Forum Journal (Summer 2013) Iconic Urban Buildings - Schools
 

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This slide show is enhanced content for the Summer 2013 Forum Journal (Preservation in the City). To learn more about Preservation Leadership Forum and how you can become a member visit: ...

This slide show is enhanced content for the Summer 2013 Forum Journal (Preservation in the City). To learn more about Preservation Leadership Forum and how you can become a member visit: http://www.preservationnation.org/forum

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Forum Journal (Summer 2013) Iconic Urban Buildings - Schools Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Historic SchoolsEnhanced Content:Iconic Urban Buildings
  • 2. Historic and older schools are facing closures acrossthe United States. The continued misapprehension that“newer is better” continues to play a role in theseclosures, and they are often tied to several other keyissues, such as:• Declining enrollments as urban populationsdecrease.• Shrinking school budgets that lead to a lackof facility maintenance and deterioratedconditions.• The explosive growth of school alternatives,i.e., charter schools (though one of the mostfrequently employed adaptive uses forhistoric urban schools is in housing charterschools).• Misguided belief that bigger and newermeans better quality of education and fewercosts to the school district (e.g., may end uppaying fewer administrative salaries whilespending more on daily transportation).• Changing land-use patterns – populationgrowth static but shifting outside of the city,leading students to live far away from centralschool.Top: West Seattle High School (1917 -1959) in Seattle, Wash.,was renovated in 2002. Read the full story here. Photo: Doug ScottBottom: Nathan Bishop Middle School (1928) in Providence, R.I..was renovated 2009. Read the full story here. Photo: Ai3 ArchitectsChallenges
  • 3. Left: The Stadium High School (1894, 1906) in Tacoma, Wash., was renovated 2006. Read the fullstory here. Photo: Lara SwimmerRight: School Without Walls Senior High School (1882) in Washington, D.C., was renovated 2009.Read the full story here. Photo: Joe Romeo/courtesy of Perkins Eastman“The choice is not between the old and the new—it is between the dignified and theundistinguished, the enduring and the disposable. It is a choice between thoughtlessreplication of sprawl and the conscious decision to invest in civic life.”– Lakis Polycarpou, graduate of Columbine High School, quoted in Schools for Cities: Urban Strategies, published bythe National Endowment for the Arts, 2002.Case Studies
  • 4. National Trust for HistoricPreservation’s webpage on historicschools, featuring the Helping JohnnyWalk to School study, advocacyresources, and case studies.Our Living Legacy, an inspiring filmfrom Colorado Preservation, Inc., thatfeatures six historic schools that havebeen renovated to meet todayseducational standards, save on capitalcosts, and help combat sprawl.Pew Charitable Trusts’ February 2013study Shuttered Public Schools: TheStruggle to Bring Old Buildings NewLife....The Stadium High School in Tacoma, Wash.Additional Resources