout the deployment.3.2.5.2 Testing the solutionEach phase of the deployment should be followed by a functionality testingexercise. It is required that the following set of test cases be applied in orderto verify the TDS solution: • Integration testing • System testing • Production testingEach of these test case types identifies a unique level of testing to beperformed to verify the solution. This will be made clear in a moment. Note Every product installation and configuration entry in the project task plan must be followed by a functionality test in this segment of the deployment cycle.Integration testThese test cases verify the connection of the functional elements of the TDSsolution. The following items are tested: • Network communication between all Decision Support Components including RDBMS Server • 32 bit ODBC connection between Decision Support Administrator Server and RDBMS Server • The shared source path has been mapped to the TDS Administrator and client PCs. • RDBMS Server is up and running and collecting data from the respective data sources • The TDS Server has been installed and configured correctly • All the Discovery Clients have been installed and configured correctly • All the Discovery Administrators have been installed and configured correctly Methodology 53
    • System test This suite of test cases is used to verify that each element of the TDS solution executes properly and that all of the solution elements function properly in relation to one another. System testing verifies that the solution accommodates the following defined requirements: • Installation and Importation of the Decision Support Guides. • Data Source connections must be tested with the database. • Manual population of the cubes (.mdc files) with representative sample data to verify that each cube builds properly and to validate data. • Monitoring of the time it takes to build the cube and identify any network bandwidth issues. • Use the Discovery Interface Client machines to test successful access to the cube and report directories on the server. Production test Production testing is the first time that the TDS solution is subjected to the production environment or a production-like environment. The intent of production testing is to verify that the solution performs properly and with acceptable performance under the load of the operational environment. Production testing can be conducted by mirroring events from the production system so that production-level testing and normal production system activities occur concurrently. Alternatively, a period of time may be specified during which the TDS solution utilizes the production system environment with concurrence from the customer that the solution is in test mode, and the results of the solution are not guaranteed. At this time, the following items require attention: • Manual cube builds are completed successfully and in a suitable time period. • Task Server is running and scheduling the builds on time without running into any errors. • All the Administrators and Client operators display a good knowledge of the product/s that they handle.3.2.6 Documentation phase Documenting the customers deployment is essential to the services engagement. The Project Deployment Summary addresses each element of the customers TDS solution including installation, configuration, customization, automation, and maintenance scripts and programs.54 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Each machine, user, group, and application used by TDS is identified. Thisdocument is the complete reference available to the customer after a servicesengagement and enables the customer to independently maintain andoperate the TDS solution.The Project Deployment Summary also serves as a reference document for aservices organization to perform future enhancements to the customers TDSsolution.The input and output items shown in Table 9 highlight the components of thedocumentation phase:Table 9. Documentation phase items Documentation Phase Installed, configured, customized, and tested TDS solution Input System architecture and design document Detailed project task plan Project deployment summary Output A complete and well-documented TDS deploymentFigure 21 outlines the process flow of the Documentation phase:Documentation Phase Flow System Administration Technical Preparation Overview and INPUT Overview Maintenance Implementation Problem Discussion OUTPUT DeterminationFigure 21. Documentation process flow3.2.6.1 Preparing for documenting the deploymentDuring the Detailed Project Planning segment and throughout theDeployment segment, elements of the Tivoli solution were documented. Insupport of this, the technical consultant in charge of the project plan has donethe following: Methodology 55
    • • Allocated a consultant with an additional project librarian role • Verified and retained all configuration, customization, solution administration, and solution maintenance procedures 3.2.6.2 Project deployment summary This deployment summary is necessary to document all installation, configuration, customization, automation, maintenance scripts and programs developed for the customer. Each machine, user, group and application managed by Tivoli Decision Support is identified as well as the versions of each product installed. Finally, the Deployment Summary documents administration and maintenance tasks necessary to operate the TDS solution. Properly controlled and updated, the document will provide benefit to the TDS solution developed for the customer. The document is comprised of the following topics: System overview This section introduces the TDS solution deployed at the customers site. Using information already created in the System Architecture and Design document, a high level overview of the customers TDS solution is presented. Technical overview The Technical Overview section of the deployment document provides detailed configuration and customization information for: • The architecture of the solution • Automation and maintenance scripts and programs developed for the customer Administration and maintenance procedures This section of the deployment document is the most valuable to the customer. It documents each Tivoli, system, network, application, and database administrator task necessary to operate and maintain the customers TDS solution. Problem determination This is the section of the deployment guide that provides problem determination and analysis information to the customer. Items addressed in this section include the following: • Log and Trace file information • Performance Monitoring tools • Daemon status information • Developed script and program error code conditions56 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • Fail-over analysis • Security permission failures • Database failures • Communications failuresDiscussion of implementationThis is a brief project management discussion highlighting the methodologiesused during deployment. This section of the deployment document includesthe project teams recommendations for future enhancements of thecustomers TDS solution. Methodology 57
    • 58 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Chapter 4. TDS architecture and design considerations The design of any solution is part science and part art, and a number of aspects that need to be considered vary from customer to customer. Only through careful consideration of the receiving information about the organization’s needs and limitations (obtained during the requirements-gathering phase of the project) and an understanding of the technical capabilities and restrictions of Tivoli Decision Support can an optimal architecture be created. This chapter describes the detailed design phase of a Tivoli Decision Support deployment project. The design issues that face us are explained, design strategies are presented, and recommendations are made.4.1 Overview Section 4.2, “Integrating Decision Support with Tivoli Enterprise applications” on page 60 illustrates how and where Tivoli Decision Support fits into a Tivoli enterprise environment. Section 4.3, “Tivoli Decision Support components” on page 61 describes the various Decision Support components and the software with which they are composed. Section 4.4, “Integrating Tivoli Decision Support components” on page 63 illustrates how the components fit together, what their roles are, and their resource requirement needs. Section 4.5, “Stand-alone vs. network architecture” on page 70 compares the Tivoli Decision Support installation modes, Stand Alone mode and Distributed Network mode. This section explains the differences and weigh the advantages and disadvantages of these two installation options. Section 4.6, “Suggested architecture and design solutions” on page 72 presents a set of suggested deployment solutions to common Tivoli environments. Section 4.7, “Troubleshooting tips” on page 81 touches on some of the common problems experienced with Tivoli Decision Support.© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 59
    • 4.2 Integrating Decision Support with Tivoli Enterprise applications In this section, the integration process will be described to provide the reader with a clear picture of how Tivoli Decision Support works within a Tivoli environment, and to gather, manipulate, and present data to the user in an easy-to-interpret format. Tivoli Decision Support works in conjuction with Tivoli’s Enterprise software, such as Distributed Monitoring, Enterprise Console, Inventory, NetView, Software Distribution, and so on, in order to perform its role. These various management applications collect the information and store it in a database. Tivoli Decision Support then accesses these databases through its product-specific TDS Discovery Guides. TMR Server Tivoli Decision Support RDBMS Gateways Discovery Guides Discovery Interface Network Endpoints Figure 22. Tivoli Decision Support functionality diagram The above diagram delineates a high-level integration between Decision Support and a typical Tivoli Enterprise Environment.60 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • The Decision Support process flow is described in the numbered steps below: 1. At the bottom of the diagram, we have Tivoli Management agents (endpoints), running Tivoli products, such as Distributed Monitoring or Inventory. 2. Management Gateways consolidate the data and forward them to Tivoli Management Server. 3. Tivoli applications, such as Software Distribution, Enterprise Console, or Distributed Monitoring, continually update its database or table with data received from all the Tivoli Management agents. 4. Tivoli Decision Support accesses this data by means of an ODBC connection. 5. These data are interrogated by a set of algorithms that are defined by the Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides, which are available in the TDS environment. 6. Tivoli Discovery Administrator then transform this processed data into multidimensional cubes consisting of business relevant information. 7. This information is then viewed by the Decision Support Discovery Interface where the decision maker can perform a drill-down analysis.4.3 Tivoli Decision Support components The basic concepts of the Tivoli Decision Support components have been discussed in Chapter 2, “Tivoli Decision Support general overview” on page 9. This section serves to highlight the technical role(s) that each component plays as well as the products that must be installed. • TDS File Server TDS File Server components include the models, queries, templates, and other information required to build the cubes for the TDS Discovery Administrator and generate views for the TDS Discovery Interface. It is required to install the TDS Server Component product. The following are some important files stored in the TDS File Server component. These files are continually referenced by the other TDS components and are either automatically installed with or dynamically created on the TDS File Server machine. These files are located in the $TDSData directory. • Cubes.mdb This file contains all the SQL queries that are executed during the cube-building process from the Discovery Administrator machine. TDS architecture and design considerations 61
    • • Ed.mdb This file contains all the topic map data. It includes which views are in which categories and topic, and the filename for the view. It also contains the related views, view hint description, and keywords for searches. • DrillThru.mdb This is created on the fly by TDS Administrator to cache the data used to create the cube. This data is then read during a drill-through operation issued from the Discovery Interface. • TDS Discovery Administrator This specialized module enables you to administer Decision Support and to build and customize cubes. This module also assists in the configuration of Decision Support. It is not only required to install the Tivoli Discovery Administrator component on the Discovery Administrator machine, but also the database client component, 32-bit ODBC driver, and Cognos PowerPlay in Administrator mode. The Database Client and ODBC connection are required to access the database during the cube-building process. The kind of database client and ODBC Driver depends on the specific TDS Discovery Guide requirements. Always refer to the TDS Discovery Guide release notes in order to get specific details. The Crystal Reports runtime module is installed automatically at the time of the Discovery Administrator component installation. Note that the full installation of Crystal Reports is optional, and it is required only if the reports need to be changed. • TDS Client Component This is the interface to TDS and provides all the tools needed to open and work with views of the data from your organization’s enterprise databases. On this component, it is not only required to install the TDS Discovery Interface product but also Cognos PowerPlay in Standard mode, the database client, and a 32-bit ODBC Driver. The Database Client and ODBC connection are only required to access Crystal Report format data from the Repository. This depends on whether the topic structure of your respective TDS Guides contain data that uses the Crystal Report templates.62 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 4.4 Integrating Tivoli Decision Support components Now, we are going to take a close look at the Tivoli Decision Support Components and how they integrate with each other. We will discuss the various components highlighting the workload and network bandwidth that each component utilizes in order to perform its tasks successfully. Crystal Reports reports INVENTORY DM TEC DATABASES DISCOVERY INTERFACES ODBC connection PowerPlay reports Cube building Network connection TDS DISCOVERY TDS FILE SERVER ADMINISTRATOR Figure 23. Decision Support components integration Figure 23 portrays a high-level view of the components that make up Tivoli Decision Support and the integration between them. The Tivoli Discovery Administrator module, which is installed on the system administrator’s machine, connects to your enterprise’s databases through an ODBC data source connection and to the TDS File server through a network connection. These connections are used to perform the cube-building process. To provide the Crystal Reports reports, the Tivoli Discovery Interface connects to the enterprise’s databases through an ODBC data source TDS architecture and design considerations 63
    • connection. A network connection to the TDS file server is used to get information from the cubes in order to build multidimensional reports. When you issue a request for information from the Tivoli Discovery Interface, Tivoli Decision Support either reads the information from the database directly, for Crystal Reports reports, or reads the cube file previously created by the Tivoli Discovery Administrator, for PowerPlay reports. The information is then returned to the Discovery Interface and presented to the user in a graphical format. A detailed explanation of the process described above will be discussed in the subsequent sections of this chapter.4.4.1 The cube-building process Our explanation of the cube-building process is divided into four steps. A cube can either be built manually or scheduled. A build is normally scheduled to occur on a regular basis depending on the customer’s business requirements, and it is preferable that it be done during a period of low network and system usage. It is necessary to understand what actually gets out during the cube-building process and the components involved in order to decide on a suitable physical design. We will now describe the process used by Tivoli Decision Support at the time of cube-building highlighting the components involved. We aim to detail the entire process and to make clear that the network traffic that takes place between the TDS components is something to be considered when planning your design solution.64 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • INVENTORY Step One DMTEC TDS DISCOVERY DATABASES ADMINISTRATOR SQL QueriesFigure 24. Cube-building process - Step 1The most bandwidth-intensive task is the cube-building process which isexecuted by the Discovery Administrator. Figure 24 shows step one. Apredefined set of SQL queries are executed on the database from thismachine. All the queries are stored in the Cubes.mdb file. These queriesperform exhaustive interrogation of the database and may take a long time tocomplete.In step two, as shown in Figure 25 on page 66, the raw data is gathered fromthe database through the SQL queries. The Discovery Administrator thencreates the calculated columns and stores all the data on the TDS File serverin the $TDSdataexport directory. TDS architecture and design considerations 65
    • Step Two INVENTORY DM TEC TDS DISCOVERY DATABASES ADMINISTRATOR TDS FILE SERVER Raw Data Processed Data Figure 25. Cube-building process - Step 2 If the query has been designated to export to Drill-through databases, the Discovery Administrator also writes the processed data to a table of the same name as the query in the DrillThru.mdb file stored in the $TDSdata directory on the TDS File server. This table will be used during a drill-through operation issued from the Discovery Interface. Step Three Model Processing Delimited Raw Data Text File Transformer File TDS DISCOVERY ADMINISTRATOR TDS FILE SERVER Processed Cube Figure 26. Cube-building process - Step 366 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 26 on page 66 shows step three. The Discovery Administrator firstretrieves the information from the model files and the data stored in thedelimited text files. Second, the information is stored into a CognosTransformer file format. The Discovery Administrator then runs CognosTransformer and processes the raw data packing it into a cube. The cube fileis now ready to be transferred to the TDS File server machine. The DiscoveryAdministrator then writes the cube file back to the TDS File server on the$TDScubestemp directory. Step Four TDS DISCOVERY ADMINISTRATOR TDS FILE SERVER Rover ProgramFigure 27. Cube-building process - Step 4As shown in Figure 27, the fourth step is when the Discovery Administratorruns a program called Rover to copy the completed cube from the$TDSCubesTemp directory up to the $TDSCubes directory on the TDS Fileserver.After studying this process, it is evident that there will be quite a bit of networktraffic generated between the Discovery Administrator, TDS File Server, andDatabase repository. It is, therefore, suggested that the DiscoveryAdministrator machine be installed on the same physical network and in thesame location as the other two servers. This will result in faster cube buildtimes and also prevent the process from failing due to packets timing out.There can be multiple Discovery Administrator machines, each building cubesfor a separate Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guide. All of them can pointto the server content on the same network TDS File server. A distributedDiscovery Administrator environment is suggested when there is a need tospeed up the cube-building process. Another reason can be for administrativepurposes when there are various people involved with the available guides TDS architecture and design considerations 67
    • and there is a need to localize the Discovery Administrator console for specific users. Note Note When planning to have two or more Discovery Administrators, install the complete TDS Discovery Guide into only one Discovery Administrator machine. Installing separate Discovery Administrator Machines to build different cubes for the same guide IS NOT recommended.4.4.2 The Discovery Interface The Discovery Interface is located on the PC clients and will usually be pointing to the server content located on a TDS File server. The Discovery Interface also makes use of an ODBC connection to the database repository to pull out data for the Crystal Reports reports. The Discovery Interface communicates with the TDS file server to access the multidimensional cubes built by the Discovery Administrator. This is made possible by mapping to a network drive share on the TDS File server. Accessing the cubes Cube, Views, DrillThru ... DISCOVERY INTERFACE TDS FILE SERVER Figure 28. Viewing the multidimensional reports Figure 28 shows the process of accessing the cubes in order to make the information available on the Discovery Interface. The $TDSCubes directory on the file server contains all of the cubes (.mdc files). They are generated periodically through the TDS Discovery Administrator. The PowerPlay report (.ppr) files are also located in the same directory. These are installed by installing a new TDS Discovery Guide. Every time the Discovery Interface is68 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • started and a specific topic selected, these files are pulled over the networkto produce the multidimensional views. In addition, the files Ed.mdb andDrillThru.mdb are also pulled over the network from the TDS File server to theDiscovery Interface machine when using Tivoli Decision Support in a networkmode architectureFigure 29 highlights the process of accessing the data and the templates inorder to have Crystal Reports reports. The $TDSReports directory on the fileserver contains all the Crystal Report files (.rpt). These are also installed byinstalling TDS Discovery Guides. In a network mode architecture, these filesare pulled over the network when a Crystal Report view is selected from thetopic map. Crystal Reports Data INVENTORY Templates DM TEC DISCOVERY DATABASES INTERFACE TDS FILE SERVERFigure 29. Viewing Crystal ReportsThe selection of a Crystal Report identified by a page-like icon in the topicmap performs two network operations. An ODBC connection is establishedwith the database from where the data is collected, and, the respective reporttemplates stored in the $TDSReports directory on the file server are pulledover to the client machine where the TDS Discovery Interface is installed. TheCrystal Report is then displayed on the Discovery Interface.The Discovery Interface also reads information from the $TDSData directoryof the TDS File server. The necessary information includes all the topic mapdata, which views are in which Categories and Topics, the related views, theview hint description, and keywords for searches. This information is found inthe Microsoft Access databases (.mdb) files. TDS architecture and design considerations 69
