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TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
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TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
TeensTALK Research 2012
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TeensTALK Research 2012

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TeensTALK® is the nation’s longest-running survey of college-bound high school students, providing the higher education marketing profession a comprehensive scan of teen Trends, Attitudes, Lifestyles, …

TeensTALK® is the nation’s longest-running survey of college-bound high school students, providing the higher education marketing profession a comprehensive scan of teen Trends, Attitudes, Lifestyles, and Knowledge with special focus on college search and selection. For more information, contact Associate Vice President for Client Services Eric Sickler at eric.sickler@stamats.com or (800) 553-8878.

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  • http://www.radicalparenting.com/2008/07/31/what-kind-of-kid-do-you-have-the-4-types-of-millenial-kids/
  • http://www.radicalparenting.com/2008/07/31/what-kind-of-kid-do-you-have-the-4-types-of-millenial-kids/
  • http://www.radicalparenting.com/2008/06/29/is-your-kid-a-toasty-or-a-teacup-why-kids-burn-out-or-break/We have all heard of helicopter parenting. You know, the kind of parents that are uber involved in every aspect of their child’s life and sort of buzz and run circles around them as they grow up.I work with a lot of parents and kids, I hear from a lot of parents and kids, and I spend all day reading about parents and kids today. Something about the term helicopter parenting wasn’t fitting right with the kinds of questions and problems that parents and youth bring to me and talk about.Teacup parenting is a much better fit. 1. Cherished PossessionLike a teacup heirloom, children are often treated as their most cherished possession. This is great!2. Teacups Break EasilyThis one is not so good, many of the kids I mentor and went to school with can break at any moment. When they do not get their way, like do not get a class schedule they want or cannot get driven to a place they want to go they literally crumble.3. Once It Gets Chipped, It Feels RuinedMany members of my generation feel the need to be perfect all the time. When something bad happens or do not get a perfect grade, they feel unworthy, like a bad person and ruined. I wish this was not the case and realize that chips and smudges build character and we learn from them, they are not to displayed prominently or tarnish your character.4. Want to Display a Beautiful SetThere is absolutely nothing wrong with parents who brag and talk about their kids, but recently I see parents putting their kids on display like they are going up for auction: “Carrie is applying to Harvard and Yale, she has a 4.2 GPA and a 90 percentile SAT score, she plays tennis in the Junior Olympics, any takers, anyone? going once, going twice…”5. Want to be like the OthersParents especially want their kids to fit in and be a perfect part of the family and uphold all of your values. This is not always the case. There is a lot of pressure on kids to not only succeed, but succeed in what their parents want them to do. We need to be different, we strive to be different, we do not fit into a set.6. Only Feed it High Quality TeaAgain, not always a bad thing. But many parents are ob.sess.ed. with the idea of only high quality, organic, positive energy, luxury, natural foods and products on, in or near their kids. Unlike a teacup, we do not get stained when we eat a big mac, and many kids are now afraid of regular food and have developed all sorts of crazy food allergies because of it.7. The Quality Reflects Your Taste and StatusTeacups or a tea set often reflects the owners taste and status depending on the price and style of the set. I know that kids reflect on their parents, but if we mess-up, we mess-up let us get a little dirty and wear mismatching clothes if we want to, it is our way of experimenting.8. You Do Not Want It to Leave the CollectionI have known parents to move to their kid’s college town or take an apartment off-campus for visiting times. Unlike a teacup, we need to leave the home permanently (some parents are looking forward to this day!)9. Must Be Very Delicate with ItWe fall, we get in trouble, we lose sports games we feel general ickiness. You cannot–and should not protect us from this. We need to feel those bumps so that when we grow up we do not fall apart at the first curve in the road.10. All Teacups Have Essentially the Same FunctionA teacup, although it can have all different designs and styles, is essentially just used to drink tea. Kids on the other hand do not all grow up to be mommies and daddies. I am now 23 and oh my goodness I cannot believe that some of my friends are deciding to get married and have kids (freak out!), but some others have decided they really do not want to have a family and are getting a lot of grief from their parents. We might lead a different kind of life than you and I hope this is ok.