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Charismatic Aspect Of Communication Remake

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the charism of communicaton as an aspect of evangelization

the charism of communicaton as an aspect of evangelization

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  • The Pope John Paul II repeated often one of the characteristic phrases of his pontificate, "A faith that does not become culture is a faith that is not fully accepted, not fully thought out, not lived faithfully."
  • Replaced by self centeredness, sentimentality, an intense nomadism, instability, fragility, fragmentation, a focus on the body, free time, shallow thinking, sensationalism, etc which flourish in another cultural setting, that of communication. The culture is a phenomenon that creates, nourishes, expands, disseminates and interact with every other culture such as politics, the economy the culture of individualism etc. Sr Joana T Puntl fsp There is an anthropological revolution – Italian Bishops conference 1996 Source: the Communication Encounter 2007 - fsp research and study of communication gathering in Rome attended by Sr Marie Paul, fsp
  • Replaced by self centeredness, sentimentality, an intense nomadism, instability, fragility, fragmentation, a focus on the body, free time, shallow thinking, sensationalism, etc which flourish in another cultural setting, that of communication. The culture is a phenomenon that creates, nourishes, expands, disseminates and interact with every other culture such as politics, the economy the culture of individualism etc. Sr Joana T Puntl fsp There is an anthropological revolution – Italian Bishops conference 1996 Source: the Communication Encounter 2007 - fsp research and study of communication gathering in Rome attended by Sr Marie Paul, fsp
  • In other words, the premise of the industry, and the principal explanation of its success, is that it is able to tap into the emptiness of the modern self. More than that, many advertisements boldly address that self, and for more than a century have honed messages that are replete with religious motifs. It is not simply a sense of well-being that they offer but a sense of salvation. ‘The language of progress and spiritual and physical fulfillment,’ Stuart Ewen has observed, is suffused throughout advertising, and advertising is the voice of this progress and spiritual fulfillment”
  • To think of the answers that we give to life’s ultimate questions about meaning and purpose as a world and life view means that the beliefs informing my perspective function as basic presuppositions, in terms of which I live, think, and act. These beliefs are especially important because they give overall direction, shape, and value to life. They systematically underlie a wide range of thoughts and actions. We may call these basic beliefs “life-orienting beliefs,” because holding them dramatically affects the shape of one’s life as a whole, not only in what one does but also in what one thinks. Life-orienting beliefs make up the starting-point of consumerism.
  • To think of the answers that we give to life’s ultimate questions about meaning and purpose as a world and life view means that the beliefs informing my perspective function as basic presuppositions, in terms of which I live, think, and act. These beliefs are especially important because they give overall direction, shape, and value to life. They systematically underlie a wide range of thoughts and actions. We may call these basic beliefs “life-orienting beliefs,” because holding them dramatically affects the shape of one’s life as a whole, not only in what one does but also in what one thinks. Life-orienting beliefs make up the starting-point of consumerism.
  • To think of the answers that we give to life’s ultimate questions about meaning and purpose as a world and life view means that the beliefs informing my perspective function as basic presuppositions, in terms of which I live, think, and act. These beliefs are especially important because they give overall direction, shape, and value to life. They systematically underlie a wide range of thoughts and actions. We may call these basic beliefs “life-orienting beliefs,” because holding them dramatically affects the shape of one’s life as a whole, not only in what one does but also in what one thinks. Life-orienting beliefs make up the starting-point of consumerism.
  • To think of the answers that we give to life’s ultimate questions about meaning and purpose as a world and life view means that the beliefs informing my perspective function as basic presuppositions, in terms of which I live, think, and act. These beliefs are especially important because they give overall direction, shape, and value to life. They systematically underlie a wide range of thoughts and actions. We may call these basic beliefs “life-orienting beliefs,” because holding them dramatically affects the shape of one’s life as a whole, not only in what one does but also in what one thinks. Life-orienting beliefs make up the starting-point of consumerism.