    • . Note When a new TDS Discovery Guide is installed on the TDS File server, the files Ed.mdb and Cubes.mdb are updated to include the new topic maps and view information. Both the Discovery Interface and the Discovery Administrator components access the contents of these files at application start-up time.4.5 Stand-alone vs. network architecture Before you install Tivoli Decision Support, you need to determine which installation method will be most suitable for your environment. The method you select depends on the way you run TDS. In stand-alone mode, Tivoli Decision Support runs on one machine, and none of its components are shared with anyone else in the entire enterprise. The user of the stand-alone system not only has access to the Discovery Interface but must also administer Tivoli Decision Support. When you install Decision Support to run in stand-alone mode, it is assumed that all Decision Support functions (querying, report generation, and administration) occur on that system. This means that you must install all the Decision Support components on that system with the possible exception of Crystal Reports, which is required only if you plan to change some reports. Figure 30 represents a stand-alone architecture. An installation of this type should only be implemented in a very small environment where a single person is responsible for the administering and decision-making process. INVENTORY ODBC Connection DM TEC Machine running TDS DATABASES in stand alone mode Figure 30. TDS in stand-alone mode70 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • I n network mode, only the Discovery Interface component, PowerPlay inStandard Mode, Crystal Reports (if it is intended to change the Crystalreports), database client, and the ODBC driver are installed on the clientmachine. The other components are installed elsewhere as described below.The user of a client system only has access to the Discovery Interface. TheDiscovery Administrator machine is the only point to administer TivoliDecision Support.The configuration diagram shown in Figure 31 details the connections madebetween the various components in a Network Mode architecture. This is thearchitecture that should be used for medium to large environments ODBC INVENTORY DM TEC DATABASES Service and support Client system Client system Client system database system running Discovery running Discovery running Discovery Interface Interface Interface ODBC Shared File Access File server running System running server components Administrator and client including guides, cubes and modelsFigure 31. Network installation architectureA network mode installation makes it possible for multiple users to accessDecision Support in the various areas of the enterprise. All clients connect tothe file server where the cubes are being updated on an pre scheduled,preferable off hours, basis. This is a more realistic and purposeful deploymentmethod where the various Tivoli Decision Support operations are separated.Only the system administrator will be able to perform the DiscoveryAdministrator tasks, with the client systems only having access to theDiscovery Interface to open and work with the views of data.A mixture of the two installation methods can also be implemented. However,this will depend on the roles and resource capacity of the machines on whichDecision Support runs. The Discovery Administrator and TDS File server canbe installed on the same machine with multiple clients accessing the shared TDS architecture and design considerations 71
    • server component directory. A thing to watch out for, though, is that a cube build may severely reduce the responsiveness of a Client Discovery Interface that is trying to view and drill down into the data at the same time as the cube build.4.6 Suggested architecture and design solutions It is clear from Section 4.4, “Integrating Tivoli Decision Support components” on page 63, that both the Discovery Interface and Discovery Administrator are required to communicate extensively with the TDS File Server and the Database in order to play their roles. From Section 4.5, “Stand-alone vs. network architecture” on page 70, we learned that if multiple users want to run Decision Support in the various areas of their enterprise, they should install the program’s components in network mode. This installation method gives each user access to the Discovery Interface while localizing the TDS Server components on a file server and the Tivoli Discovery Administrator on the system administrator’s machine. Now, we will exercise the lessons learned in this chapter so far. We will take some typical environments as case studies, and, from there, we will suggest a suitable Tivoli Decision Support Architecture. We will consider the following three types of Tivoli business environments: • Typical Tivoli Service Desk • Single TMR environment • Multiple TMR environment4.6.1 Tivoli Service Desk environment - Case study Figure 32 on page 73 shows a Tivoli Service Desk Problem Management environment with Tivoli Decision Support installed on a single machine in stand-alone mode. This is a call center problem-management solution including servers and networked clients. These machines are all managed by Tivoli. The problem management data is stored in a database server on the TEC server. As in all Tivoli Decision Support deployments, one of the questions we must answer is in which architecture mode should TDS be installed? During the Requirements Gathering phase of the project, all information needed to answer this question should be obtained and analyzed. Such information can be, but is not limited to, which Tivoli Service Desk databases are required to72 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • be processed by a TDS Discovery Guide, who is going to utilize the TDS Discovery Interface, who will be responsible for the TDS Discovery Administration machines, and so on. In addition, all Tivoli Service Desk applications and servers of the customer as well as their physical location should be documented. The situation we are faced with represents an architecture in which all the servers are centrally located in one region running on the same network segment as the Problem Management databases. There exist no requirements for decision-making personnel at other locations to access the Decision Support business information. Tivoli Decision Support in a Tivoli Service Desk environment - Problem, Change and - TEC Server Asset Management - Database Server File server - NSM Gateway - TMR Server - Distributed Monitoring - Distributed Monitoring - TME Netview - NSM GatewayTivoli Decision Support - Tivoli Inventory Stand Alone Mode - Problem, Change and Asset Management - Problem, Change and (Stand-Alone Client) Asset Management (Networked Client)Figure 32. Tivoli Service Desk environment case study Since TDS will be used by a single user, we can choose to install it in stand-alone mode. In stand-alone mode, everything runs on one system, and none of the modules are shared with anyone else on the network. In the environment under analysis, this case holds true. We have suggested a single machine to perform the Tivoli Decision Support functionality. This allows for central management and does not put extra traffic on the network. TDS architecture and design considerations 73
    • Communication is only between the Tivoli Decision Support system and the problem management database.4.6.2 Single TMR environment - Case study The most common Tivoli Decision Support implementations will probably be carried out in this type of environment as illustrated in Figure 33 on page 75. The Tivoli management environment servers consist of a TMR server, a TEC server and an RDBMS repository (usually on the same machine as the TEC server). There is only one TMR server with distributed gateways at remote sites. This type of Tivoli Enterprise management environment is usually the case with a single customer with one or more remote locations aside from the head office where the Tivoli Servers are located. It could also be a single location with multiple gateways servicing a large number of endpoints. In either case, systems management functions take place in the central location where the Tivoli management servers are located. The data collected by the management agents is passed from the endpoints through the gateways to the TMR server from where it will update the various database repositories. For the purpose of this particular exercise, we will assume that the Tivoli infrastructure sits in the same location down to the endpoint level.74 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Single TMR environment TEC Server TMR Server INVENTORY DM TEC Inventory TEC Distributed Software Database Monitoring Distribution Repository Gateway Gateway Endpoints EndpointsFigure 33. Single TMR environment case study As before, our first analytical decision is to determine whether we should deploy Tivoli Decision Support in a stand-alone or network mode. In most business, like the one managed in our example, there will be a need to present reports to various levels of management. These reports must present a wide range of data views filtered to the level of detail required by the person operating the Discovery Interface client. There should also be a dedicated systems administrator who is responsible for performing all the systems management technical administration for the business. This individual will, most probably, also be responsible for maintaining the entire Tivoli infrastructure. TDS architecture and design considerations 75
    • Tivoli Decision Support in a single TMR environment TEC Server TMR Server INVENTORY DM TEC Inventory TEC Distributed Software Database Monitoring Distribution Repository TDS TDS Gateway Gateway Administrator File Server TDS Clients Endpoints EndpointsFigure 34. Single TMR environment with Tivoli Decision Support The TDS deployment solution shown in Figure 34 will have to be a network mode installation. The TDS File server, Discovery Interfaces, and Discovery Administrator will be set up to run from the main site along with the other Tivoli enterprise systems. There will be no clients located at the remote sites (if any) and only one Discovery Administrator is required. The solution shown in Figure 34 will integrate with the database repository where the administrators will run queries to build its multidimensional cubes and the Discovery Interface can read off the Crystal Reports reports. The Discovery Interface machine will also make a connection with the TDS file server to access the cubes. All these components are located in the same LAN and, thus, the Tivoli Decision Support process should function optimally.76 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 4.6.3 Multiple TMR environment - Case study A typical multiple TMR environment is shown in Figure 35 on page 78. This environment consists of a Tier 1 TMR Server, a Tivoli Enterprise Console Server used to process events from managed servers and the Database Repository at Site A, and two Tier 2 TMR servers located at Site B and Site C. For each of these Tier 2 TMR servers, we have distributed gateways with the endpoints for each specific site. This type of TME environment is usually the case in a Service Delivery Center implementation with many customers at one or more remote locations and a head office where the Tivoli Tier 1 Servers are located and onto which the Tier 2 server is latched. In this multiple TMR scenario, the key systems-management functions take place in the central location where the Tivoli management Tier 1 servers are located. The data collected by the management agents is passed from the endpoints to their gateways and then to their Tier 2 TMRs. This data is finally passed on to the Tier1 TMR server from where it will update the various database repositories. TDS architecture and design considerations 77
    • Multiple TMR environment TMR Server TEC Server INVENTORY TEC Inventory DM TEC Distributed Software Site A Monitoring Distribution Database Repository Site B Site C Gateway Gateway TMR TMR Server Server Endpoints EndpointsFigure 35. Multiple TMR environment case study For this case, it is very clear that we will need to deploy Tivoli Decision Support in a network-mode. Unlike the single TMR environment, there will be decision makers who need to have access to the business information. This means that we will need to have Discovery Interfaces installed on the remote sites B and C. As in the single TMR environment, there will be a need to present reports to various levels of management, but, in this case, access to the TDS system from remote sites is required.78 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Tivoli Decision Support in a multiple TMR environment TMR Server TEC Server INVENTORY TEC Inventory DM TEC Distributed Software Monitoring Distribution Database Repository TDS Administrator Site B TDS Main TMR File Server Server Gateway TDS Secondary TDS File Server Clients Endpoints TDS ClientsFigure 36. Multiple TMR environment with Tivoli Decision Support As in all other cases, there should be a dedicated Discovery Administrator machine that will be installed on the same network segment as the database repository with the intention of improving performance at the time of the cube generation process. If the installation of additional TDS Discovery Guides is required, this will, in turn, result in increased resource utilization on the administration console. Consequently, the cube-building process will take longer to complete. In order to distribute the work load, it is appropriate to have additional Discovery Administrator machines installed. A scenario where we can have one TDS Discovery Guide per Discovery Administrator machine would be the best approach, but this results in the systems administration tasks being distributed. A separate Administrator machine should then only be TDS architecture and design considerations 79
    • implemented if the business requires that different people manage the guides that are relative to their job roles. Note The multi-dimensional Powerplay cubes are scheduled to be built on a regular basis. Depending on the number of TDS Discovery Guides installed, the number of cubes will increase. The cube building process occurs in a sequential order. The addition of more Discovery Administrators for different Guides will enable the workload to be shared. Now, we face the issue of the distributed Discovery Interface clients that are needed by personnel at the remote sites. Section 4.4.2, “The Discovery Interface” on page 68 discusses the operations and the communication that takes place between the Discovery Interface and all other TDS components. The Discovery Interface will connect to the TDS File Server to retrieve the Powerplay cubes and to the database server to retrieve the data needed to build Crystal Reports. The problem we face is that this connection will now take place over the WAN. This will obviously result in a delayed response while trying to access the various views over the network. To solve this problem, we recommend the implementation of one TDS file server per remote site. The main TDS file server will reside in the same LAN as the Discovery Administrator machine and will be responsible for serving both the Discovery Administrator machine and all the Discovery Interfaces in the main location. On the other sites, the TDS file server will be responsible for serving the Discovery Interfaces there. This configuration will have a significant positive impact on the response times for clients accessing information stored in the cubes. To implement this architecture, some sort of replication needs to take place from the main TDS File server to the local site TDS File servers. One method would be to write a script or program that triggers a file transfer from the main TDS file server to the remote TDS file servers. This process should be executed soon after the scheduled cube build takes place. This will ensure that cubes at all locations reflect the current environment. Besides the cubes, the TDS drill-through database files also need to be replicated.80 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Note The script has to perform a similar function to the TDS rover utility that copies the cubes from the $TDS/Cubes/Temp directory to the $TDS/Cubes directory on the TDS File server. This will ensure that the transfer of cube files does not fail if the Discovery Interfaces are using them.4.7 Troubleshooting tips This section touches on some of the common problems experienced with Tivoli Decision Support.4.7.1 ODBC source Typically, ODBC connectivity errors look like the following example: Error: 40002 - IM006: [Microsoft] [ODBC Driver Manager] Drivers SQLSetConnectAttr failed. Follow the checklist and hints below in order to verify the cause of the problem: • Always verify whether you are using the ODBC database driver for their database platform. The Tivoli Decision Support CD provides ODBC drivers for several database servers. • Check the ODBC setup in every Discovery Administrator and Discovery Interface machine. Notice that not all database platforms are set up the same way. • Check to make sure that you have used the correct qualifier. • Check whether you are able to connect to the database via a client tool, such as SQLplus, isql, command line processor, or other. • Test the connectivity using the Discovery Administrator application by choosing Data Sources -> Test Connectivity; choose the specified data source in the displayed list. The database is pinged to make sure TDS has a connection with the database. If successful, the data source dialog box will appear telling you the connection was successful.4.7.2 Cube building Most customer problems will involve errors encountered when building cubes; therefore, most of the problems will have to do with the TDS administrator or Cognos Powerplay. TDS architecture and design considerations 81
    • Discovery Administrator errors include, but are not limited to, installation errors, ODBC connectivity issues, Visual Basic script syntax errors, SQL syntax errors, runtime errors, and data anomalies. Basically, if the error occurs before the data source file is created, the problem lies either with the Administrator or with the data that is attempting to be exported. After the transformation process, you can see if a cube does not build by examining the Rover window. This window appears as an icon on the task bar at the time of the cube-building process. One error you may receive is Error 53 - Cube did not build. This error is a consequence of a query that returns no data. Cognos creates a log file called EDAdmin.log in the $TDS directory. In addition, you may check the <model>.log file that is created each time a cube is being built. This file gets saved to the $TDS/Model directory. You should look for the entry (TR3201) update of cube XXX is incomplete and find the problem. If a <model>.log file gets created, the cube build has exported the data successfully. The problem then either lies with Cognos or the cube file has not been successfully copied from the $TDSCubesTemp directory to the $TDSCubes directory. Another Rover error you may experience is Error 70 - Permission Denied. In this case, Rover tried to copy the temporary cube to the $TDS/Cubes folder and a user has a view opened that references the cube that is being built. The solution is to either try to build the cube later or ask all users to close the Discovery Interface. If Rover has timed out, you should copy the cubes manually. A failed copy message from Rover may also mean one of two things: • The user does not have write/execute permissions on the $TDS directory. • The cube does not contain at least one compressed record. If you think these two criteria have been satisfied, check the <model.log> file and the EDAdmin.log to find out why the cube did not generate. Cognos errors include, but are not limited to, General Protection Fault errors (GPFs), errors resulting from an incorrectly configured model (.pyg file), and data anomalies. Cognos errors are the opposite of administrator errors and can only originate once the data source file has been created.4.7.3 Discovery interface The following are some common problems and error messages you may receive when using the Discovery Interface:82 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • Discovery Interface does not close down properly If you shut down Windows and the Discovery Interface is still open, you may receive an error that TDS is not closed. You should always close the Discovery Interface before shutting down Windows in order to properly close the OLE link between the Discovery Interface and Cognos PowerPlay.• Receive load_graph_from_powercube encountered error message This error is received when you attempt to display a view for which a cube is not built. You should certify that the cube is built using the Discovery Administrator Component.• Discovery Interface does not display published tab To be able to publish push documents from the Discovery Interface, the published tab must be available from the Hints pane. If this tab is not available, select the Enable ADI Publish option on the Options dialog box of the Tivoli Discovery Publisher. TDS architecture and design considerations 83
    • 84 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Chapter 5. Case study The purpose of this chapter is to apply all the knowledge gained in the previous chapters of this redbook in order to present a structured TDS deployment solution in a real-world customer environment. This chapter aims to provide a reference to assist in any Tivoli Decision Support Implementation. By identifying the similarities between the case study environment and the environment of your enterprise, this chapter can also be used as a guide to estimate time scales, tasks involved, and process flows for deploying a Tivoli Decision Support solution. For this case study, the customer will be the IBM Service Delivery Center (SDC) West. All the information, ideas, and strategies provided by Chapter 3, “Methodology” on page 23 and Chapter 4, “TDS architecture and design considerations” on page 59 will be utilized here to provide a recommended solution for the IBM SDC West environment. For any Tivoli deployment solution, there is normally a group of professionals composed of Tivoli Architects, Technical Experts, and others who are responsible for providing the official and complete Tivoli deployment architecture and solution design for all management products including Tivoli Decision Support. All information provided by this chapter should, therefore, only be used as a project guide and not as an official solution.5.1 Overview As mentioned above, this chapter suggests a Tivoli Decision Support implementation solution for the IBM SDC West Environment. The SDC West provides strategic I/T out-sourcing services to over 50 IBM and commercial customers all over the United States. The SDC delivers a broad scope of solutions including server management (from S390 servers to NT servers), desk-side support, and customer care services. They do this through four teams: Enterprise Services Delivery, Distributed Services Delivery, the Business & Technology office, and the Customer Service Center. They are one of four geographic service delivery centers in IBM Global Services. The purpose of the case study is to detail a Tivoli Decision Support solution, which will be integrated into the IBM SDC West Tivoli architecture with the intention of providing a simple flowing migration from the reporting tools currently implemented.© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 85