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Presented by Eric Sickler 2012 TeensTALK® Findings Associate Vice President A Comprehensive Look at Teen Trends, for Client Services Attitudes, Lifestyles, and Knowledge with Special Focus on College Search and Selection eric.sickler@stamats.com (319) 431-5043 (800) 553-88781 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 2. About Stamats Stamats is recognized and respected as the nation’s higher education integrated marketing thought Research, Planning, and Consulting leader. Our comprehensive array of innovative • Brand clarification and development products and services has set the standard for • Image and perception studies pairing insightful, research-based strategic counsel • Tuition pricing elasticity and brand with compelling creative solutions. value studies • Recruiting and marketing Our approach is simple: recognize the unique assessments, plans, and counsel needs and expectations of each client and draw on Strategic Creative more than 50 years of higher education experience • Institutional, admission, and advancement web sites for every project we undertake. • Mobile and social media solutions At all times, we promise the highest level of • Recruiting and advancement campaigns and publications professional service and attention to detail in the • Virtual and experiential tours industry because, in the end, we know our success • Institutional identity is measured entirely by the success of our clients. • Advertising campaigns • TV, video, and radio2 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 3. 3 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 4. 4 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 5. 5 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 6. Teen Types6 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 7. Vanessa Van Petten Teen Type #1 - Teacups Teacup parenting has produced teacup kids who are extremely fragile and nuanced to their own discomforts or problems. They have a very difficult time handling criticism or rejection and tend to fear anything in which they might not succeed. When they get to jobs, college, or difficult high school classes they tend to break down or need huge amounts of outside support. Teen Type #2 - Toasties These kids were heavily overloaded starting from a very young age. Dance class, violin class, band, volleyball, college entrance exam prep courses…you name it and they were doing it. They worked so hard from such a young age, they never really had time to play. And as they get older, they become more and more burnt- out. They tend to pick jobs and careers that sound or pay great, but have no idea what their true passions are. They feel exhausted most of their lives. Source: www.radicalparenting.com; Vanessa Van Petten is a CNN columnist, winner of the Mom’s Choice Award and an author with Penguin Books.7 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 8. Vanessa Van Petten Teen Type #3 - Turtles These are kids who assume “everything will all work out just fine.” They invest very little of themselves, and just hope for the best. They do the least that is required of them and shirk all kinds of discomfort or responsibility by pulling into their personal shells. They tend to be lazy, apathetic, and passionless…unless, of course, it has something to do with their video games. Teen Type #4 - Tyrants Parents have spent a lifetime telling them they’re special and their poo smells like roses. They want the best, they expect the best, and they are going to get the best. They tend to be very aggressive and assume they are the center of everyone’s attention and their names are on the tips of everyone’s tongues. They are willing to work a little, but fully expect to see big rewards and be generously congratulated on their hard work. Source: www.radicalparenting.com; Vanessa Van Petten is a CNN columnist, winner of the Mom’s Choice Award and an author with Penguin Books.8 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 9. “Helicopter Parents” Have Created “Teacup Kids” 1. Cherished possession 2. Teacups break easily 3. Once it gets chipped, it feels ruined 4. Want to display a beautiful set 5. Want to be like the others 6. Only feed it high-quality tea 7. The quality reflects your taste and status 8. You do not want it to leave the collection 9. Must be very delicate with it 10. All teacups have essentially the same function Source: www.radicalparenting.com; Vanessa Van Petten is a CNN columnist, winner of the Mom’s Choice Award and an author with Penguin Books.9 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 10. 2012 Teen Snapshot10 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 11. 