  • To think of the answers that we give to life’s ultimate questions about meaning and purpose as a world and life view means that the beliefs informing my perspective function as basic presuppositions, in terms of which I live, think, and act. These beliefs are especially important because they give overall direction, shape, and value to life. They systematically underlie a wide range of thoughts and actions. We may call these basic beliefs “life-orienting beliefs,” because holding them dramatically affects the shape of one’s life as a whole, not only in what one does but also in what one thinks. Life-orienting beliefs make up the starting-point of consumerism.
  • “ A good part of today’s world suffers from a shortage of bread. There is a far greater shortage of the spiritual bread brought by Jesus. ‘I am the Bread of Life,’ he said. Countless people live complexly unaware of their destiny. They have no other thought than the present. Yet in a short time, death brings them to eternity. There are few to prepare them with this bread. “There is no one to break it for them.” They die of hunger without truly understanding their hunger. Jesus is Bread/Truth. I was struck by his observation that Alberione entered the seminary in 1896, when the Catholic world buzzed with energy generated by the encyclicals of Pope Leo XIII. After a string of 19th century popes who solved the problem of modernity by basically ignoring it, Leo aimed to “win back the world for the Church,” calling for a vast “Christian reconstruction of society.”
  • In the area of communication, technique is rampant and technology evolves at a dizzying pace, making possible an instant network—a world-wide web—of connections among human beings by means of increasingly sophisticated inventions. It is to be noted that the basic concept of power has not really been transformed. Only the locus of power has shifted, from the master to the pupils or disciples. Each individual has the potential to be his or her own master in the communication field, and to be master of those who wish to listen and to accept one’s message. Alberione’s prayer about the men and women of our time, “many of whom are wandering in darkness, without a pastor, a father, a teacher ( master) ” [i] [6] should be revised to read “many of whom have set themselves up as their own master.” In regard to the truth , the concept of metaphysical and absolute certitude is challenged by a plurality of viewpoints, by a mutually constructed, open-ended piecing together of possible interpretations of reality undertaken by teacher and audience. Truth shifts with every recontextualization and becomes relativized in the light of new insights. This plurality of truths is matched by a proliferation of models and projects for “the good life.” One’s way or life direction is no longer clearly and univocally mapped out. For both truth and way, then, human freedom is faced with a multiplicity of choices, and this freedom is jealously guarded as a sign that the human person has at last come of age. Life is seen as the fruit of this freedom to choose one’s preferred truths and paths from a variety of possible directions. What makes this questioning even more urgent is the fact that communication technology has worked its way into the very psyche of the human being to the point that the media are no longer to be regarded simply as instruments external to the person which he or she can manipulate without being changed from within. The media have thus given rise to what can truly be called “a culture.” This culture by now is global, though the concrete expressions and spheres of influence may vary from place to place. Sassi has already described some dangers of such a culture in the passages quoted above: the increased temptation to center on one’s autonomy, one’s power to choose from a seemingly unlimited range of life directions and values. There tends to be a leveling of these very values, none of which is seen as objectively more significant than others. The specific identity and therefore the mission of the Daughters of St. Paul is precisely to insert themselves within the technological world of communication and probe its conscience with Christ’s own questions regarding the ultimate meaning and values of life.
  • What is needed is witnessing , says Sassi, the type of witnessing that sustains the message with the example of one’s own dedication to an alternative, other-centered power. The more radical and counter-cultural the witnessing, the more effective it becomes. Apostles of communication do have to inculturate themselves in media culture, but paradoxically, they are also to challenge with their very lives whatever in that culture is opposed to the Gospel that they proclaim. Christianity is a new life; it takes a person and makes him whole. Alberione – Notes on Pastoral Theology Religious … find in their own lives consecrated to God an instrument of special excellence for effective evangelization… they are the living expression of the Church’s aspiration to respond to the more exigent demands of the beatitudes. By their manner of life they constitute a symbol of total dedication to the service of God, of the Church and of their fellow men. Accordingly, religious have a special importance in regard to that form of witness which … is a primary element of evangelization. This silent witness of poverty, of detachment from the things of this world, of chastity, pure innocence of life, and voluntary obedience, as well as offering a challenge to the world and to the Church herself, constitutes an excellent form of preaching which can influence even non-Christians…(EN 69).   On Evangelization, Paul VI
  • What are some of the attitudes and convictions that formation should help to impart, in regard to Pauline poverty?