    • We aim to exploit the Tivoli Decision Support technology using IBM as a showcase with the goal of reducing IBM IT reporting costs. This chapter will provide a list of Future Requirements for Tivoli Decision Support where ideas for extra features will be presented based on our experience with the case study.5.2 Methodology Now, we will practice the methodology described in Chapter 3, “Methodology” on page 23. The case study will start with a requirements-gathering phase where a survey of reporting requirements and the current SDC West environment will be carried out. We will then use predefined techniques to analyze all the received information to present a technical proposal to meet the customer’s requirements. A procedure-driven deployment exercise will then be presented illustrating the steps and task flow for each phase of the roll out.5.2.1 Requirements gathering phase The requirements gathering phase is split into three sections: • Section 5.3, “The existing Tivoli environment” on page 87 describes the actual Tivoli environment used by the customer; • Section 5.4, “Identifying the reports requirements” on page 92 details the current reporting strategy used by the customer and shows reports currently used by them to meet their requirements; • Section 5.5, “Customer objectives” on page 113 describes a set of customer needs and objectives to meet their reporting requirements.5.2.2 Systems analysis and design In this phase, all the requirements gathered in the previously-described sections will be processed. Section 5.6, “Mapping Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides” on page 114 will analyze the current reports generated by the customer. These reports will be reviewed and a specific TDS Guide will be recommended to produce similar results. In addition, we will show the corresponding graphic or a combination of graphics that fit the customer requirements. Section 5.8, “Suggested architecture and solution design” on page 140 presents a recommended architecture and design solution for the SDC West environment.86 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 5.2.3 Deployment Section 5.9, “Tivoli Decision Support deployment process” on page 144 delineates the implementation of the design defined in Section 5.8, “Suggested architecture and solution design” on page 140. A high-level task flow will be presented for each step of the deployment process.5.3 The existing Tivoli environment This section provides information about the Tivoli environment deployed in the customer’s environment. We will discuss TMR servers, TEC servers, Database servers, RIM hosts, and all Tivoli applications that can be a potential source of information for reporting.5.3.1 Tivoli general architecture As shown in Figure 37 on page 88, the customer has implemented what they call a Hub-Spoke TMR architecture. This model consists of a Tier 1 (Hub) TMR server in Boulder, which performs a dual role as the Tivoli Enterprise Console (TEC) and the TMR server, and some Tier 2 (Spoke) TMR servers located at each site. The Hub TMR server has a two-way connection to each of the Spoke TMR servers. All monitors reside on the Hub TMR/TEC and are distributed downward to the Spoke TMR servers and Gateways. This allows SDC West to manage all monitors in the enterprise from a common repository avoiding duplication and inconsistency, as well as the means to quickly determine exactly which monitors are distributed to which systems. All rules processing of events takes place on the Hub TMR allowing the same consistency as with the monitors. In addition, all notifications are initiated from the Hub TMR. Performance and capacity data collected from servers running Tivoli Distributed Monitoring monitors are stored on the Hub TMR server and then processed at the end of the day by scripts and programs. The customer plans to have two separate Tivoli Management infrastructures. One is planned to manage the servers, and the other will be dedicated to managing all desktops. For this case study, we will focus on the server infrastructure since the desktop infrastructure has not been completed at the time of this requirement-gathering phase. The desktop infrastructure is expected to be Case study 87
    • similar to the server infrastructure with the need for fewer high-availability features. TEC Boulder Consoles HUB TMR HUB-Spoke TMR Arquitecture TEC / Sybase Boulder Boulder San Jose Spoke TMR Spoke TMR Spoke TMR Boulder Boulder San Jose Santa Teresa Gateways Gateways Gateways Gateways Endpoints Managed Nodes & Endpoints Endpoints EndpointsFigure 37. Service Delivery Center - West architecture5.3.2 TMR servers The customer has a Hub-Spoke model TMR architecture. Due to the number of desktops and the need for a high-availability environment for the TMR servers, this architecture is considered optimal and can make tuning of the server and desktop infrastructures easier. The server infrastructure Hub TMR is located in Boulder, Colorado. Spoke TMR locations were based on analysis of the following criteria: LAN proximity and loading, geographic location, network topology, capacity management of the Spoke TMR, and the number of servers in a project or account. The actual location of the Spoke TMRs are: Two in Boulder, Colorado and one in San Jose, California.88 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 5.3.3 Endpoint gateways Gateways are located using a static schema based on analysis of the following criteria: LAN proximity and loading, geographic location, network topology, capacity management of the Spoke TMR, and the number of servers in a project or account. Sizing guidelines are one gateway for every 500 endpoints. Note that there are two gateways under a spoke TMR, so 1000 endpoints can be managed under a particular spoke TMR. All endpoints have three possible Gateways. The first two are the ones located near (network-wise) the endpoints. The third gateway runs on a spoke TMR. The Spoke TMR works as a failover gateway, and no Endpoints are assigned to it. Two gateways are assigned under each spoke TMR in Boulder and four gateways are assigned under the spoke TMR in San Jose. Also, SDC West has two physical gateway servers placed in Santa Teresa assigned under the San Jose spoke TMR. Gateway code also runs on each spoke TMR.5.3.4 TEC server A master TEC server is used to process events from managed servers. It is located in Boulder, Colorado and physically resides in the Hub TMR server. TEC server configuration was based on analysis of the following criteria: Frequency of TEC events, LAN proximity and loading, geographic location, network topology, capacity management of the TEC, detail level of event management, number of Tivoli managers deployed, and the number of resources managed. Events come from both in-band and out-of-band sources. Events are originated from Tivoli products and non-Tivoli products. These events are sent to the TEC as TEC events either by the originating source or after conversion to TEC events by Netview. Events are processed by the TEC server and displayed on a TEC console in a 24x7 operations facility in Boulder, Colorado and sent by pager to the same group. Second-level support or any other individual can also receive events by page and e-mail. Three TEC consoles are used by operations. These consoles are operated through a Tivoli desktop running Windows 95. TEC events are defined by the following groups: Host availability, Netview node up/down, new ping (socksified host availability), process, file system, Case study 89
    • NotesView, Netfinity, AMA, CRT, MQSeries, NFS subsystem, SNA links, hardware, and SP switch interface. These events are stored in a Sybase SQL Server Database and will be used as a source of information for the Tivoli Decision Support Event Management Discovery Guide.5.3.5 RDBMS and RIM hosts configuration The Sybase SQL Server for AIX is installed in the Hub TMR Server in Boulder, Colorado. The TEC Database is configured on this server with 500 MB of space for data and 250 MB of space for log and stores all events processed by the TEC Server. This database is planned to accommodate the Event Management Discovery Guide data. The TEC RIM host for the server infrastructure is also located on the physical Hub TMR server.5.3.6 Tivoli DM and monitors for performance and capacity trend data The SDC West has implemented Tivoli Distributed Monitoring to provide standard monitors for AIX and Windows NT servers. These monitors store the data collected into flat files, which are processed later, on the Hub TMR. The standard monitors for AIX servers are: • CPU Usage used to compute hourly average and sampled every minute • Process memory and paging space sampled hourly • Network packets (in/out) and errors (in/out) sampled daily. • File system snapshot sampled daily. Today, the SDC West makes use of Netfinity Capacity Manager in order to collect performance and capacity data from the Windows NT servers. The DM monitors are used to collect availability information. The following are the standard monitors for Windows NT servers that will be implemented at the time of the TDS deployment: • CPU usage - This is the percentage of processor time monitor (NT_Processor monitoring collection) and is sampled every 10 minutes. • Memory usage - This is the pages/sec. and Available Bytes monitors (NT_Memory monitoring collection) and is sampled every 10 minutes with an hourly average.90 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • Network Activity - This reflects the ammount of Packets Outbound Errors and Packets Received Errors (NT_NetworkMonitor monitoring collection). • Disk Utilization - This is the percentage of utilization of each drive or disk on the system. Currently using the Disk Space Percentage Used monitor in the Universal monitoring collection.The way monitors get distributed to servers is dependent upon therelationships between the various Tivoli container objects. Essentially,monitors are grouped in profile managers (and their sub-profiles) by account,platform, function, and so forth on the Hub TMR following a consistentnaming convention. On the Spoke TMRs, similarly-named profiles exist,which have corresponding names and simply act as containers for subscribedservers. The Hub TMR profile manager then subscribes the Spoke TMRprofile managers to it.Figure 38 on page 92 shows the actual profile structure implemented by thecustomer. Case study 91
    • Distributed Monitoring HUB TMR NCO Customer ABC NCO NCO ABC ABC AIX Monitors NT Monitors WEB AIX Monitors DFS Monitors ABC NT Monitors ABC ABC AIX Monitors WEB Domino Monitors TMR2 Spoke TMR NCO.TMR2 Customer ABC.TMR2 ABC ABC NCO NCO WEB AIX.TMR2 DFS.TMR2 AIX.TMR2 NT.TMR2 ABC ABC NT.TMR2 AIX.TMR2 ABC AIX NT WEB Domino.TMR2 Managed Node Managed NodeFigure 38. Tivoli Distributed Monitoring object relationships5.4 Identifying the reports requirements One of the most important steps to be performed when planning to either migrate to or deploy Tivoli Decision Support is to gather all the customer reporting requirements. This will enable us to decide, for example, which TDS Discovery Guides will be used, how many Tivoli Discovery Administrator machines will be needed, and what the required hardware configuration for each component of TDS will be. In this section, we will discuss and identify both the customer’s requirements for reporting and all reports that are currently being used to satisfy these92 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • requirements. Future requirements, as well as future recommendations, will be discussed in Section 5.10, “Future reporting requirements” on page 162. Note It is beyond the scope of this redbook to identify all the reports generated and used by IBM SDC West. We will only consider the reports that cover the basic metrics of availability, capacity and performance, response time to failure (sla), and cost if available.5.4.1 Customer reporting requirements Reporting requirements in Distributed Systems Management (DSM) translate into five fundamental metrics: • Availability Reports • Performance Measurement • Response Time to Failures (SLA) • Cost Prediction and Measurement • Detailed Applications Related Reports5.4.2 The SDC actual solution for reporting As shown in Figure 39 on page 94, IBM SDC West uses a variety of platforms and systems-management tools to collect the required data to generate reports of its distributed environment. The challenge is to find a solution that is able to process and interpret the data stored in different databases in different servers. Case study 93
    • Tool 1 Analysis Tool 2 . . . Tool n Reports Figure 39. The Problem for reporting IBM SDC West uses two methods for reporting. Despite valiant efforts, these two methods are still facing the problem of using multiple tools, dealing with different sources of information, and storing the data in files with different formats. The first one will be referred as the in-house method, which has been developed by the IBM Service Delivery Center Tucson, Arizona. The second method, Server Resource Management (SRM), has been developed by the IBM Global Service South Performance & Capacity team. For organizational and security reasons, both methods utilize the concept of accounts to access the reports. Each group of people responsible for their account has the capability of looking only at the reports that are related to their business and interest. There are IBM internal accounts, which are related to IBM internal departments or locations, and external accounts, which are related to IBM customers. All these reports can be reached either through the IBM Intranet or Internet. For the purpose of this case study, we will look at the reports of an internal IBM account called Network Computing Offerings (NCO). The NCO account uses both methods of reports. We will identify the reports available in the actual SDC solution for reporting and then map these reports with those produced by Tivoli Decision Support. 5.4.2.1 The in-house method The in-house solution relies on many sources for collecting data, such as: • UNIX-based tools:94 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • The vmstat command is sampled every minute and used to compute an hourly average. • Process memory is checked witht the ps gv command and paging space percentage full is checked with the lsps -a command and sampled hourly. • Network packets in/out and errors in/out are sampled daily using the netstat command. • File systems snapshot is checked with the df -k command and sampled daily. • Tivoli Applications: • Tivoli Distributed Monitoring • Tivoli NetView • Tivoli Enterprise Console • Netfinity Capacity ManagerFigure 40 shows how the process is used for reporting the in-house method: M onitors Pe rl Scripts and Program s Tivoli A pplications HT M L and Ja va form at AIX Tools IBM Intra net Phase 3 - Report G eneration Netfinity M onitors Phase 2 - Data Processin g Phase 1 - Data Co llectionFigure 40. The in-house process for reporting Case study 95
    • The three phases of the in-house process are detailed in the following list: • Phase 1 - Data Collection The monitors collect relevant information according to some predefined thresholds and write the data to files on a file server. • Phase 2 - Data Processing As soon as the data is collected, it is processed daily by the in-house Perl scripts and programs populating some flat files for each server and metric. The rolling year of data is kept. • Phase 3 - Report Generation The reports are generated in HTML and Java format showing each months data in tabular format with links to applets that graph the data sets for the year by account (server group). 5.4.2.2 The SRM method In order to satisfy the actual requirement for reporting, IBM Global Service South Performance & Capacity team has developed a set of Server Resource Management tools to expand the performance and capacity trending on the Distributed Systems Management (DSM) platforms and applications, such as AIX/UNIX, Windows NT, OS/2, SAP R/3, and Lotus Notes. The SRM tool set is used for both internal and external account reporting. The SRM solution relies on existing monitoring tools for each available platform, such as Netfinity Capacity Manager (CISC platforms), Perl Scripts (RISC platforms), Zperstat (for SAP R/3), and NotesView (Lotus environment) to collect and pass on event data. The SRM tool is divided into four main components that enable the performance and capacity trending process as detailed in the following list: • Phase 1 - Collection The data is passively collected in multiple formats and stored into files. • Phase 2 - Transmission The SRM tool receives the data and converts it to a common format. Then the data are stored in a single database in a convenient format. • Phase 3 - Analysis An automated process provides Distributed Systems Management resource trending and exception analysis in this phase. • Phase 4 - Web Preparation and Presentation96 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • The data is processed and HTML and Java reports are generated and published on the IBM Intranet. Figure 41 graphically represents the SRM collection and reporting process: SRM Netfinity Manager Phase 4 - WEB Presentation Phase 3 - Analysis Perl Scripts SAS/VM DB2 IBM Zperstat Intranet NotesView Phase 2 - Transmission Phase 1 - Collection Figure 41. The SRM method for reporting5.4.3 The Reports of the NCO account In this section, we will show the reports generated by the two methods described in Section 5.4.2, “The SDC actual solution for reporting” on page 93. The goal here is to provide information about the current scenario of reporting used at IBM SDC West to satisfy the actual requirements. 5.4.3.1 In-house reports The following are the reports available for the NCO account using the in-house method for reporting: 1. Performance and capacity metric summary As shown in Figure 42 on page 98, this report shows CPU utilization, memory paging utilization, and network I/O (IP packets and errors count) Case study 97
    • per server for a specified month. There are also links from which you can have access to detailed reports by server. For CPU and Memory/Paging, the first pair of numbers lists the averages of all samples and the average of the eight highest samples of data. The second average gives some indication of load during high usage bursts, which may or may not occur during consecutive prime shift hours. If the averages are similar, it can be inferred that usage of the system is relatively steady throughout the day. The number in parentheses lists the daily high sample. For Network IO, the daily IP packet and error counts in parentheses are shown for input and output. Network IO Utilization CPU Utilization by server DASD Usage Report Process Memory and Paging UtilizationFigure 42. In-house performance and capacity The following are descriptions of the detailed reports of the server snjs1sm1.sanjose.ibm.com .98 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 43 states the high sample, the average of all samples, and the average of the highest eight samples for CPU utilization by server:Figure 43. Detailed report - CPU utilization by server • CPU utilization by server For UNIX servers, the data is collected every minute using the vmstat command. For Windows NT servers, it is done by Netfinity Capacity Manager. The data shown for future months is from the previous year. Figure 44 on page 100 states the high sample, the average of all samples, and the average of the highest eight samples for process memory and paging utilization. Case study 99
    • Figure 44. Detailed report - process memory and paging utilization by server • Process Memory and Paging Utilization by Server For UNIX servers, the data is collected on a hourly basis using the ps and the lsps commands. For NT servers, all data is collected by Netfinity Capacity Manager. Figure 45 on page 101 states the number of IP packets In and Out.100 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 45. Detailed report - network I/O utilization • Network I/O utilization by server For UNIX servers, daily IP packet and error counts are collected using the netstat command for input and output. For Windows NT servers, the data is collected using Netfinity Capacity Manager. Figure 46 on page 102 shows the size and daily percentage of kilobytes used by the file systems for each server. Case study 101
    • DASD Usage for snjs1sm1.sanjose.ibm.com Figure 46. Detailed report - DASD usage by server • DASD utilization by server For AIX Server, the data is collected using the df -k command. For Windows NT servers, the data is collected using Netfinity Capacity Manager. 2. Availability and alerts summary The report shown in Figure 47 on page 103 displays the availability by server per month. Nodes are considered unavailable between node DOWN and node UP events received by the monitoring server (NetView, MLM, Tivoli applications, and so on). Availability windows are not currently factored in (assume 7x24). Data is generated at the end of each month; therefore, data for the current or future months, if shown, is from the previous year. In addition, percentages under 95 show up in red. The report shown in Figure 47 on page 103 shows a summary of the events for each system based on the current alert log for the account NCO.102 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Availability for NCO Systems Alert SummaryFigure 47. Percentage availability by server • Alert summary report Items covered by this report include the number of alerts and log entries, CPU and disk utilization, node up or down, and services stopped or started. Refer to Figure 48: Alert summary for: amawest1.boulder.ibm.com Note: Account alert logs are regularly trimmed -- the oldest events shown will vary by how many alerts a system receives. Log Entry Count Alert 5 . . . . . . Node down (unpingable from monitor server) 5 . . . . . . Node up (pingable from monitor server) Log Entries: Tue Jun 8 05:49:33 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node down (unpingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 8 06:01:43 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node up (pingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 11 05:52:39 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node down (unpingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 13 05:50:09 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node up (pingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 13 05:50:09 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node up (pingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 14 06:00:29 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node down (unpingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 14 08:59:54 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node up (pingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 15 05:51:12 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node down (unpingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 15 08:42:49 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node up (pingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 16 06:20:51 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node down (unpingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os] Tue Jun 16 08:27:16 MDT 1999 System [amawest.boulder.ibm.com (9.99.188.204)], Message [Node up (pingable from monitor server)], Subsystem [os]Figure 48. Detailed alert summary by server Case study 103
    • 5.4.3.2 SRM Reports The following describes the reports available for the NCO South account using the SRM tool set. We will describe the reports for Lotus Notes application, AIX Performance, and Windows NT Performance. 1. Lotus Notes reports The following are the reports available for NCO South Lotus Notes servers: • Mail Server Report This report gives daily, weekly, and monthly statistics on Lotus Notes mail servers in the NCO South account, such as number of concurrent users, number of mail traffic messages, and response time. The report shown in Figure 49 is the monthly utilization statistic:Figure 49. Lotus Notes - Monthly mail server statistics report • Database Server Report This report gives daily, weekly, and monthly statistics on Lotus Notes database servers in the NCO South account, such as number of104 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • concurrent users, the number of replicated documents, and so on. The report shown in Figure 50 is the monthly utilization statistic. There are also reports that include weekly and daily statistics.Figure 50. Lotus Notes - Monthly database server report • Mail Hub Server Report This report gives daily, weekly, and monthly statistics on Lotus Notes database servers in the NCO South account, such as number of total mail traffic (MBytes) and the average response time. Figure 51 on page 106 shows the daily utilization statistic. Other reports include weekly and monthly statistics. Case study 105
    • Figure 51. Lotus Notes - Daily mail hub report • MTA Server Report This report gives daily, weekly, and monthly statistics on Lotus Notes MTA servers in the NCO South account, such as number of SMTP transferred messages and the average response time. Figure 52 shows the daily utilization statistic. Other reports include weekly and monthly statistics.Figure 52. Lotus Notes - Daily MTA server report • Hourly Response Time Report This report gives hourly response time on the Lotus Notes database, MTA hub, and mail server in the NCO South account. Figure 53 shows the hourly response time for the Lotus Notes mail server.106 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 53. Lotus Notes - Hourly response time report • Hourly Concurrent Users Report This report gives hourly concurrent users on the Lotus Notes database and mail server in the NCO South account. Figure 54 shows the concurrent users report for the Lotus Notes mail server, which is produced daily.Figure 54. Lotus Notes - Hourly concurrent users report Case study 107