2012 Teen Snapshot • Teens carry $30 and have $742.70 in their bank and savings accounts • They primarily get money by asking their parents (51%), via an allowance (29%), from gifts (43%), and from a job (30%) (Source: C&R Research) • They are most likely to spend their money on eating out (25%), snacks (23%), beverages (21%), and candy (14%) (Source: C&R Research) • Teens are a prized demographic for marketers: they have more autonomy over their purchases than tweens, yet also don’t have the full responsibilities (e.g. auto insurance or transportation, meals) as their older counterparts (Source: C&R Research) • During the summer months, teens split their time between work, the mall, camp, and gathering around bodies of water (Source: C&R Research) • Teens’ favorite brands showcase their priorities: Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, iPod, Google, M&M’s, and Oreo’s are teens’ most loved brands, followed by Subway, Hershey’s Milk Chocolate, Target, Sprite, and Microsoft (Source: Harris Interactive)11 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 12. 2012 Teen Snapshot • American Eagle is teens’ top clothing brand, followed by Forever 21, Aeropostale, Hollister, and Levi’s (Source: C&R Research) • Three in four teens discuss media or entertainment brands at least once a day (Source: Keller Fay) • Teens are receptive to most forms of advertising; 70% recall they saw a digital video display in the past month (Source: Arbitron, Edison Research) • Teens’ friends wield the most influence over their preferences and purchases • Influential teens exist in every single peer group and are perceived by their friends as “on top of trends and able to sway opinions” • Influential teens also tend to have older siblings, middle- to upper-class backgrounds, and are attractive • The key to reaching the cool kids is similar to dating: desperation and trying too hard are ultimate turnoffs, while being aloof and mysterious are attractive12 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 13. 2012 Teen Snapshot • Teens have pretty regular routines regarding their daily activities and behaviors • They spend nearly 10 hours a day sleeping and three hours engaged in educational activities (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics) • Boys spend one more hour a day on leisure and sports activities, while girls spend 12 more minutes eating (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics) • Among those able to join the workforce, girls are most likely working as camp counselors or babysitters, while boys work as day laborers or landscapers (Source: C&R Research) • About 40% of teens spend 3 to 6 hours a day online, mostly visiting: – Facebook (41%) – Flickr (34%) – YouTube (31%) – Google (25%) and – Twitter (21%) (Source: Buzz Marketing)13 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 14. 2012 Teen Snapshot • Teens routinely watch online video and play video games, usually those having to do with racing • Nearly all teens have cell phones, with 38% claiming they will upgrade to an iPhone within the next six months (Source: Piper Jaffray) • They send 3,339 text messages a month (Source 5 Nielsen, AOL) • 58% send text messages while on the toilet (Source: TextPlus) • There’s little to suggest teens are getting bored with Facebook; they continue to post, update, and check the social network every day • Among their average 500 Facebook friends, however, there’s one teens wish they didn’t have… 29% wish they could “unfriend” their parent (Source: Nielsen)14 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 15. Teens By The Numbers15 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 16. Teen Influencers16 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 17. Teen Media Habits17 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 18. Teen Media Habits18 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 19. Teen Media Habits19 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 20. The Digital Teen20 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 21. The Digital Teen21 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 22. The Digital Teen22 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 23. The Digital Teen23 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 24. Teen Saving and Spending24 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 25. Teen Saving and Spending Despite some early signs of improvement in the economy, college-bound high school students still report high levels of concern about the U.S. economy Source: 2011 College Decision Impact Survey | March 2011 | Maguire Associates & Fastweb25 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 26. Teen Saving and Spending26 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 27. Teen Saving and Spending Source: C&R Research27 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 28. Source: C&R Research28 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 29. Source: C&R Research29 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 30. Teen Saving and Spending30 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 31. Teen Brand Loyalties31 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 32. Teen Brand Loyalties32 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 33. Teen Brand Loyalties 68% of 15- to 17-year-olds receive at least one permission-based email a day compared to 95% of 18- to 24-year-olds who receive at least one such email daily 32% of teens are fans of at least one company on Facebook, but only 3% of teens with a Twitter account follow at least one brand via Twitter33 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 34. College Search34 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 35. 