0
Paige V. Baggett, Ph.D.
              pbaggett@usouthal.edu
          University of South Alabama

National Art Education ...
In this mixed methods study the researcher explored
art concepts represented through open-ended
concept/mind mapping by 3r...
Of interest was the choice of art concepts
and how they developed through grade
levels. Students represented their
feeling...
Concept mapping, as a tool to visualize and
 communicate conceptual
 understanding, has been extensively
 studied. Accordi...
According to Eisner (2002), quot;Inviting students


    to use their imagination means inviting them to
    see things o...
United States (US) emphasis on high-


    stakes testing has decreased the
    occurrences of art learning in US schools...
All 218 students participating were enrolled


    in public schools in the southeastern United
    States. The grade lev...
A practice concept/mind mapping exercise
  was completed with students.

Students were asked to draw a new
  concept/mind ...
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Table 1.
Mean of nodes, levels, symbols, and colors used in mapping by grade level
_______________________________________...
Table 2.
Mean of nodes, levels, symbols, and colors used in mapping by gender
____________________________________________...
Analysis of the art content represented

    revealed most often the description of what
    “art is,” with words such as...
The art processes were represented with

    drawing being listed most often at every
    grade level. As in science, evi...
As students got older, they listed more

    artists, and works of art. Vincent Van Gogh
    was listed most often, follo...
Most often, elements of art such as

    color, line, and geometric shapes were
    symbolically represented with color i...
What is the perceived value of art


    knowledge?
    Is this lack of knowledge due to emphasis on


    high-stakes t...
Arnheim, R. (1969). Visual thinking.


    Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
    Baggett, P.V., & Shaw, E.L. ...
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Student Representation Of Art Concepts Through Mind Maps

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Transcript of "Student Representation Of Art Concepts Through Mind Maps"

  1. 1. Paige V. Baggett, Ph.D. pbaggett@usouthal.edu University of South Alabama National Art Education Association Minneapolis, MN April 20, 2009
  2. 2. In this mixed methods study the researcher explored art concepts represented through open-ended concept/mind mapping by 3rd through 12th grade students. All 218 students participating were enrolled in public schools in the southeastern United States. Each student-generated concept/mind map was analyzed quantitatively indicating number of nodes, levels, symbols, and colors generated. Additionally the content of the nodes was analyzed to discover themes representing the students’ representation of art. 2
  3. 3. Of interest was the choice of art concepts and how they developed through grade levels. Students represented their feelings about art; art processes in which they had engaged; tools for art productions; elements and principles of design; and artists. Students represented what they had been exposed to through art education. 3
  4. 4. Concept mapping, as a tool to visualize and communicate conceptual understanding, has been extensively studied. According to Rye (1995), concept mapping can aid learners to think about relationships between concepts. Variations on concept mapping such as Mind Mapping®, which include the elements of color and symbols, are less evident in literature, but provide relevant possibilities for applications in content domains such as art education. 4
  5. 5. According to Eisner (2002), quot;Inviting students  to use their imagination means inviting them to see things other than the way they are. And this is what artists do; they perceive what is, but imagine what might be, and then use their knowledge, their technical skills, and their sensibilities to pursue what they have imaginedquot; (p. 199). Art-making is a matter of continual experimentation and problem solving (Arnheim, 1969). 5
  6. 6. United States (US) emphasis on high-  stakes testing has decreased the occurrences of art learning in US schools (Baggett & Shaw, 2008). As educators working with preservice teachers in the current educational climate, the researchers wanted to know: What do US students know about art? 6
  7. 7. All 218 students participating were enrolled  in public schools in the southeastern United States. The grade levels were 3-12. Fifty- three percent of the participants were male; 47% percent female. The ethnicity of the participants was 15% African American, 4% Asian, 70% Caucasian, 3% Hispanic, and 8% reported other. 7
  8. 8. A practice concept/mind mapping exercise was completed with students. Students were asked to draw a new concept/mind map using either science or art as their central concept. 8
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  17. 17. Table 1. Mean of nodes, levels, symbols, and colors used in mapping by grade level __________________________________________________________________________________________ Grade Level Node M Level M Symbol M Color M Third 12.24 1.71 3.88 5.88 Fourth 13.82 1.97 5.38 6.03 Fifth 19.97 2.23 3.75 5.75 Sixth 13.18 1.85 3.03 4.70 Seventh 15.67 1.75 1.17 3.38 Eighth 22.23 2.41 1.55 4.95 Ninth 14.00 1.50 .70 2.20 Tenth 17.00 2.56 1.11 1.33 Eleventh 14.55 1.95 1.64 3.23 Twelfth 13.60 2.00 .00 2.40 ________________________________________________________________________________________ 17
  18. 18. Table 2. Mean of nodes, levels, symbols, and colors used in mapping by gender __________________________________________________________________________________ Gender Node M Level M Symbol M Color M Male 13.92 2.03 2.41 3.99 Female 17.55 1.96 3.15 5.29 __________________________________________________________________________________ 18
  19. 19. Analysis of the art content represented  revealed most often the description of what “art is,” with words such as creative, imagination, and fun. Subject matter represented in art, and  supplies utilized were the second most represented themes. Students represented things in their environment: family, pets, flowers, and trees. 19
  20. 20. The art processes were represented with  drawing being listed most often at every grade level. As in science, evidence of knowledge and skills was apparent as students included the processes of shading, cross-hatching, and stippling. The elements color, line, and shape were  listed and examples were provided more often in the maps of 3rd – 7th graders. 20
  21. 21. As students got older, they listed more  artists, and works of art. Vincent Van Gogh was listed most often, followed by the Mona Lisa and Leonardo Da Vinci. Also in the higher grades, the overall  definition of art expanded as student listed design, technology, architecture, theater, dan ce, music, and musicians, increasingly. 21
  22. 22. Most often, elements of art such as  color, line, and geometric shapes were symbolically represented with color in the early grades. Also, the common  subjects, flowers, pets, trees, were visually represented. In the older grades, a few students with skill in  representational drawing chose to create a wordless map, representing their skill in drawing. 22
  23. 23. What is the perceived value of art  knowledge? Is this lack of knowledge due to emphasis on  high-stakes testing in reading and math? How do students best represent their  knowledge in a subject matter domain? What types of assessments best reflect  student learning? 23
  24. 24. Arnheim, R. (1969). Visual thinking.  Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Baggett, P.V., & Shaw, E.L. (2008). The art and  science of Gyotaku: There’s somethin’ fishy goin’ on here. Science Activities,45(1), 3-7. Eisner, E. (2002). The arts and the creation of  mind. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Rye, J. A. (1995). Concept maps and concept  mapping. Appendix A. Retrieved June 9, 2008, from http://www.ed.psu.edu/ci/Papers/STS/gac- 6/amapgd.htm 24
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