    • • Hourly Sessions per Minute Report This report gives hourly sessions per minute on Lotus Notes servers in the NCO South account. Figure 55 shows the hourly sessions per minute by server report, which is produced daily.Figure 55. Lotus Notes - Hourly sessions-per-minute report • Hourly Mailbox Size Report This report gives hourly sessions mail box size on Lotus Notes servers in the NCO South account. Figure 56 shows the hourly mail box size by server report and is produced daily.Figure 56. Lotus Notes - Hourly mail box size report108 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • Hourly SMTP Transferred Messages This report gives hourly SMTP transferred messages on Lotus Notes servers in the NCO South account. Figure 57 shows the hourly transferred messages by server report, which is produced daily.Figure 57. Lotus Notes - Hourly SMTP transferred messages report 2. AIX reports The following reports are produced by SRM for AIX servers in the NCO South account. • CPU/Storage Utilization and IO Wait Report This report gives daily, weekly, and monthly CPU Utilization of the AIX servers in the NCO South account. Figure 58 on page 110 shows the monthly utilization statistics. There are also reports that include weekly and daily statistics. In addition, we can access data for a specific server. Case study 109
    • Figure 58. AIX servers - CPU utilization reports • Warnings Only (daily, weekly, monthly) This report gives the daily warnings during prime time of excessive CPU utilization by AIX servers in the NCO South account according to specified thresholds. This is a subset of the report shown in Figure 58, which contains only those servers with exceeded thresholds. • Hard Disk/File System Utilization Report This report shows the hard disk and file system availability by AIX servers in the NCO South account. Figure 59 on page 111 shows the disk and file system utilization by server report, which is produced daily.110 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 59. AIX servers - Hard disk and file systems utilization report • AIX Capacity Summary This report gives a summary of the percentage of utilization for all available AIX servers in the NCO South account. The report shown in Figure 60 shows statistics on CPU utilization, Run Queue status, Memory status, IO Wait status, and Disk space status on a rolling month basis for all servers. Figure 60. AIX servers - Account summary report Case study 111
    • 3. Windows NT Reports The following reports are produced by SRM for Windows NT servers in NCO South account. • CPU, Memory and Disk Utilization (daily weekly monthly) This report gives daily, weekly and monthly CPU Utilization of the Windows NT servers in the NCO South. Figure 61 on page 112 shows the monthly utilization statistics. Other reports include weekly and daily statistics. In addition, we can access data for a specific server.Figure 61. NT servers - CPU, memory, and disk utilization report • Windows NT capacity summary This report gives a summary of the percentage of utilization of all the available Windows NT servers in the NCO South account. The report shown in Figure 62 on page 113 shows statistics on CPU utilization, Memory status, and Disk space status on a rolling month basis for all servers.112 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 62. NT servers - Account Summary Report5.5 Customer objectives Although the customer has, over the years, developed a solution that works and meets the company’s reporting requirements, there still exists, as in all IT solutions, room to improve and produce a more cost-effective and powerful solution. Most of today’s businesses display a reasonable amount of concern about aspect,s such as gaining further savings on optimization of server resources while maintaining a high level of productivity. This is also the case with the SDC West. An ideal reporting tool that enables the customer to meet his or her goals would provide functions, such as Workload Characterization and Modelling. A brief discussion of these two reporting techniques follows: • Workload Characterization This process maps an application metric against the server resources used, such as transaction rates/averages versus server storage and CPU utilization. For DSM machines, the quality of collection data varies by platform and kernel collection method used. Application workload data is collected and key metrics trended to produce historical usage, application drivers, and server resources used; the output is a baseline representing customer usage and server resources consumed. Case study 113
    • • Modelling Once the workload characterization baseline is in place, What If models and scenarios may be built based on customers estimated business drivers and/or the associated server resource to be assigned to meet future business drivers. With the actual solution for reporting being used by the SDC West, workload balancing and modeling is performed platform by platform, for example, RISC to RISC and CISC to CISC (but not RISC to OS/390 or other cross-platform combinations). Tivoli Decision Support along with its Discovery Guides is the best solution for the customer’s objectives and performs exceptionally well with most business strategies. Tivoli Decision Support best delivers on server requirements for expanded Data Collection, Database Interface, Workload Characterization, Modeling, and Web Publishing.5.6 Mapping Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides During this phase, we have evaluated the various TDS Discovery Guides. In most situations, these guides, powered by the drill down capability of TDS, can completely cover the SDC requirements. In some situations, however, is necessary to use two or more TDS reports to map an SDC report. On the other hand, some reports requirements are not able to be covered by TDS and these reports will be mentioned in Section 5.10, “Future reporting requirements” on page 162. Table 10 shows the TDS Discovery Guides being mapped to the customer’s requirements. Table 10. The TDS Discovery Guides mapping TDS Discovery Guide Customer requirements Server Performance Prediction Performance Measurement Cost Prediction Event Management Response Time to Failures (SLA) Domino Management Detailed Application Related reports Network Element Performance Network Capacity and Performance analysis5.6.1 Detailed reports mapping workshop As described in Section 5.4.2, “The SDC actual solution for reporting” on page 93, the customer has some reports that are used to partially attend their114 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • actual requirement for reporting. In this section, we will show the reports fromvarious TDS Discovery Guides that have been analyzed in Section 5.6,“Mapping Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides” on page 114 andcompare them to the customer’s actual scenario.The following table shows the customer current reports and a reference forthe recommended TDS report. These report will be displayed in Section 5.7,“Tivoli Decision Support reports and business information” on page 116.Table 11. Detailed mapping reference table Customer Current Reports Recommended TDS Report Performance and Capacity metrics Figure 63 on page 118 Summary. Refer to Figure 42 on page 98 CPU utilization by server. Refer to Figure Figure 64 on page 119 43 on page 99 Process memory and Paging utilization by Figure 65 on page 120 server. Refer to Figure 44 on page 100 Network I/O utilization by server. Refer to Figure 66 on page 121 Figure 45 on page 101 DASD utilization by server. Refer to Figure Future requirement 46 on page 102 Percent of Availability by server. Refer to Future requirement Figure 47 on page 103 Alert Summary report. Refer to Figure 48 Future requirement on page 103 Figure 74 on page 130 Lotus Notes Mail server statistics. Refer to Figure 75 on page 131 Figure 49 on page 104 Figure 76 on page 132 Figure 77 on page 133 Figure 78 on page 134 Lotus Notes - Database server report. Figure 77 on page 133 refer to Figure 50 on page 105 Figure 78 on page 134 Figure 79 on page 135 Lotus Notes - Mail Hub server report. Figure 75 on page 131 Refer to Figure 51 on page 106 Figure 78 on page 134 Lotus Notes - MTA server report. Refer to Future requirement Figure 52 on page 106 Lotus Notes - Response time report. Refer Figure 80 on page 136 to Figure 53 on page 107 Case study 115
    • Customer Current Reports Recommended TDS Report Lotus Notes - Concurrent users report. Figure 77 on page 133 refer to Figure 54 on page 107 Lotus Notes - Sessions per minute report. Future requirement Refer to Figure 55 on page 108 Lotus Notes - Mail box size report. Refer to Figure 81 on page 137 Figure 56 on page 108 Lotus Notes - SMTP transferred messages report. Refer to Figure 57 on Future requirement page 109 CPU and Memory utilization, and I/O wait report by Operating Systems (AIX and Figure 67 on page 122 Windows NT). Refer to Figure 58 on page 110, and Figure 61 on page 112 Hard Disk and File System utilization report by Operating Systems. Refer to Future requirement Figure 59 on page 111, and Figure 61 on page 112 Capacity Summary by Operating System. Refer to Figure 60 on page 111, and Figure 68 on page 123 Figure 62 on page 1135.7 Tivoli Decision Support reports and business information In this section, we will give a brief description of the identified Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides that will be used to cover the customer’s reporting requirements for this case study. In addition, we will show some reports that were used in Section 5.6.1, “Detailed reports mapping workshop” on page 114 to map the existing customer’s reports. The intention here is to provide a report scenario with the same (or enhanced) quality as the current customer’s reporting scenario.5.7.1 Server Performance Prediction Guide The purpose of this guide is to supply data to help plan the network growth using basic trending of key system metrics. Most of the performance problems in workstation networks and servers are the result of system workload gradually increasing to the point where it exceeds the capacity of the system or, as a result of soft errors, gradually increasing in volume until a catastrophic hard (unrecoverable) error occurs.116 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • This guide relies on Tivoli Distributed Monitoring as the source of the networkactivity data and, if available, the Tivoli Inventory supporting enterprisesystem hardware information.The objective of the Tivoli Decision Support for Server PerformancePrediction (SPP) Discovery Guide is to provide the customer with thecapacity to plan using basic trending of key system metrics. Most workstationand server performance problems in a network can be avoided by identifyingthe system workload on time before it exceeds the capacity of the systems.The SPP guide has subsections in the form of questions, such as: • How might I improve performance on my systems? • How is my overall performance? • What performance problems are on the horizon?By clicking on these question icons, information can be obtained about yourenvironment in a report format.The following are some reports available with the Server PerformancePrediction Discovery Guide.All System Metrics reportThe following metrics are intended for both UNIX and NT platforms: • CPU percent busy (user time and system time) • CPU run queue length • Disk I/O rate and Disk transfer rate • Memory page-in/out rate (pages/sec.) • Memory page-scan rate (seeks/sec.) • Network packet collision rate (packet/sec.) • Network packet input/output rate (packets/sec.) • Network packet input/output error rate (packets/sec.) (packet # on NT)Figure 63 on page 118 shows the All System Metrics report, which displays asummary of all system performance metrics sorted down by system purpose. Case study 117
    • Figure 63. All System Metrics report CPU utilization by server By using the drill down facility, we can have some variations of the All System Metrics report. Figure 64 on page 119 only shows CPU utilization for a particular server called ariel .118 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 64. CPU utilization by server report Memory Utilization by Server From the All system metrics report, we can choose to show only the memory utilization. Once again, by using the drill down capability, we select only the DNS servers available in our network. Figure 65 on page 120 shows an example of the memory utilization for all DNS servers in July, 1999. Case study 119
    • Figure 65. Memory utilization report Network I/O utilization by server This report provides network packet I/O rate, network packet I/O error rate, and network packet collision rate. Figure 66 on page 121 shows example network I/O rate information for all SAP R/3 servers.120 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 66. Network I/O utilization report CPU utilization and memory page rates by operating system As shown in Figure 67 on page 122, this report provides daily information about CPU Utilization (% units) and memory page rates by operating system for all Oracle servers in our environment. Case study 121
    • Figure 67. CPU utilization memory page rates by operating system Summary by operating system This report gives a summary of utilization of all available servers by operating system for all collected metrics. Figure 68 on page 123 shows the summary of all AIX servers for July, 1999.122 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 68. Summary report by operating system Forecasts reports One of the most important features available in this TDS Discovery Guide is the ability to provide forecasts. We can, for example, predict future average CPU utilization of all servers in order to avoid a possible system slow down. In Figure 69 on page 124, we show examples of 30, 60, and 90 day average forecasts of CPU utilization of all servers grouped by system purpose. Case study 123
    • Figure 69. CPU average forecast by system purpose Under-provisioned and Over-provisioned servers This view highlights systems where the CPU activity is disproportionate to the network activity. If you have a system that shows very high CPU utilization but has relatively low network activity, that system may be under-provisioned (the CPU is inadequate for the work load). If you have a system that shows very low CPU utilization but has relatively high network activity, that system may be over-provisioned (the CPU is excessive for the work load). The measure used for this view is the processor overload. This is expressed as a percentage of the difference between the CPU and network utilization divided by the network utilization. Figure 70 on page 125 is an example of this report for all SAP R/3 servers.124 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 70. Under-provisioned/Over-provisioned servers report5.7.2 Event Management Guide This TDS Discovery Guide provides a strategic view of network activity as recorded in TEC events and information about the response time for these events. In addition, it provides information about areas of high activity or recurring patterns of system activity. The combination of the Tivoli Discovery Administrator and the Tivoli Discovery Interface with Tivoli Decision Support for Event Management provides you with the following powerful analysis and reporting capabilities: • It gathers and reviews information based on a set of powerful questions and reports that address success rates, effectiveness, trends, peak volume, and sources of events. • It presents event management information as charts and tabular reports. • It automates data acquisition and cube building This guide helps you to tune your event management process using TEC. It will help you assess your performance in terms of the number of problems being experienced and their severity as well as how effectively you are resolving them. Case study 125
    • The following are some reports available with the Event Management Discovery Guide. SLA statistics by event class This report ranks the different types of events that you have handled according to which ones have most often not been resolved within the bounds of the Service Level Agreement. Figure 71 shows information, such as the percentage of met, missed, and nearly-missed SLAs.Figure 71. SLA statistics by event class Which events take the longest to fix? This view gives you a snapshot of the average duration (mean time to repair) for events of different classes and highlights the ones that take the longest to fix. Figure 72 on page 127 shows the amount of time in minutes that certain events, such as Link_Down_Cisco and certain, take to be fixed.126 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 72. Which events take the longest to fix? report When are my peak times for event volume? Figure 73 on page 128 shows you the average number of events by event source for each hour of the day. This average is based on the previous 30 days worth of events. This can be helpful in establishing the shift schedules and staffing levels for your service center or in isolating a scheduled activity that is causing problems. Case study 127
    • Figure 73. Event source volume by hour report5.7.3 Domino Management Guide The Tivoli Decision Support Domino Management Discovery Guide allows data collected from Domino servers to be displayed in reports that meet the needs of customers by helping them make decisions about their Domino environment. The Domino Management Discovery Guide enhances the functions of the Tivoli Manager for Domino product allowing you to strategically manage the Domino installations in the enterprise network. Whereas the Tivoli Manager for Domino provides powerful rule-based management applications for the Domino environment, the Domino Manager Discovery Guide provides a general overview of how the systems are performing. Note The version of the Tivoli Domino Management Discovery Guide used during the course of this book was a beta code version. Functions, features, and supported environments for this product are subject to change without notice any time before or after general release.128 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • The content and detail of the reports provided by the Domino ManagementDiscovery Guide are dependent on the type of data that can be collected andthe database schema in which this data is stored. In a TMR environment,Tivoli Manager for Domino monitors are defined and distributed to collectdata and then stored in a relational database. Once this data is in therelational database, the Domino guide can be used to extract and analyze thedata through reports in the TDS Discovery Interface. Such reports includeserver performance, server ranking, and server prediction reports.For setting up the Domino Discovery Guide, the database schema must bedefined first. Domino-specify monitors are then distributed in a TMRenvironment, and a Domino roll up job is run nightly to collect and aggregatethe data into the database table. The Tivoli Discovery Administrator is used todefine queries to extract data from this table into a comma-separated values(.csv) file. The Cognos Transformer builds the multidimensional cube fromthis file, which can then be reported by Cognos PowerPlay. Finally, once theguides and roles have been defined, the Tivoli Discovery Interface is used toview these reports.Since the Domino guide uses Domino-specific DM monitors for reporting, thisguide must also use the Domino Roll Up module, which comes with theDomino Management Discovery Guide. This Domino Roll Up module, whichis installed in a TMR environment, contains the scripts necessary to createthe database schema and perform the Domino roll up job.The following are some reports available with the Domino ManagementDiscovery Guide.Domino Network TrafficThis view shows how much TCP/IP traffic is sent and received by the Dominoservers. These statistics reflect the values in bytes from theNET.TCPIP.BytesReceived and NET.TCPIP.BytesSent monitors from theDomino servers. Figure 74 on page 130 shows the monthly utilizationstatistics by hostname report. Case study 129
    • Figure 74. Domino network traffic report Domino mail statistics These reports show the various Domino Mail statistics, such as: • Mail Total Routed Figure 75 on page 131 shows the total number of mails routed by the Domino servers. These statistics reflect the values from the Mail.TotalRouted monitor from the Domino servers. The daily total values in bytes are shown for July 1, 1999.130 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 75. Domino server statistics - Mail routed by server report • Mail total KBytes transferred Figure 76 on page 132 shows the Total KBytes transferred by the Domino servers. These statistics reflect the values from the Mail.TotalKBTransferred monitors from the Domino servers. The daily total values in KBytes are shown for July 1, 1999. Case study 131
    • Figure 76. Domino statistics - Total KB transferred report Domino number of user statistics Figure 77 on page 133 shows the number of users managed by the Domino server Cartman1. These statistics reflect the values from the Server.Users monitor from the Domino servers. This view shows the server statistics by their hourly values. This is a good time to start looking for hourly trends to find specific server problems. The hourly values are shown for July 1,1999.132 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 77. Domino statistics - Number of users report Domino mail average delivery time Figure 78 on page 134 shows the mail average Delivery time statistics for all Domino servers. The average daily message count for the mail average statistics is shown for July, 1999. The statistics shown in this report reflect the values from the Mail.AverageDeliverTime monitor from the Domino servers. Case study 133
    • Figure 78. Domino statistics - Mail average delivery time report Domino replication statistics Figure 79 on page 135 shows the amount of requests for replication for the Domino servers. The daily total requests count for the mail average statistics is shown for July, 1999. The statistics shown in this report reflect the values from the Domino.Requests.Per1Hour.Total monitor from the Domino servers.134 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 79. Domino statistics - Replication statistics report Domino server average delivery time by hour Figure 80 on page 136 shows the server average delivery time statistics for all Domino servers by hour. The average hourly delivery message time statistics shown are for July 1, 1999. Case study 135
    • Figure 80. Domino statistics - Server average delivery time by hour report Domino server mail box file size Figure 81 on page 137 shows the server Mail Box file size statistics for specific Domino servers by hour. The average hourly mail box size statistics shown are for July 1, 1999.136 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 81. Domino statistics - Mail box file size by server report5.7.4 Network Element Performance Guide The Network Element Performance Discovery guide will automatically identify issues affecting the performance of critical network devices to allow network managers to identify problems before they affect network performance. This guide will allow you to investigate the elements affecting your server according to up time and down time, problem elements, and degrees of failure. This guide also helps identify memory usage issues, CPU utilization, traffic issues, and communication and router concerns. With the information discovered using this guide, you can make meaningful network performance decisions and resolve problems before they adversely affect your network performance. We use the Network Element Performance guide to quickly identify devices that are the most heavily used or that show the greatest usage or error rates. Use these reports to analyze the devices that are most critical to your network and to spot changes in error rate and usage behavior before they become major problems effecting users. Case study 137