  • The answer to this dilemma is to be found within the parameters of the mission to which Paulines have pledged their lives. The liberation of the victims of oppression and injustice must include liberation also from the subtle manipulations media are used to exert upon the very hearts and minds of people. The distortions of truth, the creation of false needs, the deceptive lure of materialistic goals as the ultimate meaning of life and human fulfillment can be fertile ground for oppression and enslavement as much as the more obvious forms of injustice. Paulines are committed to address this issue by raising the consciousness of people to the need for a critical stance against the camouflaged attacks upon their human integrity waged through the media.   The option to liberate those who are victims of consumerism. Because it means working for a change of values and mentality and requires time and patience, it may seem even to the Pauline herself to be less effective and urgent in the face of concrete instances of poverty waiting to be relieved immediately by concrete and externally verifiable actions. But this task is to be understood as a legitimate expression of poverty, as much as direct actions to help the materially poor rise up from their destitution.
  • Pastoral means going out – going toward Invite the young to our mission: here you can express your faith through movies, photos, television, movies, etc. Communication is a social process and a medium – not a process in itself. Compare the consumer approach to marketing/diffusion. Postmodernism realizes that the more you consume the more you need to consume. There is a tendency to “live for today,” rely on personal experiences and individualism. There is a tension between God and consumerism. From 1900 to 2000 we lived capitalism and socialism – the producer and the consumer. By 2001 the new technology brings a consumerism of ideas. Today there is not a passive consumer of products. It wasn’t what Jesus was teaching as much has how he was teaching: incarnation. How do we create relationships? Partners? How do we remain in dialogue? Alberione called our receivers cooperators. All techniques of diffusion had the goal to promote the Gospel.
  • Pastoral means going out – going toward Invite the young to our mission: here you can express your faith through movies, photos, television, movies, etc. Communication is a social process and a medium – not a process in itself. Compare the consumer approach to marketing/diffusion. Postmodernism realizes that the more you consume the more you need to consume. There is a tendency to “live for today,” rely on personal experiences and individualism. There is a tension between God and consumerism. From 1900 to 2000 we lived capitalism and socialism – the producer and the consumer. By 2001 the new technology brings a consumerism of ideas. Today there is not a passive consumer of products. It wasn’t what Jesus was teaching as much has how he was teaching: incarnation. How do we create relationships? Partners? How do we remain in dialogue? Alberione called our receivers cooperators. All techniques of diffusion had the goal to promote the Gospel.
  • Don Sassi Brazil 2003
  • Don Sassi Brazil 2003 – If for four years we choose to serve an audience in a certain way – to exclude another – we can better serve the category of people for whom the project is directed.
  • Don sassi
  • … cannot be considered accomplished when it has provided for the diffusion of the Word of God; that is only one the moments of the mission; the moment of TRUTH which is concerned with enlightening the mind. It must be followed by the moment of WAY which is concerned with change and conversion to God. The process must then conclude with the moment of LIFE , that is, participation of the faithful in the divine life expressed in the sacraments. Carissimi, 106

Transcript

  • 1. Charismatic Aspect of Communication In Pauline Diffusion
  • 2. Pauline Spirituality The apostle of the media is formed to transmit the gospel to others.
  • 3.
    • Alberione developed Pauline spirituality centered in Jesus Master Way, Truth and Life.