2012 TeensTALK® Methodology• A nationwide telephone survey of 496 high school seniors who will attend college as first-time, first-year students in fall 2012. Based on the national population of college-bound fall 2012 first-time freshmen, the margin of error is plus or minus 4.4% at the 95% confidence level – Data collected in February 2012 – Sampling at random (probability sample) to provide a rigorous data set for accurate assessment of the college-selection process• Main topics covered in this survey: 1. Profile of institutions considered and preferred 2. Number of admission applications submitted 3. Absolute and relative importance of specific factors impacting the college- selection decision 4. Acceptable and preferred communication channels 5. Involvement and relative influence of others in college-selection 6. The use of—and expectations for—smartphones and mobile devices in the college search process 35 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 36. Distribution of 2012 TeensTALK® Respondents • Surveys completed in Hawaii and Alaska as well36 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 37. 2012 TeensTALK® Demographics – Gender and Race Asian, 8% African American, 12% Male, 45 Two or % Female, 5 more 5% White / races, 18 Caucasian % 62% Other % American Indian 1% Pacific Islander 1% Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) Hispanic 4%37 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 38. 2012 TeensTALK® Demographics – High School Rank What is your current high school class rank? 50% 40% 30% 25% 23% 20% 20% 18% 10% 9% 5% 0% Top 10% Top 25% Top 50% Below top 50% does not provide rank know School Dont Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) • Caucasian and Asians respondents demonstrate higher class ranks than Hispanics and African Americans38 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 39. 2012 TeensTALK® Demographics – SAT Exam Have you taken the SAT? What was your combined math and critical reading score on the SAT? 100% 80% Percent of Respondents Mean Score: 1179 Did not 60% with SAT score of: Median Score: 1210 take SAT, 45% 40% Took 27% 20% 20% 18% SAT, 55% 20% 15% 0% 1000 or less 1001 to 1151 to 1301 to 1451+ 1150 1300 1450 Note: Respondents who gave ‘0’ as their SAT score have been excluded from the above calculation. (n=212) Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) • Caucasian, Asian, and Hispanic respondents score significantly higher than African Americans39 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 40. 2012 TeensTALK® Demographics – ACT Exam Have you taken the ACT? What was your composite score on the ACT? 100% 80% Did not Percent of Respondents Mean Score: 23 60% with ACT score of: Median Score: 23 take ACT, 41% 40% 31% 30% Took 20% 14% 16% ACT, 59% 9% 0% <19 19 to 22 23 to 26 27 to 30 31+ Note: Respondents who gave ‘0’ as their ACT score were excluded from the above calculation. (n=265) Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) • Caucasian and Asian respondents score significantly higher than African Americans and Hispanics40 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 41. College/University Choice - TeensTALK® Are you considering...? Four-year public college or 78% 20% 2% university 8% Four-year private college or 22% 40% 57% 3% university Community or technical college 34% 65% 2% 70%For-profit college or university like 7% 90% 3% U of Phoenix, Kaplan, or DeVry 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% End education with associate degree Yes No Dont know Start college career and transfer later Dont know Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) • More than two-thirds of those who are considering community colleges (n=166) plan on starting their college education there and then transferring to a four-year school to earn a Bachelor’s degree41 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 42. Number of Applications Submitted - TeensTALK® To how many schools, in total, have you applied for 50% admission? • Total applications 40% 39% Mean Score: 4.03 reported among Median Score: 3.00 TeensTALK ®Spring 2012 respondents are just 30% slightly higher than 2010 (mean: 20% 19% 18% 3.3, median: 3.0) 15% • Of those who are considering applying to 10% 5% more schools 2% (n=154), 25% consider 0% one additional 3 to 5 1 school 2 schools 6-8 schools 9-11 12+ schools application, and about schools schools two-thirds consider applying to two or more Base: 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=468) schools42 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 43. Teen College/University Application Influences • Majority report that economic concerns do influence their college application strategies Source: 2011 College Decision Impact Survey | March 2011 | Maguire Associates & Fastweb43 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 44. Teen College/University Application Influences Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Communication