    • The following sections detail reports available with the Network Element Performance Discovery Guide. Cisco CPU utilization Figure 82 shows the daily average CPU utilization collected by date and by hostname from the Cisco routers in our network. In addition, it shows an average of CPU utilization. Watch this report for trends indicating an increase in router utilization.Figure 82. Network Element Performance Guide - Cisco CPU utilization report Name Server speed statistics NetView collects Name Server performance data periodically during the day. Figure 83 on page 139 presents data for a single day during business hours allowing you to spot trends in Name Server utilization and determine peak and off-peak hours. This information can be used to judge the remaining capacity, to schedule maintenance (during off-peak times), or to schedule bulk jobs that depend on name resolutions.138 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 83. Network Element Performance Guide - Name server speed by hour Top ten problem systems Figure 84 on page 140 shows systems that are going down most frequently (although not necessarily accruing the most downtime) on July, 1999. Many transitions can indicate system problems that should be investigated. Case study 139
    • Figure 84. Network Element Performance Guide-Top ten nodes by transition count5.8 Suggested architecture and solution design Based on the information gathered in the previous phases of this case study, we will now outline a recommended architecture and solution design for Tivoli Decision Support for Server Performance Prediction and Tivoli Decision Support for Event Management Discovery Guides in our case study environment. We will make the architecture and design as flexible as possible so that, if any additional TDS Discovery Guide is required, it can be added without major changes.140 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Boulder TDS Discovery Interface Primary TDS File Server Spoke TMR RIM Host TEC HUB TMR TEC TDS Sybase Discovery RIM Host DM Administrator Other sites Secondary TDS File Server TDS Discovery Interface ODBC Connection Network Connection FTP ProcessFigure 85. Recommended architecture in network mode Figure 85 shows the high-level physical design configuration recommended to the customer. The figure outlines an implementation of Tivoli Decision Support in network mode. Since all main Tivoli components and the database server are installed on the Hub TMR in Boulder, it is advised to implement all Tivoli Decision Support components on the same local network as the Hub TMR Server. In addition to that, a TDS file server will be installed in each of the other sites in order to provide access to the cubes for the Discovery Interface clients. The roles of each component of TDS in this picture will be explained as follows: • The Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Administrator The TDS Discovery Administrator server provides the generation process for the cubes. This machine will be installed on the same local network as the Hub TMR, thus, improving performance at the time of the cube generation process. Case study 141
    • Cubes vary in size depending not only on the amount of data that is stored in the database and captured in them but also on the time range that is specified at the time they are built. Based on the number of endpoints and servers that are managed by the SDC, it might be a good approach to have reasonable disk space available at the Discovery Administrator machine in order to allocate all the temporary and comma-separated (.csv) files created during the cube-building process. For hardware specifications, see Table 13 on page 145. If the installation of additional TDS guides is required and results in increased resource utilization and, consequently, the time it takes to build all the cubes is not suitable to the customer, it is appropriate to have additional Discovery Administrator machines installed. A scenario where we can have only one TDS Discovery Guide per Discovery Administrator machine would be the best approach. Another reason to have additional Discovery Administrators would be for management reasons where each one would be maintained by different support people. Note Note that it is not recommended to split one TDS Discovery Guide into more than one Discovery Administrator machine. • The TDS File Server The TDS server components include the models, queries, templates, and other information required to generate views for the Discovery Interface. These components must be installed on each TDS file server in our case study environment. The TDS file server should be a very fast computer to service files and should have a fast network connection to clients. For hardware specifications, refer to Table 13 on page 145. We recommend that you have one TDS file server per site. The one in Boulder should be called the primary TDS file server and will be responsible for serving both the Discovery Administration machine and the Discovery clients in Boulder. At other sites, the TDS file server should be called the secondary TDS file server and will be responsible for serving local clients. This configuration can increase the response time for clients when accessing information stored in the cubes. There will be an update process for the secondary file server that must be started after the cube-building process and after an installation of a new TDS Discovery Guide on the primary file server. This update process is automated by defining scripts, Tivoli Tasks, and Jobs that run in a predefined order and142 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • time. For additional details, refer to Section 5.9.2, “Installation of the Tivoli Decision Support server components” on page 145.• Tivoli Decision Support Clients The Tivoli Decision Support client component is the Tivoli Discovery Interface that provides all the tools needed to open and work with views of data from your organization’s enterprise databases. This component must be installed on every client machine on customer sites where Tivoli Decision Support is supposed to be used. These clients will have two kinds of connections: • A network connection with the local Tivoli Decision Support File server to get all the necessary information stored in the multidimensional cubes for the multidimensional views. • A direct ODBC connection with the databases in the Hub TMR server for online reports generated by Crystal reports.• Cognos PowerPlay PowerPlay is a third-party application that generates multidimensional cubes and must be installed with Tivoli Decision Support. It must be installed on every Tivoli Discovery Administrator machine and every TivoliDiscovery Interface machine.• TDS Discovery Guides Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides are used to analyze the enterprise’s key information. These guides provide users with a comprehensive set of best practices and views into their enterprise’s databases. All recommended guides for this case study should be installed on each of the Tivoli Decision Support File servers (primaries and secondaries) and imported into the Discovery Administrator machine.• The information repository (RDBMS) The TEC database, which is used by Tivoli Decision Support for Event Management Guide, is installed and configured in the Sybase server that resides in the Hub TMR. Similarly, the database for Distributed Monitoring, which is used by the Tivoli Decision Support for Server Performance Prediction Guide, is created in the same Sybase server. Case study 143
    • Note On the existing Sybase server, another database should be created to attend the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide data, and an extra table needs to be created on the TEC database to house the information source for the Event Management Discovery Guide. For additional details, refer to Section 5.9.5, “Deploying TDS for server performance prediction” on page 154, and Section 5.9.6, “Deploying the Event Management Guide” on page 1615.9 Tivoli Decision Support deployment process This section should be used as a guideline for the steps involved in installing all applications, patches, and configurations that need to be performed in order to have your Tivoli Decision Support solution up and running in this case study environment. The intention here is to provide a high-level view of the deployment process and outline the steps involved in the installation of Tivoli Decision Support and the Discovery Guides. For detailed information, refer to the product documentation. The Tivoli Decision Support deployment process involves several activities. Table 12 shows the macro procedures for deploying Tivoli Decision Support in network-mode and should be used as a guide in the SDC West environment. The following sections describe each procedure in more details. Table 12. Macro procedure for deploying TDS Step Description 1 Hardware and software pre requisites installation 2 Install the Tivoli Decision Support server components 3 Install the Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Administrator 4 Install the Tivoli Decision Support client component 5 Install and configure the Server Performance Prediction Guide 6 Install and configure the Event Management Guide144 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 5.9.1 Hardware and Software prerequisites installation There is some prerequisite software that should be installed prior to the TDS deployment: • It is recommended that Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 with Service Pack 3 be installed on the Discovery Administrator machine and on all TDS File server machines. Microsoft Windows 95 should be installed on all Discovery Interface machines. • The Sybase Open Client must be installed on all Discovery Interface and on all Discovery Administrator machines in order to establish the Client/Server Sybase connection . • The ODBC driver should be installed on the Discovery Administrator machines and on all Discovery Interfaces machines. The TDS installation CD contains the Intersolv 3.01 32-bit Sybase ODBC driver. Table 13 shows the minimum recommended hardware configuration that should be used for the case study environment. Table 13. Minimum hardware requirements Hardware TDS File Server Discovery Discovery Characteristics Administrator Interface CPU speed Intel Pentium II Intel Pentium II Intel Pentium II 400 Mhz 400 Mhz 300 Mhz Memory (RAM) 128 MB 128 MB 64 MB Free disk space 1.0 GB 80 MB 60 MB5.9.2 Installation of the Tivoli Decision Support server components The Tivoli Decision Support Server components should be installed on the primary Tivoli Decision Support File server machine in Boulder and on all secondary Tivoli Decision Support File server machines at each of the other sites. Since these machines are shared source file servers, the directory that stores all cubes and queries should be available as a shared resource with full read and write permissions in the network so that it can be accessed by the Discovery Interface and Discovery Administrator machines. Case study 145
    • Table 14 shows the required steps to properly configure all file servers:Table 14. TDS file server deployment steps Step Description Where Reference Primary Tivoli Decision Support file 1 Install the Tivoli Decision Support File server and all Tivoli Decision Support Server code Secondary Tivoli Installation Guide Decision Support file servers Configure the primary Tivoli Decision Primary Tivoli Framework Planning 2 Support File server as a Managed Node of Decision Support and Installation Guide the Hub TMR File Server Configure the secondary Tivoli Decision All Secondary Tivoli Framework Planning 3 Support File servers as Endpoints Decision Support and Installation Guide File servers Create a dataless profile manager called 4 Secondary_TDS_FileServers and HUB TMR Framework Planning subscribe all Secondary Tivoli Decision and Installation Guide Support File servers to it. Primary and all 5 Make the Tivoli Decision Support secondary Tivoli Windows NT Server installation directory a shared resource Decision Support User Guide File servers Create and configure the transfer.cmd Primary Tivoli “Task 6: Creating and 6 and copycubes.cmd scripts Decision Support configuring the scripts” File server on page 146 Create the tasks and jobs to run the scripts “Task 7: Creating the 7 defined in task 5 Hub TMR tasks and jobs” on page 148 8 Schedule the jobs Hub TMR “Task 8: Scheduling the jobs” on page 152 Most of the above steps are fairly straightforward and can be easily accomplished by following the instructions in the referenced material. In the following sections, we will provide more detailed explanations of the following tasks starting with task 6. Task 6: Creating and configuring the scripts As described in Section 5.8, “Suggested architecture and solution design” on page 140, all secondary TDS file servers are updated after the generation of a new cube or after the installation of a new TDS Discovery Guide.146 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Because cube generation fails if a user has a view open during the cube updating process, the update process first runs a script (shown in Figure 86) that copies all the generated cubes in the PRIM_TDS_FSSHARENAMECubestemp directory on the Secondary TDS file servers. Later, another script (shown in Figure 87 on page 148) attempts to copy these cubes to the PRIM_TDS_FSSHARENAMECubes directory where PRIM_TDS_FS is the hostname of the primary TDS File server and SHARENAME is the share name of the primary TDS file server directory. These two scripts should be created on the primary TDS file server. Note The files to be transferred from the primary file server to the secondary file servers are PRIM_TDS_FSSHARENAMECubes* and PRIM_TDS_FSSHARENAMEData* where PRIM_TDS_FS is the hostname of the primary TDS File server and SHARENAME is the share name of the primary TDS file server directory. Figure 86 shows the update procedure first script: @ECHO OFF :: :: The following commands set the drive that correspond to the :: TDS shared directory in the primary TDS file server :: and the Primary TDS File server hostname :: SET PRIM_TDS_FS="Here is your Primary TDS File server hostname" SET SHARENAME="Here is Sharename of the primary TDS File server directory" SET FS_DRIVE=%PRIM_TDS_FS%%SHARENAME% SET FS_Cube=%FS_DRIVE%Cubes SET FS_DATA=%FS_DRIVE%Data :: :: The following are the secondary TDS File Server local directories :: SET DIR_TDS="Here is the complete path of the secondary TDS File server directory" SET DIR_CubeS=%DIR_TDS%Cubes SET DIR_DATA=%DIR_TDS%Data SET DIR_TEMP=%DIR_CubeS%Temp :: :: This step copies all new Cubes from the primary TDS File server :: to the temporary directory on the secondary TDS File server :: ECHO ... Transfering the Cubes and configuration files from the primary TDS File Server ... xcopy %FS_Cube%* %DIR_TEMP% /v xcopy %FS_DATA%* %DIR_DATA% /v ::Figure 86. The update procedure first script - transfer.cmd Case study 147
    • Note The scripts shown in Figure 86 were used in our Lab environment. The intention is to provide the reader with some example. These scripts may be modified to attend specific environment requirements. Figure 87 shows the update procedure second script: @ECHO OFF :: :: The following commands set the secondary TDS File Server local directories :: SET DIR_TDS="Complete path of the secondary TDS File server directory" SET DIR_CubeS=%DIR_TDS%Cubes SET DIR_TEMP=%DIR_CubeS%Temp :: :: The following command copies the updated Cubes to the Cubes directory :: echo ... Copying the Cubes ... xcopy %DIR_TEMP%* %DIR_CubeS% /v ::Figure 87. The update procedure second script - copycubes.cmd Task 7: Creating the tasks and jobs In order to have the above scripts executed in an automated fashion, two tasks and two jobs should be created in the SPR_TaskLib Task library. Figure 88 on page 149 shows the parameters of Transfer_Cubes, the first task to be created.148 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 88. The Transfer_Cubes taskThis task will run the script transfer.cmd stored in the Primary TDS file serversunfish. You can define this task using wcommands as shown in Figure 89: # wcrttask -t Transfer_Cubes -l SPR_TaskLib -r senior -i w32-ix86 sunfish ’C:Program FilesTDStransfer.cmd -c ’This task runs the transfer.cmd script’Figure 89. Defining the Transfer_Cubes taskFigure 90 on page 150 shows the configuration of the Transfer_Cubes jobassociated with the Transfer_Cubes task. Case study 149
    • Figure 90. The Transfer_Cubes job If the execution mode is set to parallel, the Transfer_Cubes job will run at the same scheduled time in all hosts in the Secondary_TDS_FileServers Profile Manager. # wcrtjob -j Transfer_Cubes -l SPR_TaskLib -t Transfer_Cubes -M parallel -m 60 -o 015 -D -p Secondary_TDS_FileServers Figure 91. Defining the Transfer_Cubes job Figure 92 shows the parameters of Copy_Cubes, which is the second task to be created.150 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 92. The Copy_Cubes taskSimilarly, this task will run the script copycubes.cmd, which is stored in thePrimary TDS file server sunfish. You can define this task using wcommandsas shown in Figure 93: # wcrttask -t Copy_Cubes -l SPR_TaskLib -r senior -i w32-ix86 sunfish ’C:Program FilesTDScopycubes.cmd -c ’This task runs the copyccubeubes.cmd script’Figure 93. Defining the Transfer_Cubes taskFigure 94 on page 152 shows the configuration of the Copy_Cubes jobassociated with the Copy_Cubes task. Case study 151
    • Figure 94. The Copy_Cubes job If the execution mode is set to parallel, this job will run at the same scheduled time in all hosts in the Secondary_TDS_FileServers Profile Manager. You can define this task using wcommands as shown in Figure 95: # wcrtjob -j Copy_Cubes -l SPR_TaskLib -t Copy_Cubes -M parallel -m 60 -o 015 -D -p Secondary_TDS_FileServers Figure 95. Defining the Transfer_Cubes job Task 8: Scheduling the jobs Once you have defined the tasks and jobs as described in “Task 7: Creating the tasks and jobs” on page 148, you should define the schedule.152 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Note These Jobs should be scheduled after the cube-building process is finished. For our example, we are assuming that the cubes are built daily and that this process is finished at 1:00 am. The Copy_Cubes job must run after the Transfer_Cubes job finishes. You can either use the Tivoli Desktop or the command line to schedule the Jobs. You can define this task using wcommands as shown in Figure 96: # wschedjob -n Transfer_Cubes -L SPR_TaskLib -t ’08/03/1999 02:00’ -r ’24 hour’ -h sunfish -f ’C:Program FilesTDStransfer.log’ -s "Transfer the TDS Cubes to all Secndary TDS File Servers’ # wschedjob -n Copy_Cubes -L SPR_TaskLib -t ’08/03/1999 04:00’ -r ’24 hour’ -h sunfish -f ’C:Program FilesTDScopycubes.log’ -s "Transfer the TDS Cubes from the temporary directory’ Figure 96. Scheduling the jobs Figure 97 shows the scheduled jobs: Figure 97. Scheduled jobs5.9.3 Installation of the Tivoli Decision Support Administrator The Tivoli Decision Support Administrator component should be installed on the Tivoli Decision Support Administrator machine in Boulder. In addition, Case study 153
    • Cognos PowerPlay in administrator mode, Sybase open client, and the 32-bit Sybase ODBC driver must be installed on this machine.5.9.4 Installation of the Tivoli Decision Support client components The TDS client components should be installed on every decision maker machine. The following software packages are part of the Tivoli Decision Support client components and should be installed and configured: • Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Interface • Cognos PowerPlay in Standard mode, On-line Books and Help • Sybase open client • 32-bit Sybase ODBC Driver5.9.5 Deploying TDS for server performance prediction The Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide adds new monitors and tasks to the actual Distributed Monitoring environment. Table 15 lists the sequence of activities required to install and configure the Server Prediction Performance Guide in the SDC West environment.Table 15. SPP Discovery Guide installation steps Steps Description Where Reference Hub and Spoke Tivoli Decision Support 1 Install the Distributed Monitoring Roll-up TMR servers and all for Server Performance Patches Managed Nodes Prediction guide Release Notes Tivoli Decision Tivoli Decision Support 2 Set Up an ODBC data source connection Support Discovery for Server Performance Administrator Prediction guide Release Notes Tivoli Decision Support Administrator guide and 3 Install the Tivoli Decision Support for Tivoli Decision Tivoli Decision Support Server Performance Prediction Guide Support File servers for Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Administrator guide and 4 Import the TDS Discovery Guide Support Discovery Tivoli Decision Support Administrator for Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes154 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Steps Description Where Reference Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Administrator Guide and5 Assign the ODBC data source. Support Discovery Tivoli Decision Support Administrator for Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Administrator Guide and6 Test the connectivity with the data source Support Discovery Tivoli Decision Support Administrator for Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes Tivoli Decision Tivoli Decision Support7 Set all parameters in the cube, such as Support Discovery for Server Performance date range, etc. Administrator Prediction guide Release Notes Tivoli Decision Tivoli Decision Support8 Build the cube Support Discovery for Server Performance Administrator Prediction guide Release Notes Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Administrator Guide and9 Schedule the cube build task Support Discovery Tivoli Decision Support Administrator for Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes Most of the steps in Table 15 are fairly straightforward and can be easily accomplished by following the instructions in the respective referenced material. A certain amount of configuration and effort is required to complete the DM Rollup task. In the next section, we will provide a more detailed explanation of the installation and configuration of the DM Roll up tool. 5.9.5.1 Installing the Distributed Monitoring roll up tool Other than requiring the administrator to manually create the database and tables by running scripts included with this module for Sybase and Oracle, the standard Tivoli patch-style installation is almost fully automatic, and only a simple configuration/instrumentation is needed. Case study 155
    • The Tivoli Decision Support for Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide presents information collected by the systems metrics from the Tivoli Distributed Monitoring collection and archived by the DM Roll-up module. The DM Roll-up module components collect, collate, and store the raw data from the monitors in the database through a RIM connection. The data samples taken as part of Distributed Monitoring data collection will be aggregated and rolled up from each Tivoli Profile subscribed host into the DM Roll-up database by a predefined task. The Tivoli Distributed Monitoring (DM) 3.6.1 product must be installed on the Hub TMR and updated with the Roll up patches. Table 16 tabulates, in sequence, the tasks that need to be implemented in order to successfully install and configure the Server Performance Prediction Roll-up module:Table 16. DM Roll-up installation steps Step Description Where Reference Framework Installation Guide 3.6 and Tivoli 1 Install patch 361-DMN-03 Hub TMR, Spoke TMRs Decision Support for and all Managed Nodes Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes Framework Installation Guide 3.6 and Tivoli 2 Install patch 361-UXM-03 Hub TMR, Spoke TMRs Decision Support for and all Managed Nodes Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes Framework Installation Guide 3.6 and Tivoli 3 Install patch 361-DMN-08 Hub TMR, Spoke TMRs Decision Support for and all Managed Nodes Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes Framework Installation Guide 3.6 and Tivoli 4 Install patch 361-DMN-9A Hub TMR, Spoke TMRs Decision Support for and all Managed Nodes Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes156 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Step Description Where Reference Framework Installation Guide 3.6 and Tivoli5 Install patch 361-DMN-9C Hub TMR Decision Support for Server Performance Prediction guide Release Notes Hub TMR and Spoke “Task 6: Creating RIM6 Creating the RIM object TMR object” on page 157 and SPP Release Notes “Task 7: Create the SPP database repository” on page 158 and Tivoli7 Size and create the Server Hub TMR Decision Support for Performance Prediction database Server Performance repository Prediction guide Release Notes “Task 8: Setting up the8 Set up the Server Performance Desktop of Hub TMR SPP Roll up Tivoli Prediction Roll Up Tivoli Environment and Spoke TMR environment” on page 159 Desktop of Hub TMR “Task 9: Performing the9 Perform the Administration tasks and Spoke TMR administration tasks” on page 160 Hub TMR and Spoke “Task 10: Scheduling10 Schedule the Roll up tasks TMRs the Roll-up tasks” on page 160 In the following sections we will highlight some of these tasks (starting with task 6) and supply the reader with pertinent deployment information. Task 6: Creating RIM object The 361-DMN-9C patch creates the RIM object; however, the patch installation options do not allow the user to specify the RIM Host. This patch will, therefore, create the RIM host on the TMR server by default. In our case study, the HUB TMR server and the database server are on the same machine. If the TMR server is not your database server, which is the case with all Spoke TMRs, you will need to delete and re-create the RIM Object. This step is only necessary if the TMR server is not the database server. Case study 157