    • Models of holiness Mary Queen of Apostles and St Paul the Apostle.
    Pauline Spirituality
  • 4. Pauline Spirituality
    • Foundation: Human, Christian, religious and Pauline formation = Holiness.
  • 5. Pauline Spirituality A new form of evangelization, a new form of preaching means “new apostles” and “new missionaries.”
  • 6. Reach everyone, especially those who have never heard the gospel Speak of All in a Christian Way
  • 7. As Paul we are compelled to preach the gospel to everyone Speak of All in a Christian Way
  • 8. Reach the general public and those who influence others Speak of All in a Christian Way
  • 9.
    • Adopt new media languages.
    Bring God to people, bring people to God
  • 10.
    • Take advantage of the “swiftest and most rapid means”.
    Bring God to people, bring people to God
  • 11.
    • New Evangelization;
    • New Society;
    • New Culture of Communication
  • 12. Cardinal Ratzinger on the New Evangelization
    • “ Evangelization as not merely a way of speaking, but a form of living.”
  • 13.  
  • 14. Changing Culture The cultural trends and values of the modern era have crumbled–all has replaced:
    • the reason that guided everything,
    • the science that explained everything,
    • the ideas that drove history
    J. Puntel, fsp
  • 15. Changing Culture … as expressed in the opening credits of … The Jane Austen Book Club and Young and Positive from album: I Got Shoes
  • 16.  
  • 17. Malls as Cathedrals… “ They are not just places to which we come to buy articles; they create an alternative reality: earthly heaven endless pleasures promises of enduring gratification.” Wells
  • 18.  
  • 19. Ads offering salvation
    • “ Advertisers project ‘powerful images of selfhood’ that carry ‘the promise of magical self-transformation through the ritual of purchase.”
    Wells, Losing Our Virtue , 112–13.
  • 20.  
  • 21.
    • it forms our behavior.
    • it informs us of our identity and the status of our world.
    Kavanaugh Following Christ in a Consumer Society The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 22. The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 23.
    • We lose sense of our interior selves and focus primarily on the external.
    Kavanaugh Following Christ in a Consumer Society The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 24. The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 25.
    • The mantra of this culture is “more, more and more .”
    Kavanaugh Following Christ in a Consumer Society The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 26. The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 27. The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 28.
    • Passions are channeled into possessing. When we are not producing and consuming, we watch.
    Kavanaugh Following Christ in a Consumer Society The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 29. The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 30.
    • Because of the loss of the interior self we become a culture of lost intimacy and the promise of possessions replaces the sacred in our hearts.
    Kavanaugh Following Christ in a Consumer Society The Consumer Society is a Formation System
  • 31.  
  • 32. Anthropology of consumerism:
    • It treats human beings as consumers rather than as persons.
  • 33. Anthropology of consumerism:
  • 34.
    • It neglects the person’s capacity for creative self-giving as well as the human person’s capacity for transcendence.
    Anthropology of consumerism:
  • 35. Anthropology of consumerism:
  • 36. Challenge for the Evangelizer “ In order to translate the treasures of our spirituality into another [secular or popular] language, it is not sufficient to know that language and its words.” A. Cencini
  • 37. “ We must also be mystics, deeply in love with our own spiritual wisdom, because Challenge for the Evangelizer we can only translate what has become part of our lives, what gives truth-beauty-goodness to life.” A. Cencini
  • 38. Christian are called to create alternative practices that open up a different kind of economic space – the space marked by the body of Christ. Become Consumed Challenge for the Evangelizer
  • 39. Become Consumed Challenge for the Evangelizer The economy of giving. Eucharist does not begin with scarcity but with one who came that we may have life and have it abundantly.
  • 40.
    • We must constantly be ready to relinquish
    Becoming the Body of Christ Challenge for the Evangelizer our claim to ownership, and to use our gifts for the common good of the whole body (1 Cor 12) .