Expectations of College-Bound High School. Of the 1,307 respondents, 58% were high school seniors and 14% juniors, while 27% of the responses came from their parents or guardians. One percent of participants did not report their status.44 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 45. Top-Choice School Description - TeensTALK® Yes No Made final decision 51% 49% Program length School size School type 81% 15,000 or more 30% 72% 5,000 to 14,999 39% students 28% 19% Under 5,000 students 31% Two-year Four-year Public Private Base: 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) • Females tend to choose public schools more often than males • Hispanic respondents tend choose 2-year schools at a significantly higher rate than other populations • There is no clear preference for a specific size of college or university45 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 46. Top-Choice School Description - TeensTALK® (continued) Officially admitted to this school 74% Will live on campus 66% Applied for admission to this school 85% Made official, on-campus visit 57% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) • Compared to spring 2010, more students have been officially admitted to their top-choice schools (74% vs. 56% in spring 2010) • However, fewer have made personal visits to their first-choice campuses (57% vs. 73% in spring 2010)46 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 47. Top-Choice School Description - TeensTALK® (continued) Distance to Current Top-Choice Campus from Home 100% • Distance-from-home Mean Score: 204 mi preference is generally 80% similar to those suggested by Spring 60% 2010 respondents 40% • However, somewhat 40% higher percentages of 20% students would prefer 20% 15% 13% 12% a smaller travel range: 1 - 30 miles: 40% vs. 0% 36% in spring 2010 1 to 30 miles 31 to 60 miles to 120 miles to 500 miles 500+ miles 61 121 121 - 500 miles: 20% vs. 28% in spring 2010 Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496)47 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 48. College-Selection Process - TeensTALK® Which of the following statements best describes you and your college-selection process? • 2012 findings differ from Spring Known for years which 2010, when 49% of college/university wanted to 18% 31% in 2010 respondents reported attend having a preferred option Had a preferred college/university, but considered 37% 49% in 2010 • In 2010, 31% of alternatives respondents knew exactly what college/university Did not have a preferred option 45% 20% in 2010 they wanted to attend 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496)48 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 49. Teen College Consideration Priorities High school seniors continue to place the greatest importance on “value of education” as well as: • Quality of major and students • Career-oriented coursework/majors and future employment opportunities • Total costs and the availability of merit- or need-based financial aid • Academic facilities • Campus atmosphere • Personal attention • Preparation for graduate/professional school Students’ college priorities have remained stable despite any concerns about the economy Source: 2011 College Decision Impact Survey | March 2011 | Maguire Associates & Fastweb49 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 50. Final Selection of College/University - TeensTALK® Did you, or will you, involve anyone else in your final college choice, or will you make that decision entirely on your own? For each of the following, indicate how much, if at all, they were (or will be) involved in helping you reach a final decision. (1 - no involvement, 4 - very involved) 3.7 Others were 2.6 2.4 involved 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.1 36% 1.8 Made final decision 64% on my own Parents Relative other than HS friend Brothers/ Sisters parents Base: 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) • Two years ago, 47% said they would make their final college choice without help (versus 64% in 2012) • Those who seek help from others, rely on parents’ opinions more than on advice from other sources50 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 51. Factors Impacting Final College Choice - TeensTALK® MAX DIFF Which factor is most important to you? N= 496 Quality of my preferred major or field of study 16.2% Graduates get good jobs 13.0% Graduates are accepted into good graduate… 11.1% *Full text: Total cost of attending 9.9% Graduates are accepted into Net cost after financial aid, scholarships, etc., are… 9.5% good graduate programs/ Quality of faculty as teachers and mentors 7.2% schools to pursue master’s Feels like a good fit for you 6.2% degrees, doctoral degrees, or Overall academic reputation 5.4% highly specialized professional Quality of academic facilities 4.5% training like law school or Safety of the campus 2.4% medical school Study abroad opportunities 2.3% The city or community where campus is located 1.9% Variety of on-campus activities 1.8% Distance between campus and home 1.7% Quality of campus amenities 1.7% College or university is widely recognized 