    • Note The default RIM object name is spr_rim which connects to the dm_db database. The default database user is dm with the password dm_tds. To delete the DM Roll up RIM object, use the wdel command: # wdel @RIM:spr_rim To re-create the rim object, use the wcrtrim command. For a detailed explanation of this command, refer to the TME 10 Framework 3.6 Reference Manual, SC31-8434. # wcrtrim -v Sybase -h rim_host -d dm_db -u dm -H /sybase -s SYBASE spr_rim After the execution of this command, you will be prompted for the user password. Note The RIM host cannot be reset using the wsetrim command. The RIM object has to be deleted and recreated. Task 7: Create the SPP database repository The Tivoli Decision Support for Server Performance Prediction Guide relies on two Tivoli application databasesL: The Tivoli Distributed Monitoring Roll-up module database and the Tivoli Inventory database. The Inventory database is optional for the operation of the Server Performance Prediction Guide and supplies additional enterprise hardware data when the customer has this product in their environment. If the Tivoli Inventory database is not available, as is the case with the SDC West environment, we will need to use a set of default files supplied with the TDS Discovery Guide installation in the $TDS/util directory. In order for all five cubes of the Server performance Prediction Guide to be built successfully, these files must be available as the default files or with data when the Inventory database is available and the inventory query can run. Always retain copies of the default versions of the following files: • DM_INV_Memory.csv • DM_INV_OsType.csv • DM_INV_Processor.csv158 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • • DM_INV_SysByIP.csvMove these files from the $TDS/Util/Tivoli Decision Support for ServerPerformance Prediction directory into the $TDS/data/export directory.Before the DM TDS Roll up can store the aggregated metrics in an RDBMS,we must create the database or repository. Scripts have been provided tocreate the database and install the DM_METRICS schema.After a successful installation, the following RDBMS script files will be locatedin the $BINDIR/TME/SENTRY/TDS/rdbcfg directory of the Hub TMR server: • cr_rollup_db.sh • rm_rollup_db.sh • new_passwd.sh • cr_db.ora • cr_tbl.ora • rm_db.ora • cr_db.syb • cr_tbl.syb • rm_db.sybThere are two ways to create your SPP Roll-up database and tables. One isby customizing the SQL templates, such as cr_db.syb and cr_tbl.syb.The other is to run the cr_rollup_db.sh script on the RIM host. It will check theRIM object that was created for the SPP Roll-up to obtain databaseinformation, ask you about the size and device information, automaticallycustomize the SQL scripts, and create the required database and tables.We run the cr_rollup_db.sh script on the Hub TMR and follow the simpleinstructions to create the DM repository.Task 8: Setting up the SPP Roll up Tivoli environmentThe Installation process of the Tivoli Distributed Monitoring SPP Roll upConfiguration Patch 3.6.1 creates a policy region calledTMRHostname_SPR_Region on the Hub TMR Server. Within this region, theSPR_TaskLib Task library and the SPR_ProfileMgr profile manager arecreated. The SPR_ProfileMgr profile manager contains two profiles:SPR_NtProfile and SPR_UnixProfile, which are configured with prescannedmonitors and created during installation. Case study 159
    • This TMRHostname_SPR_Region region is not visible on the administrator’s desktop after installation. It resides as a Top Level Policy Region. You will need to drag and drop this newly-created policy region from the Top Level Policy Region View onto the Administrator Desktop. From the desktop, select the following: Desktop --> TMR Connections --> Top Level Policy Regions Task 9: Performing the administration tasks After migrating the Policy Region to the administrator desktop, the next configuration step is to subscribe the Managed Nodes and Endpoints to the SPR_ProfileMgr Profile Manager. Once all the necessary subscriptions are completed, the administrator must distribute the platform-specific profiles to the respective subscribers. Note The SPR_ProfileMgr object is created as a dataless Profile Manager and, therefore, we cannot subscribe any other Profile Managers to it. If you have a large number of endpoints, it is convenient to group them into Dataless profiles managers and then make this profile a subscriber of the SPR_ProfileMgr. To do so, the properties of the SPR_ProfileMgr profile manager can be changed to convert it to a database profile manager. The SPR_ProfileMgr profile manager is, by default, assigned as a subscriber to the SPR_DataAggregation job. The TMR Server is, by default, a subscriber to the SPR_RollupIntoDB job. Task 10: Scheduling the Roll-up tasks Tivoli Distributed Monitoring 3.6.1 has no problem monitoring a large number of servers per TMR server. Since SDC West has deployed the Hub-Spoke architecture, scalability should not be a problem. However, we recommend changing the schedule roll-up tasks differently for each Spoke TMR in order to ensure that all Spoke TMR servers will not be rolling their data up to the database server at the same time. This is more of a database server capacity concern than a TDS concern. The two tasks that should be rescheduled are SPR_DataAggregation and SPR_RollupIntoDB; they are located in the SPR_TaskLib task library.160 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Note You may choose to schedule the jobs to run at different times using the TME Scheduler. The point to remember is that the data aggregation job, SPR_DataAggregation, must be scheduled to run and finish before the SPR_RollupIntoDB task is scheduled to start.5.9.6 Deploying the Event Management Guide Table 17 lists the sequence of activities required to install and configure the Event Management Guide in the SDC West environment.Table 17. Event Management Discovery Guide installation steps Step Description Where Reference TEC Database on Tivoli Decision Support 1 Size the TEC Database. Sybase server for Event Management Release Notes Tivoli Decision Tivoli Decision Support 2 Set up an ODBC data source connection. Support Discovery for Event Management Administrator Release Notes TEC Database on Tivoli Decision Support 3 Create the SQL table, trigger, and views. Sybase server for Event Management Release Notes Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Administrator Guide 4 Install the Event Management Discovery Support File Server Tivoli Decision Support Guide. for Event Management Release Notes Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Administrator Guide 5 Import the Discovery Guide. Support Discovery Tivoli Decision Support Administrator for Event Management Release Notes Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Administrator Guide 6 Assign the ODBC data source. Support Discovery Tivoli Decision Support Administrator for Event Management Release Notes Case study 161
    • Step Description Where Reference Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Administrator Guide 7 Test the connectivity with the data source. Support Discovery Tivoli Decision Support Administrator for Event Management Release Notes Set all parameters, such as date range, in Tivoli Decision Tivoli Decision Support 8 the cube. Support Discovery for Event Management Administrator Release Notes Tivoli Decision Tivoli Decision Support 9 Build the cube. Support Discovery for Event Management Administrator Release Notes Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Administrator Guide 10 Schedule the cube build task. Support Discovery Tivoli Decision Support Administrator for Event Management Release Notes5.10 Future reporting requirements In the following sections, we will discuss future reporting needs that may be used by the customer. We will map those required reports that could not be presented using Tivoli Decision Support. In addition, we will give a brief description of some additional TDS Discovery Guides that could be valuable if used in the customer’s environment. Some of these TDS Discovery Guides are either available or are being addressed by new or soon-to-be-released TDS Discovery Guides.5.10.1 Additional reports Based in the information gathered in Section 5.6.1, “Detailed reports mapping workshop” on page 114, all customer-required reports that are not available to the recommended TDS Discovery Guide should be built. An additional sub-project for delivering these reports should be initiated. In this case study chapter, we are not going to detail the contents of this sub-project but will, instead, present a table that details the additional report requirements. The ideas presented here are for your information only.162 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Table 18 displays the reports that need to be developed: Table 18. Future requirements reference table Likely TDS Discovery Guide Report Tivoli Decision Support for Server DASD utilization by server. Refer to Figure Performance Prediction 46 on page 102 Either Tivoli Decision Support for Network Element Performance or Tivoli Decision Percent of Availability by server. Refer to Support for Server Performance Figure 47 on page 103 Prediction Either Tivoli Decision Support for Network Element Performance or Tivoli Decision Alert Summary report. Refer to Figure 48 Support for Server Performance on page 103 Prediction Tivoli Decision Support for Domino Lotus Notes - MTA server report. Refer to Management Figure 52 on page 106 Tivoli Decision Support for Domino Lotus Notes - Sessions per minute report. Management Refer to Figure 55 on page 108 Tivoli Decision Support for Domino Lotus Notes - SMTP transferred Management messages report. Refer to Figure 57 on page 109 Hard Disk and File System utilization Tivoli Decision Support for Server report by Operating Systems. Refer to Performance Prediction Figure 59 on page 111, and Figure 61 on page 1125.10.2 Additional recommended TDS Discovery Guides The following are some recommended Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides that can improve the analysis and decision-making process in this customer scenario. Obviously, these TDS Discovery Guides may require additional Tivoli applications as prerequisites. Our goal here is only to provide information about how the customer can benefit from them. 5.10.2.1 Network Event Analysis Guide While the Network Event Performance Discovery Guide helps control the ever-growing management to do list, which network events create, this guide will track key performance indicators of your network by collecting, aggregating, and analyzing all the event traffic that NetView traps and can correlate. With the information discovered using this guide, you are able to Case study 163
    • make meaningful decisions about improving your network performance and identifying problems before they go out of control. The following topics are provided by the NetView Network Event Analysis Discovery Guide: • How is the event rate (by smartset) affecting the network? • How is the event rate affecting the network? 5.10.2.2 Network Segment Performance Guide The Network Segment Performance Discovery Guide provides the overall health of a segment for any period of time. It allows you to analyze collisions, broadcasts, multicasts, and performance locations within the network. This guide will also allow you to view information on network segment statistics. With the information discovered, you can identify performance problems and their causes. The following topics are provided by the NetView Network Segment Performance Discovery Guide: • How are errors affecting the network? • How is Multicast and Broadcast traffic affecting the network? • What is my network traffic pattern? • What are the main failure points? 5.10.2.3 TDS for Information Management Guide This guide enables you to analyze the problem and change management information stored in your Tivoli Service Desk for OS/390 (formerly TME 10 Information/Management) host databases. This guide is organized into two categories - problem management and change management - to present the most typically sought-after information related to your service desk activities. This guide allows you to focus on activities and problems occurring within the service desk arena. The Information Management guide tracks the most common aspects encountered by a service desk including: • Total time spent resolving problems • Open problem volume by type • Distribution of problems by severity • Activity distribution by associated changes • Activities coming up in the next six months • Estimated duration of upcoming activities164 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 5.10.2.4 Call Center Management Decision Support GuideBy limiting your focus to this area and viewing only the relevant data, a callcenter management analysis will help you determine how effective, efficient,and profitable your support center is. This Tivoli Decision Support Guidepresents the most typical data a support center collects including the numberof interactions, the first-call resolution rate, the elapsed time of interaction,and time to resolution.5.10.2.5 Relationship Management Decision Support GuideThis guide highlights the relationship between the organization and itscustomers by focusing on how well requests are being resolved and theoverall health of the relationship. By viewing data from the perspective of therequest life cycle, you can identify obstacles or deviations from the mostefficient service process. Working with key business indicators, such asService Level Agreement (SLA) compliance and the number of call transfers,you are better able to understand how your customer perceives your service.5.10.2.6 Knowledge Assessment Decision Support GuideWith the knowledge assessment Decision Support guide, you can begin tounderstand what solutions and diagnostic aids are working best to help youmanage your investment in knowledge. By looking at the KnowledgeEngineering category, you can get a better idea of how well you are usingdiagnostics and what knowledge is most effective. Indicators to exploreinclude the number of requests resolved with diagnostics and the number ofsolutions.5.10.2.7 Service-level Management Decision Support GuideBy treating your support commitments as a focal point for further exploration,the guide for service-level management helps you ascertain how well you areoperating within budgeted guidelines and performing against the SLAs youhave established. For example, the Support Commitments categorycompares your customers expectations with how well your organization ismeeting them.5.10.2.8 Asset Management Decision Support GuideWith the asset management Decision Support guide, you can get a betterunderstanding of the assets your organization has deployed and theirassociated cost structures. This guide presents the most typical data an assetmanager needs but, historically, does not have easy access to. This dataincludes purchasing trends, yearly trend for asset acquisition, percent ofassets under lease or contract, asset base cost, as well as which networkhubs have the most connections. Case study 165
    • 5.10.2.9 Change Management Decision Support Guide If there is one thing that is constant, it is change, and in a dynamic work environment, the change management Decision Support guide can help you get a handle on corporate changes and give you the data you need to make solid management decisions. Focusing on how changes affect your bottom line, this guide includes: • Labor cost groupings • What changes are completed, overdue, and upcoming • Estimated labor costs • Percent of changes over cost estimate • Request submission trend • Task distribution166 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Chapter 6. Reports and decision information usage In Chapter 5 of this redbook, we looked at the reports generated by one customer and offered a complete solution and design document equating the current reporting environment and usage to the reports and business information provided by Tivoli Decision Support. Tivoli Decision Support is much more than just a report writer; it gives decision makers the power to make well-informed decisions about their environment and business. Customers can identify and analyze trends that would be difficult to identify if data were studied in isolation. In addition, it is possible to evaluate the impact of a change that has been decided with the help of TDS, the time spent solving a particular problem, the quantity and location of some kind of asset to be upgraded or changed, how much must be spent, or the impact of a failure to accomplish a term of the Service Level Agreement. Leveraging todays rapidly-emerging On-line Analytical Processing (OLAP) technology, TDS Discovery Guides allow customers to exploit the vast amount of IT data and information needed to help meet business goals. This chapter demonstrates how Tivoli Decision Support can support the decision-making process in your organization by describing a simple scenario and outlining the steps used to find and analyze critical data with TDS. The following sections lead you through a brief but complete data search that yields specific results. The aim is to show how we can analyze and interpret information from the TDS Discovery Guides and make decisions based on the content. For this scenario, we are based on the assumption that the following products are up and running: • Tivoli Framework • TEC • Distributed Monitoring • Tivoli Netview • Software Distribution • TDS Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide • TDS Domino Management Discovery Guide© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 167
    • 6.1 The scenario An IT Manager is concerned by the growing number of customer complaints about Lotus Notes mail service. It appears to be a response time-related problem, and not everyone is affected by it. The Executive Committee is cutting budgets, and one of the areas they are looking at is Lotus Notes usage. Based on the fact that the mail service is crucial for the business of the enterprise and that the Executive Committee had closed the annual plan of investments for the year, any additional acquisition of software or hardware must be very well-justified by the IT Manager. The IT Manager then asks the Systems Analyst if he or she can diagnose the cause of the problem and suggest a means to correct it. A detailed proposed solution report is presented to the Chief Executive Officer. The CEO then makes sure of the commitment of capital involved and the benefit to the organization of keeping the Service Level Agreement (SLA). The final report is then presented to the Executive Committee.6.2 The roles We will now describe the roles of each of the decision makers involved. This scenario is only expressed as a guide to show how TDS can be used by different role players in an organization and how each role player can view the information from different perspectives with the common goal of managing the business efficiently. In order to ensure that the Discovery Interface contains all the views that are relevant to the data search of each decision maker, the number of unnecessary views should be minimized by selecting the appropriate TDS Discovery Guide and role on the Topic Map tab.6.2.1 The systems analyst role In this scenario, the system analyst role represents an individual responsible for managing all Lotus Notes Mail servers in the enterprise. The system analyst is in charge of determining the overall performance of the servers and the effectiveness of the mail service. He or she will deliver a report to the IT Manager addressing the cause of the problem and advising a solution.168 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 6.2.2 The IT manager role The role of the IT manager in this scenario is to look at the broader issue of current and future requirements of the IT infrastructure within the organization and to make decisions about further IT investments or changes to the environment. This individual is responsible for determining problem areas in the products their department supports and anticipating those problems before they occur.6.2.3 The Chief Executive Officer role The role of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) in this scenario is to decide whether it is appropriate to approve any request for IT investment or changes in the organization and to present those requests to the executive committee.6.3 The discovery process Since the TDS Discovery Guide topics are worded as questions, a good model for any discovery process is to pose it as a series of questions with the goal of finding the answers with the help of Tivoli Decision Support. Based on the scenario description, we need to determine why the current Mail service does not handle a large percentage of the total number of requests within an acceptable response time. Based on the fact that not every customer is affected, there can be Lotus Notes mail servers operating near their capacity. If this is true, there is probably a strong case for investing in Mail service by upgrading hardware, thus, leveraging the service to conform to the SLA. If it is false, management may need to decide how to best use the current system instead of expanding it. The following sections take us through a decision process using the TDS Discovery Guides.6.3.1 The system analyst discovery process First, we will establish the scope of our data search by asking the following questions, which will help the system analyst focus on resolving the problem. Some typical questions follow: • Which mail systems have CPU workload problems? • Which systems have a high average CPU run length cue? • Which mail systems have high memory utilization? Reports and decision information usage 169
    • • Which systems have a high memory page scan rate? • Which mail systems have high network utilization? • What is the average forecast mail delivery time? The analysis of the views and information that these questions generate will allow the system analyst to identify whether there are any response- or workload-related problems with the mail servers. The systems analyst needs to do the following: • Find out why the response from the Lotus Notes mail servers is poor • Analyze the information • Consider solution options • Present the proposed technical solution to the IT Manager for a final decision on any changes or technology investment that may be necessary to resolve the problem. To begin the decision process, the system analyst will use the Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Interface, select both the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide and the Domino Management Discovery Guide, and choose the role of systems analyst. 6.3.1.1 Which mail systems have CPU workload problems? After selecting the All System Metrics report, we will filter the information to see only the Lotus Notes Servers. The resulting graph, as shown in Figure 98 on page 171, displays the Lotus Notes server performance metrics by CPU utilization. This view shows us the monthly average percentage CPU busy time of the Lotus Notes Mail servers: nickel, desdemona, cypress, and burnet. The graph shows several CPU metrics from which it is clear that the server nickel has high average CPU percentage busy, system time, and user time utilization. This could be an indication that the server has performance-related problems. We can also understand that all the other servers are under less stress.170 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 98. Lotus Notes mail servers by CPU utilization 6.3.1.2 Which systems have a high average CPU run length cue? We will find the answer to this question by selecting the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide and then selecting Busiest Systems report. In this view, as shown in Figure 99 on page 172, we can look at the busiest systems based on the average daily run queue length metric for each system. The run queue length metric is the number of processes that are ready to run (processes not waiting for Input/Output or user input) that the system cannot dispatch until it has free processor cycles. From the graph, we can see that the server nickel has a high run queue length. This a key metric for determining processor load and is measured in average number of waiting processes. The reports also show us that the other servers have average to normal workload characteristics. Reports and decision information usage 171