  • 41. Paulines Consecrated
    • Mission Today
    • Apostles Today
    • Evangelizing Today
  • 42. Paulines are involved
    • …in the world of communication, preparing themselves to incarnate Christ Divine Master the Way, the Truth and the Life in the “culture” created by the communications.
  • 43. For Fr. Alberione and the Paulines,
    • communication is an original way of preaching that reaches the masses which are far away from the parishes.
  • 44. Pauline Apostles Today
    • The apostle of the media of communication is another Jesus Christ who echoes and amplifies to people of every age and place what Jesus preached and taught on earth.
  • 45. Pauline Apostles Today Sr Veritas Grau For Alberione it is Christ who asks the questions, challenging the world to give an account of itself, of its deepest hopes and needs, and whether or not it is seeking what will truly make it happy.
  • 46. Consecrated
    • Cf. On Evangelization
    This silent witness of poverty, of detachment from the things of this world, of chastity, pure innocence of life, and voluntary obedience… Such witness is a primary element of evangelization.
  • 47. Solidarity with the poor
    • Poverty requires a wise and professional administration which makes the most of the income that the community earns and accepts a life of hard work in solidarity with the poor who have to work for their living.
    Option for the Poor
  • 48. For effective evangelization Only teaching accompanied by a corresponding personal and community life style will be effective.
  • 49. Liberty to captives…
    • For Paulines the liberation of the victims of oppression and injustice must include liberation also from the subtle manipulation of media used to exert pressure upon the very hearts and minds of people.
  • 50. Apostolic media We are willing to share the community’s goods with the materially poor. This can be done through the sharing of facilities, of time. A typically Pauline way of serving the poor is also the use of apostolic media to inform society about concrete situations of poverty that exist in the world.
  • 51. To evangelize is to communicate. To communicate is to create a network of relationships and inter-relationships. cf Don Sassi – Brazil 2003 Evangelization of culture
  • 52. cf Don Sassi – Brazil 2003 Sacrament of Encounter Ours is a sacramental mission – a sacrament of the encounter with Christ.
  • 53. What are the signs of the time? The most important thing about Jesus was not what he was teaching. Jesus lived – he didn’t just have a function to transmit content. This was the way of the incarnation.
  • 54. Diffusion
    • Audience at the center
    • Culminating point
    • Together for mission
    • Prepared for mission
  • 55.
    • We are not in a congregation where there is a personal charism and each one has her own apostolate. We are part of an organization. We become the street that permits grace to walk on it.
  • 56. Organized Witness
    • We were sent by God as a community. So for all organization is not an end in itself but is aimed at the mission understood as a common project.
  • 57.
    • Put at the center of the process our audience, their needs, their hopes, to carry out choices that are adequate in assuming more efficacious strategies of diffusion.
    • Sassi
    Are our patrons consumers or partners?
  • 58. Pauline Audience
    • A project for everyone is a project for no one. To be mediator is to have a heart open to everyone but to make a project that reaches someone precisely.
  • 59. Studiositá
    • Blessed Alberione said to study for two hours in order to learn something and another two hours to learn how to communicate what we learned.
  • 60.
    • We are God’s instruments, Gods’ pen, Gods’ voice. It is God! We must be like the evangelists insofar as the Holy Spirit enlightened and moved them to write and guided them in writing what he wanted, in speaking and keeping silent as he willed. Alberione, 1954
  • 61. Gift of Vocation
    • Publishing House of God
    • Publishing House of the Church
    • Bread broken and shared
    • Light for the world
    • Way, truth and life for humanity
  • 62. One House of God We are all part of one sole Publishing House. We undertake a mission of which we are not the “owners” but, as St Paul servants’. The initiative for the mission is not ours but God’s.
  • 63. The mission of mass media…
    • TRUTH enlightening the Mind
    • WAY conversion to God
    • LIFE divine life in the sacraments
  • 64. Come to me all of you. Go into the whole world. I am with you always.
  • 65.