1.5% Variety of off-campus activities 1.0% My family or friends have a connection to the school 1.0% Appearance of the campus 1.0% The school has a religious or denominational affiliation 0.8% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% • Two years ago, graduates get good jobs (17%), quality of preferred major (15%), net cost after aid (13%), and feels like a good fit (10%) were top importance factors, followed by total cost of attending scored (8%)51 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 52. Teens Want Live College-Search Conversations Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Communication Expectations of College-Bound High School. Of the 1,307 respondents, 58% were high school seniors and 14% juniors, while 27% of the responses came from their parents or guardians. One percent of participants did not report their status.52 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 53. Acceptable Communication Tactics - TeensTALK® For colleges to which you’ve applied for admission, do you feel it is acceptable for the college to contact you by…? (N=496). Multiple response allowed. 2010 96% Sending you personalized letters through the mail 2012 97% 88% Sending you publications through the mail 92% Sending you a personal email 95% 91% 73% Phone calls to you 85% Personal visits to your high school 77% 77% Sending mass, non-personalized emails 50% 67% Phone calls to your parent(s) 36% 65% Text messages to your cell phone 22% 39% Contacting you through Facebook 32% 39% Personal visits to your home 19% 34% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) • Notable increases in the acceptability of phone calls, non-personalized emails, text messaging, Facebook, and personal home visits53 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 54. Preferred Communication Tactics - TeensTALK® Of these items, which would you most prefer a college or university uses to contact you after you apply for admission? (N=495). Aided. 2010 36% Sending you personalized letters through the mail 2012 39% Sending you a personal email 38% 29% 12% Phone calls to you 14% 3% Sending you publications through the mail 5% Personal visits to your high school 5% 4% Text messages to your cell phone 1% 3% Sending mass, non-personalized emails 2% Phone calls to your parent(s) 1% 2% Contacting you through Facebook 0% 1% Personal visits to your home 2% 1% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Base: All 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) • Notable decrease in the preference for personalized email • Modest increases in the preference for personal letters, phone calls, publications, and text messaging54 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 55. The Digital Teen and College Search55 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 56. Use of Mobile Devices - TeensTALK® When seeking information about a college, how likely is it that youre using your smartphone or mobile device, like an iPad, to do so? Aided. Single response. Mobile user (n=256) profile: 50% • Male 56% 40% • White 56% 40% • Choose four-year public schools 68% 30% 27% 25% • Choose to live on 20% campus 76% • Similarly split among top 9% 10% 10%, top 25%, and top 50% in their graduating 0% classes Very likely Somewhat likely Somewhat Not at all likely unlikely • Average ACT score of 21 • Average SAT score of Base: 2012 TeensTALK® respondents (n=496) 91256 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 57. College Information On Mobile Devices - TeensTALK® What information about a college is important to you to be able to easily find and view on a smartphone or mobile device? (N=256). Multiple response allowed. Academic program information 25% Cost information 19% Financial aid information 12% Admission standards 10% Contact information 8% Other Number Athletic program information 7% Location 6 College / class size 5 Housing information 6% College activities 5 Other 10% Application status 5 0% 20% 40% Student / teacher ratio 3 Reviews / enrollment 2 • Information preferences generally mirror college selection factor importance ratings, with the exception of placement/outcomes evidence57 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 58. The Digital Teen and College Search • Students who prefer private colleges or universities are generally more likely to have used digital channels/social media to communicate with schools Source: 2011 College Decision Impact Survey | March 2011 | Maguire Associates & Fastweb58 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 59. The Digital Teen and College Search Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Mobile Browsing Behaviors and Expectations of College-Bound High School Students. Findings from a survey of nearly 2,300 college-bound high school students regarding the use of devices to search for colleges. 94% said they use a mobile device (such as a cell phone, smartphone, or tablet) at least once per week.59 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 60. The Digital Teen and College Search Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Mobile Browsing Behaviors and Expectations of College-Bound High School Students. Findings from a survey of nearly 2,300 college-bound high school students regarding the use of devices to search for colleges. 