    • Figure 99. Lotus Notes Mail Servers daily average run length cue 6.3.1.3 Which mail systems have high memory utilization? Using the All System Metrics report in the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide and filtering on By Physical Memory, we can see, as shown in Figure 100 on page 173, the busiest systems based on the hourly average run queue length metric for each system. The report shows us the memory utilization for the Lotus Notes servers, and we can find out that the server nickel has a high utilization and that the usage for all the other servers is moderate to low.172 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 100. Lotus Notes mail servers by memory utilization 6.3.1.4 Which systems have a high memory page scan rate? By selecting the Systems That Need More Memory report from the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide, the system analyst can drill down and retrieve information from all Lotus Notes Servers. Figure 101 on page 174 highlights systems with physical memory from 32 MB up to 64 MB where the page scan rate is exceptionally high. The page-scan rate is presented in terms of pages scanned per second. In order to evaluate this metric, you need to take into account the amount of physical memory on the system. It is known that the server nickel has 64 MB of physical memory installed. A scan rate of 1000 pages/second is considered very high on a system with 64 MB of physical memory but not on one with 256 MB of physical memory. We can also see that the server nickel has a scan rate of nearly 1000 pages per second. This can be regarded as high for this amount of memory and will need to be corrected. Reports and decision information usage 173
    • Figure 101. Lotus Notes mail servers that need more memory 6.3.1.5 Which mail systems have high network activity? By selecting All System Metrics from the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide, the system analyst can drill down and retrieve information on all Lotus Notes Servers. By filtering on network utilization the network activity is displayed. Figure 102 on page 175 highlights the systems with high network activity. It can be seen that the servers desdemona, cypress, and burnet have relatively low network utilization while that of nickel is high. Previously, we found that nickel had a high CPU utilization; this, coupled with high network activity, is an indication of an under-provisioned system.174 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Figure 102. Lotus Notes mail servers by network utilization 6.3.1.6 What is the average forecast mail delivery time? From the Domino Management Discovery Guide and the When might servers begin experiencing problems report, the system analyst can filter by mail server and then by the Mail.AverageDeliveryTime measure. Figure 103 on page 176 shows the mail average and peak delivery time forecast of the server nickel. The forecast highlights that, for the next 30, 60, and 90 days, the averages and peaks of mail delivery time are increasing. In addition, since, according to the SLA, all mail deliveries must be within 20 seconds, nickel will exceed the SLA within 30 days. Reports and decision information usage 175
    • Figure 103. Lotus Notes mail server - forecasted average mail delivery time 6.3.1.7 The system analyst’s conclusions and suggestions Based on the results of the information gathered earlier in this section, the system analyst will deliver a report to the IT Manager addressing the cause of the problem and deciding on a course of action. The following are conclusions that can be drawn from the discovery of the network: • The servers desdemona, cypress, and burnet are operating within normal parameters and are attending the SLA. • The server nickel is overloaded and under-provisioned. It means that the CPU is inadequate for the workload. • The Lotus Notes mail service is currently operating at capacity, and the response problem only affects the customers attended by the server nickel, which is overloaded. • The forecast to compromise the SLA is at least within 30 days since the workload on server nickel is increasing.176 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • The system analyst makes the following recommendations to resolve the problem: • Add or upgrade the CPU to server nickel This will relieve the problem in the short term but does not address the underlying problem of nickel being overloaded. • Increase the amount of physical memory in nickel to 128 MB. This will solve the problem in the medium term but still does not resolve the fact that nickel is overloaded. • Redistribute the workload across the other servers This will offer a longer term solution but might be disruptive to the organization.6.3.2 IT manager discovery process The IT manager will now consider the recommendations from the system analysis and use Tivoli Decision Support to answer some questions before deciding on what course of action to take. First, the IT manager will establish the scope of the data search by writing down questions that will help him or her focus on resolving the problem. Some typical questions are: • Which systems are over- or under-provisioned? • Where are the performance anomalies? • What performance problems are on the horizon? To begin the decision-making process, the IT Manager will use the Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Interface, select both the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide and the Domino Management Discovery Guide, and choose the role of IT manager. 6.3.2.1 Which systems are over- or under-provisioned? By selecting How might I improve performance on my systems report? from the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide, the IT Manager can drill down and retrieve information from all Lotus Notes Servers. Figure 104 on page 178 highlights all Lotus Notes servers that are either under- or over-provisioned. If you have a system that shows very high CPU utilization but has relatively low network activity, we can say that the CPU is inadequate for the workload, that is, the system is under-provisioned. If you have a system that shows low CPU utilization but has relatively high network activity, we can say that the CPU is excessive for the workload, that is, the system is over-provisioned. Reports and decision information usage 177
    • The measure used for this view is the processor overload. This is expressed as a percentage of the difference between the CPU and network utilization divided by the network utilization. In this case, the report shows that the server nickel has high CPU utilization as well as relatively high network activity; this can be interpreted as being under-provisioned. It can also be noted that the other servers are over-provisioned.Figure 104. Under-provisioned and over-provisioned Notes servers 6.3.2.2 Where are the performance anomalies? By selecting How might I improve performance on my systems report? from the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide, the IT Manager can drill down and retrieve information from all Lotus Notes Servers. Figure 105 on page 179 highlights the situation for all Lotus Notes servers. This view can be useful in detecting areas where one or more of the systems is not performing as expected. The logic behind this view is that, for systems having the same purpose and the same hardware configuration, processor utilization should be proportional to the network activity on the system. If it is not, then there is probably something amiss with one of the systems.178 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • In this report, we can see that the server nickel does not have the same behavior as the other servers and that it has much higher average statistics.Figure 105. Performance anomalies by server 6.3.2.3 What performance problems are on the horizon? By selecting What Performance Problems are on The Horizon? from the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide, the IT Manager can select the Systems most quickly approaching critical thresholds report and drill down in order to retrieve information from all Lotus Notes Servers. Figure 106 on page 180 highlights all Lotus Notes servers that are predicted to hit a critical performance threshold within the next 180 days. A critical situation is highlighted in red for server nickel. Reports and decision information usage 179
    • Figure 106. Lotus Notes server approaching critical thresholds 6.3.2.4 IT manager conclusions The IT manager’s role here is to look at the broader issue of managing the network in terms of meeting SLAs and providing a scalable cost-effective solution. Based on the results of the information gathered earlier in this section, the IT Manager will deliver a detailed proposed-solution report to the Chief Executive Officer. It is clear from the analysis of the reports that the server nickel is overloaded and that there is an uneven distribution of workload among the Lotus Notes mail servers. It has also become apparent that there is no formal process to add users and services to the mail servers. After analyzing the reports, the IT manager and the system analyst decide on the following solution: • Since the enterprise has an under-provisioned server, it is necessary to redistribute the workload among all Lotus Notes servers, thus, providing a longer term solution while maximizing the capabilities of the network. It must be done within 10 days because the server nickel will soon compromise the SLA. • To implement a process to add users and services to the Lotus Notes mail servers will include the use of Tivoli Decision Support to identify which180 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • servers are best able to handle the extra workload. This will allow the IT manager to leverage the existing IT infrastructure and get a maximum return on the investment. • Make budgetary provisions for memory and CPU upgrades for all the Lotus Notes servers. The trends from TDS show that there will be significant growth in workload and users. Note that TDS has given the manager the power to predict when systems will reach their critical thresholds and, therefore, can plan and budget well in advance in order to maintain SLAs. Finally, the manager must present his proposals and solutions to the CEO.6.3.3 CEO’s discovery process The role of the CEO here is to make sure that the investments in the company’s IT infrastructure and resources are being managed efficiently. The CEO is also concerned that any further investment or changes to the environment be of benefit to the organization. He or she considers the proposal from the IT Manager and, in order to begin the decision process, will use the Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Interface selecting the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide and then choose the role of CEO. The CEO needs to decide whether it is appropriate to approve the request made by the IT manager. A typical question might be: What are the performance trends? Analysis of the view and information provided by this question will allow the CEO to identify the performance behavior of the Lotus Notes servers and to certify that the commitment of capital and time involved will be conducive to the organization keeping on the Service Level Agreement. 6.3.3.1 What are the performance trends? By selecting Is my resource utilization growing? from the Server Performance Prediction Discovery Guide, the CEO can select the Daily average performance trend report and drill down in order to retrieve information from all Lotus Notes Servers. Figure 107 on page 182 highlights the growth trend for critical system-performance metrics over the last four weeks. It looks at the average value on a day-by-day basis. This report is useful for spotting growth trends and changing patterns in resource utilization. Reports and decision information usage 181
    • Figure 107. Lotus Notes server daily average performance trends We can see that the growth trend for the Notes server nickel is out of proportion to the rest of the Lotus Notes servers. 6.3.3.2 The CEO’s conclusions Now, the problem and the solution proposed by the IT Manager are clear to the CEO. After considering all the information, the CEO approves the project. Based on the information provided by the IT Manager, the CEO approves the project to redistribute the workload among all Lotus Notes servers. It must be done within 10 days in order to keep the SLA. The CEO also asks the IT Manager to prepare a detailed process to add services to the Lotus Notes Servers in order to better use the actual IT infrastructure and the investment that had been made in the Lotus Notes Mail service. Based on the information gathered from TDS, the CEO finally prepares a report requesting the budgetary provision for memory and CPU for all the Lotus Notes servers. The CEO now has a detailed description of the problem and is armed with confidence, answers, and solutions to present to the Executive Committee.182 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • 6.4 Conclusion In this simple scenario, we have attempted to show the power and diversity of TDS. By choosing different roles and following their decision-making strategies to resolve a problem, we can see how each decision maker has a part in the final decision. Each role player needs different information from the same data; the analyst needs to know the cause of the problem; the manager needs to understand the impact of the solution on the network as a whole, and the CEO needs to know what are the benefits to the organization. It would be almost impossible to show all the diverse roles and information that TDS can produce. Knowledge can help shape an organization’s thinking and its approach to its customers and service issues. As you have seen in this scenario, even a brief and basic discovery strategy can yield surprising results and help IT professionals make better business decisions. Reports and decision information usage 183
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    • Appendix A. Tivoli Implementation Methodology (TIM) 3.6 The Tivoli Implementation Methodology (TIM) provides Tivoli Business Partners and Tivoli Services with best practices for identifying, designing, planning, installing, testing, and documenting a Tivoli Enterprise solution.A.1 Target market The target market is Tivoli Services and Tivoli Business Partners customers that value quality services as part of the solution.A.2 Customer profile TIM can be used in two different ways: • Internally - TIM is designed for Tivoli Business Partners and Tivoli Services. It is Tivoli’s process for a services engagement with Tivoli customers. All Tivoli professionals are strongly encouraged to leverage this methodology while selling and implementing Tivoli Solutions. • Externally - TIM is designed to accelerate and optimize Tivoli services engagements. Customers should leverage service providers that utilize the TIM in its entirety or as part of their own best practices. The TIM, Tivoli Certification, and Training are all proof of Tivolis commitment to an open services industry.A.3 The top three things to remember The top three things to remember about TIM are: • TIM provides market and customer confidence: TIM is an industry-wide means of ensuring that our service providers are leveraging best practices and maximizing customer benefits. • TIM enables accelerated and optimized deployments: TIM enables accelerated deployments and reduces the time required to deliver Tivoli benefits to the customer. • TIM 3.6 Captures "Best of Breed" Tivoli intellectual capital: TIM captures years of Tivoli architecture and solution implementation experience from the Tivoli organization and partner groups, thus, providing customers with access to evolving best practices through their services providers.© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 185
    • A.4 What is new with TIM? New enhancements of TIM include the following: • Manage the extended customer engagement: TIM now supports a complete customer engagement - beyond that of just a software installation. • Enhanced Support for Tivoli Product Line: Improved support for the Tivoli product line includes detailed requirements and deployment guides, improved architecture and design information, and updated project management tools. This support includes the latest product offerings including Security Management, Framework 3.6, and Tivoli Migration. TIM will continue to be updated for the latest in Tivoli supported platforms.A.5 What is unique? TIM has the following unique characteristics: • TIM Sets the standard for industry-wide methodologies: TIM provides an industry-wide methodology to all of our certified services providers. This gives the customer confidence in an accelerated, optimized deployment. • TIM is a Full Engagement Tool: TIM goes beyond a simple software installation guide, and it provides management for the full engagement process.A.6 Where can I find information on TIM? TIM is available for use by Tivoli services professionals and certified Tivoli Business Partners. Business Partners order the Tivoli Implementation Methodology for Business Partners Version 3.6 from the Tivoli Information for Partners (TIPS) Web site by requesting part number LK3T-3567. Tivoli employees may access TIM internally at http://corp.tivoli.com/ under the Sales/Tivoli Services tab or at http://fortune.tivoli.com/TIM186 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Appendix B. Tivoli Decision Support customer support At Tivoli Systems, we know dependable ongoing support and services are essential extensions of Tivoli software and an integral part of your enterprise systems management solution.B.1 The support process The following list describes the process that will be carried out for any Tivoli Decision Support customer query. This aims to give the reader an idea of what the process is in order to understand how the call will be handled. 1. The customer will call the 1-800-Tivoli-8 number with a question or problem. 2. The CSR will dispatch the call to the Tivoli-Indianapolis Support Center. 3. If the call pertains to a core question (Cognos, basic functionality, and so on), analysts in Indianapolis will handle the call. If the call is a guide-specific issue, we will transfer the ticket to the appropriate site. 4. The Indianapolis analyst will provide as much detail as possible and include any pertinent suggestions in the ticket description to assist the analysts in Austin and Raleigh. 5. In some cases, analysts in Indianapolis will be able to solve foreign guide-specific issues without transferring the call to either Austin or Raleigh. 6. If the call is transferred to either site (Austin or Raleigh) and assistance from Tivoli is required in any way, please call them. 7. We anticipate that supporting TDS for Tivoli customers will be a joint effort between Indianapolis and Austin or Raleigh. Note Even though the support plan has been designed for Indianapolis to handle core issues (Cognos, basic functionality, and so on), some cases may be handled in Austin or Raleigh, and, therefore, an understanding of the core application is necessary. For related product support: 1. Cognos Support - For now, contact Indianapolis. 2. Seagate Support - oemcrw@img.seagatesoftware.com© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 187
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    • Appendix C. Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides availability The Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides provide immediate access to key IT enterprise information. These predefined solutions provide direct answers to the most pertinent business questions through a simple question and topic paradigm and single views into the data. These solutions are created through knowledge of the data captured by Tivoli applications, knowledge of IT best practices, and knowledge of IT customer needs. The TDS Discovery Guides provide out-of-the-box data views and reports for immediate value. Table 19 can be used as a reference to the TDS Discovery Guides availability: Table 19. TDS Discovery Guides general availability Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guide General Availability Tivoli Decision Support for Event Management Currently available on 2nd Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for Server Performance Prediction Currently available on 3rd Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for Network Element Performance Currently available on 3rd Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for Network Segment Performance Currently available on 3rd Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for Network Event Analysis Currently available on 3rd Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for Software Deployment Analysis Currently available on 3rd Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for Year 2000 Readiness Version 2.0 Currently available on 3rd Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for Domino Management 3rd Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for SAP R3 Analysis 4th Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for Storage Management Analysis 4th Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for PeopleSoft 4th Quarter 1999 Tivoli Decision Support for Information Management Currently available on 3rd Quarter 1999© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 189
    • Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guide General Availability Shipped with TDS. Call Center Management Decision Support Guide Currently available on Tivoli Decision Support version 2.0 Shipped with TDS. Relationship Management Decision Support Guide Currently available on Tivoli Decision Support version 2.0 Shipped with TDS. Knowledge Assessment Decision Support Guide Currently available on Tivoli Decision Support version 2.0 Shipped with TDS. Service Level Management Decision Support Guide Currently available on Tivoli Decision Support version 2.0 Shipped with TDS. Asset Management Decision Support Guide Currently available on Tivoli Decision Support version 2.0 Shipped with TDS. Change Management Decision Support Guide Currently available on Tivoli Decision Support version 2.0 Shipped with TDS. Telephony Decision Support Guide Currently available on Tivoli Decision Support version 2.0 Note Tivoli frequently announces the availability of new Guides. For the latest information on Guide availability, refer to Tivoli’s Web page: http://www.tivoli.com190 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Appendix D. Special notices This publication is intended to help anyone involved in the deployment of the Tivoli Decision Support and the Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guides. The information in this publication is not intended as the specification of any programming interfaces that are provided by the Tivoli applications. See the PUBLICATIONS section of the IBM Programming Announcement for the Tivoli applications suite for more information about what publications are considered to be product documentation. References in this publication to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that IBM intends to make these available in all countries in which IBM operates. Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only the IBM product, program, or service may be used. Any functionally-equivalent program that does not infringe any IBM intellectual property rights may be used instead of the IBM product, program, or service. Information in this book was developed in conjunction with the use of the equipment specified and is limited in application to those specific hardware and software products and levels. IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to the IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785. Licensees of this program who wish to have information about it for the purpose of enabling: (i) the exchange of information between independently created programs and other programs (including this one) and (ii) the mutual use of the information which has been exchanged, should contact IBM Corporation, Dept. 600A, Mail Drop 1329, Somers, NY 10589 USA. Such information may be available, subject to appropriate terms and conditions, including, in some cases, payment of a fee. The information contained in this document has not been submitted to any formal IBM test and is distributed AS IS. The information about non-IBM ("vendor") products in this manual has been supplied by the vendor and IBM assumes no responsibility for its accuracy or completeness. The use of this information or the implementation of any of these techniques is a customer responsibility and depends on the customers ability to evaluate and integrate them into the customers operational environment. While each item may have© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 191