94% said they use a mobile device (such as a cell phone, smartphone, or tablet) at least once per week.60 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 61. The Digital Teen and College Search Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Mobile Browsing Behaviors and Expectations of College-Bound High School Students. Findings from a survey of nearly 2,300 college-bound high school students regarding the use of devices to search for colleges. 94% said they use a mobile device (such as a cell phone, smartphone, or tablet) at least once per week.61 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 62. The Digital Teen and College Search 50% said they would “like” a school’s Facebook page so postings would appear on their walls 83% responded they would view the Facebook page of a school they were considering if given the chance Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Mobile Browsing Behaviors and Expectations of College-Bound High School Students. Findings from a survey of nearly 2,300 college-bound high school students regarding the use of devices to search for colleges. 94% said they use a mobile device (such as a cell phone, smartphone, or tablet) at least once per week.62 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 63. The Digital Teen and College Search Much like mobile site content, your Facebook pages must provide value for prospective student as they define value Keeping content fresh and relevant is key to creating a positive Facebook experience Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Mobile Browsing Behaviors and Expectations of College-Bound High School Students. Findings from a survey of nearly 2,300 college-bound high school students regarding the use of devices to search for colleges. 94% said they use a mobile device (such as a cell phone, smartphone, or tablet) at least once per week.63 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 64. The Digital Teen and College Search Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Communication Expectations of College-Bound High School Students. Of the 1,307 respondents, 58% were high school seniors and 14% juniors, while 27% of the responses came from their parents or guardians. One percent of participants did not report their status.64 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 65. The Digital Teen and College Search 69% of students and 72% of parents said they have had online video conversations using a webcam; both groups showed fair interest in communicating with campuses via webcasts Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Communication Expectations of College-Bound High School Students. Of the 1,307 respondents, 58% were high school seniors and 14% juniors, while 27% of the responses came from their parents or guardians. One percent of participants did not report their status.65 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 66. The Digital Teen and College Search Source: 2012 Noel-Levitz E-Expectations Trend Report: The Communication Expectations of College-Bound High School Students. Of the 1,307 respondents, 58% were high school seniors and 14% juniors, while 27% of the responses came from their parents or guardians. One percent of participants did not report their status.66 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 67. Teens Consideration of “Alternative” College Options Students’ willingness to consider alternative arrangements for college is not significantly correlated with their concerns about the state of the U.S. economy. Source: 2011 College Decision Impact Survey | March 2011 | Maguire Associates & Fastweb67 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 68. 68 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 69. Presented by Eric Sickler Discussion Associate Vice President for Client Services eric.sickler@stamats.com (319) 431-5043 (800) 553-887869 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 70. Presented by Eric Sickler Thank You! Associate Vice President for Client Services eric.sickler@stamats.com (319) 431-5043 (800) 553-887870 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 71. Additional Slides71 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012
    • 72. Teens Who Prefer A Private College/University About two-thirds of students who preferred a private education will (1) weigh heavily the makeup of financial aid offers from institutions, particularly in terms of the amount of grant awards relative to loans and work study assistance in making their enrollment decision; and (2) are more concerned with the net cost of an institution after financial assistance from all sources has been determined. Only one third of those who prefer a private college reported that the listed tuition had a big impact on whether or not they would apply. Source: 2011 College Decision Impact Survey | March 2011 | Maguire Associates & Fastweb72 2012 TeensTALK® | © STAMATS 2012

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