    • been reviewed by IBM for accuracy in a specific situation, there is no guarantee that the same or similar results will be obtained elsewhere. Customers attempting to adapt these techniques to their own environments do so at their own risk. Any pointers in this publication to external Web sites are provided for convenience only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of these Web sites. Any performance data contained in this document was determined in a controlled environment, and therefore, the results that may be obtained in other operating environments may vary significantly. Users of this document should verify the applicable data for their specific environment. Reference to PTF numbers that have not been released through the normal distribution process does not imply general availability. The purpose of including these reference numbers is to alert IBM customers to specific information relative to the implementation of the PTF when it becomes available to each customer according to the normal IBM PTF distribution process. The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States and/or other countries: AIX AS/400 AT DB2 Home Director IBM MQ MQSeries Netfinity NetView OS/2 OS/390 RS/6000 S/390 System/390 Tivoli Tivoli Decision Support Tivoli Decision Support Discovery Guide The following terms are trademarks of other companies: Cognos, the Cognos logo, Impromptu, PowerPlay, PowerCube, and Scenario are trademarks of Cognos Inc. Oracle is a trademark of Oracle Inc. Sybase is a trademark of Sybase Inc. Crystal Reports is a trademark of Seagate Software Inc. Tivoli Service Desk is a trademark of Software Artistry, a Division of Tivoli.192 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • C-bus is a trademark of Corollary, Inc. in the United States and/or othercountries.Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registeredtrademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States and/or othercountries.Microsoft, Windows, Windows 95, Windows NT, and the Windows logo aretrademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or othercountries.PC Direct is a trademark of Ziff Communications Company in the UnitedStates and/or other countries and is used by IBM Corporation under license.ActionMedia, LANDesk, MMX, Pentium and ProShare are trademarks of IntelCorporation in the United States and/or other countries. (For a complete listof Intel trademarks, see www.intel.com/tradmarx.htm)UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and/or other countrieslicensed exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.SET and the SET logo are trademarks owned by SET Secure ElectronicTransaction LLC.Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or servicemarks of others. Special notices 193
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    • Appendix E. Related publications The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a more detailed discussion of the topics covered in this redbook.E.1 International Technical Support Organization publications For information on ordering these ITSO publications see “How to get ITSO redbooks” on page 197. • Creating Custom Monitors for Tivoli Distributed Monitoring , SG24-5211 • Deploying a Tivoli Infrastructure in Large-Scale Environments, SG24-5210 • TME 10 Deployment Cookbook: Inventory and Company, SG24-2120 • TME 10 Deployment Cookbook: Courier and Friends, SG24-4976 • TME 10 Framework Version 3.2: An introduction to the Lightweight Client Framework , SG24-2025 • An Introduction to Tivoli’s TME 10, SG24-4948 • An Industry around the Tivoli Framework: Examples from 10/Plus Association, SG24-2122 • Using Tivoli Software Installation Service for Mass Installation, SG24-5109 • All about Tivoli Management Agents, SG24-5134 • A Project Guide for Deploying Tivoli Solutions, SG24-5310 • Designing Tivoli Solutions for End-to-End Systems and Service Management, SG24-5104 • High Availability Scenarios for Tivoli software, SG24-2032 • Instrumenting Enterprise Applications Using Tivoli GEM, SG24-5399 • Integrated Management Solutions Using NetView Version 5.1, SG24-5285 • Using Tivoli’s ARM Response Time Agents, SG24-2124 • Measuring Lotus Notes Response Time with Tivoli’s ARM Agents, SG24-4787 • Using the Applications Management Specifications in a TMA Environment, SG24-4809© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 195
    • E.2 Redbooks on CD-ROM Redbooks are also available on the following CD-ROMs. Click the CD-ROMs button at http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/ for information about all the CD-ROMs offered, updates, and formats. CD-ROM Title Collection Kit Number IBM System/390 Redbooks Collection SK2T-2177 IBM Networking and Systems Management Redbooks Collection SK2T-6022 IBM Transaction Processing and Data Management Redbooks CollectionSK2T-8038 IBM Lotus Redbooks Collection SK2T-8039 Tivoli Redbooks Collection SK2T-8044 IBM AS/400 Redbooks Collection Kit SK2T-2849 IBM Netfinity Hardware and Software Redbooks Collection SK2T-8046 IBM RS/6000 Redbooks Collection Kit (BkMgr Format) SK2T-8040 IBM RS/6000 Redbooks Collection (PDF Format) SK2T-8043 IBM Application Development Redbooks Collection Kit SK2T-8037 IBM Enterprise Storage and Systems Management Solutions SK3T-3694E.3 Other publications These publications are also relevant as further information sources: • TME 10 Framework 3.6 Planning and Installation Guide, SC31-8432 • Framework 3.6 User’s Guide, GC31-8433 • TME 10 Framework Release Notes Version 3.6, GI10-3028 • TME 10 Framework 3.6 Reference Manual, SC31-8434 • Tivoli Service Desk Enterprise Integration User’s Guide, GC31-5203 • Tivoli Service Desk Installation Guide, GC31-5167 • Tivoli Decision Support User’s Guide, GC31-5202 • Using Decision 2.0 Support Guide, GC32-0290 • Tivoli Decision Support Administrator’s Guide, GC31-5201 • Tivoli Decision Support Installation Guide, GC32-0289196 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • How to get ITSO redbooksThis section explains how both customers and IBM employees can find out about ITSO redbooks,redpieces, and CD-ROMs. A form for ordering books and CD-ROMs by fax or e-mail is also provided. • Redbooks Web Site http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/ Search for, view, download, or order hardcopy/CD-ROM redbooks from the redbooks Web site. Also read redpieces and download additional materials (code samples or diskette/CD-ROM images) from this redbooks site. Redpieces are redbooks in progress; not all redbooks become redpieces and sometimes just a few chapters will be published this way. The intent is to get the information out much quicker than the formal publishing process allows. • E-mail Orders Send orders by e-mail including information from the redbooks fax order form to: e-mail address In United States usib6fpl@ibmmail.com Outside North America Contact information is in the “How to Order” section at this site: http://www.elink.ibmlink.ibm.com/pbl/pbl/ • Telephone Orders United States (toll free) 1-800-879-2755 Canada (toll free) 1-800-IBM-4YOU Outside North America Country coordinator phone number is in the “How to Order” section at this site: http://www.elink.ibmlink.ibm.com/pbl/pbl/ • Fax Orders United States (toll free) 1-800-445-9269 Canada 1-403-267-4455 Outside North America Fax phone number is in the “How to Order” section at this site: http://www.elink.ibmlink.ibm.com/pbl/pbl/This information was current at the time of publication, but is continually subject to change. The latestinformation may be found at the redbooks Web site. IBM Intranet for Employees IBM employees may register for information on workshops, residencies, and redbooks by accessing the IBM Intranet Web site at http://w3.itso.ibm.com/ and clicking the ITSO Mailing List button. Look in the Materials repository for workshops, presentations, papers, and Web pages developed and written by the ITSO technical professionals; click the Additional Materials button. Employees may access MyNews at http://w3.ibm.com/ for redbook, residency, and workshop announcements.© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 197
    • IBM Redbook fax order formPlease send me the following:Title Order Number QuantityFirst name Last nameCompanyAddressCity Postal code CountryTelephone number Telefax number VAT number Invoice to customer number Credit card numberCredit card expiration date Card issued to SignatureWe accept American Express, Diners, Eurocard, Master Card, and Visa. Payment by credit card notavailable in all countries. Signature mandatory for credit card payment.198 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • List of abbreviationsCEO Chief Executive Officer SRM Server Resource ManagementDM Decision Maker TDS Tivoli Decision SupportDMP Decision Making Process TEC Tivoli Enterprise ConsoleDSM Distributed Systems Management TIM Tivoli Implementation MethodologyDSS Decision Support Systems TMA Tivoli Management AgentDSM Distributed Systems Management TMR Tivoli Management RegionIBM International Business Machines Corporation TPS Tivoli Professional ServiceITSO International Technical Support Organization TSD Tivoli Service DeskIT Information TechnologyMLM Mid-level ManagerNCO Network Computing OfferingsODBC Open Database ConnectivityOLAP Online Analytical ProcessingOS Operating SystemRDBMS Relational Database Management SystemRIM RDBMS Interface ModuleSDC Service Delivery CenterSLA Service level AgreementSNMP Simple Network Management ProtocolSPP Server Performance PredictionSQL Structured Query Language© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 199
    • 200 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Index CEO 169 CEO conclusions 182A CEO’s discovery process 181administering 70 charts 2administration 70 Chief Executive Officer 168administrator 68 Chief Executive Officer role 169administrator system 14 Cisco routers 138AIX 102 Client Database 14AIX performance 104 Cognos 12AIX reports 109 Cognos PowerPlay 10, 12, 14, 62, 143alert log 102 Cognos support 187algorithms 13, 61 Cognos Transformer 16, 67Analysis 96 collection 96analytical decision 75 comma separated values 129answers to questions 9 CPU 99application 10 CPU utilization 97architecture 30 critical data 167availability 1 critical network 137 critical performance 179B critical system 181bandwidth 65 critical thresholds 179batch reports 2 Crystal Report files 69best practices 23, 185 Crystal Reports 10, 12, 62better decisions 6 cube build times 67Boulder 88 Cube building problems 81Brazil 6 Cube building process 64broader vision 3 step 1 65budgetary provision 181 step 2 66business data 13 step 3 66Business Decision Information 7 step 4 67business decisions 183 cube file 16business hours 12 cubes 68business indicators 13 Cubes definition 16business information 78 cubes.mdb 61, 65Business Intelligence 1 Customer confidence 185 defined 3 customer profile 185business knowledge 12 Customer reporting requirements 92business leaders 27 customer requirements questionnaire 27business models 13 customer satisfaction 9business operation 9 customization requirements 33C Dcalculations 12 data elements 13Categories 12, 69 Database Administrator 45categories 62 Database Server Information 38Category definition 16 dataless profile manager 160central repository 10 DB2 16© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 201
    • Decision 1, 5 Drill-Through definition 17Decision Makers 4, 6, 61, 73, 78 DrillThru.mdb 62, 66, 69decision making 9 Drill-Up 17decision making process 1, 5 Drill-Up definition 17decision process 170 DSM 93Decision Support Guides 32 DSS 4Decision Support Systems 1, 4, 5 characteristics 5delivering services 9 definition 5delivery mechanisms 10Deployment Phase 47 deployment guide 48 E e-Business 2, 3 input and output components 47 ed.mdb 62, 69 process flow 48 EDAdmin.log 82 Training 52 effectiveness 9Deployment phase effects 12 advanced configuration and customization 51 efficiency 9, 13 deployment preparation 49 endpoints 61, 74, 77, 160 product configuration 51 End-to-End service delivery 3 product installation 50 End-to-End solutions 1deployment strategy 24 end-user solution 13detailed design 30 enhanced quality 116Dicing definition 18 enterprise 2Dimension Line definition 17 Enterprise Console 29dimension members 16 Enterprise solution 23dimensions 9 enterprise’s data sources 21Dimensions definition 17 enterprise’s databases 19discovering key information 13 enterprise’s operation 12Discovery Administrator 10, 11 enterprise’s service 13Discovery Administrator PC Information 37 Event Management 125Discovery Interface 10, 12 Event Management Discovery Guide deploymentDiscovery Interface PC Information 38 161discovery process 169 Evolution to Business Intelligence 2Distributed Systems Management 93 Executive Committee 168distributed systems management 3 existing 96dive 9 existing IT infrastructure 181DM 4 existing policies 28DM Roll Up patches 156 existing reports 51DM Roll Up Toll installation steps 156 existing Tivoli Systems Management solution 28DM Roll Up Tool 155 Explorers 21DMP 5Documentation Phase 54 input and output components 55 F process flow 55 Fail-over analysis 57Domino Roll Up module 129 fast access to information 2Drill Down 72 File server 14Drill Through 80 File Server Information 37Drill Through databases 66 files 10Drill-Down 17, 33, 61 Filter definition 17Drill-Down definition 17 forecasts 20202 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • formal process 180 In-House reports 97function of an organization 9 installation method 70functional elements 53 integration process 60functionality and limitations 42 interactive business indicators 6functionality testing 53 Intersolv 14functions and capabilities 31 interview 27functions for TDS 37 intranet 10 investments 168 isql 81G IT 1gateways 74, 77 IT manager 9, 168generating views 12 IT Manager conclusions 180GPFs 82 IT manager discovery process 177guide the enterprise 3 IT manager role 169Guides 10, 13 IT technical leader 27Hhardware requirements 145 J Job schedule 153help desk operation 9 Jobs 148high availability environment 88high average CPU 169high CPU utilization 124 Khigh level 9 key business 13high level physical design 141 keyword searches 13high level report 6 kickoff 33high memory page scan rate 170 knowledge 183high memory utilization 169 knowledge discovery 9high network activity 124high run queue length 171high success 21 L LAN 80high-level task flow 87 Layer definition 17highly customizable 21 Leader 44hints 13 levels of details 9historical records 20 local clients 142Hub 87 local network 141Hub TMR 87 local TDS file server 143Hub-Spoke 87 log entries 103 log space 90I Logical Design 33IBM 85IBM Global Services 85IBM SDC West 93 M managed nodes 160IBM SDC-West Environment 85 management gateways 61IBM Service Delivery Center 8 management tasks 20impact on the response times 80 management team 45Information Technology 1 management tools 3Informix 16 manipulate 60In-House 94 mapping TDS Discovery Guides 33 203
    • Measures definition 17 organizations experience 23methodology 23 organizations methodology 52methods 13 output documentation 34Microsoft Access databases 69 over provisioned 124, 177migrating 160 overall management 45migration 85 overview of the Customer 56miss the SLA 126 overview of TIM 24Modelling 113 Overview of Tivoli Decision Support 9Models 12Models definition 18multi-dimensional analysis 6, 12 P patches 42multi-dimensional array 16 performance 13multi-dimensional Cubes 61, 80 permissions 82multi-dimensional space 18 perspectives 9Multiple TMR Environment 77 Physical Design 33 policy region 159, 160N populates 11NCO 94 PowerPlay 12, 16Netfinity Capacity Manager 96 PowerPlay report files 68Netfinity Capacity Manager. 95 predictive analysis 3NetView MLM 102 preparation for deployment 43Network 39 primary TDS file server 142network administrator 45 printouts 10network analyst 9 pro-active 5network bandwidth 63 problem management 72Network Computing Offerings 94 procedure for deploying TDS 144Network Management 3 Profile definition 18network mode 14, 34 profile manager 159, 160network traffic 64, 67 profiles 159network-wise 89 profitability 13NotesView 96 Project Analysis 41 project Leader 44 Project Plan 26O Project plan 41ODBC connection 61, 69 Project Planning Phase 40ODBC connectivity errors 81 input and output components 40ODBC data source 63 process flow 41ODBC drive 14 Project Task Plan 42OLAP 6, 167 Project Team 26, 44OLE link 83 projections 20One-Minute Managers 21 proposal for TDS 30On-Line Analytical Processing 167 proposals 181On-line Analytical Processing 6 push content 10open calls 21 push-delivery 22Operations 89optimal 88Optimization 49 Qoptimization of server 113 qualifier 81Oracle 14, 16 quality 116204 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • quality of collection 113 Server Performance Prediction 117queries 12, 13 Server Performance Prediction deployment stepsquerying 70 154quickly approaching thresholds 179 Server Resource Management 94, 96 Service Delivery Center 85 Service Delivery Center architecture 88R Service Level Agreement 168rapidly emerging 167 service level agreement management 3raw data 65 Service Level Agreements 1RDBMS 74, 143 service management 3realistic deployment 71 severity level 12reducing IBM IT reporting costs 86 shared drive 15related view definition 18 Single TMR Environment 74related views 13, 18, 62, 69 SLA 1, 9, 168relationships 12 Slicing definition 18remote sites 74 snapshot-style views 20replication 80 Software Engineering Life Cycle Model 24report generation 70 Spoke 87reporting requirements overview 27 Spoke TMR 87Reports Analyst 46 Spot trends 20repository 12 SPP 117Requirements Gathering Phase 25 SQL 61, 82 input and output components 26 SQL queries 61 process flow 26 SQL Server 16resolutions 9 SQLplus 81resource allocation 20 SRM 94, 96resource availability 35 SRM Reports 104resource requirements 34 Stand-alone mode 14responsiveness 72 stand-alone mode 34RIM Host 157 support centers 6RIM host 87 support process 187RIM Object 157 surprising results 183Role definition 18 Sybase 14, 16Rover 82 System Administrator 45rover utility 81 System Analyst conclusions 176Rover window 82 System Analyst discovery process 169 System Analyst role 168S System Architecture and Design document 26, 33San Jose 89 Systems Analysis Phase 30Santa Teresa 89 input and output components 31scalability 160 process flow 31scheduling the Jobs 152 Systems analysis phasescopes 9 preparation 31SDC 85 Systems Analyst 168SDC-West 85 Systems Management 3Seagate 12Seagate support 187secondary TDS file server 142 T target market 185Selection Criteria definition 18 205
    • Task library 148, 159 support process 187Tasks 148 Supported Platforms 15TDS 5 terminology 16TDS Discovery Guides 143 users 21TEC 74 Tivoli Decision Support methodology 23technical proposal 26 Deployment phase 47technical solution 31 Documentation phase 54templates 12 Project planning phase 40Testing Phase 52 Requirements gathering phase 25 input and output components 52 Systems analysis phase 30 process flow 52 Testing phase 52the challenge 4 Tivoli Discovery Guidesthird-party application 12 Call Center Management 165TIM 23, 25, 185 Change Management 166Tivoli certified consultants 46 Domino Management 128Tivoli commands Event Management 125 wcrtjob 150, 152 Information Management 164 wcrtrim 158 Knowledge Assessment 165 wcrttask 149, 151 mapping 114 wdel 158 Network Element Performance Prediction 137 wschedjob 153 Network Event Performance 163Tivoli Decision Support 3, 5, 6, 7 Network Segment Performance 164 architecture 34 Relationship Management 165 Base Product 10 Server Performance Prediction 116 client component 62 Service Level Management 165 components 14, 61 Tivoli Distributed Monitoring 7, 60, 61, 95 components integration 63 Tivoli Distributed Monitoring object relationships 92 concepts 16 Tivoli Enterprise Console 7, 60, 95 Discovery Administrator 11, 62, 141 Tivoli Enterprise Environment 60 Discovery Guides 10, 12 Tivoli Enterprise solution 7 Discovery Guides availability 189 Tivoli Implementation Methodology 23, 185 Discovery Interface 12, 14, 68, 143 Tivoli infrastructure 75 environment 61 Tivoli Inventory 7, 60 File Server 12, 61 , 142 Tivoli Management Agents 61 File Server deployment steps 146 Tivoli Management Server 61 functionality 19 Tivoli NetView 60, 95 functionality diagram 60 Tivoli Servers 74 functions 70 Tivoli Service Desk 7, 72 goal 9 Tivoli Software Distribution 60 Implementation Modes 14 Tivoli System Administrators 45 implementations 74 Tivoli Tier 1 Servers 77 into the Decision Making Process 5 Tivoli Tier 2 Servers 77 network mode 71 TMR 74, 77 overview 9 top level policy region 160 Product Components 10 topic 62 resource mapping 36 Topic definition 18 Server Component 10, 12 Topic Map 168 solution objectives 42 Topic Map definition 19 stand-alone mode 70 Tourists 21206 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • Trainer 46 ZTraining plan 46 Zperstat 96transactional data 6Transformer 16Transmission 96trends 12Troubleshooting TDS 81Tucson 94Typical Architecture 35Uunder provisioned 124, 174UNIX commands df 95, 102 lsps 95, 100 netstat 95 ps 95, 100 vmstat 95, 99user permissions 45user-friendly 21Vversion 42View definition 19view hint description 62, 69viewing Crystal reports 69viewing multidimensional reports 68views 13vision 3WWAN 80Web Administrator 46Web Preparation 96what if questions 1Windows 95 15Windows NT 4.0 15Windows NT performance 104workload 63workload characteristics 171Workload Characterization 113Workshop summary 46Workshops 46YYear 2000 189 207
    • 208 A Design and Implementation Guide for TDS
    • ITSO redbook evaluationA Design and Implementation Guide for Tivoli Decision SupportSG24-5499-00Your feedback is very important to help us maintain the quality of ITSO redbooks. Please complete thisquestionnaire and return it using one of the following methods: • Use the online evaluation form found at http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/ • Fax this form to: USA International Access Code + 1 914 432 8264 • Send your comments in an Internet note to redbook@us.ibm.comWhich of the following best describes you?_ Customer _ Business Partner _ Solution Developer _ IBM employee_ None of the abovePlease rate your overall satisfaction with this book using the scale:(1 = very good, 2 = good, 3 = average, 4 = poor, 5 = very poor)Overall Satisfaction __________Please answer the following questions:Was this redbook published in time for your needs? Yes___ No___If no, please explain:What other redbooks would you like to see published?Comments/Suggestions: (THANK YOU FOR YOUR FEEDBACK!)© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999 209
    • A Design and Implementation Guide for Tivoli Decision Support SG24-5499-00Printed in the U.S.A.SG24-5499-00